The Real Estate Law Podcast

48 - Financial Independence One Acre at a Time Inspiring Real Estate Stories with Author Kendra Barnes

May 03, 2022 Jason Muth + Rory Gill Season 1 Episode 48
The Real Estate Law Podcast
48 - Financial Independence One Acre at a Time Inspiring Real Estate Stories with Author Kendra Barnes
Show Notes Transcript

Meet Kendra Barnes, the Founder and Creator of The Key Resource - a community of aspiring and experienced Real Estate Investors, building wealth together.

Kendra is a wife, a mom, and a full-time Real Estate Investor. Her real estate investments afforded Kendra the ability to retire from the 9-5 life at the age of 32.

Along with her portfolio that generates over $150k of annual income, Kendra is a reach estate coach, helping beginner Real Estate Investors learn how to make passive income with Real Estate (even if they don't want to be a Landlord!)

Kendra's latest project is a book entitled Acres, Inspiring Stories of 25 Real Estate Investors Who Are Normalizing Black Wealth One Acre at a Time. Her goal is to normalize black wealth and inspire others with the stories of black real estate investors, how they have built their investments and overcome obstacles, by showcasing their stories in a beautiful coffee table book.

Kendra has been featured on Black Enterprise, Side Hustle Pro, and Forbes, and now also on The Real Estate Law Podcast!

In this episode, we discussed:
- How playing the game CASHFLOW changed everything for Kendra
- How Kendra was living comfortably, but didn't have income-generating assets
- Switching strategies on her first duplex and going to short-term rental route
- Leaving her stable government job to become a full-time real estate investor
- Establishing goals and purpose with one's real estate investments
- Creative ways to come up with down payments for properties
- Location rental strategies (for photo shoots, back yard, etc.)
- Shipping container and prefabricated homes
- Normalizing real estate investing and ownership for Black Americans

Get in touch with Kendra:
Website - https://thekeyresource.com/
Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/thekeyresource
Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/groups/241836009576155/
Acres book - https://getyouracres.com/

Join Jason Muth and Attorney / Broker Rory Gill of NextHome Titletown and UrbanVillage Legal in Boston, Massachusetts for another episode of The Real Estate Law Podcast!

#realestatepodcast #nexthome #humansoverhouses #realestate #realestateinvesting #realestateinvestor #retiringearly #realestateinvesting #househacking #downpaymentassistance #firsttimehomebuyer
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The Real Estate Law Podcast is hosted by Jason Muth and Attorney / Broker Rory Gill.

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Kendra Barnes:

We tried to figure out okay, how much is it going to take for us to sustain our lifestyle? Right? Like how much do we personally need in passive income per month to live? How much do we need in savings? How much do we want and you know, different investments. And once we reach that in cash flow and savings, that was like, okay, we can now, you know, leave our nine to five jobs.

Announcer:

You found The Real Estate Law Podcast, because real estate is more than just pretty pictures. And law goes well beyond the paperwork and courtroom argument. If you're a real estate professional, or looking to build real estate expertise, then welcome to the conversation and discover more at realestatelawpodcast.com

Rory Gill:

You found The Real Estate Law Podcast, my name is Rory Gill, with NextHome Titletown and UrbanVillage Legal. And I'm really excited today. We're joined by Kendra Barnes. She is a full time wife, mother, and real estate investor who retired from the nine to five at the age of 32 doing the work. You'll see her she's the founder and creator of The Key Resource, which is a whole collection of resources for anybody who's looking to get into real estate investing. And she's also the author of an upcoming book Acres, inspiring stories of 25 real estate investors who are normalizing black wealth one acre at a time. So with that, I'm really excited. Welcome, Kendra, thanks for joining us.

Kendra Barnes:

Hey, thank you for having me. Super excited.

Rory Gill:

We just kind of rattled off in the introduction, a lot of the things that you're you know, if it's you are working on you've been working on in any one of those things would have been really impressive unto itself. That tells me you must have been deeply involved in real estate from the very beginning of your life. Is that right?

Kendra Barnes:

I wish but not at all. It's so crazy, because I grew up in a middle class household, like, you know, with that very normal trajectory that I was going after, like, go to school, get a good job, like, you know, get married, buy a house, like just kind of going after the American dream. We did not grow up wealthy, but we grew up middle class because my parents were in the military. So we didn't ever want for anything. But we didn't ever talk about investing, right? It was like, get a good job. And thankfully, I got a good government job. I was actually international economist for the Department of Agriculture for 10 years. And so yeah, I wish I had been involved in real estate investing from the very beginning. But what happened was, I played the game Cashflow one day. And that what put me on to the idea of passive income in real estate.

Rory Gill:

So this is after your career has already started. You're into the government job. And then you have the realization after the fact that that might not be all end all for your career.

