She's Brave Podcast - Kristina Driscoll

Conversations Beyond Courage: An Intimate Interview with Kristina

January 02, 2024 Kristina Driscoll Episode 67
She's Brave Podcast - Kristina Driscoll
Conversations Beyond Courage: An Intimate Interview with Kristina
Show Notes Transcript

Today's episode holds a special place in my heart, as it's my late husband's birthday and the first anniversary of the She’s Brave Podcast! We will delve into an intimate conversation I had with Lianne McAughey, the brilliant host of 'The Spiritual Shiftworker.' Our discussion revolves around courage, a trait that isn't always about roaring like a lion but sometimes about mustering the strength to face another day.

We explore themes of bravery and authenticity, reflecting on a transformative trip to Cambodia, where I was fortunate to make a meaningful impact. We also discuss the keys to happiness, the power of intuition, the importance of serving others, and the search for purpose.

If you're curious about my personal journeys and insights, this uplifting episode will be a treat. My aim with this podcast is to spotlight women who've achieved great things and weathered life's storms. Together, we discover tools for resilience and authenticity, encouraging each other to stay true to ourselves and make decisions based on our needs rather than external expectations.

In this episode, you will be able to:

  • Discover your inner wisdom and intuition for personal growth.
  • Forge your unique path to fulfillment and happiness.
  • Fill your own cup to live a more meaningful life.
  • Prioritize self-care and nurture your needs for a balanced life.
  • Embrace self-discovery and intuition for a more fulfilling journey.




Connect with Kristina:
Instagram
Facebook
Join our Podcasters Facebook Group
Website

Loved this episode? Leave us a review and rating here: https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/id1660488233

Kristina:

Hey everyone, its Christina. Today's January 2 2024, can you believe it's been a year today that I started my podcast. And if it weren't for all of you guys, I wouldn't be here where I am today in the top 2% globally. I just want to say you guys, thank you. Thank you. Thank you so much for tuning in for listening to my podcast. And I just love you all so much. So that being said, today is a very special day, because it's my late husband's birthday and I want to share a very special intimate conversation where lyin Macaw he She's the host of the spiritual shiftworker interviews me. And of course, we talk a lot about courage. You know, Courage isn't always the lion roaring in the jungle. We want to feel that way all the time, right? Like we want to feel courageous all the time. But sometimes courage is literally just getting out of bed and saying, I can do this today. That's it. So LAN, and I talk about a lot of great stuff. In today's episode, we talk about obviously, the tools of bravery, authenticity, we also talk a lot about a trip that I had just taken to Cambodia last year, and how I was able to change the lives of six people in that country. We talk about the keys to happiness, intuition, serving others, finding your purpose, and so much more. So if you're a little bit more curious about me and some of the journeys that I've been on in life, and who I am as a person, this is a very inspiring, uplifting episode. Eliana is just very, very talented. So I hope you really, really enjoy this episode. On my podcast, my goal is to interview women, not just what they did, but how did they get through it to give me and my listeners tools of how to get through those hard things. What are the tools? What are the things that we can do to be braver because it's all about authenticity? Right, LeAnn? And so it's all about being ourselves and not, you know, being our true selves, making decisions based on what's best for us, and not making decisions based on other people's excellent expectation. So it's about resiliency, courage and authenticity. That was kind of long. No, I saw good

Unknown:

because it really, I love it. I love it. Because there's so much there that I get to touch on for sure. And I liked that you explain that. When people hear that word braid, you're right, you're exactly on point where people are like, Oh, it must, they must be like, you know, doing all these, we always go to the extreme of what that word is. But it really is in the small things like, exactly leaving a job that no longer serves you after 30 years of marriage or, and we'll get into it, like your journey, when you know, being a caregiver. And those things take a lot of courage and bravery, because you're giving up a part of you like those fears, or you're serving others. So yeah, I love that you shared all of that. And before we get into all of that I know and I want to hear because it looks fantastic was that you just returned from an epic trip to Cambodia. So let's talk about that for a minute. Because I've never traveled to that part of the world. And I know that there's a lot of spirituality and a lot of sort of religious things and prayer and that aspect out of that. But just maybe if you can riff on that for a little bit what brought you there? It's you. I know you've been doing it for a while. And then what the biggest lesson or what was the biggest eye opener that you came out of that out of that trip?

