Skincare Anarchy

Innovating Sustainable Storytelling Scents with FOOPE Fragrances

March 01, 2024 Ekta et al. Episode 610
Skincare Anarchy
Innovating Sustainable Storytelling Scents with FOOPE Fragrances
Skincare Anarchy
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Have you ever caught a whiff of a scent that instantly transported you to another time and place? Prepare to be whisked away as I sit down with Femi Oloruntoba, the alchemist behind FOOPE Fragrances, who shares his transformative tale from chemistry student to perfume virtuoso. His journey, marked by an unwavering passion for the olfactory arts, is a reminder that resilience and dedication can lead to the birth of something truly extraordinary. We delve into the symphonic structure of scents, where Femi illustrates the delicate balance of top, middle, and base notes, shaping the fragrant melodies that define our sensory experiences.

The world of 'clean' perfumery is bustling with ambiguity. Femi helps us navigate these uncharted waters, shedding light on the murky definitions that shroud the industry and the need for both skin-friendly and environmentally sustainable practices. We're then entranced by the narrative of IFÈ, a fragrance that chronicles the vicissitude of love. The episode wouldn't be complete without a masterclass in the sophisticated art of layering perfumes, where Femi imparts his knowledge, allowing you to craft a scent as unique as your story.

As we wrap up our aromatic odyssey, we spotlight the emergence of a fragrance brand that captures the Gen Z essence, where inclusivity and innovation are paramount. Through a collaborative effort, we witness the creation of a line that's not only a hit among the younger crowd but also a testament to the power of authenticity and market savvy. Join us for this episode, where the nuances of fragrance blend with the notes of personal and entrepreneurial triumph, crafting a narrative as evocative as the perfumes themselves.

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Speaker 1:

Hi guys, welcome back to Deuctor Energy. This is a fragrance Friday feature. I am so excited about this brand. I literally was talking to our guest today you know, behind the scenes, and we were discussing how I made my own little TikTok with the fragrances because I'm just so in love with the scents and so, without further ado, I can I wait to introduce you guys to the founder of FOOT Fragrances, Femi Olertoba. Welcome to show Femi. I'm so honored to be hosting you.

Speaker 2:

Thanks for having me.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I want to. You know, I want to dive in Femi and learn all about you and your background and your journey into creating the brand and what led you into the world of fragrance.

Speaker 2:

You know it's a funny story. It started the summer of 97. I went to the library after I had lots of like C's and D's studying chemistry. I was looking for something to get me very motivated. So I saw this book called the Art and Signs of Perfumeery and that changed my life forever. I literally spent like three days in the library reading chapters from chapters to chapters until I knew at a spot that in the long term this is actually what I wanted to do.

Speaker 2:

I just got really fascinated about how the ingredients actually interact with each other and the smell of each of them and how you create amazing fragrances as a consequence. That can go into fine formulation or to soft straights like candles, shampoos. And I think the highlight for me was when I realized that an average person interacts with fragrance nine times daily. Can you imagine that From the time you actually shower to your tits page, you know there's actually flavor of fragrance in there? And then there's the baits and salt, the shampoo. If you've got the coily hair, what kind of hair? In the entire journey all through the day, the minimal like nine instances where you're going to be confronted or have contact with fragrance.

Speaker 2:

So I think I knew at our spot. This was what I wanted to do. So I started studying chemistry. Like I mentioned, it was fun but also very abstract. But I enjoyed doing it because I worked as a chemist for a few years and then I transitioned. I tried to get into perfumery school and I didn't make the cut. That really hurt me in France because it's highly competitive and I try to get into grass sayings to do perfumery at that point. But I mean, except like 10 students every year, like it's really highly competitive.

Speaker 1:

You made an incredible line with Adam, who needs him.

