Successful Life Podcast

Navigating Business Growth and Adversity: Ian Yearsley's Success Story

August 25, 2023 Corey Berrier/ Ian Yearsley
Successful Life Podcast
Navigating Business Growth and Adversity: Ian Yearsley's Success Story
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Show Notes Transcript

Dive into the remarkable journey of business growth and resilience through the eyes of Ian Yearsley. Join Ian and Corey Berrier as they candidly discuss the intricate balance between surging ahead in business and weathering adversities. Gain insights into Ian's path to success, his strategic approach to hiring, and the pivotal role of a growth mindset. Discover how Ian navigates challenges, nurtures a thriving work culture, and fosters a sense of extreme ownership to drive continuous improvement.

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https://ianyearsley.com

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Corey Berrier:

Welcome to the Successful Life Podcast. I'm your host, Corey Berrier. And today, folks, we got Ian, I'm gonna mess the name

Ian Yearsley:

up. Or Ian. Yearsley. Yep. Yep.

Corey Berrier:

Yearsley. I was close. I mess up somebody s normally. So

Ian Yearsley:

what's up, Ian? Hey, not too much. Happy to be here. I'm happy for you to be here. So,

Corey Berrier:

let's stop you, you've gone through you've gone through some bumps in your business to

say

Ian Yearsley:

the least. Yeah, for sure. It's been a ride the last 10 months or so. Well and heck, even the last five years. So, we've definitely been through it, that's for sure. So

Corey Berrier:

you, but before we get rolling, you own a company in North Dakota, did I say that right? Is it north or south? Is that right? North, yep. North Dakota. What's the name of the

Ian Yearsley:

company? Air pro heating and cooling.

Corey Berrier:

Alright. And so, so you just do HVAC

Ian Yearsley:

obviously? Yep. Yep. Okay. Just heating and air on the residential side mostly we're focused on residential service and replacement.

Corey Berrier:

But you have experience in commercial too,

Ian Yearsley:

I think. Right? We do, most of my guys are actually from the commercial side of things before they came to work for us. So, we definitely touch on that stuff a little bit. The light commercial we'll even touch a little industrial occasionally.

Corey Berrier:

Sure. Well, so what

Ian Yearsley:

got you into this business? Well, originally I was a union man, so I did about three and a half years as an apprentice. And eventually that work ran out. So I was on the unemployment list for about nine, 10 months until the savings kind of ran out, the unemployment ran out and me and the business partner Nick we're both kind of in that same boat. And we said, well, what the heck? We don't got much to lose. You got about 500 bucks to our name. So we Jumped in the personal truck, my little 1500 and loaded up the tools that we had and away we went.

Corey Berrier:

So, alright. What hap so what Ha, so what happened next?

Ian Yearsley:

Yeah. Yeah, so we spent the the next two years we started this late or about middle 2018. We started out in the oil field. We were doing a lot of new construction subbing out for another company and then Covid came along and all the buildings stopped basically overnight. And so that was really the first, Kind of rough patch being an entrepreneur, being an owner, really. Where we went from, a hundred miles an hour. They're building like crazy up there in the oil patch, and then they just turned it off. It was like turning off the faucet, right? So, we had to figure it out pretty quick there. Luckily we do live in North Dakota, where population's a little more sparse and The restrictions weren't nearly as, as restrictive as most places. And so, it was only about three, four months before they turned it all right back on and back to the building. So, we were lucky, to have that to our advantage. And so, we continued on to that new construction. But locally we brought it home outta the oil field. We started out here in Bismarck building a company. And so, we started out with one of the largest home builders, if not the largest home builder in town. And we were doing, 70, 70 homes a year, which is a lot for the small company that we were. So, that was kind of our bread and butter. And so, we did that for, another basically two years up until now. So,

Corey Berrier:

and what made you what made you shift from that?

Ian Yearsley:

Well, the biggest Kinda mind opening thing was twofold. So I've been preparing to switch from that new construction to that service and replacement. I got with a, with an organization, a training organ organization that had taught me a lot about what is actually profitable in the HVAC business. And so, when you go to the bank to try to sell your HVAC company or if you're trying to retire and sell it or to private equity or which, whichever you choose, right? New construction, it doesn't hold any water. It really doesn't mean anything to them. If you haven't built a membership base, if you haven't built a customer list that revenue to them and the new construction side, it means nothing because, well, you, I learned that lesson pretty quick. It can get pulled out right from underneath you. Right? So, the switch was kind of, kind of transitional. I had touched base with this training organization before and right before kind of the all the bad stuff started happening. The second time around. I had prepared for that and started making the systems and getting ServiceTitan integrated and really drilling down on what the numbers were on my market to make sure that we could support switching over to that service and replacement. And so, once we started in on that that was right around the time when that September October of last year hit and well, the. The faucet got turned off again on home building. So that's kind of what led us up to that surface and replacement was we knew we were gonna have to do more repair and more replacement didn't get away from that new construction again.