Kristina:

Oh, I'm so happy you asked me about that plan. Because it was it really was a trip of a lifetime. And to be honest, it's probably the biggest trip that I've had. Well, it is the biggest trip I've ever taken and maybe the biggest trip on I will ever take. It was actually a whole month. I booked it during COVID. So I booked it in February last year. And that was it's so weird to think if you just think back to last February, people were still not traveling. People were terrified of COVID people weren't going out. People were still wearing masks and the travel companies were like, Ah, here here's this awesome, awesome deal. So I just jumped on that bandwagon and took that leap of faith and booked a trip. You No for myself and, and partly with some friends and with my husband and my son and got a great deal and actually went to four countries. So Vietnam was first then Cambodia, then Thailand and then the Philippines. And the first thing I want to say is that in all, I had never been to Asia before. But like you like I was curious about Buddhism and that way of life. And first thing I want to say is that every all four countries, the people were amazing, we I didn't have one negative experience, everyone was 100%, honest, kind. And that's quite fascinating to have a really positive experience with all four of those countries, Vietnam, Thailand, Cambodia, and the Philippines. But the country that really touched my heart the most was Cambodia. And I've heard that from other travelers. And I never knew why exactly. But Cambodia actually is known as the friendliest people in the world isn't fascinating. And yet, they're one of the poorest nations in the world. It's really, really interesting. It's really interesting. One. So yeah, I would say, it was things like going to a palm sugar farmer who was 71 years old. And he and his wife were, in my opinion, happier than Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk. Yeah, I would, I would trade places with him. Before I would trade places with those three people who, you know, are the richest people in the world. But yet, you know, they've been through some of the multiple divorces. They don't seem particularly happy. And it's just so interesting, because, haha, you know, money, money can do a lot of things, and it is positive. But ultimately, happiness, I think, is really, when you find your sense of purpose. And when you are of service to others. Does that make sense to you?

Unknown:

Oh, absolutely. Absolutely. It is. And that's why I mean, yes, you're right. Money can do a lot of things money can, in the hands of good people can help a lot of people. But yeah, it doesn't buy happiness, for sure. It buys the things that are the experiences that can bring the happiness but money itself, right, having the million dollars in the bank isn't going to make you happy. So yeah,

Kristina:

and you know, just, I mean, I'm just using him as an example. But, you know, there was a small group of us that we were we were on a small cruise boat going up the Mekong River, and we were in Cambodia, and we want you to very remote village and, you know, this farmer, he's 71. And he twines. And video footage of him actually having my personal Facebook page, climbing up, palm tree is to collect the sap and make it into palm sugar. And he climbs 50 trees a day. And he's 71. And he's so happy. He and his wife were just these kind, gracious people who love to joke around and have fun. And they he took a shine to me, he grabbed some traditional Cambodian clothing, he started dressing me, and the more he dressed me, the more you know, it just got kind of ridiculous, and everybody who were all laughing and laughing and laughing. And you know, he even put a little scarf on my head, and then a jug on my head. And then everybody started taking pictures. And then he dressed up my husband and my son, and we just like we had the best time. And I think that in his case, he just wants He just lives joyfully. He just wants to make other people laugh and other people happy. And that he's being of service in that way. You know?

Unknown:

Yeah, absolutely. He's He's literally like living his purpose by doing just that bringing joy to other people. And it brings joy to him. Right. You can use felt it, you saw it. And I think there's a lot to be said for, you know, being able to travel again, over the last couple years, so many people have it, and some people probably never will, again, because of what's going on. But I feel there's just so much to learn, when we can just open our minds that you know that people are living differently, and they're living better and I'm going to put better in those quotes. A better life because we're not stuck to the hustle and the grind the 40 hour workweek or the striving to move up the corporate ladder and for anyone who is doing that and is getting something out of that and that is where they find their purpose then Keep doing it. But when we can turn around and look at something that's, again, simpler, I think it's, you know, when we take away all the distractions, that's where our life is. Absolutely,

Kristina:

you know, and there was, there was another time when we were in a remote village along the Mekong, um, and two little girls, they were just so ridiculously happy that we were there. And, you know, I interacted with them and, and then they picked me some flowers and gave them to me. I mean, it's just kind of one of those amazing things. And Leon, it was my first time in Asia, and it was at Southeast Asia. And it, I feel like it changed me, it changed me. I love that.