Speaker 2:

It was really hard and I considered a lot of options and I think at that point I started kind of concatenating my own formulations and kind of replicating some of the very known fragrances, like CK1, Contradiction, Teres, DMS. You know, although this fragrance is that I really loved, I think I just knew at that point that at some point I would have to create my own brand. I reflect my environment. But for me to do that I needed to understand how fragrances were being made and also understand the business side of fragrances. And really that's how the journey began.

Speaker 1:

That's such a cool way to start into the fragrance world, honestly, because no one talks about the chemistry behind a good fragrance. And you know you had said something very intriguing for me when you're explaining the background. It was this idea of molecules interacting with each other. Right, and this is something for me as a consumer that has always baffled me is that how does fragrance really come alive? You know what I mean, like because there's no one out here talking about that. I mean I don't have any education around it. You can definitely see where there would be a lot of education involved.

Speaker 1:

You know, if you're trying to go into it as a business or anything, but I mean even as a consumer, I can tell you there are so many times where a friend is recommending something to me, or has in the past, and I try it on myself and it's just, it's terrible for me. You know, and that's where I'm always like, how do these molecules really work? You know, when they're interacting with your skin, each other, the environment, like what is going on. So that's fascinating to me, your journey into this world.

Speaker 2:

I mean thank you. But I think the challenging thing about industry is education, I think, and it's incredibly hard to describe frequencies and I love the idea of the TikTok perfume community because they've actually helped in bringing a lot of education but on a very high level it's really hard to describe scent because when you think about Begumon, for example, you think it's a citrus note. What exactly is it? Is it like a sweet, fresh note, is it? It just comes very, very complicated and I think at the end of the day, it's incumbent on a perfumer that designs the fragrances. But also, I think they have to educate them much more so people really know what goes into the formulation, what kind of molecules and compounds combine to form a particular note. That has become the signature of most of us very successful fragrances.

Speaker 2:

But if I can provide kind of like an overview of how fragrances are being made, just a very, very high level, perfumery is a symphony. There's a beginning, there's a middle, there's an end. So the beginning is called the top notes that everybody pretty much know about. When you spray it on your skin, the first couple of notes that you smell, they're often very fresh. You know they. Often you're going to hear that they're kind of like citrus notes or Begumon, that all of us are very fantastic oils. And then when you go to the middle, which is a meeting note, there are whole kind of collections of notes that you could create or ingredients that you could add in there, like floral notes, like green notes. So when I talk about notes, it notes is a combination of different oils to form a particular signature smell. So we'll call that in notes and then all an accord.

Speaker 2:

And then the base note, which kind of allows the fragrances to smell much longer 10, even 15, 20 hours. In some cases. They are very resiniest in nature, very balsamic, and I could talk about the origins pretty much for the entire day and I'm very fascinated by the base notes. But in a nutshell, it's a combination of the beginning, the middle and end, and the symphony of that is what really makes the fragrance from an art form. But each of the ingredients are so unique in a way that if you, if you're buying, like, let's talk about the top notes. So if you take citrus notes, let's say lemon oil, lemon oil has over 30 ingredients in the oil, the essential oil, when you buy it. Oh, when.

Speaker 2:

I look at lemon oil, even bergamot oil, and I kind of as a chemist, I can break that down and see pretty much everything that is in that oil. It's a combination of the good and the bad right. So they're tap-ain-synid, they're the bad stuff actually in traditional natural oil. So when you hear a lot of fragrance companies that isolates or use synthetics, they are literally isolating the chromophores or the, the reverse part of that oil, the good stuff, and then isolating that and synthesizing that in the lab, which was the bulk of what I did as a chemist. Synthesizing that's very clean, it's very affordable and the deliberate is much better when you come, when you start in formulations, and that's why you say the fumaridest days is a combination of the synthetics as well as the naturals. But again there's this dichotomy the naturals are better compared to the synthetics. Let's complete the BS.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, I agree with you, though, on that. The last point that you made, because I have a lot of perfumes in my collection that there is synthetic in there and they're some of my favorite scents. So, but that's very interesting what you said. Now I'm trying to keep up a little bit from the chemistry angle, because when it comes to these specific like molecular structures right, I mean, it's very complicated, I'm sure, the actual chemistry of the interactions, but you had mentioned something like a specific type of chromophores.

