Inside Real Estate

Vic Simjanoski, DOBI Real Estate: How Vic Went From Manufacturing to Real Estate

September 12, 2019 Season 2 Episode 37
Inside Real Estate
Vic Simjanoski, DOBI Real Estate: How Vic Went From Manufacturing to Real Estate
Chapters
Inside Real Estate
Vic Simjanoski, DOBI Real Estate: How Vic Went From Manufacturing to Real Estate
Sep 12, 2019 Season 2 Episode 37
Vic Simjanoski
Vic Simjanoski of DOBI Real Estate tells his story about going from years in the manufacturing space to real estate.
Show Notes Transcript

It was a pleasure sitting down with Vic Simjanoski at DOBI Real Estate on our lates episode. DOBI has quickly become one of the top brokerages in southeast Michigan and Vic has been a very big part of their growth. He offered up some great insights on the market along with some tips for succeeding in a very competitive industry!

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Speaker 1:
0:01
You're listening to inside real estate, your source for all things, mortgage and real estate related, the shows that brings you all the hottest topics and insights directly from those who know it matters. Now, sit back and enjoy the show. Good morning everyone. Paul potluck is Brad. Why's Gerber
Speaker 2:
0:21
forget about a name for something. Yeah, Salvador. Who's Mano? We are inside real estate. Uh, today we have a very special guest. Vick. What was that? It's about as bad as you're saying. You should be able to say mine and say your last day. Sim Chenowski some Janesky Veetsa some Janesky you that? Yes. You got the first name other than the name. You're, you're Greek, right? No, no, no. Macedonian or Macedonia. Yeah. The same thing. Descendants of Alexander the Great, no, no, no, no, no. He's sorry. Yes, he's all right. Everything's the creeks. He's sorry. This whole thing. Alex. Anyway, Steven invented iPhone by now. What's everybody? Ah, obviously today we've got a special show. We've got Vic from Doby real estate, a great real estate agent. He's going to talk to us about his story, how he got into the business, how he does his hair in the morning, always looks amazing.
Speaker 2:
1:12
Uh, and then, uh, you know, we've got some more topics I want to talk about. Uh, credit scores being the highest that they've ever, that they've ever been on average. And I'm going to ask you guys what you guys think that number is. Uh, we're going into a buyer's market and also some loosening of guidelines with Fannie and Freddie. Maybe going private. I want to talk about what we think I might do to the mark. But first and foremost, we have Mr victim and, uh, Vic, uh, obviously you're with Adobe real estate, a great friend of the, of the show. Um, we've had Simon on before. We've had some other people from the show, uh, from the, from the office on the show. Tell me why you got into real estate, how you got real into real estate, and then we'll transition from there. So we have more than 30 minutes. No, we gotta you gotta do it like two minutes. We know how you miss it. Don't want to talk.
Speaker 3:
2:02
My family is manufacturing. So my family, when they came back, came over here from Macedonia. Um, I was in a manufacturing company with my father for, oh, about 30 years of my life. I'm 45, so he looks like he's like 35, so it's good. So you know how it is coming from a, uh, immigrant family. They make you go to work. Even when you're 12 years old, you sweep the floors, you do whatever you have to do. So, uh, me and my dad opened up our own business. Uh, we're in business for about 15 years. The economy took a little bit of a dip. He turned 70. He's like, what do you, what do you want to do? I'm like, I don't want to do this anymore. I'm sick of this. It's like, well, what are you going to do? I'm like, I don't know. At that time we just had a baby. So I took a year off. You and your dad?
Speaker 2:
2:44
No, me and my wife and my wife, man, she's getting roasted right now. So
Speaker 3:
2:51
we took, I took a year off. Uh, my, I had a little newborn baby. I took a year off, spent the first year with him and my wife's, Whoa, what are you going to do? Why you sitting all day? I'm like, well, I'm trying to figure out what I want to do. So at the age of 40, I made a career change and got into real estate. Yeah. What year was that? That was what, four years ago? 2015 you've only been in the business four years. This is April. Start was the start of my fourth year. Wow. And, and so for years you've built a good business, uh, which is, which is what I want to talk about. So obviously you got into the business and where did you start? Um, I started at Cranbrook, which is I think Howard Hanna. No, yeah, yeah. And Birmingham. Michigan.
Speaker 3:
3:29
That's correct. Yeah. And then w and then you ended up going to Keller Williams and then ended up with Simon Simon, who started his own brokerage as Adobe real estate. By the way, for everybody out there, there'll be real estate is a really good like boutique type lender here in Birmingham, Michigan. How many agents you guys have now? When we started there was five of us. Um, and we're not, lenders were upside, they said lenders. Jesus. So real estate, sorry. It's the whole, yeah, sorry guys. We started with five guys, five, five people at, uh, Blue Simon, Thomas homes when it started. And now we're close to 40 agents within one year. We started back in August of last year. That's a lot of growth. So talk to me about Dolby and why you think, I mean, you're having success, you guys are doing a lot of good stuff at that brokerage in general.
Speaker 3:
4:14
Uh, how are you, how did you start? Let's start with, let's go back. Sorry. How did you get in the business? How did you start getting a business very early, right? Cause that's tough. A lot of people that get into the industry, you know, four years you're doing pretty well, but that first year or two years is really, really hard. Well, I, I did it, uh, ordinary way of doing real estate. When you're 40 years in a different career, people know you as a steel fabrication. Yeah. So I said in my first year I'm going to do all cold market. If I can do cold marketing succeed, the warm market's going to come back all over time. So I did a lot of open houses. I did a lot of lead genning. Um, I did a lot of Zillow ads. First Year was a great year for me.
