The Crime Fiction Lounge Podcast

Episode #9 – Debbie Young, Author of The Sophie Sayers Village Mysteries

November 25, 2018 Season 1 Episode 9
The Crime Fiction Lounge Podcast
Episode #9 – Debbie Young, Author of The Sophie Sayers Village Mysteries
Chapters
The Crime Fiction Lounge Podcast
Episode #9 – Debbie Young, Author of The Sophie Sayers Village Mysteries
Nov 25, 2018 Season 1 Episode 9
Paul Stretton-Stephens
Today, Paul's guest in The Crime Fiction Lounge is Debbie Young, author of the Sophie Sayers Village Mysteries.
Show Notes Transcript

Today, I have great pleasure in introducing today’s guest to you. We have Debbie Young in the lounge. Debbie is the author of the Sophie Sayers Village Mysteries. Debbie, or as she likes to call herself, ‘The Reluctant Murderer’ is about to launch the fifth title in a planned series of seven, and she’s found her niche here – with funny, warm, feel-good fiction, and gentle mystery attached, and happy endings for everyone except the murder victims. She calls herself “The Reluctant Murderer” as she has to force herself to kill people, and sometimes give the intended victim a reprieve, or get round the need to kill in other ways! 

Debbie’s writing is inspired by life in an English village in the stunning Cotswolds where she lives with her husband and daughter.  

The Sophie Sayers Village Mystery series is Debbie's first series of cozy mystery novels. She has published three themed collections of short stories," Stocking Fillers", "Marry in Haste" and "Quick Change". She publishes a new collection every year. Her stories also feature in many anthologies and she has performed them at many spoken word events including the Cheltenham Literature Festival, the Evesham Festival of Words andStroud Short Stories. 

She is founder and director of the Hawkesbury Upton Literature Festival, a regular guest on BBC Radio Gloucestershire's Book Club and often appears on other regional and community radio stations.  She is Publications Manager and UK Ambassador for the Alliance of Independent Authors and an ambassador for the British children's reading charity Read For Good and for the Type 1diabetes research charity JDRF.



Speaker 1:
0:01
Hello and welcome to the crime fiction lounge. You're listening to Episode 9 author of Sayer's village mysteries.
Speaker 2:
0:10
Ladies and gentlemen let me introduce to you the crime fiction lounge the place for crime fiction lovers. Sit back relax and unwind. You listen to some of your favorite crime fiction and thriller authors. And here's your host Paul Stratton's Stevens.
Speaker 1:
0:35
Today I have great pleasure in introducing our guest Debbie Young author of The Sophie say village mistress Debbie or as she likes to call us of the to murderer is about to launch the first title in a planned series of seven and she's really found here. It's funny warm feel good fiction and a gentle mystery attached and happy endings for everyone except the murder victims. She calls herself the reluctant murderer. She has to force herself to kill people and sometimes gives the intended victim a reprieve or get round the need to kill in other ways. Debbie's writing is inspired by life in an English village in thrilling parts from here in the UK where she lives with her husband and daughter. Sophie says village mystery here is Italy's first series of cozy mystery novels. She has also published three theme collections of short stories stocking fillers.
Speaker 1:
1:26
Marion Hayes and Quint change. He the new collection every year. Stories also feature in many anthologies and she's performed the spoken word events including the literature festival even festival of words and straunge short stories. She is founder and director of the Hort Literature Festival a regular guest on BBC Radio roughish bookclub and often appears on the regional community radio stations. There is also the manager and UK ambassador from the alliance of independent authors and an ambassador for the British children's reading charity read for good and for the Type 1 diabetes research charity jadi or f I hope that you enjoy this fun and informative interview. Here we go.
Speaker 3:
2:17
Hello Debbie. Welcome to the crucifixion. Thank you very much it's a pleasure to be here today. And how was it with you when Anthony last issue.
Speaker 4:
2:25
Well not so Sunday actually in fact I can't see any blue sky or sunshine at all. It's all very overcast looking ever so slightly sinister out there. And with all the storms we had a couple of weeks or so ago the trees NL pretty bereft of leaves. So it's starting to look quite quite nice and sinister and spooky out there ready for me to get down to writing my next Chromebook.
