The Root of The Matter

The Sweet Deception Compromising Our Nerves and Teeth

February 25, 2024 Dr. Rachaele Carver, D.M.D. Board-Certified, Biologic, Naturopathic Dentist
The Root of The Matter
The Sweet Deception Compromising Our Nerves and Teeth
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Discover the surprising ways your diet could be affecting your nerves as Dr. Rick Jacoby joins us to unravel the connections between sugar consumption and nerve pathology. Drawing from the knowledge shared in his book "Sugar Crush," Dr. Jacoby offers insight into how high fructose corn syrup is not only wreaking havoc on our feet and dental health but also implicating conditions like carpal tunnel syndrome and cardiac disease. It's a revelation that will make you reconsider the sweet temptations in your pantry and their long-term impact on your health.

Venture beyond the toothbrush with us as we tackle the challenges endodontists face and question the efficacy of common dental practices. We break down the importance of understanding the root causes of issues like teeth grinding and the potential exacerbation of conditions such as sleep apnea by quick-fix solutions like nightguards. The discussion extends to the critical blood flow necessary for dental and overall health, scrutinizing ingredients in oral care products that may be silently contributing to health issues.

In a world where stem cell therapies are on the brink of transforming medicine and dentistry, I reflect on my own journey from a procedure-focused dentist to one in pursuit of the underlying causes of health problems. We discuss the exciting potential of stem cells—from tooth pulp to Wharton's jelly—and the regulatory hurdles these treatments face. Wrapping up, Dr. Jacoby invites you to explore the future of dental health through alternative treatments and to keep an eye out for his upcoming book, "Unglued," promising to be an essential guide in nerve health maintenance.

To contact Dr. Jacoby go to:

www.drjacoby.academy

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To learn more about holistic dentistry, check out Dr. Carver's website:

http://carverfamilydentistry.com

To contact Dr. Carver directly, email her at drcarver@carverfamilydentistry.com

Want to talk with someone at Dr. Carver's office?  Call her practice: 413-663-7372




Disclaimer: This podcast is for educational purposes only. Information discussed is not intended for diagnosis, curing, or prevention of any disease and is not intended to replace advice given by a licensed healthcare practitioner. Before using any products mentioned or attempting methods discussed, please speak with a licensed healthcare provider. This podcast disclaims responsibility from any possible adverse reactions associated with products or methods discussed. Opinions from guests are their own, and this podcast does not condone or endorse opinions made by guests. We do not provide guarantees about the guests' qualifications or credibility. This podcast and its guests may have direct or indirect financial interests associated with products mentioned.

Speaker 1:

Welcome back to another episode of the Root of the Matter podcast. I am your host, dr Rachel Carver. Today I'm excited we have Dr Rick Jacoby with us. He is going to talk to us a little bit about his book called Sugar Crush. He's going to talk to us a little bit about how what we eat can really impact our physiology and we're also going to talk about nerve pathology. So we were just talking a little bit offline here about about the nerves, and I've never.

Speaker 1:

As a dentist, I'm constantly trying to prevent people from needing these root canals. We all know that every tooth has a nerve running through it. Anybody who's ever had tooth pain you're well aware of that fact and, again, as a biologic dentist, I want to do everything I can to try to preserve that nerve. We don't want to just always assume you have pain, boom, go get the root canal or have the tooth extracted. We know that the body is an amazing machine and it is capable of healing if we're able to give it the right nutrients, take away the toxicities or infections that might be contributing to the pathology. So with that, dr Jacoby, welcome. Maybe you want to tell us a little bit about your background and how you know, came to the dark side maybe.

Speaker 2:

That's a good. That's a good intro. Thank you and welcome me to Massachusetts, correct? Yeah, we're in sunny Scottsdale, arizona. We got a cold wave here, it was in the forties this morning has warmed me up to about 65. So just to let you know, we're not used to that. So we like it. We like nice warm weather.

Speaker 2:

But just as an intro to this field of nerve and dentistry and podiatry, there is a connection and that connection I learned of really about 25 years ago with Dr Lee Dellen, who's a professor of nerve surgery at Johns Hopkins. And it's really interesting that we would have this conversation because I have had that conversation with many different dentists. Friend of mine said Endodontist, and a play tennis with him and the root and I love the root of the matter, it is the root of the matter. So I'll work backwards from that particular nerve to my particular nerve in the foot which is Morton's neuroma, which is an interdigital nerve between the toes. That is the most common foot problem with nerves. And it's interesting because when I met Dr Dellen down at Johns Hopkins he said why do you podiatrists cut the nerve out on the foot? I said that's what we were trained to do and I thought about that. I said Gee, that is unusual, but it did work. Most of the time when it doesn't work it's a nightmare. So I was explaining that to one of my dental friends and he said Endodontist. And he's. I said I said Dr Dellen said that's the only nerve removed in the body. I said I don't think that's correct either, because your nerve is the one most commonly, probably even more than Morton's neuroma. So what's the connection? So I drank the Kool-Aid back then on Dr Dellen's theories, professor neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins, pretty bright guy, and he's developed a nerve decompression, not excision decompression, so he came to the problem from a handsurge point of view. So back in the seventies neurosurgery as a specially peripheral neurosurgery was not especially plastic surgeons did that surgery because it was very rare in the sixties. Actually there were only 12 carpal tunnels in the literature in the 1960s. Last year we're close to 800,000 carpal tunnel surgeries.

