Finance Roundtable Podcast

Episode 12: Former Arizona State University student, Nabia Kheshtchin-Kamel, shares her powerful story

November 15, 2023 Jacob Gold, Michael Cochell and Kelvin Gold Season 1 Episode 12
Finance Roundtable Podcast
Episode 12: Former Arizona State University student, Nabia Kheshtchin-Kamel, shares her powerful story
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Ever felt humbled by the sheer resilience of the human spirit? I had the privilege of catching up with one of my former students, Nabia Kheshtchin-Kamel, who embodies that spirit in every sense. Nabia's captivating story spans her family's immigration journey from Iran and Egypt to her endeavor of navigating medical school. Their united front and love for each other forged an unbreakable bond that's been instrumental in shaping her life. Join us as she reveals how her parents met, their subsequent struggles, and the strength she has derived from their resilience.

Nabia Kheshtchin-Kamel is not affiliated or registered with Cetera Advisor Networks LLC. The views depicted in this material are for information purposes only and are not necessarily those of Cetera Advisor Networks. They should not be considered specific advice or recommendations for any individual. 

Speaker 1:

This is Finance Roundtable.

Speaker 2:

Good afternoon everybody. This is Jacob Gold, professor at Arizona State University, and in this episode of the Finance Roundtable podcast I have a special guest, one of my former students at Arizona State University. I so look forward to hearing her story, hearing what she's up to these days and what she's planning for her future. So today we are very honored to have Nabiah Keshchin Camel. Nabiah, I'm so sorry if I mispronounced your name. It's a beautiful name and hopefully I did OK there.

Speaker 3:

No, you did great. Thank you so much, and I'm so excited to be here. I've been looking forward to this for a really long time.

Speaker 2:

And I was elated. Oh, you're so kind. It was so wonderful to have you in my class and refresh my memory, it was a fall semester, but what year were you in my course at ASU?

Speaker 3:

I believe it was fall 2019.

Speaker 2:

OK, right before the pandemic began and the world changed. But, nabiah, tell our audience a little bit about your background Because well, and I'll share this that in my course, personal Financial Management, towards the end of the semester I have all my students do a financial planning report. And this financial planning report is very detailed. I teach my students everything on trying to factor in how much they need, how much they need to be putting away mathematically, when they'll have enough money working for them that they don't have to work and yet still be able to maintain a very desirable lifestyle. So a lot of equations, a lot of thinking about your future, a lot of just putting your soul into this project, and I tell my students that this should be your Magna Carta, this should be something that is your driving force. And every couple of years you go back to it, you update it and you really make sure you're on the right glide path. But in that, I really get this amazing opportunity to get a peep into all of my students' lives, their background, their families, what motivates them, and I usually grade them over Thanksgiving break and I remember reading your financial planning project and being like holy cow. What a fantastic story. I've got to get to know Nabs a little bit more, because she is just a remarkable individual and I would be honored if you could share with our audience a little bit of your family background and how close you are. I mean, I'd like to think that my wife and my three kids and I, we are super close and I would say that, from what I know of you and your family, you're extremely close to your parents and your siblings and it is truly one unit and everyone that is a member of that tribe can fully lean into the other members with absolute confidence and love and support. And I think, in my opinion, that's your secret weapon, that's the secret ingredient of what has made you successful and will open up the doors for so many more opportunities, which I'm excited for my audience to hear about what you have in store for this next chapter of your life. So I apologize, I'll stop there and I'd love to have you share your story and your family history with our audience.

Speaker 3:

Thank you so much, yano. I think you completely said it. I think it's my greatest asset to ever how close I am with my family. So my mom is from Iran and my dad is from Egypt, and the immigrated here separately. They met in New York and then the rest is history from there. But they just culturally. Those two are very different, but they're more similar than Eastern and Western culture, for example, and so that's our whole thing is. We are our own community and every choice every single one of us makes it's my mom, dad, sister and I. That's pretty much all we have in the states. I mean, I have some uncles here and there, but it's mostly just us. All my cousins live out of the states and it's just like. Every single choice we make is for each other, whether it's our career or even maybe our health or anything like that, like any choice that we can consider one another we do, and I know for myself that's all of the choices I'm making too.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, yeah. So every single decision that we make, we make together, or at least with each other in mind. I know that everything. It's so obvious that my parents they came to the US separately with that same vision in common for what they want for their kids and for their future generations, and they met in New York. They were my dad. He was in the food industry, he was a manager at a restaurant, and my mom was actually. She applied for a waitress job. He was on interviewing her.