Speaker 3:
2:51
Are you keeping warm.
Speaker 4:
2:53
Yeah I'm very lucky I live in a little cottage which is Victorian Major Victoria if Cotswold stone because I'm in the Cotswolds and the very thick walls so once you get the place warmed up it stays warm and snug and cosy and Royton little study at the top of the house with a desk facing the window looking out over the garden which is which is lovely so I can be very aware of the seasons without actually having to be necessarily out there if it's less hospitable weather. So it's just the seasons by the apple tree outside my window which is now actually got no leaves on at all and yeah so I feel very lucky to work where I do a cottage in the Cotswold sounds idyllic yes.
Speaker 3:
3:42
Can you tell our listeners a little bit about your background.
Speaker 5:
3:45
Yes yes well I've been writing been taking Molly my fiction writing seriously for the last few years. Having spent my previous career in property you'll see it's sort of office job. I worked. I did what I always loved writing always wanted to be a writer and I was tidy and I did the first thing and did an English degree and then wasn't quite sure what to do.
Speaker 4:
4:14
And the first really lovely job I was working as a journalist for trade press magazine called telecommunications which involved writing news stories and editing features and Rush reports of things which was hardly fiction but it was very good discipline for writing because it got me from sort of in my 20s being able to write to length to order to a timetable to a deadline and to be quite ruthless about editing whether it was for length or for a hostile offer clarity or whatever. So that was a good basic training and then I went over to work in public relations I worked in public relations consultancies for about ten years working primarily in the business sector but also a bit of retail a bit of consumer because I was working for consultancies rather than for an individual company as a sort of an employee. It meant that I got to see behind the scenes are lots of different companies and lots of kinds of industries meeting working both at board level you know taking my brief from managing directors marketing directors and so forth but also meeting the people on the shop floor meeting customers and all that sort of thing as well.
Speaker 4:
5:32
And after that I went to work. By that time I'd moved to the to the Cotswolds and got a bit fed up of commuting into Bristol and looking for local job and found a lifestyle number at a local girls boarding school a very lovely boarding school called West Amber which is certain it was listed Helsel Grail's Beach Florida stately home built as the private house of the man who went on to found what's now West Humpert Arboretum the country's foremost Arboretum for a historic scientific interest so I worked there for 13 years doing public relations relief at the school trying to get people to send their children to the school.
Speaker 5:
6:16
But when I hit a significant birthday I although I enjoy what I do enjoy enjoyed working wearable is it spoiled me to work anywhere else because it's such a beautiful setting and the people were lovely really lovely people. Really nice community a bit like a village in its own right. So that was also very interesting because that gave me another example of of a self-contained little world of the kind. I like writing about now. So you reached a significant birthday decided that OK if I was ever going to do what I really want to do when I grew up which was to write books that I better get on with it.
Speaker 6:
6:56
And I had a big sea change. I left that job without another job to go to get some freelance writing gigs.
Speaker 4:
7:06
But in fact as well as doing that I also got a very nice part time job at a children's charity. I was worth just up the road for me which is used to be called Read reader film. When I get to work there it's now called read for good. It's a national charity dedicated to helping children to learn to love reading for pleasure and also sending free books and storytellers to children hospital. So it was it all kind of came together because working there gave me licence in Hawaii to put books first and put my writing first because it was a constant reminder of time. And I was working four hours a day.
Speaker 4:
7:47
Just how great books are if you can. My love of reading and of writing too so I was always doing things like writing their websites and brochures and a lot to think. But then this was around the same time that the Alliance for independent authors was being set up and the whole new idea of self publishing was becoming established and started to become quite mainstream. And I thought this is this is calling me to do to write my books and papers myself and be in control be creative director of my books rather than submitting manuscripts off to publishers and having to wait six months from reply and a likely rejection and all that sort of thing. I had always in my twenties I had actually started writing stories for magazines and had a couple published but I quickly realised that if I wanted to go down that route I would have to commit to being very formulaic and I wasn't prepared to do that.