Speaker 2:

Something is happening. It's not because we have better diagnosis, no, it's because there is a common denominator between, I think between a dental nerve compression and infection to our diet. And that answer to me is sugar, and specifically that is high fructose corn syrup, which the human genome has never seen before 1974, that's when it started. So my theory is sugar plus trauma equals nerve dysfunction, certainly in the mouth. Grinding your teeth, malalignment, malocclusion, the bio mechanics of your mouth plus the biochemistry of the nerve around it, and then you have dysfunction. So that goes for any nerve in my opinion.

Speaker 2:

So Dr Dillon taught me peripheral nerve surgery, went down there, learned his technique, read his textbooks and then maybe 2005, somewhere around that, I made the mistake and I said, dr Dillon, I think there's more to your theory, these ones you figured out. That was a mistake. That was a mistake, but I did. I started to look at literature that I normally wouldn't read Circulation Journal, 2005, dr Cook and see another point of view. That's why it's so important that different points of view come to the table. This peer reviewed nonsense is not. It's just do you fit the narrative, yes or no? If you don't fit the narrative, you're pushed out of the room, and that's the way it's always been. That is a very bad way to approach a problem.

Speaker 2:

So now we have Dr Cook. He's a cardiologist by train, he's got a PhD in vascular biology and you would like this article. It's called the Uber marker. It's about the biochemistry of cardiac disease. Now Dr Cook's background. He was at Stanford and I don't know if you know this named Gerald Raven, who was the person who really looked at metabolic syndrome X, which then became metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, etc. Etc. And he was at Stanford and Dr Cook took that over. So I read his article, I text him. I said, hey, dr Cook, great article. I think it has something to do with Dr Delan's theory. And he called me on the phone. He said I love your idea, come up to Stanford. Long story. I worked with him.

Speaker 2:

We tested his molecule, which is asymmetric dimethyl arginine. So that molecule was suspected to block the nitric oxide pathway and I thought that what better pathway than nerve, the blood supply to the nerve? And it is true, and it did that. But we didn't know that in 2005. So I used my patients who had diabetic neuropathy and looked at that molecule and put them in different quintiles and there were correlations between lots of different diseases, including MS, and there were about 162 patients in my study. So I theorized that the biochemistry of nerves has a common denominator. Doesn't matter what nerve it is. We call these obviously we have names very one of these nerves and we're very proud that we can pronounce and remember them, which is really a trap in a way too, because that's not a diagnosis and, like Morton's neuroma in the foot, do you have a name for nerves in the mouth that you put labels?

Speaker 1:

on. We usually we would call it irreversible pulpitus, right when we know that the nerve is dying it's inflammation of the nerve and when it's said to be irreversible, that means you either have to have a root canal or extraction. That's how we're taught. That's standard care of traditional dentistry.

Speaker 2:

That's standard care, prediatry for the interdigital nerve, which probably really never looked at the size, but I'll bet you're very similar, subjected to trauma in the foot mouth for sure. Trauma, sugar, yes, see how it starts to come together. Then you look at the biochemistry and that molecule, asymmetric dimethyrogen, is the connector, so that blocks the blood supply to the nerve. So with my conversations with my local dental friends I said theoretically we really wouldn't want to cut the nerve out. We would want to heal the nerve if we could. So let's look at the, probably the trigeminal nerve that supplies the jaw, the upper and lower. That is a very painful condition and Densis encountered that what's called the suicide nerve, and it is Now. This is ironic as well. So let me I've been around a long time, so when I say these dates it's embarrassing. So in my training in Philadelphia and I was at Pennsylvania Hospital which is the first hospital in the world or in the United States, by the way still there beautiful, great learning institution, and there was a doctor there by the name of Dr Jean Netthead. I don't know if you know that name, but he came up with a procedure for decompressing the trigeminal nerve for that quote, unquote neuralgia, and he was a resident with me at the time. I knew him from rounds in the hospital but he was neurosurgeon so we really didn't have that much contact other than through neurology and he theorized back then that was a nerve compression. Then it radiates into the jaw and it can be mistaken for a root canal because the pain is so intense. And of course a patient who has that kind of pain said do anything, take the tooth out, take the jaw out, I don't care what you do, I can't live with this pain. And the foot is similar, but it's certainly not as severe as what your field is. So that was the connector and so Dr Dillon said the carpal tunnel was a nerve compression and the owner at the elbow and then leg.

Speaker 2:

Then I came along and said wait a minute, it's all the same, they're just different locations of the nerve, so MS cranial nerve or AOS, et cetera. And I'm sure your field sees those changes of different cranial nerves because you're in that space and of course they come to you probably more from the mechanics, like anybody else. It's always pain, chief complaint where does it hurt? Right, and then we try to fix it. Yeah, let's see the connection between nerves Doesn't matter where it is, what it's called, it's still the same process and I think, all the nerves throughout the body, even autism, which is interesting because that's in your field as well and from this standpoint, for the hypoglossal nerve and that is an interest of mine, which is amazing because the hypoglossal nerve innervates the tongue what's that?