Speaker 3:
4:57
Um, just by doing cold market, second year people started looking at me like, Hey, this guy is pretty good at what he does. So I started getting more warm leads from friends and family and the third year a lot of referrals, a lot of stuff. So people actually see me as a real estate agent now, not just a manufacturing guy. That's interesting. So, um, and obviously you, you're, you're from and you, you guys do a lot of social media, a lot of you guys, you utilize that a lot. We do. Um, social media is the new, uh, way of doing advertising. Um, I have a great assistant, Leanne Allen [inaudible].
Speaker 3:
5:31
She runs my social media. So everything you see she's in charge of, and she's doing a great job about being, being 45 years old. I can't do it with the millennial time like she is, she knows what she's doing and put my trust in her. Yeah. Yeah. I mean to, uh, to that point to, you know, a good team really helps you write like being, especially only like four years in, you probably see new every single day, you know, we do every, every day's like we talked about before the show started doing cryptocurrency. Yeah. As a deposit or as your EMD trek gets. That's insane, right. The way that times have come. Yeah. Yeah. Lot changes. A lot changes. So your first year, how many loans? How many, how many ah, sorry. I mean, how many deals did you I did 15 deals for $5 million. That's pretty good.
Speaker 3:
6:20
First year. Yeah. That was their great first year. And he's all that grand book. All that Cranbrook. Yeah. It was a good price points. Yep. Yeah. I mean, look, at the end of the day, I think you, you hit that. I mean, you just worked hard. There's no way around it. Like a lot of people kind of get into the business and they think that it, things are just going to happen. But it takes a lot of hard work to be in this business. I mean there's, it's pretty competitive. Like I said, being part of manufacturing go in the morning at six o'clock and I just, sometimes I'd work till eight o'clock. So I treat my real estate business the exact same way. What you put into it is what you're going to get out of it. If you work from 12 to two, you're gonna get a 12 to two paycheck.
Speaker 3:
6:53
Uh, you put in 10, 12, 14 hours a day, you're going to get a ton to 12, 14 hours a day paycheck. Yeah. That's why I liked real estate. Cause in my other manufacturing company at 35 employees, um, I was at their mercy. If they didn't decide to show up today, didn't matter what I did or how hard I worked, I was only gonna make what I was going to make. I'm in real estate. That's the reason why I went into it. Um, if I worked hard, I knew I would get a great outcome out of it. Yeah. Yeah. So I want, I wanted to talk about, we were talking about this earlier. It's definitely, and I think we're seeing this, it's much more of a buyers market all of a sudden, you know, and if you were definitely in a buyer's market much more very quickly, it did, it changed very quickly and now we're definitely there.
Speaker 3:
7:32
You know what I mean? Now everybody's like, okay, yeah, we're definitely a buyer's market. So, um, for you, uh, what do you seeing as far as the market goes and what are you feeling as far as, you know, buyers, sellers, you know, houses sitting? I think the price points mattered. Like the one to 200, two 50, they're selling pretty quick. So, yeah, I think when you get into the five to 600,000 buyers are sitting back. I think most of it goes to the interest rates. I think they keep things that are going to come down. And the beginning of the year, uh, we were selling a bunch of houses because interest rates were out close to 5%. People thought they were going to keep going higher and higher. Um, so they were like, we need to buy, we need to buy. And I think they're taking a step back, uh, W W waiting for new inventory to come on.
Speaker 3:
8:13
And I think that's, that's what's driving the market right now to be more of a buyers market. It's interesting. It's like when rates go down and people get kind of complacent, they're like, oh, they're low. Right? And then when they start going up, people start freaking out. They're like, oh, I gotta refinance. I gotta buy a house. Right. I got, I've got to think of it before they go up too high when it's like, she should be the opposite. Lots of people on the edge right now, you know? Uh, oh, I hear another rate cuts coming and maybe you know, I mean, you know, I could tell you that rates are real low right now. Right. And you should take advantage as opposed to waiting. I'll give you an example. It's not a good strategy. We doing a deal for someone's totally no cost. Who's going to save like $15,000 over 14 years? And he's like, no, I, it's free. Right? It's free. It's free. It's $14,000
Speaker 2:
8:57
of free money. He's like [inaudible]. No, especially with the first time home buyer programs that you guys are offering right now. They're insane. Yeah. Uh, being able to just three and a half percent gifted money. That's insane. You don't even have to select your own money in going to put your own money in. Yeah. I mean, look, I know, we'll talk about that in here in a minute there. There are a lot of programs out there and as we kind of go into for the next few, I mean, things have gotten looser and looser and looser with, with lending. And if it's freaky. Well, we talked about it and it's freaking me out because I don't like looser and looser guidelines because it allows, it gives us an opportunity to potentially hurt ourselves in our, in the industry and give bad loans again. Right. I think to a degree, as long as we don't get to where it's normal again for stated income or stated assets to a degree, it can get a little looser because it's tightened up a bit over the last few months.
Speaker 2:
9:51
So it can, it can loosen up again to what it was like last summer. But any further than that and then I start getting worried, well, I mean stated incomes here. I mean, you can do some, but it's not normal, but you can do it. You could, but it's not as widely spread becomes widely spread and more of the norm or more of a legitimate option for more people. That's scary. Yeah. Hello. It requires a pretty substantial down payment to, you know, which to me most important is the equity position would be the most scrutinized thing on a loan. Right? Like, uh, or at least like the, the biggest decision maker. If you're going to put 20% skin in the game on, you know, $400,000 house, I mean, it's going to be, that's what the money in the house, right? Right. Definitely. Yeah. Yeah. You're not gonna walk away and even if you take a dip or whatever, you can sell it.