Speaker 4:
8:48
I wanted to write my own little idiosyncratic stories and call the shots. And so the modern way of self publishing is perfect for me. So I now have I'm effectively my own publisher with my own little hawks free press just imprint my books like publish books or a few other people as well. Local people in the village maybe they started off by writing short stories because that was my comfort zone having been about having been a journalist and PR person writing short pieces the magazines and brochures and things. So short stories my comfort zone. And also while I was doing a full time job I was writing those short stories because it was much easier to find the time to write a short story than to plan and write edit a novel. So I also became the thing that piqued my interest. MIT's YASIM I became aware of flash fiction. I'd never really known about before. Chuck called Callum Kerr who set up national flash fiction day I came across him on Facebook I think what he was doing and so started writing flash fiction. Weirdly it turned out later that his aunt and uncle although he lives down in Southampton I think he's all alone cool live in my village. Known him for years.
Speaker 1:
10:14
So it's an interesting coincidence. Yeah yeah.
Speaker 7:
10:18
These things seem tough and yeah so that so that made me think well he must be alright with weapons.
Speaker 4:
10:29
So I saw struttin flash fiction and I had some flash fiction published in anthologies and online competitions and things. It was a lovely feeling confirmed to me that yes I didn't know what I was doing with writing and that I should carry on and pursue my dream really so I published. Having had my first my first book I published was a collection of flash fiction actually quick change which for 20 very short stories and that went down quite well and I had one of the stories was chosen for a local competition you've come across Straut short stories. It's been cold for a few years. It's a local event held in Stroud Gloucestershire authors.
Speaker 6:
11:14
They submit submit submissions twice a year you send in short story up to fifteen hundred words.
Speaker 4:
11:23
The best had chosen by the judges the authors were botched gun retest or in the public event. It's great so I've chosen for that. I've now established more and I've got such a good relationship with them now that I'm actually one of the judges. One of my stories was chosen by them to be read the while I read it at Cheltenham Festival Literature Festival a couple years ago when they had a special statute stories about so. So all of that was good for my ego my self-confidence and then I wasn't entirely convinced.
Speaker 8:
11:58
The I could write a novel in that it seemed such a big leap in terms of the size of the canvas really. I wanted to write a retreat ethic her as bizarrely as a speaker about self publishing.
Speaker 5:
12:13
But this time it became a blog Malecha Author Advice Centre manager for the alliance of independent authors. So I've made so many friends all over the world so much to go and speak about self publishing with that attitude. This conference in Ithaca. Writers Retreat. And but I was also part of the whole workshops and things I came away from that retreat thinking I can Rocheleau Hill and I will the following the following November. Another Ribo you notice Nashed for listeners who Doebbler about lots of campaign in November where writers around the world pledge to write the first draft of the novel 50000 words for novel in a month.
Speaker 9:
13:01
Sounds like madness but it's jolly good fun and it gets me writing. Even though you obviously had to get very scrappy first draft. Nice to sing. Works best if you planned it beforehand as well. So you know what you doing. But it's still good fun to have a try to feel part of this community of people scribbling all over the world. So.
Speaker 10:
13:19
So I wrote my slightly predictably I suppose my novel was going to be about an aspiring writer who goes to a retreat. Ross on Ithaca and there's a murder somebody is murdered because I love reasons I chose. Crime is a cozy crime is that I love all the old classics or the gold našich. Keith Christie Dorothy L. is all that sort of thing. Line of Sherlock Holmes and things like that watch list. I like that. I like the intellectual puzzle of a mystery story but not necessarily.
Speaker 5:
13:59
Well I don't like violence Gore and all that sort of thing. So I've kind of grown into this role. I tell myself the reluctant murderer because I like writing murder stories but murdering people. So sometimes like I let them off the hook. So I decide to write another Ribot wrote it and then it's sort of a frenzy and at the end of it I thought no no no this hasn't got enough depth to it really nice backstory. The heroine Sophie needed help and it soft like an astonishing story beforehand. And I started plotting that out. No no no no we need another one before that. So long story short that is not going to be the sixth book series. I'm just about to publish the fifth.
Speaker 7:
14:51
So you go yeah yeah I have.
Speaker 10:
14:55
So now the whole series starts it's going to run the course of this year only that one book is set in Ithaca and that's going to be called murder your darlings. And the the other books are all set in this little village called Wendell Berry borrow small Cotswold village inspired by a small Cotswold community.