Unknown:

And so is that just the experience of the people? I mean, I know, a very good friend who's from Vietnam, and she's always telling me about how beautiful the country is. And yet, here where we are in, you know, Canada and the US, sometimes all that we get to see unless we know people or have experienced in ourselves is what the media, you know, the mainstream media shows us. And sometimes it's not always in the positive way. And so what was that was it was those interactions and seeing the joy and the simplicity of, of their life? Was it the beauty? Was it all of it? What was it? Yeah,

Kristina:

it was all of it, they both are actually all for the countries are incredibly beautiful. And some of them in different ways, but they're all incredibly beautiful. It definitely was the people interaction with the people. And I'm, really, I'm saying, you know, you can watch as many PBS specials as you would like to see on TV, about third world countries or second world countries, and but you don't really get it until you're in it, you don't get it. And, you know, there was a fishing village that we visited, that's on stilts, because it floods every year for six months of the year, it's water. And so the kids grow themselves to school in a boat. And then the other six months of the year, it's dry, and I'm the lifespan of the average male in that town is aged 54. That's how old I am. So my life would be over about now. And the reason for that is lack of clean water. So what happens is, and it's a lot of these countries are clean water doesn't exist. So they, they have to boil it or get bottled water. So what happens is the fishermen go out to the lake. And sometimes they forget and they run out of water, they jump into the lake, they drink the water, and then they get a disease and they die. So it's it's just really, really eye opening. And I'll give you one one other story example, um, I, I have quite a quite a few rings, beautiful rings I buy from a gem specialist here in Seattle who makes these beautiful gems, and they're quite, they're fairly inexpensive, her prices are way better than most jewelers. And I normally wouldn't travel with jewelry, but something my intuition said, bring some of bring some of your raise. So I did and I knew that I was in a place where there would always be a safe in my room and indoor there, there are ways to keep your stuff safe. And these entries were all very safe, honestly, like, there were no issues with any of that stealing or, you know, having things grabbed off the view or anything like that there wasn't anything like that. Um, but I took so I took some some jewelry with me, which was unusual and just listen to the intuition. And so we were on a boat for seven days going up the Mekong River and the people that worked on the boat, were just the most kind. They were Cambodian, because it's registered in Cambodia. And they were just the kindest, most humble, and again, happy people. And oh, throughout the course of the week, I because I love connecting with people. I love knowing their stories. I got to know them. And on the last day, I'm the director of the boat. And again, they don't they don't make a ton of money. You know, that's just in Cambodia. If you're really really rich, you can go to you can pay and get really proper medical care. And if you're not really rich, you don't get much medical care at all. And that was kind of eye opening to so on the last day our director had his wife had just given birth to a baby boy, and he was born prematurely. And then, you know, the only reason why we found out about it as guests on the boat was that one of the other guests on the boat. It was on the last day. So we're in, we're in Phnom Penh, and which is a big city, thank goodness. So he he got off the boat at 7am Somebody saw leads, and then they saw him come back at 10 because we were getting off the boat at 11am. And then all sudden everybody was talking, you know, where was he going turned out that his wife and his son were not doing so well. And they were in the hospital. And he he went to visit them and then he had to come back and get on the boat and continue on with his job because that's just how it works there. And I just took one of my and I had quite a few opals because I was kind of collecting them for a while. And I gave it to him. And I said, this is good. And the good news is this boat goes back and forth between Phnom Penh, which is a big city and also into Vietnam and Vietnam would probably be better places to go to three jewellers have it appraised, and then sell it. Now you're not going to get as much as a full price. But you know, and I said, I want you to give, I want to give this to you, because, you know, then your baby can get better care. And I did this with six. And I haven't really told anyone this, but I think I felt like telling it today because I gave jewelry to six of the staff who I knew had different situations. One is a single mom. You know, she's 30, she's single mom of two, five year old and she's gone and her mom has to watch her child and her English is excellent. She works in the dining room. Anybody wants to call Aqua expeditions, I can verify all this. But um, and she, you know, her English was so good. I said, you know, in this case, it was a a $2,000 necklace. And I said I want I want to give this to you, I don't want you to put it towards, you know, going to tourism school, because I did I kind of asked around and said how much is tourism school, you know, it's about $2,000 and takes about six months, I think. And because once they become a tour guide, I didn't officially you know, instead of working as as a server in the dining room become become one of the guides, you know that take the the guests out on an excursion, they make a lot more money. And so I just, you know, I left Cambodia knowing that I had made six people's lives better significantly, by about two grand each. And, you know, it was life changing, because I think I live in an area of Seattle where you can get pretty caught up in the materialism aspect of life. And I have just over this last year, and this journey of starting my podcast, and really coming to understand what true happiness is. And to me that is serving others and finding your purpose. And when you do those two things, you're incredibly happy. And if I had a lot of jewelry that I wasn't wearing, and why is it sitting in a drawer just sitting there doing nothing? Let's put it to work. Let's give it to somebody who needs it. Oh, it's just life changing land. It's life changing. It's