Speaker 1:

Oh my goodness.

Speaker 3:

I know which is like. I know it's like kind of.

Speaker 2:

That's like out of a movie, isn't it?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I know, yeah, and it was really fun for them, like they loved their New York memories and they loved working in the food industry too. I think it gave them a really unique perspective. I think anyone who has worked as a server will say the same. You know, it's totally. It really it changes your perspective on a lot, absolutely. And so in New York, by the time they got together, my mom, she started at Hunter Community College, which she loved, and then she transferred to Columbia University and graduated from there with her undergraduate degree I believe it was also biology and then at that point she already had my sister, they were married and they had my sister, and so she never had school without a baby. So she had my sister ended and was raising her, and my grandma helped raise us, actually, because my dad was working more than a full time, because he was the only one working so that my mom could do school, sure. And so she finished her undergrad and then she went to NYU for dental school and then by the time she finished that she had me, and at that point it was they moved to Arizona for her residency, she got placed there and they actually liked it. They liked the weather and the pace, and so my grandma was really the one spending a lot of time with my sister and I, because my mom and dad were just putting in the workout all hours, all hours of the day, and so because they're starting from scratch every part of it and not only were they like there's some stories of people who come to this country and they have a certain amount of money and stuff. It just so happened that both of my parents did not have that and they already knew that as soon as they start making some, that it's actually going back to back, they're supporting both sides of their family tree, and so it. But honestly, it was really fun and unique. I think that's why my parents they decided to open a dental practice and they actually they named it A&N for Amina and Nabiya, and like growing up seeing that every single choice they make is for us and that's-.

Speaker 2:

Take pride in creating and serving and being people of substance, and I think that the world needs more of those types of families and individuals and that's what makes this world turn around is people that really put pride in all that they do and do it for the right reasons. And, from what I see is, your family is so strong and it seems like you are so passionate to replicate that in your lifetime, to be able to create a family and replicate a nest that is comparable to what your parents created for you and your sister, and, as a parent myself, I hope that my kids see how my wife and I raise them and how we make choices and how we are the engineers of our life, and things happen to us that are out of our control and some bad things come our way, but we always have to rise up and keep moving forward in the direction that we feel is most wholesome, not just for us individually, but as a family and as a society. And it just seems like you and your family have just nailed that and like your emotional intelligence is just off the charts, and it's just, it's really impressive. I really appreciate your story and now one question I have for you, navya, is what are you gonna be specializing in within the medical field?

Speaker 3:

First of all, thank you so much and yeah, for your question. You know that is a tough question. I've been thinking about that and what's funny is, you know, being pre-med for the last six years, people who were excited and had faith and we were like so, what do you wanna do? What doctor do you wanna be, what specialist? And my answer was always, oh, let me get into medical school first, and then I'll tell you. And now I'm in and I'm like, oh, it's time to start, it's time to start, it's time to start really narrowing down. But I'm pretty lucky the way that the school is set up, like I really do have this first year to explore and learn a lot and you get to see a lot more and learn a lot more. Once you're a medical student, you know, legally you get it's so much different than just shadowing as a pre-med student. So I'm lucky I'm gonna take this next year to really do a deep dive into everything they have to offer me to make this decision. But I know that I think for a long time I really wanted to do something with women's health. I think that was really important to me for a long time.