Speaker 5:
15:16
I've lived in since 1991. I've been involved in just about every committee an event that takes part in this very very busy village. So I've got so that really has kept it as kind of research in that I know. I know what it's like to live in a village. I know what it's like to be part of a community. I've known so many different kinds of characters that there is an endless number of ideas lurking there that would fuel a series like this. But I wanted to run to have a serious oestrus series partly for commercial reasons because it's easier to sell a serious than to sell lots of standalone books but also because it would be fun because having created this very charming world in the first book I wanted to keep Rosselli there as I as readers say they want to as well.
Speaker 5:
16:02
And so I'm but what I'm also trying to do is to build up an arc of character development for Sophie and that the love and trust in the. Because this romance and there is also a gentler romance for a lot of subplots and little sort of other developments. So Sophie moves to the village aged 25 having been working abroad teaching English abroad leaving behind a unsatisfactory relationship but she's been rather taken advantage SCIAF moves into the village because she inherits her aunt's cottage. Harold is a travel and travel writer to the cottage and says Right this is the side she's going to start again and pursue her own dream of becoming a writer. She needs to find a job to pay her bills and to be in trouble. She's able to live rent free luxuries that she's welcomed this community because she's never lived in this kind of community before she's quite thrown by she's also has a lot to learn a lot of comedy have lots of jokes and lots of one liners lots it's a funny set ups.
Speaker 10:
17:10
And so she goes to work gets a job in the local bookshop which is lucky enough to have its own bookshop which it turns out later is funded by lots of other things as well we discover not just by selling books because it would be hard to sustain a bookshop in a village just from book sales. But there's also funded things going on as well. It's a bit of intrigue there as well. So she goes that falls in love with a very lofty bookseller. They become a bit of a double act. And so the series is going to run the Southern books in the course of the village from one summer to the next. All sorts of Bertus cheeks arising in village situations so in the first world somebody is found dead on a on a colorful float to the village show the last book in the series somebody is found dead in the school lost property coppers and all sorts of funny games in between.
Speaker 9:
18:08
So first book is called Springtime for murder comes out very unseasonal.
Speaker 11:
18:14
On the 15th of November I was going to ask you about how I started off but I started I was writing very very appropriately in the season but I sort of all sort of slipped a little bit.
Speaker 5:
18:27
So I think like I published Myrta by the book in April which is one that goes up to Valentine's Day and say the springtime for murder is set in the run up to Easter and then lost and failed the final. It's got to get started the school holidays.
Speaker 12:
18:48
So.
Speaker 9:
18:49
But my my theory is also that people will feel a marked inputs few people will be able to find a seasonal story in that set at any time of the year to suit them so murdering the mate will trickle murder. The second one is set between Halloween and Guy Fawkes conflict between hallooing and Guy Fawkes in the village. The vicar wants to ban Halloween and the villagers don't. The murderer of the major is Getaround the school of the village nativity play which Sophie writes for the school children on the drama society stay together. It all goes horribly wrong.
Speaker 11:
19:28
From the very first as you've seen you've read the stories the first chapters of it kicks off with lot of tip like going off script.
Speaker 13:
19:41
So what was the problem with that. Because my daughter grew grew up here she's been through the village school and has been in the umpteenth 50 place. And so I know I know what all these things like first hand so it's very very easy for me to come to those up. It's great fun as well. So so I think it gives my books a authenticity because I've lived through a lot of that. We haven't any murders yet. If we do I'll probably be the bomb suspect but we've lots of things lots of little details drawn from life although obviously that the characters are completely fictitious and the situations are completely fictitious with the best murder and show all about the colorful and the village the village the village show committee for 13 years. So yeah. HARRY Well yeah yeah.
Speaker 3:
20:38
And I'm sorry for our listeners. I mean I have read the first chapters of the book. You mention the reverend Kneip in the Halloween a real character and you can picture him in the village setting completely. So it's a very British thing. But I'm sure it will appeal to our other listeners around the world. Other English speakers as well. The other thing you've mentioned is one of the stories I think it was the hollow of a Guy Fawkes one was that Harry was a couple of the American tourists were driving around and saw all these young kids with all these bodies carrying them around in one room. What was going on. You know get out of here.