Unknown:

so good. So good. I thank you for sharing that. Because I think all of that, like people have such a perception of what these countries are like. And yes. I mean, they're they're certainly you know, like you said he went to work, the one the tour guide, went saw his wife then had to go back to work right. Otherwise, he's not gonna get paid. Absolutely. What I love. I mean, there's so much about this whole experience, Christina, but I love what you said that your intuition told you to take the jewelry. It

Kristina:

didn't make sense. Yeah. Is I really should have kept the jewelry at home. Like, you know, that wasn't exactly the safest thing to do. But all of a sudden, it became very clear that I was here to give it away. Yeah.

Unknown:

And that's where I think we need to start listening and because you did listen to your intuition, and then you're knowing that you're serving and helping these people. Yeah, it's going to make everyone happy. It's making your soul happy. And so I really love that you share that because I know that from your story that you you're you developed your intuition at at a pretty a younger age. I mean certainly compare it like I've just started to really tap into mine in the last couple of years. And so maybe we can go back and talk about you know how that was and I'll be you you met your your your husband at first and then how So how you listened and over the years what that happened, and then you know how that makes you feel? Because I think so many people don't understand what that what that feels like to follow their intuition.

Kristina:

Yeah, great question land. So I married my college, I'm gonna do the clip, the cliffnotes version. I married my college sweetheart, who was a very controlling person, and a year and a half later, got it out of that marriage, because I didn't knew that I couldn't live a whole lifetime if someone tried to control me. So I took that first brave step of leaving that marriage. And for the first time in my life, I went to therapy. And because I wanted to know why I chose this guy, and how could I choose better next time. And so the therapy helped me understand why pick Jim and, and how to choose better and looking for red flags and things like that. But it also got me going down a self development journey. So I started really poring through books about self help. And I really worked on myself for the next six years. And then when I was 31, I was on a hike on Mount Rainier. And the leader of the hike services in the Seattle area was a man named Bill Driscoll. And I got to the car at the trailhead on Mount Rainier and our eyes locked. And there was just this pole that I had never experienced before. And I elbowed my way to the front of the line, because you know that it's single file only when you shoot when you're picking up Mount Rainier. And we didn't go to the top, but it was one of these beautiful hikes where you're, you know, hiking along all the scenery, and, but it's single file, and it's narrow. And I was like, I need to get an elbow my way to the front, and get right behind him so I can get to know him better. So, and again, we just, we just clicked instantly, we were both in the financial industry. And we just looked at the world really similarly. So long story short, he was 24 years older than me, very unconventional. He'd never been married before, but six months later, we were married. And nobody ever questioned either of us, oh, gee, she's way younger than you, oh, gee, he's way older than you. Because I think that people sensed the deep authenticity of our connection, and that we were meant to be together. And I think when people sense that you're really in the deepness of your authentic being, they don't even question your decisions anymore. They just accept it. You know, it's really interesting. So, you know, that was kind of the first maybe brave out of the box thing that I did, where I just knew that I was meant to go on this journey with my husband, and I didn't care what the neighbors thought, you know, I