Corey Berrier:

So pain, basically, like you, you had to get, you had two big lessons in there, it

Ian Yearsley:

seems like. Yep. And I learned quick. So after about the second time having that happen, it was like, all right, time to pivot. Right.

Corey Berrier:

So did you lose a bunch of money in that

Ian Yearsley:

process? I did. We probably lost upper six figures just in invoices that were outstanding and couldn't get paid out to us. And then of course the lost revenue along the way since we had all our eggs in that, that one basket and you're doing$2 million worth of revenue just in home building, 2.2 million or slightly above that, right? You turn off that revenue all the way. So lost opportunity cost and lost revenue trying to collect those checks from those individuals that we were working with. Yeah. You don't

Corey Berrier:

run into that with what you're doing now'cause you get paid up front, but basically

Ian Yearsley:

Right, right. Yeah.

Corey Berrier:

Yeah, dude, I mean, you look at like, 2008. Obviously a lot of people lost a ton of money. Yeah. And so you kind of experienced a mini version of that, or your own version of that, so to speak?

Ian Yearsley:

Yes. Well, 2008 I was old enough to to be around for that, and my family experienced that and we had to move around because of it. So that wasn't the first time that that I'd been through a crisis similar to that. So I'm used to the dealing with that from a young age, I guess. And so that probably prepared me a little bit actually to be able to. To handle that kind of loss two times in a row. So do you

Corey Berrier:

ever this is probably gonna be a hard question, but do you ever, have a, do you ever sit and think like shit, when's that gonna happen again?

Ian Yearsley:

All the time. I bet all the time. It's always especially when you're just coming out of it. We just started coming outta that as this busy season has kicked in. Whatever things are kind of precarious. Things are on sand, right? So the thought is always, well, well, what the heck? I've almost gotten stuck in that cycle of that mindset. And I've always been a growth mindset type of person. Take the risk keep things going. But I've found myself and caught myself pulling back, right? And money, like speed. But Trying to be more reserved with it. That's not necessarily a bad thing, but it also can work against you, right? And so it creates a lot of anxiety where you're like, well, I don't know if I'm gonna have that, that money to pay payroll next week or that bill or that supply or whatever it may be. And so you kind of hold onto a lot more of that cash. And it just, once you get stuck in that loop, it is hard to really get back out of again and get back into that growth mindset again. It's a

Corey Berrier:

fine, it is a super fine line. I mean, it's a really fine line when you're looking at, well I need to hang, like, kinda like you just said, I need to hang on to whatever I've got.'cause I'm not sure when the next thing's gonna come in. And there's, in my opinion, in my experience, when that happens, it's almost like, I'll give you the analogy with your hands closed, you can't. Expect for somebody to give you something if your hand's closed. Right. It's kind of like that. Right? Right.

Ian Yearsley:

It's for sure. Yeah. It's it definitely has been that experience. Right. So, it's just trying to get back outta that and change that mindset has been my struggle over, over these last, 10, 10 months or so. It's Now we are on that better footing. We are kind of, in fact, we're expanding. We're on the opposite end of the spectrum now. Before it was famine and now it's feast where we were bidding like crazy. We were, looking for work every single place that we could. We weren't gonna quit until we got work lined up again. And so while we were bidding during all that time well, they all came back and awarded to solve it. And so now on the other side of the problem, which is now, I don't have enough staff in order to get the job done as fast as I would like, and now it's summer, it's a little harder to get people to come to work for you or to leave their companies during summer. They've got work, it follows that. That cycle, that that shoulder season, the on season, off season. And so, but I would rather be drinking from the fire hose than wondering where the water's coming gonna be coming from. So it's definitely better to be in that position, versus, versus the one we were in before.