Speaker 2:
10:36
No big deal. Right. But it's funny, like you said, you know, 3% down, not even your own money. It's like you can put 300 like walking out of a lease, kind of both are going to jam or credit. So whatever, $400,000 house with 3% down. Yeah. That's crazy. You can't do $500,000 house. 3% Geez. Actually, yeah, it's pretty well, I know it's pretty well, I mean, that's the thing, it's like that worries me as a marketer, you guys talk and you're in your business about the recession, how to prepare for it in the winter. I mean, this winter is gonna be, I think tougher than the last few winters. Yes. Right. For sure. As far as the market goes. I mean, I mean everyone likes to speculate about the market and they interest rates. It's like everyone's full of shit. You know, this, you have a point, you know, I guess it's the beginning of the year, you guys said that interest rates were going up like six, 7%. What happened? They went down to three and fucking winner, winner, winner, and then there's huge, you know, uh, huge winners, right? Huge, huge opportunities for people who couldn't get in in the summer to now do that. So, you know, whatever. Right. Prepare for the worst, I guess, and hope for the best. It's good to have a healthy anxiety. So winners coming, anticipate the norm of things that are going to get a little worse. Yeah. I think that's a healthy anxiety because it pushes you to work harder as a real estate agent. What
Speaker 3:
11:54
do you do usually to prepare for it? Because winter regardless is generally a little slower no matter what. Like December a thanksgiving, people aren't really looking at houses at that time. What do you do to prepare for that during that time? Is the best time to peak a new clientele? Yeah. Anything that happens in the real estate industry, you know as well, just as in mortgages takes 30, 60, 90 days to actually get a lead to go out sometimes and even look at a house. Uh, you're constantly contacting them, getting them in front of just even a picture of a house just to take a look at it. So you just lead Gen at that time to set up your first quarter of the year. So it's a great time and you're going to go out and see people at parties, holidays. You get to actually interact with friends, family that you didn't see the entire year and trying to build up your next year of a book of business.
Speaker 3:
12:41
That's a really good mentality to have. A lot of people look at it like, oh, it's down. I'm going to go on vacation and I'm going to go and do this. But you're like, let me just take these opportunities to aid, work on my business at a different angle, get in, get in front of people. I don't get in front of very often you see my friends and family and what people don't realize a lot of times it's just being around people will create business for you. It does the best part of being around friends and family as they all all want to talk about houses. You know when you go to a party, what do they asking? [inaudible] I was at a bachelor party this past weekend and picked up a new buyer and a new refi, you know, cause it's like, hey, save you money. I'll hook it up.
Speaker 3:
13:17
Right. They, everyone has questions. Like you said, people don't know what they don't know. So when there's an expert in the area, especially at someone that's comfortable as you know, a friend or family member, I mean they'll ask and usually I end up picking clients and building a book, especially late fall or early spring. Even like the best part about it. When I go to these parties, um, they'll start talking to me and I'm like building parties. They can be, it can be any type of party that you want. I'll invite you to one pond. You just got to come dressed in blue and white so they can know you're the Greek guy in their flag on the shoot. But I'll let them know. I'm like that. Those are some great questions, but why don't you stop by the office? Let's talk about it at my office.
Speaker 3:
13:59
Um, I know you're in different fields. I don't talk to you about what you're doing and we're here to have a good time. Um, those are some great questions. Why don't you stop by the office. We'll sit down, we'll write down what your goals are and we'll figure out what's the best game plan of getting you a house that you're looking for. I'm talking at parties, you know, you have a couple of drinks and things get escalated and people are like, oh, this guy charged me 1% to some house. Well, why are you going to charge me 3% my house and how that, all that stuff rates are 3% now, bro. Not through Zillow shut up. And my cousin called me get 2.75 from this guy. Right? Yeah. You can't only give you, you can only give me three. Yeah. So the, you know, you bring him, call him, give him a call.
Speaker 3:
14:43
So what do you do to combat this like discount brokerage model? A lot of [inaudible] hat like we're getting right, cause it's, you know, as a, as a real estate agent, you know, you charge what you charge and it costs money for good agent. I mean they, they should get paid for what they, what they for their value or whatever that may be. There's a lot of models now that are coming out a little, sell your house at, you know, 1% or 2%. Um, what do you do to keep your value proposition high so that you can say, no, that's my, that's my cost. The way I let them know is that at 3% you might get someone that's going to do a 1% job for you. So you got $100,000 house. For example. I might be able to get your 90,000 because I'm going to work hard for you.
Speaker 3:
15:19
The guys working for 1% he's going to sell your house for 70. So that difference in fees that you're going to make up, I'm going to make up, cause I know what I'm doing. Uh, the other guy pretty much charging a 1% fee. You just signing a document and hoping he's gonna make a grand on the house. You know, he doesn't really care. I'm going to fight for you. I'm going to do all I can to get you the best value. If you're selling or if you're buying a house and let's be a, a houses are sitting more now. So you know, like, like a year or two ago, like you could sell a house with your eyes closed. It wasn't very difficult. You put a sign out in the front of the front of the yard and that houses 10 offers within like a few hours. Right now it's a little different.