Speaker 2:

So chromophores are the kind of structure, architecture of the odourifarius part of that particular oil, so the best smelling part of that oil. Like taking rose oil for example, there are probably like 1112 ingredients, compounds within a rose oil. But what really makes rose oil the smell? You can isolate that and that's what we call the chromophore. Right, it's responsible for the intensity and the smell of the oil. What chemists would do is just to isolate that, understand the molecule structure, then synthesize that inexpensively in the lab, which is still very expensive actually to do.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I'm sure it is. I can only imagine you know something very interesting about top notes, because this comes up a lot for me when I'm shopping for perfumes, because I personally prefer people like to refer to as clean scents or like citrusy scents, or you know what I mean. Like I like a lot of white floral in my perfumes. Oftentimes, as you know, that is what evaporates quickly. That's the quickest part to leave, right? So that's where I'm very interested in, because your fragrances, to me, are very unique.

Speaker 1:

I love the if a one I hope I'm saying that correctly it's beautiful because it's a citrusy and clean scent, as one would usually hear someone describe, but it really lingers in a beautiful way. That's what really, I think, blew me away about your line was that I'm finding something I truly love. But my pain point as a consumer is the fragrances I love are like that one, you know, and they're the ones that evaporate so quickly or they leave so quickly and they don't linger at all. So what did you do? Because you really created magic here with that. You know when I, when I spritz it on, I mean I've got great wear time with it. So I'm curious.

Speaker 2:

Interesting, I'm glad to hear that.

Speaker 2:

I mean there are. There are a lot of dimensions to that. So let me let me start by talking about clean. So the clean ingredients it's a highly debated, quite unregulated, actually, space within perfumery and in every company defines what clean is for them, and I know the governing body in for allows us to walk within a spectrum of chemicals or synthetics that we could use to to make fragrances. Now, that being said, for us clean ingredients are ingredients that have no limitation, rational complication on the skin, and clean could also mean helping sustainability initiatives within, within, within the perfumery space. So let's take a couple of oils that I know and a couple of ingredients that I know are in danger of being extinct If you continue to harvest those trees or those oils. It could cost a lot of effects for in terms of biodiversity, and what we try to do is then to create a cleaner version of it in the lab and that becomes classified as a clean ingredient. And again, this is so highly debated industry and for us, we're very clear on what clean is Cleaner ingredients that do not destroy the environment, the ones that protect the sustainability of ingredients and also very great for the skin, great for the body. That's what we're putting our fragrances Now, regarding if a affair is actually a very personal story to me, it's actually my personal story.

Speaker 2:

It's a story of broken relationship and broken love. We try to capture the best and the worst of a romantic relationship. You know, when you start dating, you meet a person for the first time. It's like roses and violets, like nothing could ever go wrong. You know the dates, the feeling, the butterfly feeling in the stomach. We try to capture that excitement, that soft, fresh excitement within the fragrance. And then on the other side of it lies the moody days. You know the when you suddenly get broken hearted and that beta, sweet relationship was captured in the fragrance. And what really makes that fragrance unique is the mojito fusion that we added into that fragrance. Very unique, it's hard to replicate. It's the mojito fusion. And the mojito fusion is a citrus, woody, fresh, aquatic note. That is a combination of about seven different ingredients to make that particular fusion. So that gives the fragrance this very angelic, aquatic feel, also luxurious, and then can carry through with the mask in there, can carry through between eight to 13 hours. I love that fragrance so much it's so good.