Speaker 2:

So excited. Well, I know that you know conceptually, I think you've always been an individual with a vision, with a dream, with a passion, and I hope that my course, personal Financial Management, gave you some tools on, at least financially, on how to work towards that, because I know that a lot of times if someone conceptually has an idea, they just maybe don't have all the steps on how to get there, at least financially, and hopefully you learn some tricks, whether it's about taxes or a state planning or talking about investments and portfolio theories. Hopefully all of that is, if nothing else, has instilled some confidence in you to know that you know we tend to fear what we don't know and you are so science-based, you're so intellectually beyond so many of your peers that hopefully some financial tricks are gonna really help you stay in front of the pack and really get you to where you ideally wanna be financially in the future.

Speaker 3:

Yes, oh, my goodness, I'm so glad you brought this up because not only did so much of it conceptually help me with everything, I think even just that project that you had us do at the end, with everything that you had us do it like five years out, 10 years out, something like that, for all of these spreadsheets that you gave us and I remember looking at that and it made me feel so much better once I completed it. About. You know, I think that a lot of people that do understand finances and were kind of in the background of my life you know they had a better handle before I did this class on it than I did they were like how are you not worried about going to medical school, especially given the position that you're in? You know, some people in medical school they're paying for it right as they get in, which is, you know, definitely not the same where I'm standing, with it too, and so. But lots of people do take out loans for medical school because it's so much and I remember finishing that project and being like it is really so simple. I'm not going to say it's easy, but it is palatable and possible, you know, and you just have to actually plan it out and know exactly what you're given to and understand you know how interest rates work. And then suddenly you know it's really, it's foundational stuff like that that will definitely make or break someone's understanding. And you know, I'm still, even though it's something like that that's so foundational, I'm still wrapping my head around it because there's so many ways that it can go. But in terms of medical school, like I, you know UA Phoenix, maybe in state, I actually am so lucky with the tuition. It is better than most medical schools in the US by far. The tuition alone is around 37, 38,000 a year, which my master's program, the tuition, and that my master's was at University of California, san Francisco, and that was 50,000 for one year, one accelerated year and that's more on par with a lot of graduate programs. But UA Phoenix is just really about the community and when they let me into, when I got that acceptance call, I talked to the dean and he was telling me specific stuff about my application that he loved and that he can tell that I have the same vision for Arizona and that I am here for Arizona as well and the people here to help the healthcare here. And I think that it's really obvious that UA Phoenix cares too with how they plan all this out. But with that said I, actually I just got my. I just got access to what my finances would look like when I'm receiving it from UA Phoenix and the government, and it looked like it would. By the end of it, I will have taken out around 75,000 per year for the next four years, and that is so daunting. That is such a high number and I've never, if you told me like, oh, if I'm talking to eight year old me and I let her know, hey, just so you know, one year you're going to spend at least $75,000 while making no money during that year, I think she would say, like, did I get into some trouble? I think she would ask me, like, what did you do? Why are you doing that? And so, but it's such a. I explained this in the classes. Well, I think the very first day you actually had to stand up, every single person introduce themselves, say a little bit about themselves, their background, their goals, and you specifically said your relationship with money. And I think one of the first things I said because I do enjoy being a bit of a class clown I knew that it would catch people off guard, but I also did mean it and I think it did scare some people. Well, the first thing I said was I'm not very afraid of debt and I know that. That. You know you have to have the context to understand why I say that. But your class only reaffirmed that. Because I think that if you are choosing to take on debt responsibly and altruistically and you know I'm not taking out 75,000 every single year for the next four years to buy really fancy cars and you know, go around and do whatever you know. It is so that I can become a doctor and to be the best person that I want to be, and so you know, with my background too, like and I explained this in the class and in my paper at the end and you said that it really brought the full picture together is that you know my parents being where they're from, especially like my mom from Iran. If you are poor and you know, let's say, you can't afford something, whether it's healthcare, education, and you are going to die if you don't get this loan, you die like that is it. You know what I mean, and I think that when, if people