Speaker 13:
21:21
Yeah yeah well it's I think got the best both left right because I've never to live anywhere else. I love living where I live now. I love that part of this community. But because I'm still an income I've only been here in Atlanta 30 years. I grew up in suburbia so I can also see it from the outside just point of view. So I've got that I've got the perspective and from the from general Rita's point of view as well as from Cotswold residents. If you have fun with that as well. The point in the book I've just written I think well somebody says well that's a bit strange even for one to bury borrow and then later on somebody says well it is when the report is all about it's all affectionate. You know this kind of community where things are slightly ball is when things happen around me all the time what they are but because nobody would believe it.
Speaker 3:
22:19
You could make it stranger than fiction and money. Yeah yeah. And that will be more about spring fun from murder.
Speaker 14:
22:26
Yes yes. Now this one it was inspired actually by the village churchyard. And I I wanted to have I just for some reason I don't know why. Oh well I think it was trying to think of the east to the east to sort of spring.
Speaker 6:
22:46
Same story be. I thought well I've got to have an Easter Bunny in there and so the book opens with the the two children who have been in previous books Thomas and his sister Sener. They come charging into the bookshop saying help help. We found that the Easter Bunny dead in the Turgeon a grave in the churchyard because it's really the Easter Bunny somebody in a fur coat with bunny ears on and that is the old lady left for dead. And so the story is about how she got there boy sort of who did it to her.
Speaker 5:
23:26
She actually spoil the plot. But there's also as happens often in these in my stories everybody. Sophie and sometimes Hector think everything's fine. They just take everything as normal and as unsuspicious but Sophie has a sort of a bit of a loose for the murder unfit unfit suspicious circumstances. And but to start with she's not competent enough to stand up to the other villages. So part of the whole story arc of all of the books is that she becomes more confident and more assertive because she's quite bowed down at the start of the books but so.
Speaker 9:
24:07
But in springtime for murder she really develops in that way and that she starts off taking the cheapies which is word for and sort about him as being the superior professional and accepting his opinion and suppressing their instincts.
Speaker 6:
24:23
But by the end of it she she actually solves the mystery at the end.
Speaker 5:
24:29
The she knows that there's something going on and she is wary of another murder happening again which it does. There's a murder later on that it sort of builds up to sell it to you. Who or how Ahwoi that is. It's there's lots of red herrings so people can guess who is going to be and hopefully be surprised both by who is murdered and who the murderer is. I love throwing in loads of red herrings and evil. I've just been doing the final final edit and check before it gets uploaded to KDP. A lot is not just another red herring it now. You can't have too many red herrings. So yeah. So it's following the story of. Well this is all the in the run up to Easter and. So there's lots of sort of spring settings and things and it also allow Sophie. Also allows me to introduce new characters what new character is actually the main one is very charming that mischievous old lady who actually had 10 children but has alienated most of them.
Speaker 5:
25:47
It's about a lot of it is about family relationships. She's had three husbands three different husbands. It's about love and loss and friendship and family and relationships. There's also a strong strand in there about her professional vocation as well so there's lots of it sounds like there's lots of sort of deep themes in there but actually they're all light Rietz they're all very they're all laugh out loud funny although this is the fifth one in the series it becomes a little bit more thoughtful and a little bit darker. Towards the end not still not all. It's still uplifting overall but there's a whole poignancy to it and the sort of reflecting really how Sophie is growing up and becoming more mature and more self-possessed and composed herself as well. And that will continue to the end of the series so yeah it will have been a real sort of trading in the village that I'm going to stop at 7. Well actually I'm not concerned that it's going to be a complete sets of seven got one bonus going right after that which is set in Inverness when Sophie takes her parents to to see takes Hector to her parents who live in Inverness.
Speaker 5:
27:03
A couple of ideas spin offs as well. So some backstory stories about some of her neighbours but in the meantime I'm starting the second series of books I want to have. I see these these series as sort of series of plates spinning or I want to have several series on the go. And so the new series that I've learned about 20000 words into the first book the new series is called staffroom Broyd. Is the series day and so bright is a girls boarding school possibly no surprise there. Yeah so I've got another another world I'm creating there it's inspired by lust but not based on it because this school is complete different principles.
Speaker 8:
27:49
It's quite idiosyncratic and it's about a woman who goes to work there again leaving behind a failed relationship but it's completely different story and in completely different setting.