Speaker 2:

It's very personal to me and I think, from the feedback we've gotten from our customers, they tend to use that on romantic dinners or even during the summer when they want something very fresh, not too intrusive, but still very luxurious in nature.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely. And you know you just made my little ego, my little pick talk. You know, perfume, hashtag, perfume, tiktok. Ego go up because I was describing this on my little TikTok that I made and I literally said I was like it smells like water, like I meant aquatic, but there were so many notes you know what I mean that was just like. This is like it's amazing, it's like a burst of joy.

Speaker 1:

So I just really really love that one specifically. But all of them are just so lovely and you know I really love that. You tied in that the story behind it, because you know I'm not gonna lie to you, you know, when I look at perfumery and maybe I'm kind of a different consumer, I've always been like this I do look at. You know, what does this really mean to me? You know, because I'm not that girl that has, you know, 500 perfumes in my closet. That's not me, you know, it's just not.

Speaker 1:

And so the ones that I carry with me, the ones I take with me or I include in my day to day, they're very like, you know, precious to me. Like it sounds weird, but like it's true. I have like maybe five. You know that I really love, and so one of the big things for me is pairing them and being able to add on to them. And one thing I noticed about Ife was that I can have this as my main scent of the day. But I also like other brands, like, for example, joe Malone is one of my all time favorite brands you know, I love yeah great brand and they make some great citrusy scents and so I layer most of my perfumes also with their perfumes, you know.

Speaker 1:

So I was layering, if I would Joe Malone's a couple of you know Joe Malone's and I was like this is like heaven. And then I tried pairing it with Caroline Herrera's Good Girl, because I like that one as well, and I was like this is amazing.

Speaker 1:

So it's like as if the scent is almost, you know it's amplifying the other ones. You know what I mean In a very beautiful way, and I think that's what I want you to really speak on is this idea of layering perfumes. What should we know as consumers? You know from the perspective of what should you approach this with? You know the understanding and knowledge when you're trying to layer your sense and create that. You know custom blend for yourself.

Speaker 2:

It's again. This is one of the very debated part of perfumery and I've seen quite a number of tick talks from influences about this, but here is a full perspective around layering. We think it's the best that can happen in perfume really. I mean, fragrances can be one, as it is based on the signature that you buy it or you use it, or you can combine that with other fragrances that help to amplify the signature.

Speaker 2:

Now, in the case of effect, because if there is so very aquatic, very musky, very unisex in nature and it's lingering towards a kind of like a summer scent, it can be easily complimented with a warm scent. So if you're using you talked about Joe Malone, I don't know which of the fragrances, but it can easily be layered with a different fragrance that changes the chemistry of the entire fragrance to give something totally different. And to me that's the beauty of perfumery, because you don't have to stay very low key with one fragrance. You can always combine to create something different. And it's always an inspiration to us, because when we're creating fragrances I can go in 50 different ways and I need to stay very focused because there's just so many options that you could do.

Speaker 2:

You could take a fragrance and I think that's that's one of the reasons you're beginning to see fragrances that have one the same fragrance, that have like three variations, and I've seen that with some major brands are doing that right now. For us we're just going to stick to one. But to answer your question and how you should look at, or look at this if you have a fresh, then something very fresh, very aquatic layer that on top of a of a very warm, resiniest, balsamic consent and the only one I can think about when it comes to foodies. Iberra, for example, is a best selling scent. It's actually sold on the website right now. It's very woody and very nature and then you can kind of layer that on top of the effect. It creates a different total signature. It's just, it's just incredible, incredible.

Speaker 1:

So I'm not surprised you had that feeling and you're probably gonna have that with different fragrances, that you layer on top of the effect or by I just think it's brilliant and I and the reason I'm even saying is because I've I've layered a lot of you know different brands and I just this just stood out to me. You know what I mean. It didn't take away from my other ones that I love, but it didn't mute the you know effect, we that at all for me and I really appreciated that as a consumer. So that's why I was like I gotta ask him yeah, what is that? Yeah, I mean.

