Fabulous F**kery

Season 2 Episode 2: Heartbeat Fuckery with Anna Fitzgerald

January 15, 2020 Season 2 Episode 2
Fabulous F**kery
Season 2 Episode 2: Heartbeat Fuckery with Anna Fitzgerald
Chapters
Fabulous F**kery
Season 2 Episode 2: Heartbeat Fuckery with Anna Fitzgerald
Jan 15, 2020 Season 2 Episode 2
Baroness Brée/Anna Fitzgerald


This episode features Anna Fitzgerald, Queen Bee, Chief Creative Pollinator of the Heartbeat Hive.  Anna Fitzgerald, The Muse Writers Center's Program Associate, holds a degree in Art Education and has taught art K-12 in multiple settings, including at an international school in Costa Rica. Her philosophy of teaching includes multiple intelligences and holistic approach to the student as a learner and member of the education ecosystem. She founded a music program at age 19 with two of her best friends in Tennessee that eventually became an arts & music nonprofit. It’s called Youth Empowerment through Arts & Humanities, YEAH, and is headquartered in Nashville, TN. This TN nonprofit serves youth ages 10-17 through summer camps both all girl, co-ed, and transgender inclusive. Instructors are community artists, musicians, and arts supporters. YEAH! is now 16 yrs old and funded by the TN arts Commission and companies such as Guitar Center, Fender, and Gibson. She holds a masters in Radio/TV/Film from the University of Texas at Austin, TX in Radio/TV Film. Her published research includes the history of concert posters and music subcultures. She has presented at the National Art Education Association conference, to many organizations, and enjoys contributing to her community wherever she may be as a volunteer and positive leader. Her professional experience includes 16 yrs of volunteer & nonprofit management, music publishing, vinyl production, and administrative support. She is originally from NC, plays the cello, and loves being in nature.

This episode was edited by son, thank you for your patience while we learn the editing process. 


Show Notes Transcript


This episode features Anna Fitzgerald, Queen Bee, Chief Creative Pollinator of the Heartbeat Hive.  Anna Fitzgerald, The Muse Writers Center's Program Associate, holds a degree in Art Education and has taught art K-12 in multiple settings, including at an international school in Costa Rica. Her philosophy of teaching includes multiple intelligences and holistic approach to the student as a learner and member of the education ecosystem. She founded a music program at age 19 with two of her best friends in Tennessee that eventually became an arts & music nonprofit. It’s called Youth Empowerment through Arts & Humanities, YEAH, and is headquartered in Nashville, TN. This TN nonprofit serves youth ages 10-17 through summer camps both all girl, co-ed, and transgender inclusive. Instructors are community artists, musicians, and arts supporters. YEAH! is now 16 yrs old and funded by the TN arts Commission and companies such as Guitar Center, Fender, and Gibson. She holds a masters in Radio/TV/Film from the University of Texas at Austin, TX in Radio/TV Film. Her published research includes the history of concert posters and music subcultures. She has presented at the National Art Education Association conference, to many organizations, and enjoys contributing to her community wherever she may be as a volunteer and positive leader. Her professional experience includes 16 yrs of volunteer & nonprofit management, music publishing, vinyl production, and administrative support. She is originally from NC, plays the cello, and loves being in nature.

This episode was edited by son, thank you for your patience while we learn the editing process. 




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spk_0:
00:00
way. Welcome to Fabulous Factory. I'm your host. Fairness. Pre fabulous factory is yours to fist Erratic destination for discussion on wellness, Dating, Family and Blair life. Come with me while we discuss emerging fabulously in spite of Life's Factory. It's a girl. Baron Esprit. Good afternoon. Today I have with us Miss Anna Fitzgerald. She's amused, writer centered program associate, and she holds a degree in art education. She has taught grades K through 12 and multiple settings, including an international school in Costa Rica. Miss Fitzgerald also has a program called YAH, which is a youth empowerment through humanities and arts program centered in Nashville, Tennessee. Her Tennessee nonprofit serves youths ages 10 through 17 through summer camps for both all girl coed and transgendered inclusive students. Miss I'm sorry, Mr Fitzgerald. You just first of all blow me away because you have included transgenders in a program before, it was even something people understood about. Can you tell me how long it has been around?