realize that you know loans can be such a privilege to bring you up to a certain playing field, as long as you're being responsible, like, and your tools in your class are going to help me be responsible, because now I'm going to know exactly how long it's going to take me Once I put in these numbers that they're giving me on this sheet. You know, I literally just have to copy and paste those exact numbers into this spreadsheet, and once I do I only got it last week, I wish I was able to do it sooner, but once I do that, I can look at you right now and tell you when I'll be done paying it off. You know, and I'll still be living a great life the whole way through my life won't start once I'm done paying it off. It'll start right away, because you know, we're lucky enough that, as long as you plan it out and you're doing exactly what you need to do with the payments, like it's just. It really is that, you know, I almost I don't know if simple is the word maybe it's fair that I'm looking for. I think that, yeah, it just takes a lot of care and intention. And then, all of a sudden, you know, this debt that I've been taking on has opened doors for me, and so I'm just excited, and you know, it's such a I'm so grateful for it that I'm not upset to have to pay it back. You know what I mean. It's like it literally was a gift, and so I it's just, you know, from my background I'm really not upset to have to pay it back, and the interest too, I think I, personally, I think it's fair, like I, there was no way I could do all of this without it, you know. And so, like I think I'm the best family in the world, and you know it sounds like you do. Yeah and like and with that family. You know you still can't do it. If you don't have to have the student debt or something you know you can have, you can. I think I have everything I need. But you know, if you want to achieve really great things, sometimes you need a little bit more, and that's okay as long as you're going to be responsible and I think your class like it. Just there's no other way I could describe it than how palatable it made it. Especially those the spreadsheets you gave were such a gift Like. I think that people don't realize that there's stuff out there that will help you take it in pieces. You know it's not, you're not. You don't need to be drowning in debt, just like just lightly swimming. You know what I mean. Just for a bit.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely Well. And what's so amazing about you is you live by design, right. You have a vision of what you want your life to be. You dream big and then, once you figure that out, you reverse engineer it and you'd have no problem putting the work into it because you recognize how wonderful of an opportunity it is. And once again, I feel like if more people looked at life that way of recognizing the opportunity, internalizing it, strategizing, making sure that you live by design and then you're able to reap the rewards of it long term. You know, sometimes people want the reward and they don't want to do the work for it. And in reality, if the opportunity is there, there is a cost to that. And if you don't have the tools needed to be able to understand money as a foreign language, then knowing all that debt is gonna be on your balance sheet. It is very daunting and it's paralyzing, and there's gonna be so many moments in medical school that you might scratch your head and say why am I doing this? This is so difficult. And if in those moments, you have that doubt come into your mind and the fear about money, that could just be enough to squash your optimism and you are exhuming optimism and that is so beautiful, and I feel like your tools, your mindset, are gonna allow you to stay on the right path and avoid so much danger. Therefore, you'll be able to enjoy the path that much more and you'll still be able to be optimistic and then, most importantly, serve and help other people, and I think that that's really important and I think that perhaps your parents did a really good job of, early on in your life and in your sister's life, recognizing the importance of love, hard work and serving other people. You cannot get ahead in life unless you're willing to humble yourself enough to serve other individuals and make their interests yours. And if you really can put yourself in that situation to help others, then I feel that your own life will just, the pieces will fall into place, and you are just a prime example of that, nabiya, and I can't wait to hear about all of your victories and all the people that you help in the future. And I'm honored that you're one of my students. Every now and again I get a student and I say to my family this person's gonna really make a positive difference in the world and I definitely wholeheartedly feel that you're one of those individuals and I am so grateful that you have decided to be a guest on our podcast today and, if you don't mind, I'd love, every once in a while, to get an update from you. I know that there are some shows out there, some podcasts out there that you know. They have reoccurring guests and whether they're a business owner and they're talking about how their business is doing in this economy, or a parent talking about the changes in their family's dynamics, I think that our audience would enjoy, every now and again, hearing an update of how your life is going and how you're helping others. So would you be willing, every once in a while, to come on and give our audience an update on how awesome you're doing?