Speaker 2:

I'm glad you actually saw that because we don't get that question quite enough. And Well, we everybody have access to ingredients, like every perfumery can buy rose oil, I can buy jazz mean, whatever oil it is, but the, the magic of perfumery is creating a proprietary Formulation on a chord a note for yourself that is gonna be so almost impossible to replicate and on the GC Spectrophotometer you wouldn't really see those compounds in there. And that's one way to fusion dots. For us it's just a magic formula in the fragrance and the rest of the ingredients you can buy it. But again, you gotta figure out where did we get the bergamot form from? So the the beggarman from Egypt smells different you, differently from beggarman from Mexico, from South Africa. They're gonna have to figure out like each of those ingredients from different countries have different notes. And that's what make perfumery so interesting and all the replicas that we see it's it's almost impossible for you to get the exact formulation because you just don't know where they got the ingredients from.

Speaker 1:

You know you bring up such an interesting point there because I am often, you know, seeing a lot of this reverse engineering Going on in the world of beauty, fragrance, everything and I'm sure you're aware people love Taking a scent and trying to reverse engineer it, you know, and and figure out how can we dupe this. But I I don't believe in dudes. Personally speaking, I think that if you love a brand, you love a brand, you know, go and buy that brand. But you know, one thing I want to ask you about is Gen Z, and because Gen Z, to me, is a very interesting consumer when it comes to Fragrance, you know they're very different than millennials.

Speaker 1:

I'm a millennial, so, like I, because I feel like I consume fragrance of, you know, buy them very differently than they do. You know, sometimes I'm scrolling through TikTok or social media, wherever, and the purchasing decision that they make is so it's like I don't know, I don't know how to describe it. It's just very different than millennials, I think, because we're used to going into stores and Spraying on like you know what I mean like a like sheet of paper and and wafting it, but they're just like everywhere, like a body spray. You know what I mean, I was just spraying everywhere and they're like this is it, this is the one and I'm so just interested in. When you were marketing the brand, were you thinking about Gen Z and and what they would like? I mean, what was that journey like for you as a entrepreneur?

Speaker 2:

Well, let me stop by saying but we are a Gen Z focused brand that we created a brand because my niece and nephew has reached out to me about three, four years ago and said hey, femi, we've stolen some of your fragrances. How come we don't have a dedicated brand for Gen Z's that Recognizes the value and the truth that it represented? That really got to me and I think that's when I began intense research around what exactly are the truths behind Gen Z's, and I've got 17 Nays and nephews now that are all Gen Z's, so I literally gathered them together and I'm like, okay, you guys gonna tell me what you want. And when they began Talking to me about what it would like to see in a brand, I knew we didn't have any brand out there that could do that was currently doing what I wanted. For example, they wanted, obviously, an affordable, accessible and experimental brand that is very fun and that allows them to be who they are, plus more In addition to that, they wanted to Unconventional kind of branding, something very bold and very, very bright and colorful. And then we take all those pervasive feedbacks from from all of them and then from all their friends as well about 40 of them and that's how our market research actually started. So for one year after that I Visited over that's over 40 supporters across Canada and the US Trying to understand how Gen Z is really shop. We learn very quickly that very few of them went to Gen Z to do support or to shoppers drugmat or even alter in the US To buy fragrances at the store. They prefer to buy other cosmetics at the store, at alter or whatever the case might be, but they didn't just buy fragrances in there. They prefer to just shop online and get recommendations from their friends. So that's the.

Speaker 2:

That was a starting point for us. So we started consulting them and we built this board of directors. There were 40 of them. All Gen Z's and colleges know Jean, a master's program on the grass studies, and we presented about 10 different ideas and and inspiration that we had. Then they selected three out of the 10 and that's how we started the First generation of fragrance that we belong.

Speaker 2:

So if a bear and 39, 10 whether three, they selected out of 10, right, and then we started making formulations around each of those fragrances, around the, the story that we we wanted to reflect, and we sampled that with them over the course of another one year. It's incredibly tough, actually, to manage that process, but I think, at the end of the day, when we launched Summer 2022, we we were sold out of the first one month that we launched. It was a small batch, we wanted to test the market and that's when we knew there was an opportunity here for us to communicate the brand to Genzies and some of the friends and use what of now to spread the news I saw to you today. We worked on our branding so that we're extremely Differentiated and I think you must have seen that on I love your branding.