Corey Berrier:

Yeah, that makes sense. So, let's talk about for a second. How you mentioned hiring. We didn't say hiring, but you said, you're looking for guys, how what is your, what is your thought process on that? How do you bring people on? How do you hire and fire people? Or is there a certain. A way you do that? Is it?

Ian Yearsley:

There is, we do have a written process, a set of 10 questions that we rate from one to 10 that gives us kind of insight into how that person is going to operate within our company. And so, obviously having a process that you can follow means that you can then delegate that process later down the road. But it also kind of ensures that we're that we're hiring the right mindset from the start because we can teach anybody pretty much anything. What we want is the right attitude, and obviously we want people to show up on time and are willing to learn. And so, between that and having a set of values and a set of, standard questions we make sure that we're hiring the right people and we don't always get it right. I think the statistic is that like for every four hires you get one good one. But I've learned over the years from various places, masterminds, people that I look up to is that you Hire slow fire fast. So you can find out in about 90 days what type of person you've got in front of you. It's pretty easy to tell and that's where a lot of business owners tend to get it wrong, is they wanna hold onto somebody a little too long or they're feeling kind of desperate. They need that help, right? And I've been there where you know, you gotta get rid of that person'cause it's toxic and you gotta hold onto'em because you got the work. Well, a lot of the times what you find is. It's a lot easier to just fire that person, get rid of the toxicity either. I mean, you might have to go back to work for yourself or you might have to have your team take over some of that work if you have one. But at the end of the day, you usually find out that it's for the best to really get that person on their way. Unfortunately. Hey, is

Corey Berrier:

it, can you think of a time when maybe you have held on and when you have held on somebody too long? And my question really is, How, if you can think of one of those times, how long did you hang on to'em, which I guess a day longer than you needed to is too long, but when, there's usually a person that you can think of, and I don't need their name, but just the person that I. You're like, I think they're gonna work out. I, and you kind of force it, you push the envelope and you realize, damn, dude, if I'd have pulled this bandaid off 4, 5, 6 months ago, a year ago, what could it have done based on what it's doing for you now? Does that make

Ian Yearsley:

sense? Absolutely. Absolutely. And I can think of two. I had one recently and it was during that, that hard financial, period. And I had one before that. And he was a younger kid. We kept him around just a little too long and we let him kind of, kind of keep on kicking the can down the road, right? Not showing up on time, not paying attention, being argumentative with the journeymen not willing to learn, thinking that he kind of had it all figured out. And the kids is, 19, 20 years old. At the end of the day He just doesn't really have the knowledge that a lot of us have. And I'm not saying that I know everything because my job as an entrepreneur is to hire people that know more than me. However, that said, sometimes you just gotta have that attitude of, well, I'm willing to learn anything and everything, and he just really didn't fit into that culture of the. Get it done. Use your resources be willing and open to learn. We do what we say we're gonna do when we say we're gonna do it. So very quickly we got him out the door and it was the same thing with the more recent one. The first one took right around. About a year that I held onto him too long. And we were kind of in that beginning stage of the company when we brought it back to Bismarck. So it was a little harder to let that guy go. But I had learned my lesson by the time I got to the second one. Right. And he made it three, about three months, about that 90 day mark before it was it was over, it was time to go. So he moved on and. I don't know what he does now, but I certainly hope that he's doing, a lot better now and has kind of, kind of learned. Grow up just a little bit, right?

Corey Berrier:

Sure. So, do you hire a lot of young people? Because I imagine, I wouldn't say every young person's gonna be this way, but Dang. I mean, the way people are, the way people come up now is very different. And I don't know how old you, I can't really tell, but like I'm in my mid forties, like I came up very different than how people come up

Ian Yearsley:

today. Yeah. Yeah. So I'm 29 so I'm right out, right outside of that generation that I like to say grew up with the phones, right? Right. That was kind of the changing time where you have access to a lot of information. You have you have that device in your hand all day long. I didn't have that growing up. And so, I know a lot of people, they kind of, They kind of hate on that millennial generation, that newer generation, the Gen Z generation. But right now, that's what you have to work with, right? But there's plenty of good ones out there. And so where those companies are missing out is that these kids know a lot more about tech. And other things like that and how to access that information, then we really do. So they're ahead of the curve. They're ahead of the curve on things like social media, which is a big, integral part of building a business today. And once you find the ones that are willing to learn they learn quick. And so I always say that. Be willing to hire those millennials.'cause I hear it in the trades all the time. Well, these millennials, they don't wanna work anymore. They don't want to they don't want to, work hard. They don't wanna get dirty. There's plenty of them that do. The problem is that a lot of companies don't provide the culture to be able to hire the right people. People don't wanna stick around for a boss who's, excuse my language, an asshole. Yeah, they don't wanna work for those people and they know they don't have to post the virus. Right? Right. They know that they are just as quickly replaceable as the next guy. And so you have to build that culture in your company from the very start. People want benefits. They want a good place to work, they want to be appreciated. It's a lot more than just money.'cause I see that all the time is, well, I'm paying 26 bucks an hour. Why does no one wanna come to work for me? Well, it's probably because you're an asshole. Sorry to tell you. Yeah.