Speaker 3:

Of course, that's not even like. It is such an honor that you asked me to do this one and I would not have guessed that you want me to be on here for more than once, because you don't understand like I especially oh, I have so much to say now, especially given my background, like when I first came to your class, I think that I had never even you know, you're a certified financial planner I had never heard that to in my life, like that to me. I'm like that's just something that maybe someone would say on TV. Like that is not, there's no way that you know. That is where I came from, and I think that it's just so funny because we're actually so similar, because it's so obvious that you know that giving like what you just said, giving is at your core and it is also in your foundation of your values, of what you want to be drawn through everything that you do, because this class that you did you know what I mean it would not like you've opened so many doors for people, myself included, with this class and it's just it's obvious that you don't need to do it, that it is not you know, it is not anything that is probably greatly financially contributing to you or making you you know some famous business mogul, I don't know. It is just from the bottom of your heart, because what you love to do is to help people and to help as many people as you can in, people who are in different social circles, and all of that. And I just like you and you made it so easy and so under, like I was able to understand so much and ask you anything, and the fact that you know it's not just you were there to show how much you know. You were so proud of all of us for our questions, like and I think that that is so telling you know that I was always comfortable to ask as many questions as possible, and not only comfortable, but you made me proud to ask questions, like as if you know I'm doing a good job because I don't because I don't understand something, but because I want to, and so, yeah, I just I think it's I don't know. I think your class is just something else that you said too, that reverse engineering. That is definitely something that I learned in your class too, because that was one of the very first things. You were like who wants to be a millionaire when they're retired, and you know you taught us start from there. What number do you want there, and then you know you have to look at yeah, we have to, okay, you have to consider inflation throughout this time. You have to move backwards, decide, and now you know what your starting point is and I think that that's exactly what I needed to hear and what was super helpful for my goals that I had to, because, especially at the time I was 19-20 and I was pre-med, but I was only that and at like at the time I had maybe worked in my research lab for a year I was really at the bottom of the totem pole for everything I was doing. You know, you're not even a med student yet, so it was really difficult and everyone along the way is telling you what's your plan B? You know what I mean, because it's so. Ua Phoenix is, I think their acceptance rate is like five to six percent and and they are not the lowest acceptance rate by far, that's that. That is the thing about medical school and so. But you know, I just it with your class, like you're I was I was taught to look at big picture, you know, and I think that, again, that's very in line with my family too. That's what my, my mom thinks as well. You know, no matter what state we're in, because we have this family practice that we all work at my sister and I work at as well, and my dad does too every single day, we're all there and she's all like, no matter what state we're in with this practice, she's like the one thing that I heard while growing up and my dad says this too is don't be afraid to give back. Like, anything you give is going to come back. Maybe not now, maybe not in 10 years, maybe you won't even know it, but it has in some way. And so, like I just think that, yeah, both of my parents like I'm lucky that it was very in line with it's so funny because we never really talked about finances they actually know a lot more than I gave them credit for growing up. Right, that's fantastic yeah, I mean, there's no way. How could they not? They open a practice you know what I mean like they knew so much more and they just didn't want to bother me with that. Actually they, because of the, the childhood they had, yeah, they wanted my sister and I like that was their point of view they wanted us to be so unbothered financially. They were hoping that's what we felt and we did, and for a long time, up until, you know, around I was like 15, 16 and maybe around that time and when my mom's Hashimoto's disease got way worse, then you know, that's when they started being honest to us about you know what's going on where we're at, and that's when we all started putting in more. But you know, I I still feel so lucky that they made that choice, because I think they're right. It makes a difference to not be financially stressed as a child. I think I'm lucky that I didn't have to go through that. It was once I was mid teens and even that makes a difference. You know, if you're it does. If anything, that was that was a great time for me to wake up and understand what the world is and what my world is, you know, and so I just, yeah, I think that my perspective really helped me appreciate everything that you had to offer in your class, because I swear every day there was something new. You really did mix in concepts, life lessons and the actual technical stuff of what all of this means. Like finances are finances are. It's so interesting because I feel it's very man-made, but it's so obvious that it's man-driven. You know that it is, that it is coming from our psyche, like all of it is, but it makes it a very nuanced thing. You know you have to, you have to adapt to it and and once you do, you see the nature in it, because that, like, there's a reason why we all function with it really seamlessly, as if it were not man-made, as if it is nature itself. And so, yeah, I just your class. If I could take it again, I would, because because, excuse me, there's. And yeah, if I could take your class again, I would because there's just never. I feel like with stuff like that too, learning it more than once is helpful, and so much of it hasn't applied to me yet. You know, I've been. I've been lucky enough. I haven't had to buy a new car yet, I haven't had to do any of these big adult things quite yet, and it, it's just, it never stopped being relevant like that foundational stuff. I, just I, I would come home and talk to my sister about it. I showed her, we logged in the van guard. I showed her. Yeah, I showed her. You know all the quizzes that we took to show what type of stuff she actually I remember. After that, you know she went to fidelity because before your class and and this actually is not even a reflection on my family again they just didn't talk about finance as much because they were, you know, they were bigger fish to fry, they were like, you know, working and stuff yeah, right but I remember before your class I thought that to buy stock you like it was like an invite thing like I did not know that anyone. Anyone can do that like they. They just have to open an account and want to do it right and and as long as they have the means. You know, it's not like there's no one saying no, where's like you're not on the list.