Unknown:

don't care. That's amazing, because so many people, so many people would let the judgment of others. Because when you it's interesting that you said that people never questioned you because you were being so authentic, and you knew so deep down that it was where you were supposed to be. And I think a lot of people, when they start to see the judgment coming from others, it's a really, really great opportunity to use them as a mirror and go, What is it that I'm judging about myself? And you didn't even question it? So therefore no one else question it right. So many people would put themselves in that situation, and then have the under a subconscious thoughts. Oh, my God, maybe this person is too old for me, maybe this is wrong. And then they would start seeing it reflected back to them from other people. So that is so true. When you are so in your knowing that it doesn't give anyone else the opportunity to see anything different.

Kristina:

Yeah, yeah. So you know, that that ended up being a really beautiful marriage, but but there were, there were a lot of challenges along the way. We definitely wanted a family but it didn't happen. And so we we tried naturally. And then we did some fertility treatments. So four years later, our son was born. And that was that was amazing. And he's now 19 And he's an amazing kid. And I'm sure every parent says that. Um, but yeah, when our son was five, my son developed or I mean, my husband developed early onset Alzheimer's. And so it was, you know, really really terrifying Leon, and, um, you know, I was I wouldn't have considered myself to be a particularly brief person. And I was really terrified with that diagnosis, but, and it was a 12 year journey of him having Alzheimer's disease, and he passed away in February of 2017. And it was, but I always believed ran that it was, it was happening for me, wasn't just happening to me, it was my spiritual path. And that I, I was going to learn and grow from it. It was meant to be, and I was I was going to learn on this, like this adventure called life.

Unknown:

That is really the way that we all need to approach hard times. Right. And it's

Kristina:

easier said than done, I guess. It's not like you say that to yourself. And then you say, I'm good. I'm gonna do it. You know, it literally can take years to slowly, you know, courage. Isn't everyday courage is not necessarily, you know, a lion roaring in the jungle. You know, it's not that, you know, we all want to feel that way all the time. But some days, it's literally getting out of bed and saying, whispering to yourself, I can do this today. That's it. Yeah.

Unknown:

And interesting. I spoke with a friend yesterday who had lost her I think he was 20 or 21, her son in a car accident last fall. And, you know, and that's what she said, she goes, I feel that this has happened for me. And that is hard, right? That's hard. That is hard to accept when literally shit is hitting the fan and bad things are happening. And it takes a lot of awareness and honesty to say, we'll, what can I take from this? What can I learn from this experience? Because if you don't look at it that way, you'll constantly be in victimhood.

Kristina:

Yep. That's true. It's so true. Yeah, yeah.

Unknown:

And so what did you learn? I mean, it 12 years is is a long time where you've given up, I'm going to get and I'm going to not put the words in your mouth by giving up a part of you to be your husband's caregiver. And so how did you dingy? Or it maybe you didn't even during that time? Take

Kristina:

care of yourself? Yeah, so, you know, again, I think this came in handy at that time, too, of not worrying about what other people think. So according to society standards, I was nothing. I was just a mom, who was raising her son, and a caregiver who was taking care of her husband, you know, I, I was not a CEO, I was not an entrepreneur. You know, I was not, you know, making a million dollars a year, I was just managing our money, and being a caregiver during those years. And I just knew that that was my path during that time in my life. And, and it was very hard at times. And some of the tools that you use in the beginning, well, throughout the journey are denial. When I first started realizing that he was getting forgetful, you know, for six months to a year, it was just denial, so that I could get more comfortable with the reality. And that's okay, too. Because there really, at that time, there were the medications didn't work, there was no proof that they actually worked. So and I think it still may be that way, actually, they it's really hard to find, they're still working, I believe they will come up with a way to stop Alzheimer's the minute it starts, and just stop it from progressing. So that you don't ever develop it. But at that time, that wasn't the case. And I also learned so a lot of self care. So, you know, I didn't beat myself up for you know, I am not starting a podcast, I'm not doing something that that the rest of the world thinks is impressive. I just knew that this was my path. And I need to not worry about what other people think. And I need to just embrace this path. And you know, and then even just going out with girlfriends and later joining a single parent group in the Seattle area, because we we ended up moving a couple of different times as you often do when you're caring for someone for different reasons and to get more help and my husband's family is all in a suburb of Seattle. So it was it was a really great move because they were super helpful. And they visited him faithfully. So He had a lot of visitors, when he did eventually have to go to a chair home. And so that was all great. Yeah, I