Speaker 10:
28:05
Although although was about 10000 words into it I thought that actually I'm going to have a little bit of crossover here so I've just written the scene where she and the teacher cycle down to Edinburgh to visit the bookshop and meet Sophia Alexa. So I'm happy lots of fun. This is also going to be a sort of mystery.
Speaker 8:
28:24
All of the teachers at school have different secrets to hide. It's about Jebba uncovering the secrets and finding out what is going on.
Speaker 11:
28:35
So again it's really good. You know I'm having complete self-indulgence really. And why not. Well they say write the book that you want to read loves Julia. You know that's what that's what we do isn't it. Because if if we didn't read them then we couldn't expect he will still read them.
Speaker 3:
28:51
No. Very true. Very true. Well you wrote Korphe for us for our listeners who know the Cotswolds and they don't know the scenery and the setting everything. Could you describe when will be about.
Speaker 14:
29:03
BB Yes yeah. Now the Cotswolds in the West traceroute West of England. It's the Cotswold way. It's a path that runs from Bath to Cheltenham and there's a long long stretch of hills that gently rolling hills.
Speaker 8:
29:24
It's very green lot of farming country relatively sparsely populated outside of the big cities like Boston Cheltenham renowned for sheep farming a lot of arable farming green rolling hills peaceful soft honey coloured stones. The houses built the old houses built out of my house is a Victorian Cotswold stone cottage. It's a. Mostly it spans close sheer will share a little bit of books that share a little bit of North Somerset. It's a very pleasant area. Some of it's affluent some of it's quite posh but there's also a lot of less affluent areas and some villages where there's no employment. So it's a real mixed community. There are some very very posh Barrow is a mixed village like Hawkesbury Hopton where I live. So there are a few people who are very well off the old lady in Springtown murder lives in the house but there are also people who are very working class. There's everything in between. So it's a nice mixed open village. Some of the villages in the Cotswolds it's very difficult to move there be accepted but a place like where I live in the model Ribeira are very accepting of commerce not least because they need new people in to help to afford the houses. Some houses are too expensive for locals to buy but they will help build local business and local bringing local people you know village is thriving.
Speaker 9:
31:10
NEARY Yeah yeah that's right. Everybody knew a lot of the villages including Hawkes brain including one Ribeira of new developments around the Repin developments that the old sort of market towns and the little villages and every village his dream is to have enough children coming in to sustain the village school and enough people doing a bit of shopping locally to sustain the village shop and Post Office and village pulp. So all of those places are at the heart of the community and they keep the village vibrant and one of the reasons that I'm writing the reason I'm writing these books really is to celebrate that kind of community and make people realise actually places like this do still exist. I've had some people say to me Oh well it's you know it's a bit nostalgic isn't it. No I live somewhere like this. It's real.
Speaker 9:
32:01
Yeah so. So I'm hoping that by raising your word encourage people to move out and try some of these places themselves because they're wonderful places to live want places to raise children want places to grow old because everybody looks out for you. And so it's those little black books though I have a lot of fun with them. There are serious social and community messages and I'm trying to make people send up messages to help people be more tolerant of each other more tolerance of difference which they're very good at being in my village and in what Kypri borrow my fictitious village people are tolerant and kind unskillful and Poteat put themselves in other people's shoes. I think those are those are absolutely messages for the moment for the present day in the times that we live in now and I hope that also timeless.
Speaker 15:
32:52
What made you decide on the issues you tackle within your book.
Speaker 8:
32:58
Well the having having decided on the season or the having the year span for these books the seasons each one was it was obviously the starting point. So I picked up my favorite sort of focal point of interest reach of those and the village show is is one of the great things that we do in this village. And that was the obvious starting point. The best merger in show very very fond of that tradition for the new series for the staff droits looking instead what started me off.
Speaker 9:
33:36
That is to see to look at the issues that people will be running away from when they go to work in a in a sort of enclosed community like that in a boarding school. But when I was 14 I got to school in Germany to an international school for four years under the but one of the teachers said to me there. Because there are people who come to teach them all over the world. He would say oh well we're all running away from something. And he he was this is in the 70s and this particular teacher was gay and he didn't want anybody to know where he left home. And so he's running away to be two different countries to be what he wanted to be to be himself away from home. And I thought Well that is a good starting point. So I've got all these people running away from dark secrets in the sprites and seeing how they all come together and how they how they all survive together really. But again it will be a lot of fun a lot of comedy and happy endings all round for everyone who gets everyone except the person who gets bumped off.