Speaker 3:
15:53
Take some, some it takes an acumen and ability to sell a house, whereas before it was a little bit different. So the value proposition is much higher I think for someone that knows what they're doing. And would you agree with that? I totally agree with you. When a new agents come in and they freak out because their house has been sitting on the market for a week and I'm like, a week is not that long. You know, we just not, unless you're in a super hot market like royal oak was when they're doing 15, 20 offers on a house the first day, there's a lineup of agents. Uh, those days I think are gone. Um, great properties sell pretty fast. Um, but I think you're going to have to actually be a real estate agent and work for your commission instead of just putting a sign in the ground and hoping it sells in a day or two.
Speaker 3:
16:33
I mean, if your property is unique at all, right? Like it, it may take even two months to find that right buyer, you know, even if it's in a great area and whatnot, or it's like, mm. You know, you, you can't just make the buyer come out of nowhere. Like you said, it's not like a line of people waiting for each house now, unless it's like that cookie cutter home that fits like 80% of everyone's boxes. It depends too on the school districts too. Most like Troy, Rochester, blue field, um, they don't really care. Like fillers are like, oh, it's a house in Troy. I want the school district. Yeah. They'll deal with it and they'll renovate it over time. But if you're not in a desirable school district, the house is going to sit for a little while, even though the school district might be great.
Speaker 3:
17:18
Um, they still like, oh, it's not the top school district top five. We're not gonna go there. Yeah, no, that's for sure. That's, that's true. So like for you, when you, when you get a listing, what is, what do you, what do you do differently or what do you do that helps, uh, your seller get more looks at it, right? I mean, that's a big deal. You just want people to get into the house and see it. How do you create traffic for that house in a market where the sellers or the buyers or the buyers have a lot more control? They can be more picky. And you might have a house that has like a really small, a master bedroom
Speaker 2:
17:50
that, that, you know, that's harder to market. Like what do you do
Speaker 3:
17:52
do that's different? What we did, I'll give you an example. We did, we sold the house up in Clarkston. We marketed it on Zillow coming soon, two weeks in advance. We put the sign on the ground with the coming soon sign on top. Um, we sold the house in five hours. While it was appalling, it was, the price point was two 50. Now we got two 65 for it. Uh, the guy was excited. We got five offers the first day. People wanted to go inside of it because they have that anticipation of they can't have something that they can't have a, so they are looking like, what would this house is in the area that we want to be in, but I can't have it yet. I need to be first. I need to get there. So they're constantly calling. When is it going to go on?
Speaker 3:
18:29
When is it going to go on? Um, that's one way we do it. We do videos. Um, we do a lot of, uh, blogs. Uh, Leanne sends out a bunch of email blasts, um, which we try and market each house the same. It doesn't matter if it's a a hundred thousand dollar house or if it's a $2 million house. We treat each client the same way. Um, our motto with a, my group with me and Leanne is above, um, all of our clients' expectations above and beyond. So when you can think of some kind of a memory of like going out to a restaurant, how many times have you eaten dinner, but what's the one restaurant and what do they do? Two that stuck out to you? Uh, for us, we try and go above and beyond what their expectations are right from the start. We do everything that we can to make sure that it's not a transaction. Uh, we treat everyone that we do a, uh, deal with this family, their friends, their friends and family for life. Do narrate like a slideshow for you, for your listings because that voice is,
Speaker 2:
19:25
you've got that voice, Silky smooth [inaudible] narrating slideshow wherever that radio show pillowtalk or whatever it was. Hell and all that. Yeah. There you go. Yeah. [inaudible] she's laughing cause they do, they, they do the same thing to me at the office. You should be, you should be on there. You should be actually the host. Can you be the host [inaudible] not do it anymore. Um, yeah man. So it definitely is definitely gonna be a buyer's market. And as a listing agent, you can't just put a sign in the ground anymore and, and take a picture with you within the background in the bathroom, in the mirror. And you know, you have to be a pro about it.
Speaker 3:
20:04
Yeah. Like I said, each, each house, it doesn't matter what the value is. We, we try and do it all the same. Um, that's why I like Doby. Um, the part about Doby as we were changing the game in the real estate industry, a bout a year ago when we left a kw, there's an agent that came up to us and was like, what are you guys going to do when you go into a listing appointment and it's me and your brokerage number 5,000 and I'm number one at the time. I'm like, it doesn't really matter what the brokerages now they care about the person. Yeah. So that's all that matters. The sign that goes in the ground is a sign they just care about who's going to sell the house and how personal your be to them. That's all that matters. It doesn't matter what brokerage you work it cause you're not the number one person in that company when you go to and you're like, oh I didn't, I bought this phone from the number one Verizon seller at Verizon.
Speaker 3:
20:52
Right, right. The name might get you in the door, but it's not good. And another thing too is you know, you're gonna explain to that that person like that, that doesn't even really matter. Right? Right. You, when you talk to them like who's Dob? Oh, let me tell you about us. Right. As opposed to, well, we're not number one, but like does that, like you said, it doesn't even matter. Like it's all access to the same thing. I don't think clients realize that. I would say same just clients. It's also people in the profession. Right. I would say think about when you bought this house, do you know who the, who the agent was that listed it when you bought it? They'll say no, because nobody knows it doesn't matter. Yeah, it's the house. Yeah. It definitely isn't. Like at Adobe we have 13 staff members for 40 agents, so we have a marketing director.
Speaker 3:
21:37
We have a market, like everything is done for us. Simon Thomas, who runs the brokerage, he treats it like a business. It's not, we have one marketing guy for 200 people. We actually have, your marketing is great. It was a conscious effort by, by you guys and Simon and everybody to actually have a marketing team and companies in today's world, what Paul gets all gated about marketing, man, he'd go away. I'm just saying, dude, I think, I think companies that don't think about marketing, like we talked to a company that is a, is a $2 billion company the other day and we brought up marketing. He's like, Oh yeah, we don't do that. They would have a budget for that. I mean, how do you, how do you, like, how do you not have marketing, especially in this, when it's as this competitive and it's obviously working for you guys because you know, you guys built a brand very quickly, very quickly.
