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Idaho Farm Bureau's Podcast
Markets down--Wolf expert speaks out!
August 12, 2018 Idaho Farm Bureau
Idaho Farm Bureau's Podcast

Markets down--Wolf expert speaks out!

August 12, 2018

Idaho Farm Bureau

Live cattle futures open with sharp losses this morning. Feeder cattle futures are down 40 cents to $1.25. The CME feeder cattle index is steady at $151.12. Wholesale boxed beef values open higher. Choice boxes are up $1.82 at $208.43, while Select boxes are $1.89 higher at $199.66.
Live cattle futures open with sharp losses this morning. Feeder cattle futures are down 40 cents to $1.25. The CME feeder cattle index is steady at $151.12. Wholesale boxed beef values open higher. Choice boxes are up $1.82 at $208.43, while Select boxes are $1.89 higher at $199.66.

Episode Transcript

Speaker 1:0:01The Idaho farm bureau micro report. Here's Jake Putnam.

Speaker 2:0:05Good Tuesday morning. Thanks for joining us. This is the farm bureau market report available on spotify and itunes. It's 61 degrees this morning in Boise, Nampa 60 in Pocatello, Idaho falls 58 in Moscow in quarter lane and smoky up there. Valley county ranchers say they're on constant watch over their cattle because of wolf attacks. Steve Ritter visited with one of the ranchers

Speaker 3:0:31their lives, the man in cascade, Idaho, who might very well be the world's foremost expert on wolf cow encounters.

Speaker 1:0:38You seem to have an area the wolves just seem to want to walk through and when they walked through it, they go cattle and he finds him and calls us.

Speaker 3:0:49That's cattle rancher. Failed Davis being introduced back in 2015.

Speaker 1:0:54I do have some experience with wolves. Every one of these or a wolf depredation over the last 20 years. There's 42 aren't here. There's 44 and four. Probable

Speaker 3:1:06fast forward to August 2018

Speaker 1:1:08when we had cows in two days. As of today, it's three dead cows and three days and seven about five

Speaker 3:1:20census. First cow, last two wolves in 1996. Davis has been active in Wolf control. His relationship with government agencies who manage the wolf, it's mostly good. He agrees. Past control methods have had an impact on back behavior, but it's short lived and longterm I failure and back in 2015 he spoke to Katelyn about their responsibilities to gather accurate cal loss information that would help and allowing more lethal control.

Speaker 1:1:48I've done it myself. I know I ignored the signs and not look at that have died and assumed they died of something else. I will guarantee you, everybody's in a warfare in this room, has done it and you didn't know it. You've got to get off and get your knife because more often than not, these cattle will be intact. When I get my knife out and scan it out and there it is, the trauma on the legs of these cattle that have died from a wolf and you wouldn't know it.

Speaker 3:2:22Three years later,

Speaker 1:2:23we're losing too much livestock and it's happening more and more every year because not because necessarily there's more depredations just because more operators are learning when they find a dead animal to have wildlife services come look and determine if it was killed by a wolf and more and more people are recognizing that no, it's helping because you got to have the evidence evidence,

Speaker 3:2:51and as the last losses continued to mount in more ways than just dead cows. Activist Davis has new ideas he wants vetted like an executive order from the president, allowing unobstructed control methods year round on public lands and a state legislative mandate allowing year around lethal control and designate the wolf as a special Predator rather than a game animal. All three, allowing more options and control. The management that is mandated now isn't working from a rancher who for 22 years has lived among the wolves ideas we're talking about with the Idaho Farm Bureau, the Voice of Idaho agriculture. I'm Steve Return

Speaker 2:3:33onto the markets. Corn features open this morning with most markets down his sin. September 18, corn futures open this morning at 3:56 down one and a quarter cent lead futures open today's session with most Kansas City contract. Seventeen cents lower with Chicago Board of trade in Minneapolis down thirteen cents. September, Chicago Board of trade opens at $5. Thirty three cents. That's down thirteen cents. Kansas City opens at 5:40 down nineteen cents over in blackfoot. Things not much better. They're soft white wheat for 50 down twenty five cents. Hard red winter 5:15 down thirty cents. DNS 14 percent, five slash 50 down thirty cents. Hardwire 5:45 down thirty cents. Live cattle futures open with sharp losses this morning. Theater counter features are down forty cents to a dollar 25. The Chicago Mercantile Exchange Feeder. Cattle indexes steady at $151. Twelve cents wholesale box beef values open higher choice boxes or up a dollar 82 at $208. Forty three cents while select boxes or dollar 89 higher at $199. Sixty six cents. Sugars down two percentage points this morning. Milk is at $15. Four cents per hundred weight, no gain. From yesterday. You can check out all the Idaho market prices on the farm bureau website. That's it for the Tuesday market report for the voice of auto agriculture. Um, Jake Putnam.

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