Speaker 2:

You know, right, you know, and we don't know what we don't know until, yeah, ourselves right and and knowledge is power and I I'm so glad that you know we were able to demystify money a little bit for you oh, definitely throughout the course and and you know, and what's funny is ever since I took your course.

Speaker 3:

So I took it fall 2019 and since then it was like shortly after was the pandemic. But I'm so glad I took your class before because since the pandemic, you know, tick-tock, tick-off, and what's funny is I see all these like financial gurus saying so much online that some of them are very helpful and you know they put in links to different resources so that you can actually read up on stuff. Some of them are amazing, but some of them sound really amazing and are just are, I think, are doing way more damage than if they just stop talking, because you know some of the stuff they're saying and I wouldn't know that. You wouldn't know that unless, unless you have at least some bit of a background, and that's what's kind of scary about it. But I'm so lucky that right before, you know, I went on tick-tock during the pandemic, what else was there to do? everything was online for a bit and, and I still use it, I love it. But it's just funny because sometimes they'll be like did you know that you could do this and get three million by next year, or something like that. And and you know, people are I don't even blame them, they believe it and it's just. I wish. I wish your class was just like a class that was available at every college and with you. I wish you could be everywhere. I wish you could be everywhere, every school. Maybe start at high schools and like, yeah, I. Just what's funny is sometimes I'm like, wow, I did start on that. It feels like I started on that kind of late compared to people who are. You know, I, I'm grateful, I have achieved a lot. I'm going to medical school, and so a lot of the people that have made it this far, they already knew all of this, you know, when they were. They were having these conversations when they were so young. But at the same time, I just feel like I feel like I was able to appreciate it so much more because I wanted to learn it. You know, I wanted to hear it and I think that and I hope that you know, when your podcast blows up and is number one on Spotify and people are hearing this, I hope that it would like give some hope to anyone who feels behind or feels like it's too late. It really isn't. You just, you know any anything feels like it's too late when, what? Once you're older and you're in your own head. But I I feel like, as long as you have someone kind and with a lot of knowledge, you're lucky, you have that person around you, then why not, you know, be, don't be afraid to like ask questions and stuff, because you made it, you just. There's no other way to describe it other than like it incredibly safe and just. That environment was just. You know, I really feel like I grew inside, not with it, it was just amazing.

Speaker 2:

The compliments you've given me today. When I have a bad day, I'll just re-listen to this podcast. Good and you deserve it.

Speaker 3:

You should because it really is remarkable. I think that you know, I really I don't want to generalize, but I think it's hard for someone who you know, you're a family man, you're a business owner, you're so busy. I it's just, I feel really lucky that people like you are out there, because it is important. You know that you took the time to do that. I think that we're like I, you know, I wish there were more that we're having like the same capabilities as you to be able to do all of this and to give back, because it it wouldn't have been the same learning all of this from someone else. You know, you, you really have seen, you can see all sides of things regarding fine-fances, because you've made it so far, and I think that it's just, you know, it's so necessary to learn from someone like you. I feel really lucky.