Unknown:

think interesting what you just said about you were there and not even worrying about, you know, not guilting, or shaming yourself for doing other things are absolutely or whatever. And that is, I think, you know, so much of our overwhelm so much of our frustration, is because we want to be somewhere else. And when we can accept that where we are, in this moment, in this moment, in time, this present moment, a lot of that stress, a lot of the frustration, a lot of the overwhelm literally dissipates, because you are so accepting, and not that you're accepting, knowing that you're going to be stuck, and that you're not in a negative way. But like, this is where I am right now. I am going to accept this fully and be fully present. But know that it is just like you said, this is where I am in this time in my life. And then, you know, knowing that deep knowing I love that you talk about that you have in yourself, where it's like, this is just my path right now. And that, if so many more people could lean into that. The depression, right, you could eat, I feel and I don't know, maybe I'm completely wrong. But knowing that in accepting and validating your emotions and your feelings where you are, and then release it and then move on. And no, it's easier said than done. 1,000% But I just love that you you know you that deep knowing that where you were was where you were right now.

Kristina:

Yeah, and I just want to interject land that for anyone, any of your listeners out there who are maybe in a similar position where they're they're heavily caregiving mood right now. What really helped me a lot was was going out with my friends. And, you know, just me with my girlfriends, and you know, talking about being just being a mom. And literally, when it came to going out with my friends, they knew the rule, which was we're not talking about being a carrier, we're not talking about Bill. And we're not talking about caregiving, because I needed time to just be normal. So there were times I would escape from it. And travel was another escape to, you know, once once my husband went under care, my son and I started traveling, and you know, some of it was was, you know, further desperate destination, some of it was just going to the Grand Canyon, or, you know, going going to Utah Moab or, you know, it's just different things and where you can just be a mom and a son, and you're, you're not, you're not going to no one's going to slap a label on you. And that's, that's a way that you're able to take a break from it to, you know, even even if you are still a caregiver, even when my husband was at home when he was still functioning. If he was, you know, when it leaves high enough level functioning, I could still go out, you know, for dinner with my girlfriends and just be a normal mom for a little while and that I cannot emphasize how powerful that is. You do need a break from it.

Unknown:

Yeah, and that's where the filling your own cup first, right? Like I hadn't you been doing that. You're making them things 10 times more difficult, right? Where you're going exhausted, like, physically exhausted.

Kristina:

Yeah. Enough to it. Yeah. And I did, I would check in with myself a lot and say, What do I need right now?

Unknown:

That is so important, right? That's where so many, like, everybody, humans are just so disconnected with our bodies with our inner being with that soul and whether or not any of the listeners actually, you know, agree or believe that there is this other part of us that so much of our frustration, if we would just like less and less the resistance, follow the path of least resistance to to allow what our body needs and what our soul wants to do. Like, sometimes it's sitting in reading for five minutes in the morning rather than, you know, rushing around doing all the things, and then you can fulfill your cup first. Totally. Yeah. Good. So I want to just touch on as I mentioned before we hit record that, um, I was listening to a podcast that you were a guest on recently, and how you just knew that when you started your podcast, initially, given your experience, given your journey with being a caregiver, that you felt maybe that that was where you were gonna go with the podcast and it is such an important topic. It is so needed out there for given the demagogue the aging, you know, population and that more. Younger people are looking after their elderly parents and whatever it might be. ie at that some very, very important topic. And yet, you knew, and again here comes in that intuition that that wasn't where you were. That wasn't where you're supposed to go with the podcast. So maybe you can just talk about that for a bit.