Corey Berrier:

You're right, dude. Look, people don't really, people don't leave jobs. They leave bosses. People will work for less money for a guy they like and they will for more money. For a guy that's an asshole, that's just, I mean, absolutely. It is what it is. And if you're having trouble, your situation's a bit different'cause you're having trouble'cause you're growing fast. But if you're having trouble just keeping people and you're not growing fast, then unfortunately you gotta look at what you're doing. As the owner, you gotta look at yourself. Yeah. Yeah. You can't point the finger at anybody else. You know what I mean? You

Ian Yearsley:

just can't. Extreme ownership. That's right. It's something that is very handy in this business is the end of the day. It's Everything is your fault, even when it's not your fault, and usually there's a way to fix it coming from your end before we go and try to point fingers or place the blame somewhere else, whether it's in your processes or in your culture, or in your personal life, whatever it may be extreme ownership will serve you very well.

Corey Berrier:

Yes. I totally agree. So let's talk about we kinda hit on this a little bit, and I think you were alluding to the, core values. What do you think about, it says about an owner that. Maybe they got their core values on the wall, which look great. But in one of the core values is, well let's just take one of yours. We do what we say we're gonna do when we say we're gonna do it, and everybody's supposed to be there at 7:00 AM including the boss.'cause he is done this for years. And then all of a, he starts slacking off. He gets a guy, a service manager, he's taking a lot of slack off, and so he starts coming in at, eight 30. Now I'm not saying that's a wrong thing. But I do think that if your core values, for example, say everybody's supposed to be here at 7:00 AM your ass needs to be there at 7:00 AM Because what happens is people see you strolling in, even though you're the boss. And even though you own the place, it doesn't matter. You're the number one person they're looking at.

Ian Yearsley:

So we wanna, yeah, we wanna lead by example. For sure. For sure. Yeah.

Corey Berrier:

Absolutely. Because if not, I mean, you are leading by example, regardless of which, good, bad, or indifferent.

Ian Yearsley:

Yeah. You know what I mean? Yeah. Yep. We want to be, yes, we want to be The example being a leader is it's not for everybody. Right? You gotta have certain traits about you to be able to do that job effectively. And if you're not, Willing to do that work and be the example from the start. And we do what we say we're gonna do, right? We do things the right way the first time. If you're not living those values yourself, then no one else is ever gonna take you seriously. They're not gonna. They're not gonna wanna follow you, right? Because you're saying one thing, but you're doing something else. And so, it becomes more and more important as you hire more people to actually double down on those values and double down on that, that standard and that behavior versus pulling back from it.

Corey Berrier:

Yeah.'cause you got more eye, you have more eyeballs on you at that point. I totally agree with you, and I believe that if if you don't, if you don't, if you don't follow those core values more than just a poster on the wall it does affect the company. And you may not even see it at first. And, some guys don't see it at all. I mean, they can't figure out, that's the

Ian Yearsley:

problem. Yep. It all starts there. Having that culture and having those values, People often get it wrong, right? They chase the money instead of chasing the standard or chasing the the values. And doing the job right, and doing the work right? If you do all of those things, the money's gonna follow right behind it. Now, I'm not saying ignore the money altogether. I'm not saying that you shouldn't know your finances from top to bottom. I'm saying that if you have your priorities right, Everything's gonna follow because your customers are getting treated right. Your employees are getting treated right. Your suppliers and vendors are getting treated right. And if all those relationships are in harmony, you shouldn't have a problem with the financial side. So those values and those standards, they shouldn't just be a poster on the wall or a dusty book on the shelf, right? They should be something that is every day in all of our work, in the weekly meetings all the time.

Corey Berrier:

That's right. Do you make it pr, do you make it extremely, I would think you would make it pretty apparent to anybody new that's coming in like, this is how, these are the things that we expect from you, obviously.