Speaker 2:

You are so nice. Thank you for those compliments like a permanent smile on my face. I so appreciate you being a guest today on this episode and such a special episode, and I want to congratulate you and I also want to thank you for your kind words, for being one of my students and and also being one of my apostles out there. I mean you, you talk me up so much and beyond what what I deserve, and I but yeah, I'm still very much appreciated.

Speaker 3:

I'm so glad I just yeah, I'm. There's nothing that makes me happier than being able to make, you know, my family proud and you proud, and that was something when I was so stressed out. I stayed for the MCAT twice and that second time, you know I was just so and my score, the percentile, like I'll just be very honest it pretty much doubled. That's how, that's how unprepared I was the first time and I didn't know it. I worked just hard the first time, but but with the wrong materials, you know, doing it the wrong way, and so it's just one of those. Yeah, you didn't. You don't know what you don't know, and so I'm really grateful I had to go through that. First time. I took the MCAT when I was doing this second time and I was studying and you know it's mid-summer, we're all really tired, we're all really hot and I'm like taking this seven and a half hour practice exam and you know, I think of people like you that I just I'm so excited to make proud because, like you know, you've given us so much and I'm just I'm already proud of you as a professor. Thank you. Yeah, I was so excited when I could tell you that I got into medical school. I got into a few, actually, and I was able. I was lucky enough to pick this one and to be happy to be in Arizona and to be close to your family while you're in medical school yeah, it's wonderful, exactly, and so I just yeah, I can't emphasize enough I'm just I'm very excited and I hope you should make making you proud.

Speaker 2:

I know you will and I I am very proud of you and I'm proud to know you, and I just I wish you the best and I can't wait to get updates from you. And it's nice to know that good people are working towards becoming doctors or lawyers like your sister that are really wanting to do good in the world. And if more people were really trying to do good in the world, opposed to just getting the almighty dollar, I think that this world would be a better place. So more people like you and your family. We need them out there, and so you keep spreading the love and you keep paying it forward and we'll just keep making this place a better place. Thank you absolutely will. You have a wonderful day and, once again, thank you so much for joining us today and I'm sure we'll be talking here real soon. But I also want my audience to know how much I appreciate you as a student, and I hope that our audience stays tuned for next month, when we have a another great guest to share their insights on, on something that that my team and I find a very interesting and fulfilling. So Naps. Thank you so much. I wish you all the best of luck in the future, and please stay connected with us and give us as many updates as you're you're willing to give yeah, of course I can't.

Speaker 3:

You know you're going to regret saying that I won't stop. I will know I update then.

Speaker 2:

I don't say it unless I mean it.

Speaker 3:

I can't, I can't wait honestly it's just and I can't wait to hear all of your next podcast episodes. I'm already your biggest fan. I can't wait you're so nice.

Speaker 2:

Well, thank you so much, have a wonderful day and we'll be talking soon, okay thank you, you too thank you for listening to the Finance Roundtable podcast.

Speaker 1:

make sure to check out other episodes at wwwfinanceroundtablepodcastcom. We also encourage you to explore wwwjacobgoldcom to find articles, research videos and more from Jacob Gold and Associates Incorporated. If you have a question that you would like to be answered on air, please call 480-998-4653, extension 12, and leave a message.

Speaker 2:

Jacob Gold and Michael Koshell are financial advisors offering securities and advisory services through Cetera Advisor Networks LLC, doing insurance business in California as CFGAN Insurance Agency LLC, member, finra SIPC, a broker dealer and registered investment advisor. Cetera is under separate ownership from any other named entity. Jacobs California insurance license 0E55425. Michaels California insurance license 0K90130. The views depicted in this material are for information purpose only and are not necessarily those of Cetera Advisor Network. They should not be considered specific advice or recommendations for any individual. Neither Cetera Advisor Networks nor any of its representative may give legal or tax advice. Kelvin Gold is a marketing associate. Registered address is 14850 North Scottsdale Road, sweet 255, scottsdale, arizona, 85254.

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