Speaker 2:

It's just a muscle articulation. That's one of its functions. So if that nerve is damaged, delayed speech, that's autism. So that's what I did in the book. Sugar Crush went through all the different nerves, looked at this symptoms, literally swam upstream along where the nerve was and see where the compression was, and so that's my basic theory.

Speaker 1:

So what you're saying, is this like a physical compression, or is this biochemical, this substance that you mentioned? That's what's causing the compression. Maybe you can just clarify it for me a little bit.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. So now let's dig into the biochemistry. So it is known that in diabetic neuropathy you know, see even that term that sounds like that's distal for the leg. No, let me give you a little anecdote to see how Dr Dillon came to that conclusion. He had a patient and he fixed the carpal tunnel in the older tunnel of her arm. And she said to him in early 1980s said, dr Dillon, you fixed my arm, why don't you fix my leg? And he said, oh, that's a different disease, that's diabetic polyneuropathy. Thought about it, went to the laboratory rats really phenomenal experiments and then operated her leg and she restored her sensation without cutting the leg off, because that's a cure too, isn't it? It's like root canal, that'll fix it. And she got better. And then he started writing papers. And then I picked up on that.

Speaker 2:

And when you really think of it as a very simple equation here, so what is the number one thing with sugar? So sugar, the malarier reaction. Are you familiar with that reaction? So the malarier reaction for your audience is a sugar plus a protein goes through a chemical reaction and it actually shrinks the collagen around the nerve. So you think of that as like a shrink wrap. It's squeezing the nerve from the outside. Then the second one is the polyol pathway, which is a sugar inside the nerve breaking down to a alcohol sugar which is called servitol, and the water is pulled into the nerve by the alcohol and it swells the inside of the nerve. So now we have a covering that's shrinking and the interior of the nerve that's swelling. I think we can call that compression. That's the type of neuropathia.

Speaker 2:

So neurologists do not buy into this theory. This is not a put down for neurologists. They're very bright guys and I studied with lots of them, but they have no skill set to fix it. All they can do is write for a prescription. I always tell them this I suspect if you pressed hard enough with your pen you could do surgery or you can give an injection. But basically they only can write for prescriptions like lyric agabapent and all that sort of thing. But see, you and I have different skill sets. You can do the surgery, you know the chemistry, you know the mechanics, natural remedies, so you come out to come out the problem with lots of different modalities which most subspecialties can't do. But I actually is very similar to that. So I can write a prescription, I can do the surgery I can fix the biomechanics, so that kind of gives me an advantage.

Speaker 2:

When he wrote his original papers, the neurology world thought it was crazy that operating on diabetic leg it's just crazy. If you didn't have surgical training like he did or I do, that would be crazy. So what's the difference? So first of all I'd like to use this term Can you see what I see?

Speaker 2:

And the answer is if you're not trained, like in your field or my field, with microscopes and magnification, you don't see what I see. And if you don't know what we're talking about, then what would you look for? Because you don't have any suspicion that I don't know. I'm looking inside. I actually did look inside another friend who's an endodontist. He has that big microscope as ice as it is, and I looked inside the tooth and I'm like, oh my God, all those crevices, how would you get all that bacteria out of there? It's a pretty interesting space. Can you see what I see?

Speaker 2:

Do the average friend answer is no, you can't, because you don't have the knowledge and you don't have the lens to look at it through that point of view. And if you can tell me you looked at the point of view, you do have the knowledge and we disagree. That's fine. We disagree on, at least on a common ground. But most people, oh no, that's nonsense. What are you looking at the things? Especially in neurologists? They don't know that. Even if they did see it, what are they going to do? They're going to write for a lyric.

Speaker 1:

So, part of the reason why we do this podcast right, because we want to create awareness that there are alternatives, that there are people who understand, who, like yourself, like myself, who are always asking why, why, why why why?

Speaker 2:

why, why why?

Speaker 1:

How can we get at the root of the problem? How can? Because we can bandaid everything with medications, and even in the mouth. We can put nightguards in everybody because they're grinding. But that's a bandaid. Why are you grinding in the first place?

Speaker 1:

Because, now it's even. There's some studies showing nightguards ooh, they may even worsen sleep apnea or snoring, because they're causing a slippery slide, allowing that mandible to fall back. So again, why is it? I just had a conversation with a new patient this morning. Are you grinding? Because you have parasites? You have stress, Everybody has stress, but not everybody grinds. So what is at the crux of that? So I want to circle back to something you said that was really interesting to me. Talked about sorbitol causing some swelling. Now sorbitol is a very common ingredient found in natural oral care products. Not, I'm not a fan of these sugar alkyls, but xylitol is another one. That's huge and there is research saying this is great, it prevents cavities, but it kills things, right. So the long-term use of these sugar alcohols is not, in my opinion, right. Is not good long-term care. Can you expand on that?

Speaker 2:

Yes, I can. The sorbitol piece? Yes, I can. So in that chemistry dive that I did with Dr Cook. So let's go to that molecule asymmetric dimethylogene. So basically, what is that? So it blocks the nitric oxide pathway. For your audience, we have l-arginine, semi-essential amino acid, and it converts the nitric oxide. Now, if those other cofactors are there for instance, there is a thing called BH4, which is B6B12, folic acid and vitamin C and if those levels are low, then you're going to not produce nitric oxide, you're going to produce more perioxine nitrite. So what's?