Speaker 1:

I love it.

Speaker 2:

I'm so. I'm so all CD around, not only creation of the fragrance itself, which has to be truly original, but how we communicated, which is branding, which is my background. I worked in business development for Over ten years, so I wanted to do something very unique, very different, very creative, very experimental and very experiential and and we wanted to tell the story from you Getting our box to reading our story we just wanted everything to kind of fit together and again, that's a very long answer to your question, but that's how we approached Genzies and we continue to do that on a week-to-week basis.

Speaker 1:

It makes sense and you know, I think that for me, I mean, it's difficult to understand how Genzie really just thinks about everything. But I love that you went to the you know, to the root level and you really tried to figure out. You know, what do they resonate with, what's their vibe? Because oftentimes I, you know, I don't understand it, even with like, something like skincare, as the you know Well, versus I've become in skincare, sometimes I, even with that, I'm like I don't know how Genzie shops, so like it's very interesting.

Speaker 1:

But you know, I want to, actually I want to shift the conversation a little bit, because we were talking earlier a little bit about this, the clean aspect, right, of fragrance and the fragrance industry as a whole, and you made a very, very good point and and that's the fact that there is no real Definition of this word, you know there's no definition. There's no real, I mean not that I know of, at least you know there's no like. Here's a list of things you always have to do to make something clean. So I would love to just get your general viewpoint on the industry when it comes to creating like, because you've created something vegan, you know it's clean, it's really, really good in terms of quality. But then you know what were some of those like war stories, some hurdles, maybe, that you encountered, you know, trying to make something clean was there. Was there a point where you were like what you know, how do I get around this? Or something like that?

Speaker 2:

Absolutely. I think the the major problem for us is when you determine or you create a brand around being clean, you're gonna limit your ingredients from, say, 10,000 to about 300. Yeah, it's. It's really, really hard for Fumors and for us and a great creative process then to to walk with 300 ingredients rather than like 10,000. And In my opinion, that's pretty much what every perfumery is going to face the limitation of the ingredients that you can use. They's accepted under the EU regulations, fda and out Canada, which is so strict around ingredients and perfumery and just in beauty products generally, and Also aligning with the requirement of infras. So infras, the regulatory body in perfumery. For us.

Speaker 2:

We, the approach we took was when we decided we're gonna be a claim fragrance brand, we understood we're gonna have to walk with limited ingredients and then we're gonna have to be very Creative and very thoughtful in how we use the ingredients themselves yeah, all our formulations as a consequence have less than I would say 20 ingredients, but we're very meticulous and how we use ingredients to create magical notes. If we are like a different brand, I'm not gonna name any, but there are quite a number of them out there that are just fragrance houses or or beauty houses to have this handful of ingredients that they use. I mean it's it's amazing because they have a lot of substitute. For us, the cost of cleaning ingredients a little bit higher and in fact, we use organic alcohol actually to sugarcane alcohol in our own fragrance, so again, it just makes a unit price very expensive.

Speaker 2:

Well, I think, as an industry, every fragrance house that classified himself as a clean fragrance brand Would always face that problem of limited ingredients in formulation. There's just no way around it, and I think they would have to define what clean ease in their own eyes and and for us it's. It's about Acting environment, it's about helping Ensuring that your skin is not damaged in any shape or form, and then it's also ensuring about that we have greater education, so people really know what exactly clean ease. And if you check our website, we don't. We don't consider this as a competitive advantage. I think it's not. It's just the right thing to do to beauty, sustainable future. I.

Speaker 1:

That makes sense. It's crazy how many like ingredients you can't like that. It gets narrowed down to 300 from 10 thought. That's that blew my mind when you said that. That's like you know.