Speaker 3:
34:43
So you really give the enemy everything. Yeah you have everything planned that well anagrams yeah I'm going to.
Speaker 9:
34:51
I've got probably ideas for books keep me going for the next couple of years at least and by the time I get to the end of that list probably have a lot less to keep me going beyond that so pledged to keep me busy as ever for our listeners for a recap on the book you have got available.
Speaker 3:
35:09
Yeah Spruit with a new one called the bird vine for murder and you wonder who comes out on the 15th of November.
Speaker 8:
35:17
Yes it's up for preorder on Amazon as an e-book on the paperback should be at about the same time so you can place an order for that. Now that all four books in the series are there at the moment the books are available exclusively for Kindle. But the paperback she could order anywhere. You got the ISP and you can go into a bookshop you can look at Amazon to get the ISBN. But if you just if you just go into Amazon and look up Davion you'll find that they've got them listed in the series the first five books. They're also people who find them on my website which is W WW dot author Debbie Cole. If people would like to go there they can read the first chapter of the first four books on their course closer look inside all of us and if you want to bet that some years ago it was.
Speaker 8:
36:15
Yes. And show up for the summer Leblon Liberty trick trickle murder between Halloween and Guy Fawkes. Number three murder in the manger in the run up to Christmas in fact that starts the day after the last one finishes that starts on the 6th of November. So that also includes what hopes quite a moving scene around Remembrance Day as well the service in the school which is again inspired by what we have here. So take Alberta to merge with the. Number three they're both good seasonal rates that they'll then know before. Murder by the book starts at the beginning of January and leads up to Valentine's Day although there is at the very beginning you know there is a murder somebody somebody falls down a well to their death. In the chapter of murder by the book then the rest of that book is leading up to finding out who who's down the well how they got their boy and then sprint for murder is number five will be out in November. Murder your darlings. I'm hoping we'll be out next spring.
Speaker 9:
37:29
Murder lost and found property in the autumn so hopefully this time next year this will be complete. For somebody the other day for a treaty the other day they sat up they like to read to read the Levant. They read each book season every year.
Speaker 11:
37:48
I it was lovely complement Yeah yeah I was very touched yes.
Speaker 3:
37:53
And I'd like to hear of Debbie. We come to the part of the interview where Mike was rapid fire questions and answers. Yep. OK. So are you ready. OK. So if you could chat with any crime fiction author dead or alive who would it be and why.
Speaker 8:
38:09
I think Dorothy L. Sayers because they fell in love with Lord Piech would see her creation. When I was about 14 she is still my favorite crime writer. She is also very interesting and rebellious lady who lived her life. She will to do it but she dictated it. I think she would be fascinated to talk to.
Speaker 1:
38:34
They all say is an extreme. Can you name it all.
Speaker 9:
38:37
From you can't without them more I think it is very boring but I think it would just have to be worked out pretty low tech also. I do all my writing in word. I just find it easy and simple as simple to use as an old toilet bright idea with added convenience. It's. It's the breadstick. I've tried other I've tried Scrivner I've tried other fancy apps. Actually that's what is what helped me get the books out there.
Speaker 1:
39:10
OK. And can you tell us something unique and interesting about you. Not many people meaner.
Speaker 14:
39:16
Yes. I like this.
Speaker 8:
39:19
I've got to live in California for a year. Not many eight year olds. It's true that I had a road trip from Philadelphia to California and I know what Jack Kerouac style it was in the back of the car with my dad my big brother and sister. And I think that must've been a big influence on me to spend 10 days driving across America opening while considering till that lifted little suburban city cop in the same place that my mom and dad grew up to the same school that my dad went to when he was a boy he was little. But at the same second school my mom went to to go and have my eyes those wide world out there. That was incredible.
Speaker 11:
40:03
Brave enough to do it.
Speaker 1:
40:06
Yeah. Oh good. What's a typical day like for you in your writing life.