Speaker 1:

the difference. Sorry, I'm going to interrupt you right now and say that one more time for us. What are those nutrients that are key?

Speaker 2:

We're trying to convert l-arginine to nitric oxide.

Speaker 1:

Because nitric oxide creates blood flow right.

Speaker 2:

Yes, because it dilates the blood vessel. But it has a lot of cofactors ADMA, that asymmetric dimethylogene, we'll call that ADMA. So that blocks the pathway and we'll get into why that is. And then another cofactor is BH4. That's a notation for tetrahydrobioopterin, which is a chemical cofactor and it consists of B6B12, folic acid and vitamin C. Now in biochemistry it just goes on and on. It gets complicated.

Speaker 2:

But vitamin C competes with sugar because humans cannot produce vitamin C. And you produce vitamin C out of glucose. It's just two carbons difference. So if you're drinking a lot of fruit juice, you're getting sugar. You're not getting vitamin C because insulin will tell vitamin C to take a hike, because there's only one, as I say, bouncer at the door and insulin can tell the difference. So we need vitamin C to get in the cell. But if you're eating a lot of sugar, including alcohol, sugar like sovertal, you're going to knock that out. So that's the basic equation. So we're producing nitric oxide, dilating the blood vessel, or it's counterpart, perioxynitrite, which is ONO notation, and it causes the blood vessel to shrink.

Speaker 2:

There's a formula called the Puswells. I don't know if I pronounced that correctly, but Puswells theorem, which is interesting, has all this stuff in there A lot of variables, but the most unique part of the formula is R to the fourth power. So when you have blood flow through a vessel, that means the radius to the fourth power. So 19% reduction in the radius equals a 50% reduction in blood flow. That's enormous. And talking about your nerve or my nerve or anybody's nerve, if that blood flow is interrupted you'll get necrosis. What?

Speaker 1:

happens every time you have your tooth filled. Most dentists are using anesthetics with epinephrine. And what does epinephrine do? It constricts your blood vessels.

Speaker 2:

That's right yeah.

Speaker 1:

I had a colleague who told me once I noticed 18 months after I would give people blocks, which is a nerve injection that numbs the whole bottom side of your mouth. He said then the teeth would die. And I just thought about that. I was like that's not good. This is a doctor who had been practicing he's actually from Arizona. He'd been practicing for 40 years. I'm like he's got some knowledge and so from that point on I stopped using epi and I use a carbocaine now with no preserves, no epinephrine, and then subsequently found all this research was done in knee surgeries but they said specifically 2% lidocaine, which is the dentist's gold standard anesthetic we use, created.

Speaker 1:

Not only is the epinephrine a problem, but the lidocaine itself causes mitochondria to die and, as most of you will know, mitochondria is where we produce our energy. It's really important for our immune system. So this is a big problem in dentistry and people think nothing of it. You go, you get your shot and go on your way, but even 30 seconds of restricting that blood flow is huge and usually in a dental treatment if you have one shot which sometimes it's harder to numb the bottom teeth, maybe you get two or three that can shut off the blood flow for an hour maybe, so really problematic.

Speaker 2:

That's the same issue in the foot, so I don't use epinephrine for that exact reason, because the toes have very poor circulation and if that stops for more than an hour you've got problems, and so, yes, so we have a similarity there. The other issue is nitric oxide. Back to nitric oxide, the production. There's so many things that can stop that, like mouthwash. So mouthwash kills the nitrites and you can't. It goes in your saliva, it goes into your gut. That's all part of the microflora and it's amazing. Just a little change causes major outputs that are not good. We should discuss dental hygiene. That's a good one to talk about.

Speaker 1:

It's important because maybe if you have your wisdom teeth extracted or another extraction or you have some gum surgery, most of the time you're going home with what's called chlorhexidine, which absolutely kills all of these very important bacteria that sit at the back of your throat, a near sinus, and they are able to convert nitrites from your food into nitric oxide. So if you kill all those nitric oxide producing bacteria, you are creating major problems for your cardiovascular system, among other things. But that is so. We've got to get away from the list strain. We've got to get away from thinking about, we got to kill everything we don't need to kill. We need balance, right.

Speaker 2:

So give us your take on the hygiene. That just flipped right into the pastor, the pastorization and the terrain theory.

Speaker 1:

Yes.

Speaker 2:

I've always thought about that Wait a minute, just because you couldn't see those critters. And somebody came along like and you put it in the microscope and you see all the bugs and you go oh my God, we're going to kill all those guys. Maybe at some point we'll get deep into that. For the most part, you don't want to kill them.

Speaker 1:

They're your buddies.

Speaker 2:

So that kind of gets into the COVID issue as well, because where's the portal of entry through the mouth and the nose? Where do you have most of the nitric oxide produced in your nasal cavity? And if you're a mouth breather, that's going to be a factor. So these little guys and they're not mean guys maybe COVID, the SARS were tampered with, let's just go with that. But normal viruses, as I say, viruses are people too. What do they do? They just want to raise their family and find food. So where are they going to find food?