Speaker 3:
22:24
Yeah. Within the first year, uh, last month we hit number 37 brokerage in the state of Michigan with 40 agents within here with one year we started with five, right? So, um, Mike and it goes to show you that it doesn't matter who, uh, who put what signs in the ground. Now you don't know the people of today. Salvador Cusumano decided to go, uh, work wherever or start his own. Whoa, Whoa, calm down. He's not going anywhere. I'm just saying if he did or if someone from our team, if they decided to go somewhere, they would still be the same person. They could still get the same business. It doesn't matter that they're with omega. But then again, it's like what value does Omega or Adobe give their people to like feel like they should be part of that. That's the difference. That's what, that's what happens at Dolby.
Speaker 3:
23:06
Everybody, there's family like we are, we have that open concept. We go in there, it's fun to go to work, great office. Everyone loves talking to each other. We collaborate on stuff. If somebody doesn't know something, we're not locked off, locked up in our own office. Everybody talks. So everyone hears what's going on and you get input from a bunch of different people. Um, it's great. It's a great concept of having a free flow. Well, open guys actually have people in the, Oh, interesting. You guys actually have people in the office. Like when we walk into the office, there's people there, there's buzzing there, you know, and then sometimes you've walked into other offices, cell and they're big market centers. Nobody's there. Like nobody's there, nobody to be there. They're all walking right past each other. There's no collaboration. Uh, it's a very different environment, uh, like as far as how do you keep that going?
Speaker 3:
23:55
As you guys grow, we'd like to celebrate wins and losses with each other. It doesn't matter. We always help each other out. We have this little Gong in the back. Uh, every time somebody puts a deal under contract, we have this little nerf gun that we try and shoot the, the Gong from. So everybody knows that there's something going on. Yeah. It's just the culture. Um, you've been to our office. Yeah. You know, all our core values that are in the back of the office. Yeah. Um, if you don't fit that core value, you, you don't fit at Dolby. Um, that's the, that's the key to the success that we've had. Simon's put a lot of effort and time into creating an amazing culture. And, uh, it, it breeds a great culture of people that come in and feel welcome. Uh, they don't feel like, oh, this guy's coming here to steal my deals.
Speaker 3:
24:39
There's enough deals around town. It doesn't have to be that way. Um, if you make people feel like your family, then wait, that's like you said, they enjoy coming to work because they feel like their family. And that's what we all are. We're a big family. Adobe. Yeah. So let's fast forward. So obviously you've been in for years now you're doing fairly well. Um, how do you continue that? Like, you know, obviously you started off really hammering the phones, being in front of people, doing everything you could do to get business. How now that you've kind of get, have more of established business, people are probably calling you more, you'd probably gain more fro business. Do you, how do you manage that and what do you do to increase your, your bandwidth to do more business? So at Adobe we have a, we call it our baby list, which is your sphere of influence.
Speaker 3:
25:19
We tried to touch each one of our baby lists four to five times a year by sending gifts, not on the main holidays, like on a holiday that people don't expect that flag day. President's Day, President's Day something where people don't expect to get something. Alexander the Great's birthday, that's a, that's a definite, that's a definite. So, uh, that's what we do. And then we have a bunch of w w we tried to get six or seven different lead streams into our, uh, our office. Um, we have a great training program that Simon doesn't charge any of, uh, of the agents with Jon Dwoskin. Uh, he comes in and he pours into a lot of information into us on a weekly basis. Uh, he opens up your mind to different ways to do things. Uh, so Simon, he cares about his agents. He treats us all like his clientele.
Speaker 3:
26:06
Um, he doesn't treat us just like an agent with a number and tells us to leave. Uh, he calls it, we are his clients. So anything that we don't like, he likes to hear about it and he does everything he can to change. Um, anything that we don't like, he's a great guy to work for and he's an amazing broker. What I'm hearing right now is that your environment and actually the place where you're at is actually a big contributing factor to the success that you're having. 100%. Um, if it wasn't for just collaboration, being a new agent for years in the business, it's, you're learning a lot of stuff like sale set every day. I learned something new being in my little cubicle by myself, not having anybody to talk to. Um, it's hard as a, you know, like for example, I work with Ross a lot and I'm like, Hey, like what do you, you know, even on a refi or something, you know, we'll be talking about like a past client and hey, you know, so and so said their house, you know, a couple houses down the street sold.
Speaker 3:
27:03
I talked to the appraiser that we have in our office for someone who used to be an appraiser and they say this, right? Like, what, what value, especially if we're pricing a house and whatnot, just from having that team around you to be able to do a better job at your job. Right. Cause you know, as a newer agent sometimes like, man, I've never sold the house in this area. Right? Like you can ask people around you and not go in blind and actually do the service that your client hired you to do better. It's 100% correct because if we have 40 agents now, each of them specialize in a different market. And just being able to go talk to someone and say, Hey, what, what do you expect? And going on, I'm not in this market a lot. If I was to go say to Madison Heights site, go talk to someone that specializes in there.