Ian Yearsley:

Right? Yep. All right. In our operational manuals in our onboarding all that stuff is laid out for them right away. What we expect from them, having those job roles written down, having expectations, having an employee manual, having an operations manual, all of those things from the very start is what ultimately allows you to be. 80 20 in your business, right? 80% of the time somebody can do their job. The other 20% of the time. You're never gonna be able to really account for that.'cause that's just the nature of being in business. But making those standards clear from the start is easier for them, easier for you. Nobody's confused. So definitely beneficial to do that.

Corey Berrier:

And guess what? That rolls right into the customer. If you give the customer expectations of how that job's gonna go, the process, what you know, if you've gotta, you know if it's gonna take longer because of X, Y, Z, or you gotta order a part that's not local or whatever it is, as long as you set expectations, you're probably not gonna have an upset customer. But a lot of guys will just. They avoid setting the expectation for whatever reason. I'm not really sure why, because it really does make things a lot easier and you're less likely to get, an irate customer.

Ian Yearsley:

Yeah. And this business is all about referrals. That's the last thing that you want. You do not wanna have an irate customer. So having that process in place from the very start where you're setting those expectations, and it's hard. It is. And I think that's probably why a lot of people avoid that pain, right? Is sitting down and making those standards. It takes you away from the business. And it can take a long time. Some guys take six, eight months, a year to, to really. Drill down, just get that first draft. And so, if you're building those processes now what I suggest to do is just start with one thing, right? Sit down with your team and start with one thing that, that isn't working so well, and just document that thing from start to finish. And slowly but surely, you're gonna fill that binder up and that's the fastest way to do it while using the group mind to get the work done. Right? And not only that, but it also gives buy-in on that process because people then I. Feel as though they're valued for their thoughts on that process. And they're gonna do it a different way than you as well. So you're not out there doing the work sometimes. Well, you're gonna want that feedback.

Corey Berrier:

For sure. I bet. I talk about this a lot. I have, I have a D H D. Most people in the trades have a D H D. Oh yeah,

Ian Yearsley:

I do. And that's the

Corey Berrier:

reason we hate doing processes because it's boring. It is nothing exciting about it. It's really the last thing on the list typically.

Ian Yearsley:

Yep.

Corey Berrier:

So, if you listen to this and you're like, yeah, I wish I could do process, but I like, I get it, you get it. It's not fun. And it's not supposed to be fun, but it is important. And it's vital to the success of your company. Absolutely. Yes. Yeah, a hundred percent dude. Alright, so you have. You've you mentioned that you're growing quite a bit right now. Can you give me an idea of, maybe where you guys, and you don't have to gimme the exact numbers or anything, but like the, over the last 10 months, 10 months ago you were stressing out, sounded like up until now. What kind of, like, per, like, have you seen how much growth have you seen? Can you gimme an idea of what

Ian Yearsley:

that looks like? Yeah. So, Two things. So October it leveled off to, I think we made$1,200 in October. So when you're going from anywhere from 150 to 350 in the summer months of revenue running through the, running through the company to zero Yeah, that does get pretty stressful. And so, we've managed to bring that revenue back around to probably right around that 200, which is pretty decent for where we came from, starting from that zero. And so, we had a couple months in there where it was 15 grand. We had a couple months in there where it was, seven grand. Then February came along and February was usually my slowest month. In February we went over six figures. So we kind of climbed that mountain real quick and then it kind of came back down again. Right. And I don't know what the heck happened there. That march, April was cold, but it wasn't super cold. People usually have their furnaces fixed by then, right? Sure. And so we saw that dip again and then may came along and it rocketed off like a rocket ship. So now we're back way up into the, that six figure range where just in service and replacement, we probably pull in 50 know fat service site right in front of it. But 50, 60 a week. Easily. So, we're doing replacements like mad now. What the percentage growth is off the top of my head I can't tell you, but I do know the numbers from realm ServiceTitan pretty, pretty well.

Corey Berrier:

That's pretty significant dude, mean that's pretty damn significant. Yeah.

Ian Yearsley:

Yeah. It went from keeping me up at night to. Now, I'm also up at night, but I'm like, well, what am I gonna do next? So how do we get the momentum?