Speaker 2:

When I was in school way back, worked in a laboratory, really a famous laboratory in Philadelphia, ben Franklin. So I did the experiments for Dr Sheffield's world famous guy and I rendered the rats and did the electrophoresis and we had to grow bacteria and viruses. Viruses are very difficult to grow. You have to have a live tissue, perfect nutrient, or they die. So let's look at the oral cavity as the perfect breeding ground for it. Viruses in general, not the ones been tampered with. But what are they looking for? They're looking for food because they cannot duplicate themselves or replicate, because they're basically RNA. So they look in your cell and look around, say, let's see, are you using that copy machine for the moment and if your cell says no, would you like to make some copies? They're going to multiply. But what are they looking for? They're looking for sugar for food and an ability to replicate and raise their family. You die, they live. Oral hygiene is extremely important. So putting listerine in, like you said, is no. That body has developed its own immune response with lots of nitric oxide in the nasal turbinates to protect the body, the terrain and not pasture.

Speaker 2:

So we get right into that debate. But it is difficult for patients because they've been. It's just been hammered down. This is the right thing, so that we're. Let's go back to this peer reviewed thing. I really think any new idea should not have the previous generation. It's like politics you don't think they're going to listen to you if you have a new idea. I think there should be as many diverse people on that panel, like an adenis looking at what we're doing in the foot. You would look and say why did you do that? That's what we were taught and you say maybe you look at it differently.

Speaker 2:

You have a guy like Dell and a cardiologist. You need a mix of people from all points of view. No, we're not saying anybody's correct, but it's interesting to hear the different points of view. Look at the commonality the adenis and podiatrists. You would never think that would have anything to do with each other. But it's physiology. It just has a different part of the body. That's all it is.

Speaker 1:

We often get stuck in our ways because this is what I was taught. I'm not supposed to know any better, but there are some of us who just have that curious mind and we want to know. And for me it wasn't satisfying to know that my patient had to have a root canal or have a tooth extracted. As much as I enjoy doing tooth extractions, I'd rather my patient never lose a tooth, and so it bothered me.

Speaker 1:

I went into dentistry because I wanted to provide health, and the more you got into it, it was like I'm just like a tooth engineer and I'm just managing these diseases, and that's unfortunately a lot of healthcare is today. We're managing, and so that just didn't feel right for me. I just didn't like how I felt, plus my own personal trying to deal with what's causing my own eczema, and that made me think, oh geez, maybe I could think about dentistry differently. So, yeah, I agree, just like I said, with that dentist from Arizona who I didn't go look out for some peer reviewed journal, I said, hey, I'm gonna take his. He has 40 years of experience and that's a heck of a lot more valuable to me, in my opinion, than reading some study done on a rat. Yeah, I think sometimes we put too much emphasis on it has to be double blinded, random, controlled, peer reviewed, when sometimes anecdotal evidence is one of the best evidence and as long as we're not harming somebody. I'd like to try and see what works.

Speaker 2:

Right, and most of these studies are with. The endpoint is to find a drug. So they're trying to put money into a project to monetize whatever that disease is. That's not pure science, that's business.

Speaker 1:

We know healthcare has to become business. Now, right, it's unfortunate, but we've lost some of that personalized. Your doctor doesn't come to your house anymore. There's no such thing as house calls anymore, and that's unfortunate, and it's because we've it's become more of a business. We've taken the doctor's authority away in some cases.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so yeah, unfortunately that's what's happened. So that's why in my all this stuff we just talked about is in my book, sugar crush. But my new book hopefully comes out next few weeks or so is really exploring the solution to this sugar problem. When I see a patient who's 50, 60, 70 years of age and they have a diabetic neuropathy and you're about to lose your leg, which is roots Same thing as a root canal what can I do to save this? Are the things I can do to intervene?

Speaker 2:

Stem cells are a really big part of this equation and one of the sources is pulp. Tooth pulp is a good source of stem cells. But the problem is the way I see it. You've lost about 90% of your own stem cells by age 50. And most of the people I see have chronic disease or over 50.

Speaker 2:

So what if I said to them we're going to take, I'm not going to pull tooth, but drill a hole in your bone, pull out the bone marrow, spin it down and inject you? Is it going to work? It's going to help, but you don't have enough stem cells. So I like pernatal stem cells, which is the after birth, and specifically the Horton's jelly from the umbilical cord and that's magic that could be used anywhere. As I had to use the crude expression, I say stem cells don't give a rat's ass what you call your itus. And because they're going to go wherever the inflammation is. They're really smart little guys and they put the fire out. Now in the United States, fda says whoa, wait a minute, you're going to kill a pharmaceutical company. That's really what they're saying. So they want us to be. Do you use stem cells in your practice?

Speaker 1:

Interesting. You say that because I use the PRF technique. So anytime somebody needs a tooth extracted we will draw their blood, spin it down and use their platelets, plug them in, and the healing with that is unbelievable and I've never seen anything like it in my 20 years, so that the same idea that we're saying we're using the stem cells from your platelets, but interesting that you say older the patient are. Maybe it's not as profound though that they are.