spk_1:
01:21
So, um, I wa sw 19 when I got involved with the Southern Girls rock n roll camp in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, where he, uh, sort of started, Um, and at the time, the community really needed women to step up and the men around us to encourage us to make music. And so my best friend, Kelly Anderson, founded the camp, and I started teaching there, taught guitar and song writing. Um, the students have several workshops that are, um, including recording their music recording, uh, screen printing their own T shirts. I added a music, her story class so that they could learn about women throughout the times and their involvement in music. And I want to say about 2005 we started noticing our students either making ah transition either way. And we made the decision that, you know, they belong. Everyone belongs. And, um, we had already had transgender instructors. And so I just said, This is it, um, We then started a coed camp after that camp had been around for a while. And the official nonprofit paperwork, um, was filed later, but it has now been around 17 years.
spk_0:
03:01
Congratulations on that. So, um, but I mean, in addition to all of that, you went back to school. You got your master's, um you are doing some amazing things. You have your master's In what record radio, TV and film media studies. And that is a blanket statement. Um, if you
spk_1:
03:24
are in academia or lots of things. But I did a combination of, I would say ethnomusicology, um, art history and I would say multimedia production. So my my degree, um, I designed it to be about the history of concert posters and how music subcultures form.
spk_0:
03:52
Yeah. Yeah, it's very, very concentrated. Okay, well, that sounds really a man just thinking about the fact that you wrote a paper on concert music posters. It shows that you really do love music. And you really are saying it heart definitely. And I just I just think that's so neat. Like, I wish I could tell my parents that I was getting a degree, right? Somebody
spk_1:
04:21
funded as an undergraduate scholar, um, to study just that screen printing and rock and roll because we were on our rock camps. And, um, and as an art student art education student, I had to take screen printing, and I was very active in the music scene. So, um, yeah, I always, uh, kind of talk about the fine print of life. There are ways to find money. There are ways to get what you want to accomplish, done, and you just have to search for it. And you also have to let people know about your ideas. And some people come along and help you with that. But one of those was my scholarship program, which eventually ended up funding my graduate research too. Um, called the McNair, uh, fellowship near scholars, um, named after Ronald E. McNair, who died in the challenger. So, yeah, um, I am incredibly honored to say that I have been paid many times to study rock and roll in music.
spk_0:
05:33
That is amazing. I'm sorry. I think that is just so cool. Um, now I want to talk a little bit, because you also in addition to all of your other fabulosity, you're also a life coach Green of people. And that is how I met you Through her program card, the heartbeat hive. Anna has transformed herself into the Queen Bee where she isn't, you know, encouraging this hive of people to change their thinking, to increase their creativity and be more successful in life myself. I mean, you have just helped me to learn more positive thinking to change my vibrations, cause when you met me, my vibrations were very low. And, um, I just want youto talk about how you came to decide that this was a coaching program for you.
spk_1:
06:23
Um, I would say bear threads in our lives. And sometimes, you know, during the moment or the season of your life, you pull on that thread. It's just not the right time. And in that case, it becomes a snag. But when the time is right and you pull on the thread and you see how far back it goes, you coming to the realization that everything has led you to this moment in my life. I have worked with so many creative people in so many different fields. And then I've also participated in theater in chorus in drum line, um, orchestra, visual art, just all kinds of thing acting, um, radio experience in the fortunate enough to dive into those areas. And oh, I even worked at a comedy club. So I was in the comedy scene for a while, um, getting to know how those creatives think. And when I was in it, they seem to be snags, you know, because I wasn't, um I hadn't arrived. So every time I would think to myself. Wow, you really love what you do. And you love being in this energy of creative people, which now I call the hive. Um, but you're not sustained. You haven't quite figured out how to be sustained by those experiences. And I'm still learning that I think we all continue to learn that sustainability part, whether it's money or energy or time. So, um, I have advised and been the person that people come to when they want to understand how I had I maximize my time, how to become more productive. And then some of my friends and people I've worked with this. How do I heal myself? How do I stop looking for the external and find whatever I need inside? So I came to a point where, um I just decided that it was time like those. Those snags were no longer snags. They were a threat. And I could see all the way back to my experience. Even as a little girl. I was I asked for drawing lessons. Still life, mind you Still life drawing lessons as my Christmas present when I was eight so very serious, Um, about my passions. And I was very fortunate to have parents who always supported me in that, um so I saw a program that really caught my eye. That combined sort of pretty basic quantum mechanics ideas, quantum physics ideas and a more spiritual side. I thought, Well, um, I've got plenty of practical experience about plenty of, um, Rhea world experience. And then I have, you know, a couple pieces of paper that say I could do things are, but I've studied this in that. So I wanted to go to that spirituals side and figure out how to combine everything in a harmonious way. And so I went through that 13 month coaching program called the Quantum Success Coaching Academy. And, uh, from my just really love bees. And, uh, I used to keep bees on my family farm. So I said, You know what this is? This is for me. I'm doing this and I haven't looked back.