Speaker 3:
27:45
Um, and they tell me, hey, this is what you're going to expect. This is how long you think it's going to sit on the market. Um, they'd give me a great idea of what to, uh, set my customer up for when I go and have a talk with them. If I was to do that by myself, it'd be hours and hours and hours of research or even in some big office. It's all fragmented and you know, people are in and out. Maybe they, they don't, they don't want to help you out at the Madison Heights guy. Right. But they've only really sold two or three houses there the past couple of years, you know, and they didn't want to help you out. That's the problem is they're like, well I'm in Madison Heights. Why you selling the house in Madison Heights? Yeah, that's a, I mean there's a, there's a lot, there's a lot of good that comes out of that.
Speaker 3:
28:23
Um, for me it's, it's, I always wonder as a real estate agent, you know why you would not be in an environment that would be more conducive to your growth. You know what I mean? Like so like there's a lot of agents that I've talked to before that are, you know, like Ross for instance, he was at a place and I think uh, we actually were like, man, you should go to Dolby cause we like what they're doing over there. Cause as a, as if I was a real estate agent, I'd feel like I'd want to be there. So we kind of pushed that on him. Um, but he was a little hesitant, right? Change and all that. But as a real estate agent, why wouldn't someone want to be an environment like that? Me and Ross would become pretty close. Uh, we talk every day.
Speaker 3:
29:01
Like he'll text me at 11 o'clock at night. We'll try and collaborate on different ways of helping each other grow our business. Where like you said, you go into a bigger brokerage where other people are like, they're standoffish. They try to hold everything tight. They're like, why am I going to help you? Which was going to affect me. But at Toby, everybody loves helping each other. Like Ross, like you told me, um, me and him talk every day. Like we sit across the desk. There's a huge desk like this. There's probably 20 of us that cram in on a little desk and that you see the space. It's huge, but everybody wants to be around each other because right. Excitement creates a different leads in it. It's exciting to hear what other people are doing. Yeah, it's interesting. So talk you about the relationship
Speaker 2:
29:42
between, cause you know, as a real estate agent you have the ability to work with, you know, title company, different title companies, different mortgage lenders, that kind of stuff. What do you look for for partners that you work with to service your clients? Right? Because you know, ultimately when a buyer comes to you, they're gonna be like, Hey, I want to buy a house. And usually are you preapproved now? Okay, well here, talk to these few people. Right? So what do you look for? So for Maz from a, from a, from a lending company, like what is it that's important to, to you as a real estate agent for your partners to, to provide to you?
Speaker 3:
30:11
I just don't like a Aha moment where somebody scares you like a week before or day before and says, Hey, we can't close. Or what do you mean we can't, we can't come out and do a closing at nine o'clock on Monday. We can only do it on Friday. So I look for people that are actually as professional as I am in my business. Right. I'd like to know right from the start, hey, we were having a problem with this client. Don't get me a preapproval if it's not really gonna happen. Don't string me along 60 days when you told me you're going to close in 25 days. I'm just being professional. That's the main thing for me. Yeah. Because my clients are going to be like, you referred this person to me. Why? Why does it take me nine 90 days to get my house closed? When you said 25? Yeah. It really does reflect on you, right? I was talking to someone the other day and they're like, yeah, I mean, you know, they, oh,
Speaker 2:
31:00
people have their guy, so it's, you know, or people come to me sometimes preapproved from their bank or whatever. Uh, and it, it's a pretty big deal if I give your name out. Right. Because essentially that's your, I'm your guy now, right. So like you better do a good job, but like, it's just kinda like the, the in and out of it. Right. Like you got to know that whoever you're sending them to is going to take care of them the same way that you would.
Speaker 3:
31:27
It's just like you guys referring agents, your clients is the same thing. If they just put them off to the side and deal with only their clients, you're going to get a bad name yourself. So it is funny how people sometimes, you know, it's like they'll
Speaker 2:
31:40
blow me up all day over like ordering a certificate order. Did it go? I'm like, Dude, yogurt order. We got like 30 days left on the contract. It's going to get ordered today. Right. And then I send a client over there way and clients will answer it. Yeah, I called So-and-so, they didn't answer him back. I'm like, what? Like, I don't know. Yeah. I just, it's crazy. It's crazy to me that people are still not communicating because one of the reasons sells successful in general and I've, I've seen it happen is he answers his phone and he, and he lets people know and sets proper expectations. Like, dude, Hey, uh, yeah, his income's kind of shaky. We just FYI, we got some Britain verification back and it doesn't look great. It tells them right away.
Speaker 3:
32:21
Yeah, that's the best way to do and be honest. Because then the other [inaudible] it's not fair to the other agent or the buyer or seller of the house. Um, when you're representing each side there, they're like, why'd you wait so long? We might have missed out on somebody.
Speaker 2:
32:34
Yeah. I mean, I think that translates to a lot of different, I mean, good and bad news should travel fast, right? Yeah. The worst thing that a loan officer can do, and I've seen this throughout my career so many times I've done it. Yeah. And I've done it when I was young, right? I was like, I didn't want to tell people bad news. So you were in the background trying to fix it. Like, Oh, I've got to fix it. I go scrambling. Yeah. And then you don't get it fixed and then all of a sudden you're three weeks in and you're like, well, what do you mean there's a problem? Well, let's say same with newer agents when they go into a home inspection. And they get this huge list of items and they're like, I don't, I don't know. How am I going to tell this guy?
Speaker 2:
33:05
All these things have to get fixed and he's just always usually a way to solve it, right? Like a loan officer or an agent or something. You have to know what's realistic within those bounds, right? Of course we can fix it if you put a hundred percent down loan, right? But like what, what has to be done? Is it realistic? It's not. You got to pull that bandaid off the second year know otherwise, like have a conversation with their client, hey, you didn't tell me about this. You know, and I asked you and you didn't tell me. Well I didn't know. You know, I was on the title of that House. We gotta do this. We've got to do that. Is it doable? Right. And if it's not, then you got to ring the bells and let everyone know, look, good loan officers do their due diligence as much as possible in fronted to give a proper preapproval on a, on a purchase.