Corey Berrier:

So what do you, how do you try, how do you try to, how do you try to get new technicians? Or is it something that you look for? Do you ever look for I mean, maybe'cause of the stage you're in, maybe you wouldn't look for somebody outside of the industry. But have you ever

Ian Yearsley:

considered that? We do consider hiring hiring outside of the industry. We do have an apprenticeship program. We do have in-house training. We have a training area that we just finished up. We've had that as an idea for a couple of years to bring in and train people from the bottom. Two things. One, Technicians are in a shortage right now. It's hard to find technicians. And number two, when we train from the bottom, we can train them our way and then we don't have any bad habits to come along with that training. Right? So it's much easier to do that and spend six months doing that training and sending them on the job training after they get through that first six week course than it is to. Try to hire somebody and deal with all that stuff. And so, we do put the ads off for the apprenticeship stuff on what we call Wise Hire. It's an app that goes out to all 200 job boards. We get a fair amount of those that way. What we don't get a lot of from that method is journeymen or masters. And that's because most of the time they're already working for somebody. That's right. So you can't find people that are. Unless they're looking for a job, they're not on Indeed, they're not on Monster. They're not on any of those places, and so you have to go where they are at. And I learned this at Profit Rocket last year. Facebook is where they are at, right? If you're running the right ads, just the way that you're advertising to your customers, you gotta think of hiring in the same exact way. So when you're running those ads on Facebook to get more leads, it's the same thing. You're trying to court journeymen and masters and whoever else, your office people to come and work for you. They don't know that. They need a new job. They don't know about you, that your culture's good, that your benefits are good. And so you gotta put that word out there and everybody's on there scrolling all day long. Right. That's right. So, that's right. We might as well be throwing those targets out there and getting those leads in. And so that's the best way to really find the people that you're looking for.

Corey Berrier:

Interesting. Yeah. I like that. I, and I agree with you Totally. I just, I don't guess I. I really asked that question, I guess.'cause I really didn't know. I mean, I guess it made, that makes total sense. I guess I was thinking maybe from a trade school, but that's really, that would not be, obviously they would have experience at that point. So that would kind of negate what I was thinking. Yeah, dude, that makes complete sense. Not having bad habits, I think is. Vitally important to the success really for, I shouldn't say any business, but you know, like salespeople, I'll give you, that's a great example. Like if you can hire a salesperson that's just a people person, maybe you find'em in a restaurant or maybe you find them doing a job that they're just, maybe they, again, like you said they don't know about you. They don't know what's out there. So, do you ever see people out and about and you're like, this guy's not doing anything like what we do, but he'd be a great fit and you just, and you offer to talk to him.

Ian Yearsley:

Gorilla, gorilla hiring. Yep. It is a thing, right? Yeah, so I actually gave my card to a guy as I was going through the the Burger King drive through the other day. I was like that type of customer service that you just gave, like. You definitely can take that experience and apply that somewhere else. And I don't know what the guy's habits are like or anything, but I'm a good read of people ever since I've been young. I think it's a little bit of one of those a d h adhd traits. Yeah, you can tell pretty quick what type of person you're getting and in about seven seconds, right. And so I actually gave'em a card. I haven't gotten a call yet, but gorilla hiring. Yep. Yeah, that's, it's a good way to to grab people.

Corey Berrier:

And you may do this already, but don't be afraid to go back to that drive through and see if that dude's working.'cause you know he may be scared to death to call you. That's true. He was working in a drive through at Burger King. He's probably like, this guy's crazy. Yeah. Like, did he not see me working at Burger King? It's just the mindset thing. Yeah. And that could change that kid's life. You never know.

Ian Yearsley:

Yeah, absolutely.

Corey Berrier:

Yeah, man. Well, listen, I really appreciate this, Ian. This is great.

Ian Yearsley:

Yeah, for sure. I appreciate chopping it up and being able to come on.

Corey Berrier:

Definitely. Where can people find you? Where would you like to tell everybody the company name again? The website, and then where would you want'em to find you on

Ian Yearsley:

social? I. You can find us on Facebook air Pro air pro.cool is the company. And you can find me and all of my socials on pretty much every one of'em at the Ian Yearsly. And you can also find all those links@ianyearsly.com. So, pretty easy to find. As far as my contact information goes, I'm always willing to help, always willing to share what I know. I'm always willing to collaborate. So definitely reach out to me. Appreciate

Corey Berrier:

that, brother. Thanks. Thanks a lot. It was a great conversation my friend. Yeah,

Ian Yearsley:

absolutely.