spk_0:
10:41
Now, my question for you is What was it like transforming your life when you decided this was what? My goal? Waas. What steps do you take to say Okay? I'm not doing this daytime job anymore. I'm going to follow my passion. When did you decide to make that transformation?
spk_1:
10:59
Mom, I want to back up and say that I have a very different view on whether or not your passion needs to sustain you fully. Financially, I have, ah, theory that creative people need different stimuli. And if they feel trapped in the same stimuli receiving the same stimuli every day such as, like a cubicle job, they're soul begins to wither. And in a neuroscience way, that really is happening because you're using the same patterns and the same pathways in your brain because the stimuli is not different enough. So I, uh, currently work other jobs, and that is something that really helped Once I came to that conclusion, um, it really helped me with understanding that the transition that you're talking about doesn't have to be right away. A lot of people talk about jumping, you know, just jump, trust the universe. Dren. Don't get me
spk_0:
12:18
wrong. I
spk_1:
12:18
really trust the universe. But I also know that there are practical things that if you did that jump and you got into a stressful situation or in a state of black then you would really be hurting. And in that state of black, you can't be of service to yourself or to others. So with the stimuli and actually, um, kind of relates to creative flow. So in creative flow, diversity of stimuli is one of the biggest needs to create flow to get in tow flow. Without that diversity of stimuli, your brain cannot make connections, which is called pattern recognition. So, um, I have several jobs right now, and my business is open enough to say, do speaking to dio coaching to do YouTube Uh, podcast much like yours, Um, so that I can get that stimuli and be doing different things. Um, at night time, your brain actually does that pattern recognition in a way, and it also releases a stress protein. And there's these cells that go in and clean that protein out at nighttime. So ah was a long
spk_0:
13:50
way around. Just one to
spk_1:
13:53
make that transition. The first thing you need to d'oh is through. Except that it will not happen overnight and to decide what is the's stimuli that I want and how dowe I want to expend my energy.
spk_0:
14:15
Hey, guys, it's your girl. Baroness Bree, Save yourself that trip to the market and follow the link in my show notes to my insta card discount for this week. Insta card delivers groceries and a fast is one hour. I don't know about you, but I had to work overtime yesterday, and the last thing I want to do is go to the grocery store checkout insta cart. I like that because, you know, ah, lot of people. We live in the world of social media where everyone is doing well and everyone is living a fantastic life and everyone's driving fancy cars, and it's making it look like these creatives are quitting their day jobs to follow their passions. Some are in Lord bless them, but I appreciate your reality. Take on the fact that, yes, I do work a couple of jobs, but at night I get to do the things that that stimulate me and keep me happy. And I think that's the most important thing. I'm learning that myself. I think I was expecting way too much of myself at one point, and I was burning myself out, and now you say, OK, I can work my 9 to 5 and then, you know, do my to our transition, do my mom life. And then I go in my room and write to my heart's content. And if a peace sells a P cells, and if it doesn't, I still have a day job that will feed me. Um, if I jump in with both feet, every project is no longer a passion project. It is now a meal ticket, and it will stress me to the point where you don't feel comfortable creating because it's known the job that you loved in the first.
spk_1:
15:54
Yes, um, you know, people ask me, what do you do? So many different things. Um, because they dio. But I've I've been that way a long time. I've always done a lot of different jobs or taking on odd jobs, even when I had stable, you know, abundant income. And I always look for the advantages. So one of the things that I do now is I work in a restaurant. Um, I can work at any restaurant, but I've been working at the same restaurant because of people. They're incredibly creative. There are artists, there are skateboarders, There are musicians. There are seniors are, um, hello. It's There's just that energy that I like to be around, and I like to stay connected to them, to kind of keep my, you know, my ear out for opportunities that would relate to my coaching or to listen to their problems and apply it to the content that I'm putting out. Even if those people never ever become clients or, you know, watch my YouTube channel or anything, it doesn't matter to me because I'm there listening and I'm getting paid to be there. So I I really see it as a two for really
spk_0:
17:15
it sounds like for research project.