Speaker 2:
33:50
That's like the number one thing. Right? You've got to make sure that you're looking for issues before they are. But the reality is, like sales said, sometimes stuff comes up like you don't, you didn't expect, like you said, I was there on title of a different house. They didn't tell you about, well, not what, you know what I mean? You don't, it's not something that might come up right away, like, right. So it does happen. The trick is realistically, it's just like, why are you laughing? I just thought it was scenario that happened recently. Go ahead. Talk about it. It's, Oh yeah. I own a vacation. I own a cottage up in Trevor city. You guys need to know about that. Yeah. You own any other properties that that's coming in that kind of matters? Yeah. I don't have a mortgage on it though. It doesn't matter.
Speaker 2:
34:28
You own the property. Yeah. If you're buying a house, and unfortunately, you know, sometimes it's like people's parents add them to deeds. They didn't do that all the time. Right. They quit clean on mind in case something happens to them and then you gotta figure that out. Or was it done the right way and so on, so forth. It was, things just happened though. You know, you have to address them as they come and get it off your plate. I think that's the biggest issue of people getting, like once you start to get to a level of where like, Hey, I'm doing four or five, six deals a month, right? Once you start to get really busy, like everything feels good, but you got to get the bullshit off your plate like the second time, you know? Otherwise you'll get bogged down and you're next month you'll do too.
Speaker 2:
35:08
It's like you tell your client don't buy anything until you sign the sign. The mortgage closing thing. Well I needed a appliances for the house. I needed a Mazzarati. Like I really needed the Mazzerati man. I needed something to the ground. And how about do not quit your job before you close? I had it or put your two weeks on. I had a guy freak out on me because he was, he was clear to close and then he did. So just ever understand, let me get clear to close. And there's one last check. Let's just make sure he's still working. All they do is call the company and say, right before closing, is so-and-so still working at your company? Or they did that call and he was pushing me. He was like, I need to close. I need, I'm like, dude, okay, we're just got to do this last thing.
Speaker 2:
35:47
We're going to close. We're way ahead of schedule. Uh, yeah, he quit two days ago. I'm like, you quit your job. He's like, yeah, what's the problem? Well, you don't have income. How are you going to pay your mortgage when you don't have income? There's no way that you can have outcome. And that last track is sometimes it's insane to right before closing. It's, yeah, it has to be within seven days of closing. And often, you know, uh, closing doesn't get scheduled until, you know, three, four days before. So usually happens the day before or two days before. So right there. But people don't like be like, well, I'm going to get another job. I'm like, well, I don't know that.
Speaker 2:
36:27
Like if, if, if I had $100,000 right and you didn't have a job, would I lend you the a hundred thousand dollars row? You have the potential is what he thinks I have to. I have really high potential. I have potential. I'm very hireable. We watch a lot of sports so they get paid off. So that guy's house, he didn't close, he didn't get cash from his dad and it was a nightmare for him. And it was just like, well, you didn't tell me I couldn't work. I'm like, well bro, you didn't tell me I didn't have a job. I can't get a mortgage. You think we got your pay stubs, brother.
Speaker 2:
37:00
There's a lot of crazy things like this is what people, sometimes there's this whole movement to automate the mortgage process and automate the real estate process, but there's so many moving parts to the whole, I mean, yeah, if you have a refinance or the person who was with $200,000 in equity and it's as simple that's, I could see that being automated. There's still so many moving parts in that I get it. But it comes up. Yeah. But a refi is harder to write than a purchase. Uh, can be. Yeah. Like it can be often, especially if it's like a, someone who used everything that they had to buy that first home. Like that deal has to be structured accordingly to like fit into their life. Like you, you can tell some of them with pretty much like a $500 certainty up front on a purchase.
Speaker 2:
37:43
What it's going to cost. Well, this, I don't know if we can transfer your escrows where your taxes paid winter, your insurance do kind of pain automation will happen on some level, but I just truly don't believe that you can remove the human element just yet. Well, people don't know what they don't know and then, you know, unless they feel like, which they won't reading, uh, the Fannie Mae guidelines a couple of times and places you need a human to explain, well, what if I, you know, I got a deal right now. We are in process just like, man, I took a new job. Is that going to be, I want to take this job. I'm like, Whoa, you're closing at the end of the month. Fine. Give me the offer letter. Right. And they have the reserves. No big deal. It's all good. But otherwise, if it was like you would do a voe at the end when she's supposed to close on, oh, now we need the offer letter and now we need this and now you can't close for another week.
Speaker 2:
38:32
Yeah. It's going to be interesting to see what happens over the next few with our industry or industries. Really a lot of money's get being poured into the business to like automate things. You've got a lot of this, I buy your platform where Zillow's going to buy and sell houses and open doors in the buy and sell houses. They're not really in Michigan yet, so I don't think a lot of people are really thinking about it here in this area. But they just went to San Diego, I think it was. So they're infiltrating all these markets and they're getting a lot of funding and they're actually doing a lot of deals. But, and what people don't understand on those deals is, yeah, the real estate commission is one part of it, but they also have fees to do it. They're losing a lot of money by doing it.