Kristina:

Yeah, I think this is a very powerful topic. lyin. And, and here's where I want to start. So I, my son graduated from high school, last June, and then I got remarried, in July. And, and then my husband and I went on our honeymoon, and we got COVID, did we on your route? Oh, it was quite the adventure. And anyway, came home. And I had that deeply unsettled feeling that so many women get, and particularly in our 40s and 50s. And we have this deeply unsettled feeling. And it's, it's, it's hard, like what is going on with that, right. And what is going on with that is that a little voice in our head is saying, I'm met for more, that's what deeply unsettled feeling means. I am meant for more. So I felt very unsettled in August. And I slowed down, I had to actually because of COVID, sometimes the universe literally physically makes us slow down in order to get the right path. To get it, I saw that there was a podcast class, and I thought, you know, I've got I have to start somewhere. I don't know what my my next chapter is. But I feel a pull that there's a next chapter. And it's very significant. And so if you don't know what it is start with something, anything, anything sign up for a class, which is what I did, I signed up for the class. And I was terrified. We had a private Facebook group, and we had live classes. And I actually started attending class live. And then I started chatting with people. And then I started practicing interviewing with them and just fell in love with the whole process. But part of the class was doing a lot of exercises where you needed to find out what your topic is. And like what you said, I thought, I thought that I was going to do a podcast on caregiving. So it is it is needed out there. But it felt too heavy. When I was answering all the questions and trying to figure out my my podcast topic, it felt incredibly heavy. And the reason why it felt heavy, is that it was requiring me to go into into my past and live there, you know, and bring other people along. And we're not meant to live in the past, if you live too much in the past. So you get depressed, you live too much in the future, you get anxious. And that's why we need to try to always focus on Live in the now. So I did the exercises. And finally one of the exercises was to reach out to at least five people who knew me really, really well. And ask them what they thought my strengths were. And the same answer kept coming back to me lyin. Everybody said, You're incredibly brave. You're very resilient. You're very authentic and true to yourself. You don't care what other people think. You just live your life on your own terms. And that's how she's Braid was born. Oh, oh, my

Unknown:

gosh, I just love that so much. And I And again, I feel like all of that, right. And it's right from the beginning. So I mean, I've been sort of on same thing, this personal development journey for probably 2019 is where it really sort of popped out. And it was like, Okay, these are the books that I want to read the podcasts that want to listen to you. And, you know, people would say, oh, it's that midlife crisis, you're in your 40s. And it's like, no, it's the feeling that there is something more that there is more to life than just, you know, the grind of the work, the 30 year career. And so going into this next chapter, I love how you followed and again, tapping into yourself and going up to this topic is going to put me back into the past. And that's not where you want to live. And I'm personally to be honest, Christina, I'm dealing with that right now with this podcast. I mean, it's been out now for six months. And as everyone knows, like any of the listeners is that I am a police officer. But I'm, you know, very grateful for that career. But I'm really shifting into this just more of this entrepreneurial world and supporting women who are making massive impact in the world. And so, that's sort of the people that I'm loving to interview and that's, you know, having you on and showing what you're doing in this next time. Actually of your life is just so inspiring. So I just love, love your story so much, Christina. So thank you. Thank you. Thank you for sharing all of that. Is there anything that you'd like to as we sort of wrap up today? Just leave the listeners, just with as far as following that intuition, or how to start to tap into that?

Kristina:

Wow, that's a really great question. Yeah, I think that you can start anywhere, like what I mentioned, you could sign up for a class, you can read a book, literally, I think that we are drawn to the books that were ready, you know, we're ready to receive the information for so you could start by finding a book that you're drawn to, or a, or a class or anything else for podcasting, podcasting is phenomenal. I mean, I have listened to podcasts for about three years. And I feel like they have really helped me grow too, because you can always pick and choose the topics. And I'm sure there are podcasts out there that are focused all about intuition. You know, yes, yes.