spk_1:
17:17
I used to say that about someone more physical jobs like, Oh, you want to pay me to work out great. So I think you can always find the good, and that's your job. Your job is not to struggle and get through things. You drop us to find buying the good and how it can work for you. Whether that means that that specific job is a step to another place, Um, or there's something you need to gain from it. Ah, that's just how I see that. But I think um, the woman who wrote a Pray Love.
spk_0:
18:01
This is Gilbert
spk_1:
18:02
Liz Gilbert. That's right. She has a really good talk on this. If you ever want to look that up, she talks about people with diverse interests and people who just can't find their passion. They need to be respected to, because sometimes those people come into your life and really inspire you. And their job is not to stay in one place. Their job is to Pollen E and go around and look at different flowers and comment on how beautiful they are or, you know, encourage and support in those ways. So I really enjoyed that talk
spk_0:
18:39
about Nash. She's amazing. She's one of my favorite authors. Um, I've actually quoted her a few times on the podcast on the book. Big Magic is one of my favorite books, and she just changed the way I looked at our and it was interesting because around the time I've read that book, I found you on Instagram, and you're like, Okay, you know, guys she's is in as she is right now, like Anna's just so cool and calm and collected, and your instagram is very well cultivated with thoughts and ideas that aren't tied to. They're tied to nature more than anything else. And I wouldn't ask you. How do you go through the day today? Like, how do you How do you say Okay, this is what makes me happy or this is what you know, This had this. I'm sorry. Whatever. Rephrase my question. How would you say this is where I This is my happy place? How did you discover your happy place? Because I'm learning. A lot of people don't know how to find happy time for themselves, and it makes me said So. Do you have any tips for people who are saying this is my couch? This is how I found my happy place.
spk_1:
19:54
Oh, okay. I want to back up and say that finding your happy place in order to do that, you must be content by yourself, huh? So most people, our own overstimulated just by pure like existence in this modern world, we make you know, like, 7000 decisions. Every day we're bombarded with media, media media, um, and the perceived expectations of responding to things. So, um, I have a long history of alone time. Um But that was due to the fact that my parents were in the military, so I often didn't get the choice, you know, as a child. So I learned to sit with my cell and be alone very early. So for me, that's that's a very normal thing. It is not. I realize that it's not normal for everyone. So, um, there's some things that happen when you are not okay, so to speak, comfortable with that one of them is co dependency. The other is, um, I would say, a chemical dependency of dopamine. So when you find yourself attracted to checking your phone because you would like a message to be there or a lot are looking at your likes or something like that, what's actually happening is, um, you're getting dopamine hits every time you check it, and it's there. So the next time you go back, your expectation is connected to the chemistry of what's happening in your brain.
spk_0:
22:02
Will. You just snatched everyone's edges, Anna, because, um, you know, phone is life, you know, Social Media's life and yeah, you know it. So we're addicted to the likes, and that's sad. It's really sad. I think it's okay. I think
spk_1:
22:21
we're going to get better. We're already coming back around. And this is something that you study in. You know, like my master's research was very much about, um that the people, my cohort, some of them were studying Facebook. You know, before it was like, cool to study. Facebook is back in 2009 and 10 but I think we're gonna be fine. There's definitely a movement two. Recognize what is authentic and what is not. And the first wave has come. And so we're coming around to that. And, you know, it's funny because you can decide how you want to perceive it, and you can decide how you want to. Um, project. So, for instance, my instagram is you use the word cultivated. Thank you. Um, it's ah, it's aesthetically pleasing. Every one of those photos I have taken, or someone I know has taken my ghost for Tarver. Okay, Um but they are a real person taking them. None of them are bought, and that's my choice. But, um, when I look at pictures online, I have pretty much zero assumptions about whether I want it to be riel and the energy of what's projected. I feel it. So when I see someone holding in their stomach or whatever, like I can, I can recognize that very easily because I have those senses for people who don't have that. I wouldn't worry about it unless it was affecting you negatively. And that's where that dopamine, those brain chemistry, you know, chemicals come in. If you're starting to compare yourself, then you know there's something going on. Um, but if you look at it and you just pass on by, that is not harmful in that way. So I think what I'm getting at is that we need to take responsibility for ourselves. It versus blaming other people for putting out whatever they're putting out.