Speaker 2:

Okay, let's talk about that because that's really interesting subject. Yes, prp, which I've used for years. It works because you're you can get a high concentration, but over 50, it's not really that, not as potent as stem cells. So if you get them from a perinatal tissue you got millions of cells. They're young, good cells. Now here in the United States we can use them Wharton's jelly but the FDA says under their 361 category and this is if you read the document you'll be.

Speaker 2:

It's nauseating how, to the extent, they have done to try to prevent you from using it. But there is a way to use it as long as it is homologous use. And what that means is the umbilical cord, in my interpretation, or a lot of the recipe on this one, but that's what they say. So they say you can use Wharton's jelly as long as it is not manipulated, in other words, don't add chemicals A, it doesn't have a systemic effect. I don't know how you prevent that, but you can't claim that and you can't claim anything because you haven't done the research. And it has to be homologous use, meaning like for, and I looked at that in my field of diabetic neuropathy. I said to myself the umbilical cord is a conduit, artery, nerve and vein with a supportive tissue which is called Wharton's jelly. What is in the hand? The median nerve. In the wrist, the carpal tunnel, artery, nerve and vein supportive tissue innervates a muscle and that's his function. There's no different than any nerve. So this would apply to your field as well. Now I'm not putting words in your mouth, but if you had and I'm sure you had these cases where just multiple root canal problems and maybe there's a compression with the facial nerve or, excuse me, the trigeminal nerve, injecting Warton's jelly in this area is going to change the inflammatory nature of that entire distribution of that nerve distally exactly the same as it would in my field down at the like, the compurneal nerve. So that could be a really interesting dental procedure to enhance alkyne, especially with implants. Now you're putting an implant and a jaw on an 80 year old. The circulation can't be that good, but augmenting with Warton's jelly I think it would be a great adjunct because you need to get that good blood supply. So let me just segue to.

Speaker 2:

This is all my new book, but working with Dr Cook at Stanford. Now he's the head of stem cell research at Baylor. We have these conversations. You would love the conversation, but he's such a super guy, he's in the cardiovascular, he's making new hearts. I'm down here in the clinic trying to figure out save legs. And also there's a fellow called. His name is Neil Reardon.

Speaker 2:

He has a clinic down in Panama. Used to practice in Scottsdale but he couldn't do the things he wanted to do. So he cultures these cells and grows them and he treats all kinds of diseases MS, autism, it doesn't matter, like I said, stem cells. By the way, they don't speak English and I've been to Panama. They don't speak Spanish either, because they work down there just like they work here, and I've also. There's a great clinic in Mexico and around Puerto Vallarta, the dream body clinic.

Speaker 2:

So do they work? Yes, are they safe? Absolutely. Do we need more research? Of course we do. But the FDA, in my opinion, is slow walking the cure to protect these drugs that really don't work, but they do monetize the disease quite nicely.

Speaker 2:

But you and I are patients as well and we're also citizens in the United States, I think. Right, so shouldn't we have a voice? When do we give all this power away to some agency who only cares about themselves? They give lip service. That's a dental term, right. Yes, lip service. They're protecting us. They're no more protecting us than the IRS. We need an open and honest discussion, just like we're having today, and that should be the peer reviewed and that really would I. Would I get people like geologists, anthropologists really know that at dentals world. They're amazing. They're saying Institute for Human Origins, don Johansson's at Arizona State University. He talks about teeth all the time because that tells you exactly, going back millions of years, what did humans eat? Why do you have incisors and canine and grinders and whatever you can tell from the dental record? What food was the best for human beings? That should be in all our conversations.

Speaker 2:

So that's what I try to do in the new book it's called I'm going to ask you the trick question because it was asked to me. They said asked me, what's glucose mean? And I gave that answer. I gave you and he said no, what's the word mean? I went, I don't know. I had to look it up. It's a Greek word. Glucose meaning to adhere, stick together. It's glue. It's that simple. So this was at a think tank over in Hollywood, the Hollywood type people. There we go. You need to call your new book Unglue. How do you get on glued and it's such. So stem cells are part of that.

Speaker 2:

Red light therapy, which is, I think, good for dental, produces more nitric oxide. I just had him on my podcast, nathan Bryan, who's he's big into the nitric oxide world. He worked with Dr Cook as well, so you have nitric oxide. Ultimately it is nitric oxide because that dilates the blood vessel. The stem cell, really, they gave, they gave in a name MSC, mesenchymal stem cells. That was given by Arnold Kaplan who first saw those cells. But they're really periocytes. They're just look like little amoebas on the back of blood vessels. They secrete growth factors like VEGF, vascular endothelial growth factor, and they just burrow their ways into areas lacking. Angiogenesis really is what it is blood supply, same for your field, same for my field, same for everybody's field, and stem cells do that. That's how they work.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, the stem cells are great and there's a lot of research in dentistry, especially with extractions and implants. It's just how do you get it? I went to last February, I think I was in Vegas at a conference and we were talking about and this company was there and I'm not sure what happened to them because you can't get ahold of them anymore.

Speaker 2:

I had some of their products and I was trying it out, but it is, it's a problem, it's it's, it's probably yeah, probably because they didn't understand that word homologous use, because in my field that means I'm treating nerves, I'm I'm operating on nerves every day, so I can, I have to, I look at them, I'm looking at them under a microscope, so I'm using stem cells, and if that's not homologous use, then they have to put that in there just to stop everything. But that's what I interpret the word homologous is, and I could interpret that for your field as well. And the trigeminal nerve, that's where I would inject it. Oh, I'm not a dentist and I can't make any recommendations, but they're just between you and me. No one's listening to this, right? Yeah, yeah.