Speaker 2:

It's pretty more than that if we're gonna be like 500, but I think that the one I know that I keep track of is probably 300, though it's an old palette and we don't use all the 300. We probably use about 75.

Speaker 1:

Wow, that's incredible. I mean. That's like telling an artist like, yeah, you can forget about like 90% of the spectrum of color, like this is what you have to work with, so make something beautiful. So I really hats off to you, you know, I mean, for doing this. This is you really created something magical here. And I really mean that, you know, because I'm like I said, you know I'm a very picky consumer with my own fragrances and it's very hard for me to find.

Speaker 1:

And when I really resonate with any sense and I know a lot of you listening up there might be able to relate to this when I read, when I personally resonate with something, it just becomes a part of, like the DNA of my life. You know what I mean. It's, it's part of that point.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that's incredible.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I mean that's how I am, I mean as a consumer, that's how I am, and I know that there's a lot of people like me. I think a lot of millennials are like this, you know, from what I've noticed. But yeah, I mean, I use it every day and I love it and I think it's a. It's just something that you know that's the hard part. For when I look at the perfume and the fragrance world, I think that's the tough part where how can you ensure a consumer's life in a way that You're there to stay at that point, you know, I mean because they're really attached now to that fragrance, it.

Speaker 1:

You created this with your own story in mind and the and the romantic story that you explained. But for me, like if a has become part of my story, you know, am I a free day journey and it's, and every time, you know, I get a, a whiff of it or smell or whatever it is, it reminds me of whatever I am thinking of. So it's like building memories, you know, I mean that's what I love a little bit.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I'm actually very curious. What kind of memory did I trigger for you?

Speaker 1:

Yeah for me. This was really reminding me a lot of my teenage years, because we used to vacation a lot in very summary areas. We were moving around a lot. My father was an academia and I just remember going to just not even like full beaches, but these random waterfronts, a lot of time sitting there, genuinely like reading a book or, like you know, playing with rocks or whatever I could do to pass the time, and but I loved those moments, you know. I mean they were quiet. Yeah, for me, and that's what it invokes. Honestly, that's. Those are the memories you know it's.

Speaker 2:

It's interesting you mentioned that because I recall when I got my heart broken the only time. I was actually, I went to the be relieved the very close to the beach out, so I I was actually in there, and that's when I wrote the formula for what I wrote, the inspiration and the brief for, in fact.

Speaker 1:

Oh my gosh. That was definitely comes across, you know that that was 2009, by the way.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I mean, it's honestly, it's like a message in a bottle, like that's what it feels like, you know, when you discover a great scent, and that's that's what I've experienced with your brand, and then I'm such a fan. But I just want to, I want to say thank you so much for your time. This has been lovely chatting with you. I mean I really for everyone listening, I the, the entire you know brand will be tagged in all of our concert art. But I really encourage you guys, you know I know there's a lot of stuff on tick tock, you know, I think for me and I discussed that year but really take that journey, you know, find what resonates with you and I promise, you know, that's a better experience than having like 500 different scents, because I personally think that, at least from my perspective, because will you really connect to it? When you connect to something, it just makes it more special. So thank you so much. For me this was such an honor and I really champion you for for doing what you're doing. It's beautiful.

Speaker 2:

Well, thanks for having us and let us know when you're in Toronto. We'll be more than happy to bring you to our lab and you can try things out of maybe, maybe even make your own fragrance.

Speaker 1:

Oh my gosh, yes, Amazing. Yeah, I'm gonna. I'll try it, but you know I'll probably need a lot of guidance from you. But absolutely, Thank you so much.

Speaker 2:

No problem, yeah, feel free to reach out anytime, and again, thanks for having us.

Speaker 1:

Thank you.

The Art of Fragrance Creation
Debating Clean Ingredients and Perfumery
Creating Clean Fragrances for Gen Z
Fragrance Brand Appreciation and Collaboration