spk_0:
24:47
E. I agree with you 1000% on Lee because, you know, at one point in time, I was really addicted to Instagram and, you know, before you realize that is like, Oh, my phone, my phone didn't beep. I didn't get any likes. I got to take the picture down. What? And I'm like, when did you turn into a teenage girl? So I got to a point where you know, I said OK, let me meet this. Let me decide. Disable my notifications. Let me disable because at the end of the day, I'm putting out content that I know is useful. And some days I'm being silly. And sometimes being silly is OK as well. But you know, it's finding that violence of usefulness and fun, and that's where you find your authentic place. And so, my, you know, one of the things I've learned, um, with you, Anna is figuring out my purpose and balancing my part productivity. And so I want to know if you have any balancing tips that you can give my listener
spk_1:
25:46
by. Ah, um okay, so I have a triangle that I I used to kind of base my coaching on in my life and breeze probably heard this, but if you were to look at a triangle that, you know, it looks like a pyramid at the top, it will be beliefs in the left hand side will be behaviors, and then the right hand side will be results. And that's the first layer of that triangle. And I like to say that that's also an equation. If any one of those are removed and you want to find out? What is it that's triggering me? To be unbalanced. Remove one of those words and look at the relationship and you'll find it so so Like, if your belief was really heavy in one way, I think of it as a weight. If it waited that triangle down, the pyramid would collapse. Right? So all of those have to be in harmony and on the sides of the triangle. They are clarity, consistency and commitment because you can do something consistently and not like it. So if you are not committed in that way, then the change isn't gonna happen for you. And that balance isn't going to be maintained. So the first thing is to get clear. And that may be getting clear about your belief. Like, Okay, why don't even have this believe What? What is This thing isn't my parents. Is it a triggering event that made me kind of go towards that? And once you get clear on that, you can start to say, Well, what is what is this belief? Is it affecting my behavior and is it affecting my results? So belief behaviors results is the first sort of layer. And then the change comes through the clarity, the consistency and then your commitment to that and what I want to stay, too, is that different beliefs serve us in different seasons of our lives.
spk_0:
28:05
Then it's true that it's so true would serve. We need not gonna No, you go.
spk_1:
28:12
Um, we need not blame ourselves. So sure you have this belief you got into some bad stuff. Um, you hit a low point. It didn't serve. You got a body? Yes, that happened. But you are who you are because of that. So let's not shame ourselves and beat ourselves up over the past. Let's move forward with all that you are and all that you are includes the bad, you know, it really does.
spk_0:
28:49
No about me. This is I opening. And I'm not sure if the listeners are gonna listen to this on their draft work in the morning Nor, you know, on their way home at night. But, you know, I hope no one is like ready tow, like turn in a resignation letter. And, like, I'm about to find my clarity and purpose And, you know, just just the way that you explained it is very well put. And, um, I want to know if you can share with our listeners where they can find you. And what's the best way to get in contact with you?
spk_1:
29:21
Okay, um, I want to say that my instagram is gonna be changing. My that goes for Tiger fur Was my boys ever That is, uh, gonna be changing. But, um, you can find me on instagram that is at heart beat time. And, um, I post affirmations and powerful questions there, um may be going live soon on. Um, we'll see. You can also find me at my website, which is heart beat hive dot com. And you can find all my, uh, service's and about my creative mastermind there as well.
spk_0:
30:06
Well, I want to just thank you for just beings in and providing tools, especially guys just she has guided me through. Even if I don't know if you realize it. But the guidance that you've provided as faras just do it and see what happens. I'm like what? You know. It's no return on investment, you know, that is just anti would have been taught my whole career and is like you know. You know, podcasting for 90 days. I should have a 1,000,000 followers. You know, I should have 17 sponsorship, and and it's like, Why? Why should you have these things, Mike? Because Instagram told me I would. So, you know, we have to really look at our thoughts and our beliefs and say, Why do we believe these things for ourselves? So thank you for sharing your story. And thank you for giving this information. Um, Guys, this is fabulous buggery. And this is Bree Hill bareness. Bree and I thank you for joining us today. And, Anna, thank you for your time.
spk_1:
31:08
Thank you. Keep your vibration. Hi, guys.
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