Speaker 2:
39:06
But you know, people sometimes just want the quick cash. Like if I could sell my house, I don't have to do anything, I'll do it. So there is going to be a market for it. I just don't think the educated buyers going to be using those too often. They want to have someone hold their hand. Right. If you're buying a house, how would would you want somebody to just click on a, on a Linkedin, buy the house? What happens during inspection period? When you go in, they don't know that and you take a look at this house and you see all these things that are wrong. Who's going to negotiate for you? Who's going to help you understand what's wrong, that it's not a dead deal or computers can't be fixed. They might be able to do it in like when I'm gone 30 30 or something like that, but not right now. I mean there's more to a transaction than just signing the PA. That's what people don't understand is the fun part of being a real estate agent starts after the purchase agreement signed the hours and the fun part is that you call it the fun part. I want to add a line on the CD that says psychologist [inaudible].
Speaker 2:
40:02
It is hard enough to buy a car online. Right? I agree. Pictures Look Great. I had a big crowd in Carvana comes in, it's got this little scratches. I didn't see that. I didn't take a picture of this. I mean you could call and have them facetime around it, but like that's a car. I mean house. It's insane. Yeah. Cause you imagine you buy a house online, the whole on the scene. People buy a house site on site, there's no drywall. It's like buying a house on auction where you can't get into it. Yeah. The exact same thing. And you walk in and you're like, it's like a mystery box. There's a huge hole in the floor here. Yeah. Which house often that's done by investors and they know it's gonna [inaudible] lights. When people are like, yeah, we, uh, we had our agent go check it out.
Speaker 2:
40:44
We're buying it sight on scene like that better be a good agent. It's turn, it's a turnkey house and the only thing that works is you turn the key and you can get in. That's about it. The house is turnkey. There's nothing [inaudible] turnkey. All right, we're going to do three questions, uh, that we do this about every show and we're going to start with the random, uh, that I choose in my head. Uh, question number one is always the same. What scares victim. And I don't know who you're talking about. Put me what scares them. Yell. It scares you. What do you mean? In like whatever. It's up to you, your interpretation. This is how it works. That you're going to keep asking the questions about Macedonia cause you know you're Greek. No, cause I don't mess it up. What scares me? Uh, just not being able to provide for my family every day.
Speaker 3:
41:34
I think about my family. Family comes first. Um, I have two little boys. Um, it's all I work just for them. Um, coming from immigrant parents, you know how that is. They kids come first. So it's the same with me and my wife and kids come first. Yeah. All right. Next question is if you are on a deserted island and you can only have one item with you for the rest of your life, what would it be? Item item on it would be a comb. Hair. Dry your hair on a desert island. That's a pretty good question. Um, deserted island in that desert. So there's no cell service or wide? No, no, no. It's one item. That's what I was going to say. Is it an iPhone? I probably have to have a house on the island. A house. Well you can build a house.
Speaker 3:
42:24
I'm going to build a house. What are you gonna Build? The house was, if you only have one item, one item, Cheetah House. A house is already hot. So you want a house like a nice house. We want like you want like a nice house? A really nice, if I got off of the island that I could sell it cause I hate going agent. I can sell the house, get some money out of it, then move on to another island. Right. Good cop. Um, I like this one. If you could spend one week in somebody else's body, who would it be? Obviously you'd have, you'd just be them for a week. Who would it be? Um, it would probably be, uh, the guys from million dollar listings, La be two guys. They're brothers. So you can be two guys. Josh Waltman, Josh Allen, I call it if you're listening, uh, give us a call and like his, uh, just style of business, the way he does business.
Speaker 3:
43:11
Yeah. He's an interesting character. He's, he does a good job. Um, that's it man. I think that you guys have anything else you want to add to this, this amazing show that we had? No. Good. No. So no, no. The, uh, that island one always has me thinking like, man, that's pretty good. Even for sale right now in Michigan, there's a lot islands for [inaudible]. There is, you go to Greece, there's another facility. It's tough with Greece. It's amazing. It's an amazing place on their rented islands. They actually did. Probably invented a year. That air you're breathing. That's my ear. Stopped breathing late. So. All right man. Well listen, we really appreciate you coming by. Obviously. Tell the audience how they can get ahold of you. Uh, you could get ahold of me by, uh, calling my cell number (248) 229-9137. And you can also email me@vicatweareadobe.com.
Speaker 3:
44:02
Um, we also offer a great service to our clients, uh, that does set us above and beyond everyone else. Uh, we've started up a concierge service for our clients, so anytime somebody buys a house from us, um, Leanne, our concierge calls them up, set them up with telephone, gas, any type of a service that they need for their house to make it a seamless transaction for them. So that's something that we're doing and it's awesome. So you guys continue to add value to your clients clients, which is awesome. That's a great idea. Yeah, that's a really idea. A,
Speaker 2:
44:32
by the way, uh, Verizon, I think we have, our phones weren't working the other day. They're still not working. So I don't know what's going on with our phone services. But uh, I'm, I'm over the phone. I want to sell the other day I got to tell this story. Sounds, got an earpiece. He threw it on the ground and stomped the living shit out of it and just stop the life out of it like, like it. And then it was a cockroach. Five minutes later went online and ordered another one. That's why they're doing it was it felt good. But then afterwards I was like, I really want that headset. It's Verizon. It's not my headset. I was on the phone the of hour and a half last night. I told Paul the same thing when I go on my drive home lands like, oh you're here, I know where you are. Yeah my wife laughs because I do business in my driveway cause that's the best place I could get the best cell service when I talked to you, you're walking around in my driveway and people probably think I'm insane. But I think like we talked, I need something to do with that five g networks cause I do too. You can go suck it. Alright guys, have a wonderful day. We're out. Thanks for having me on.
Speaker 1:
45:30
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