Speaker 14:
40:11
It's quite rigid all day very disciplined.
Speaker 8:
40:15
I during term time at least I've got a 15 year old daughter. Once I pack her off to school she goes out the door. Ten to eight. Then I sit down and start writing. I try to write for two hours every morning because that's my freshest and I can be taken unawares by my subconscious still this morning to my great surprise I felt myself writing the first chapter of Bird a lost and found which hadn't been lost. List of things to do at all but I just like to listen too much to my unconscious and to write whatever it's telling me to do that. And then I do. After that I have coffee at about 11 and then do sort of bed marketing bit of work. I do lots of independent authors and potter about in the afternoons or do things like website updates. I do a bit of writing still for a couple of local magazines so it's all sort of the writer's housekeeping stuff really. I try and stop time. And spend the evening reading or doing other pleasant things I don't much much telly but I believe all writers ought to retrace Insley and I do anything.
Speaker 1:
41:36
What would it be.
Speaker 8:
41:38
Believe in yourself and right. Don't listen to what anyone else tells you about not being able to write or not being a potential living. If it's in your heart to write books get on and write and write what you want to write and what's your favorite book and why. My favorite book is one that I first read when I was about 6 which is Alice Through The Looking Glass. I love both Alison much love on the street laughs. And again I think I love it is well. I've loved MIEJSCE all through the years when I was little I loved it. It's a Sally's story as I was older and became more aware of all the sort of all different cultural references and the jokes things in there. I left all of that and realized how clever writing could be. I put lots of sort of popular culture references in and literary references in my book. Now I have thought is sort of like a game really in my books now and ultimately as the mother of growing daughter I love the poignancy of it being a hymn to children who growing up those very moving Palin at the start of Alice's looking glass. That is such a symbol but it still I still find it very moving. So lots of levels and it never gets old.
Speaker 1:
43:02
Gary what's your favorite movie about me.
Speaker 8:
43:06
Cabaret because it is. I think it's artistically perfect. It works on so many levels. The casting is sublime. It's the role. Liza Minnelli was bored bored play the music is wonderful. It manages to make you smile and send shivers down your spine and puts the fear got into you as well. All within the space for an hour and a half the filming is beautiful the way it conjures up the not pre-war Nazi Germany and how evil overcomes good is is chilling. A good lesson that we should still be learning from. And I think it's I think it's a masterpiece.
Speaker 1:
43:56
Gary what's your favorite piece of musicals.
Speaker 8:
44:01
The piece of me that I come back to Time and again. It's I think Paul Simon the boy the bubble which is like this these are the days of marital Monda and it's lawful so his voice. I find it very soothing very peaceful and very clear. But I love the sense of wonder in the soul. I always want to sustain the sense of wonder at the world.
Speaker 1:
44:32
Well there were about that time. I really appreciate you sharing your time with us on the crime fiction today. Thank you for being with us.
Speaker 8:
44:40
It's been a pleasure. So a starfish talk by itself is so it's been lovely talking to you. And I've been enjoying listening to some of the other interviews that you've done as well.
Speaker 3:
44:52
So it's quite ProCol series a day for so much but still very old feel welcome for our listeners out there Debbie's details which you mentioned earlier but you'll see them on our Web site with complete details of all of the books as well. You can come to the crime fiction lounge dot club that's the crime fiction lounge club. I want to thank you for listening and you know our next guest will be thriller author Rob Sinclair.
Speaker 1:
45:17
Rob is the author of The James Riker and the anime series put a reminder in your diary for that interview. Now before I go I wanted to let you know that with the Christmas holiday is upon us we do have a shot at the crime fiction lounge where we curated a range of gifts that are ideal for the crime fiction mystery thriller fan art jewelry technology with readers. The latest technology any readers who pervert headphones so you can listen to your audiobooks is murder mystery dinner party games and sign memorabilia to name just a few items you can find the shop at W W. Crime fiction lambed top club forward slash shop. I hope you find something for the crime fiction fan in your life. So that's it for me. So until next time. Have a good week.
Speaker 2:
46:07
If you've enjoyed this episode Why not subscribe now leave a review and share with your friends.
Speaker 16:
46:14
And don't forget to tune in for the next thrilling episode. Until then stay safe.
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