Speaker 1:

Well, again, that's part of the podcast, right, it's just, people aren't even aware that there are these alternatives, and that's that is my goal is not to tell somebody what to do, what not to do, but the more we start talking about just like you said, the more different perspective, the more we start talking about it, and if people start going to their doctors and asking for these things, then we have to open that conversation and do those kind of things. That's all we really want to do. We're not trying to denigrate anybody per se, we just want to have conversations. We just want to have open, honest conversations that there are these wonderful treatments that we can do if we just really listen to the body.

Speaker 1:

Right, I love this. It's really, and it's interesting because I will tell my patients if I have somebody who has this pulpitus right, if it's reversible and I'm fingers crossed can I keep it and can I get rid of that inflammation. One of the first things I'll say is no sugar for at least three days, because we know so and you've just explained why what the sugar is doing it's causing this compression. We also know that sugar can create inflammation that also reverses the fluid flow within the tooth right. So not only the nerve coming to the tooth but the nerve inside the tooth, we have a couple things going on and we want, and people don't realize that every tooth is an organ.

Speaker 1:

We think that's just something I used to chew. But every tooth has its own nerve, blood, lymph supply and we want that fluid to come from circulation and put it into the enamel. We want all those minerals to be deposited out into. It's not that the way we typically learn about cavities. It's just your mouth is acidic and you've got bacteria. That's only a very small part of the story, right, and people don't realize. Also, enamel is constantly turning over, just like bone. Every seven years we have a brand new skeleton, right, so the same thing with the teeth.

Speaker 1:

So to say that you can't ever try to remineralize decay or anything like that's just not true. We know it's more challenging in the mouth versus bone, because the mouth is full of bacteria, right. So versus bone is a closed system. Usually it's sterile. You can heal bone more easily than, say, a cavity, but that's why we want to look at that. The terrain right. Get you, create an alkaline environment, create the healthy bacteria, remove too much sugar so that the fluid is flowing in the proper direction, and that's how you can heal these things. But it's complex, but the more we understand, and so I love this. Also, one of the other things I'll tell my patients is giving them some nitric oxide tablets, right, you can suck those in boom Open up, because we know, in my opinion, like when we have pain the energy isn't flowing right, there's something preventing any. So, whether it's a physical compression, some kind of toxin or infection, how do we get that energy flowing right? So that's why I love red light therapy.

Speaker 1:

So we have a ton of red lights in our office. We have patients, they can purchase them. They have a little wand so you can put it directly over the tooth and if, ideally, you can do that for 60 seconds a day again, that constant, because you can't come into the office every day. You couldn't, but you really don't want to waste your money on that. So I try to encourage my patients purchase a red light, whether it's a full-body panel or but if you have teeth problems, having that little handheld one is phenomenal. If we want to do, patient wants to do everything they can, because one root canal that's gonna set you back almost $2,000. Whereas you can buy a handheld red light for a couple hundred bucks and then you'll have it forever.

Speaker 1:

I tell my patients all the time too if you ever fall down, get a cutter or a script, do not ice. You do not want to ice, because what are we doing with ice, cutting off circulation? You want red light, you want good circulation, and that light stimulates our mitochondria. It's so important for how the cell works. I absolutely love, love, love light therapy because it's again, it's another modality to increase blood flow and that is the key to life. We know right what happens in cancer we don't get enough oxygen, so we need better blood flow so we can deliver that oxygen to where it needs to go. So, again, this is super exciting.

Speaker 1:

For those of you out there, maybe, who have a tooth pain, what can you do? How can you increase that circulation? Light's an option, using nitric oxide supplementation, as you said. What makes that BH4? Those B vitamins. B vitamins are so crucial to energy production. So a nice, good quality B complex Fantastic for so many reasons. Here's another reason to use that too. It's been great. What other good, good advice Can we take home for us with?

Speaker 2:

nerve. What nerve is doing what it's supposed to do? Sending a signal something's not going to look at. It figured out to the red light, dr Michael Hamlin. I worked with him about 20 years ago. He's up at Harvard and he was working on lasers at that time. Now he's saying that LED red light therapy is pretty close to the lasers that we used to use 20 years ago. They were like 50 grand. Now that now the cut cost to come way down.

Speaker 2:

I love your idea. Yeah, just put that in your mouth if you have an inflammatory problem. Yeah, it's all about blood flow. Bring. It's really so simple, silly when you really think about it. And to the cancer as well. That's why cancers grow, because they lack blood supply. Then you go to anaerobic metabolism. There's no oxygen there and that's the Werberg effect. How do Werberg, beginning in the 19th 30s, got the Nobel Prize? It's sugar, it's fructose, it's not complicated. And that's really the question here. Why is this all being suppressed? It is being suppressed and our, our leaders, need to become come to task on this, making us feel like we're the criminals Because we can't express ourselves. That's Soviet stuff and you. We should have this conversation without any threat, and there should be more conversations like this, and that's like you said. It is a conversation and your audience. You calling us a Jacobi. This is not true. You didn't say it the correct way. Good, I want to hear that.