Unknown:

Those are all great tools. Oh, amazing. And as we're sort of rolling into, at least here in Canada, the US we're rolling into spring and into summer, and, you know, you've come off this amazing, amazing trip, right now. Like, how are you finding because I know for me after coming back from such a life changing trip like that, that then sort of settling back into as again, reality? What what are you doing right now to fill your soul and to find some harmony between podcasts and you know, you've got newly married, your says, Son, son has graduated, which I'm, I can't even get there. My, my kids are about nine and nine and 13. And the thought of them graduating is like, Ah, I don't want that yet. But where are you finding the harmony in your life right

Kristina:

now. That's, that's, that's such a, that's really impressive that you're, you're saying, hey, you know, you get back from a big trip like that, and it's, it's life changing, and it's, it can be an adjustment to come back. And, um, you know, one of the things that I'm doing is I'm actually doing a fundraiser party at my house for children in Cambodia, kind of a little side hobby that I'm developing, and I'm really excited about it. And that really fills my cup to be of service. And then, you know, I have to be really, really honest with you on that on this, I absolutely love podcasting so much that I will literally be doing it from from ATM, you know, until six or seven or eight or 9pm and my husband lesson again, like intuitively, you know, we both knew, um, that, you know, this, this marriage is meant to be because he around five or six, he'll, he'll tell me it's time to stop. And if you weren't, if you weren't there to tell me it's time to stop. You know, whether it be I'm working on, you know, again, like, you know, fundraising for Cambodia, or, um, my podcast sometimes I will literally just go Go, go, go go and I won't, I will stop and relax and slow down and and he gets me to stop slow down, relax in the evenings with him and just, you know, watch a comedy or, or some kind of British show, or whatever. But I really need that balance. And I feel like he is so good at balance helping you balance out. Oh,

Unknown:

that is so good. Because there and there's the ticket. Right? There's the golden ticket, is that when you get so lost in the doing by saying yes. I know you're in the right spot. You know, your Yes.

Kristina:

Tendency I get very, I'm so excited and enthusiastic about my podcast and you know, and so my hobbies and so it just can literally overtake my life. And then my husband steps in and says, okay, honey, come on. Let's eat some dinner. Let's let's watch the show. Let's let's connect plugs. So it's it's great. I'm a human being right. I obviously need to work on that. I need to work on that. And that's Ignite. That's okay, too. Yeah, absolutely.

Unknown:

Right. It is okay. But I love that, you know, he's the wine and like you said, like, he's in there in your life. He came into your life as you've started this new chapter together, but that you've got this sort of, hey, you know, it's time to come back and let's get some balance. Let's get some harmony with other things. And that, you know, you've got this another chapter that you're doing and spending time with him and I love all of that. So, oh, Christina, thank you so much and just maybe share with the listeners of course. Where's where they can find you the

Kristina:

podcast? All the things? Yeah, so you can find me on Apple, Spotify and probably 10 Other places Yeah, sure where my producer put me on the other day she said oh, by the way you're on I Heart Radio. I'm like, I don't know what the state is but oh well that's wrong. So anyway, so it's called she's brave podcast with Christina Driscoll to find me there and then you can also find me on Instagram at she's brave podcast, and I have a website because I'm always looking for great people to talk with and I love talking with my fans. I always get back to you when you email me or connect with me on Instagram. I will always respond. So that's at she's brave podcast. And then I have a Facebook group. She's brave podcast.

Unknown:

Amazing so much. Did I mentioned I think I didn't mention also I have a on my website, www dot shiz. Break podcast.com Okay, perfect. And I will make sure that all of that is in the show notes. As well as if you are you know, this the thing that you're doing the fundraising for Cambodia, if you have anything to add or want to have that I can certainly put that in the podcast as well. I'm sure there's many people that would love to support you in that journey as well. Thank you, Lan.

Kristina:

Hey, everyone. Thanks so much for taking time out of your busy life to listen to today's episode. I love learning about what makes you brave. I'm here with you. I see you. I hear you and I want to hear from you. I want to know how you're showing up as being brave and authentic. Connect with me on Instagram at she's brave podcast or come join our community in the she's brave podcast Facebook group. I'm sending you so much love. Until next time. Keep being brave.