Speaker 1:

Bring your paper, let's talk about it, let's figure it out and if we never had these conversations, we would still think the world was flat, right. Oh, yes, this is how we evolve science is.

Speaker 1:

We ask the questions and that's important if we we need to try to get at the Bottom of all this chronic disease, right? So we have to ask the questions we have to do. I had a patient the other day. He said he said a brand new patient Sinus issues for six months and he's on his third round of antibiotics. And I said remember that same? What is the definition of insanity? Right, you keep doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result.

Speaker 1:

I said this is that's crazy. Like it's the same antibiotic he's been on three times. So it's so interestingly. So you're killing all this bacteria. I guess what's gonna overgrow fungus? Right? Fungus is very common in the nasal cavity. So I was like maybe we need to look in, look for the fungal component. Like, let me just try some ozone, because ozone can kill bacteria, virus per se and fungus on Context. Why don't we try this? And I'm not saying maybe he will need an Systemic antifungal and not against it, but hey, let's see if we can just oxygenate the environment, create a healthier environment in general, so that the body will clear the infection on its own.

Speaker 1:

Because that's what we're doing with these oxygen therapies. It's not a drug, it's a stimulation to your own body and tea here, and that's why I love that, because it's not. There's no side effects, no contraindications. It's very safe. We're using something that your body makes naturally. People aren't aware, really, that ozone is something you make Internally. People just think of it as the smog and we're killing the, the environment. But just like you said, without a warwick, the whole idea of oxygen.

Speaker 1:

We've been using ozone to treat water since the early 1900s, so it's another thing that nobody. Fortunately, it's been grandfathered. The FDA's grandfathered ozone for dentistry, not the same for medicine, but but anyway, side-tubbed again. We just we need to get that off. So I use a lot of ozone with these pulpitus cases too, because we want oxygen, we want blood flow and ozone's very good Ozone. Actually, when it hits the body it will dissociate. One of the molecules that dissociates into is nitric oxide and that's one of the most profound healing effects of it is creating the blood flow. That's what we need our body to heal and that's how it heals faster. That way.

Speaker 2:

All the same, doesn't matter what air the body, same physiology.

Speaker 2:

We're in exciting time now because we have all these new modalities. And I have to look up dr Hamlin. At Harvard when I was with him he had about 150 papers. He's up to about 500 papers now and I'll bet you he has some work on the dental cavity. I'll bet, yeah, I'll look that up, but for your audience, michael Hamlin he started with lasers, now is into the. Led is a formula. Two joules of Energy per square sonometer is his formula and, yeah, that's what it does. So simple, yeah it's great.

Speaker 1:

Who would? Have known right, you know this is why, why sunlight so important to write all of these. Frequencies are cells actually communicate with photons. So you don't think about it, but you know again. That's why, living up in New England in these dark, cold wintery days not getting enough sunshine, we get more of that seasonal effective disorder. Yes, part of its vitamin D, but again it's. It's also the light we need our light.

Speaker 2:

They want light, and you know that. You said that because it was cold this morning here and so I had to cover my geraniums and I was looking. I mean you're right, they're just like, okay, take that off, we need the sun, yeah, and you can see the flowers start to bloom. How did they do that? It's just a photon light wave, that's. We're the same. We're the same thing, yeah it's absolutely fabulous.

Speaker 1:

You've left us with some great information. You taught me something new. I appreciate that and Really interested. I think I need to stock up on a little more Electric oxide in the office too, because I'm always thinking what can I give the patient to take home? Because when they have that kind of inflammation you can't just come once a week. Right, what it? What can we do on a daily basis to enhance that circulation? So that's what I'm always looking for what are the best things we can use?

Speaker 2:

that. That's my formula. So number one, be vitamin, or number one don't eat sugar. Number that's a whole discussion, but limit the sugar carbohydrates. Number one be vitamins. They have to be in the methylated form, I believe. Nitric oxide supplements, red light and stem cells and you have a perfect, non-surgical approach to disease. And that's in my book, unglued and Right, so I don't all right.

Speaker 1:

So everybody, please check out. And can you find your books, like on Amazon, or where can we find your books?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, sugar crushes on Amazon. They're pushing my audio portion of it. I just noticed that the other day this still being carried at Barnes Noble I. I still like books to hold on to so I can mark them up. And Ungluttle come out, it'll have all the same thing. It'll be on Amazon and Barnes Noble it it'll be. It should be a good book, I think.

Speaker 1:

That's fantastic.

Speaker 2:

If anybody had any questions for you specifically, is there anywhere they can reach out or yeah, I have a couple different websites, one of the ones which is the courses dr Jacobi, small caps, jacobi dot academy, so I teach this whole thing, so that's probably the best way to get a hold of me.

Speaker 1:

Fantastic. I hope you all learned something, just like I did, and now we know how to try to keep all our nerves as healthy as possible. So I appreciate all your time with us today and for all you listeners. We'll catch you on the next episode. Have a great day.

Impact of Sugar on Nerve Pathology
Exploring Dental Hygiene and Oral Health
Exploring Stem Cells in Medicine
Alternative Dental and Health Treatments
Healthy Nerves Book Promotion and Contact