Kendra Barnes:

Yeah, it's funny, because I actually realized that in grad school, so I went to undergrad, and then I went to grad school at Purdue University. And halfway into my first year, I tried to drop out. And my mom wouldn't let me because I was on a full ride scholarship. And she was just like, that's crazy. Like you're wasting the opportunity. So I ended up staying there. I'm glad I finished it. But I just knew that what I was going after just wasn't for me, you know, as you grow up, and you start to really get a sense of who you are. But I didn't know what that other thing was. So I finished grad school, went to DC started working as an international economist, and I just didn't like the nine to five life, but I really didn't know any way out. I thought, Okay, I'm gonna have to work this job until I'm like, 70. And then I retired and then I lived a life of my dreams. And then in comes Cashflow, right. And that's where I got introduced to this idea of oh, you can make your money work for you. And then you can reach financial freedom. And so that's where everything just kind of took off from there. And at the time I was married, we owned our primary residence. And we had never thought about owning any other real estate. Like for us, that was it. We're like, cool. We bought this big house like we've made it. And you know, everything just snowballed after playing that game.

Rory Gill:

So what was the first step you took after you? You opened your eyes up to kind of in the world of real estate investing or just investing in general? What was the first step you took?

Kendra Barnes:

Yeah, we went and started. So we played Cashflow on like a Saturday or Sunday. By Monday, we were looking at properties. Now mind you, we hadn't done any research. We did not. We were like not even really saving money to invest. Like I always tell people, we were living really well. But we were not building wealth. Like we were going on four international vacations a year. And that's the study been counting like domestic vacations and just like building custom closets in our house. And not to say that any of those things are bad, but none of our money was making money. And so we had this idea to invest in real estate started looking at properties. And we ended up three months later buying a duplex, again with no idea what the heck we were doing.

Rory Gill:

That's actually a pretty quick turnaround time from just having the the idea to actually taking steps to doing so. You actually you were leveraging your W-2 job you're I'm full time job probably to get into the real estate world to start, is that right?

Kendra Barnes:

That's correct. Yeah, it was a big help. But even with that W-2 job because we were not saving. So the duplex we bought was in Washington, DC, it was $228,000. So the downpayment was about, I think it was like $57,000, which is a lot of money, like, especially if you're not saving for it. And so this was in like, 2014, I believe. And we ended up borrowing that money from our retirement accounts, because it was the only way that we were able to afford it. And I want to make sure I'm making the distinction that we took a loan, we didn't take an early withdrawal or anything like that. And I want to say to if anyone tries to do this method, please consult a financial advisor. This is not legal advice. This is not. And we're like a law podcast, right. But we took a loan from our retirement accounts to afford that downpayment.

Rory Gill:

I mean, I'm not sure what every financial adviser would have to say for that, but did this first investment work out well?

Kendra Barnes:

it worked really well, like the money worked better for us in that investment than it would have in our retirement account. So that was great. But also like the cash flow from the property was amazing. We did have some hiccups along the way, like, one week after we closed and got the keys, we inherited a tenant with the property. So there was one unit where there was a tenant in it, the other unit didn't have a tenant. So we're like, cool, we'll just, you know, kind of DIY the renovations on the empty unit. While we're cash flowing with this occupied unit. A week after we bought, it the tenant just up and left, like no warning. We went over there to take some measurements. And he's like moving his stuff out of the other unit. And we're just like, where are you going? And so that was a wake up call, because we didn't know how to find tenants. Like, how do you create a lease? You know, we think we're thinking we're just gonna be like smooth sailing, like collecting this money while we figure everything out. And he threw a wrench in that plan. And so what we did was we decided to put it on Airbnb, like, let's just throw this on Airbnb, like, get some furniture from Goodwill, and like, see if we can make it work. And it ended up being a very profitable pivot. Like, we were making three times what that tenant was paying after we put it on Airbnb.

Rory Gill:

With the Airbnb strategy, that's what we do, and three times as much income. But is it three times as much work to get going?

Kendra Barnes:

It was a lot of work. And we thankfully lives like only like a mile and a half from the property. And so it's easy for us to pop over there. But it is really high maintenance like Airbnb is it can be high maintenance at first.

Rory Gill:

Yeah, so not to dive off of your story. But this kind of leaps into the some of the work you do. But some of the people you're working with how do you help them? Pick the strategy? Do you tend to encourage people to look at short-term rentals? Or do you discourage a lot of the your clients from working with short-term rentals?

Kendra Barnes:

Yeah, two things are really important to me when identifying a property. One is figuring out what your money goal is, like, always start with that in mind, because it's easy to back into it from there, like, you know, if you're trying to make an extra $500 a month, what does that mean for where you are because like, Detroit is different than DC is different than Raleigh, North Carolina different than LA like, you know, that's really important to figure out what your goal is and what that looks like where you are. But the other thing is, when you're identifying a property, let's say for Airbnb, that's cool, because the numbers could look really good. But like, what if Airbnb doesn't work? What if your county or your city comes down with some restrictions that impacts your Airbnb business? Or what if the HOA if you have an HOA says no more short term rentals? So it's very important to make sure you're also making making it possible to pivot and be profitable. So if it works for Airbnb, great, but does it also work for Section Eight? Does it also work for travel nurse rentals, military student housing, like regular cash tenants? So if you can still pivot and be profitable, it's a good property. That's That's my view.

Rory Gill:

You know, I love that you're starting with your clients goals as the basis for everything. Yeah. But I have to ask when you got started, how clear were your goals?

Kendra Barnes:

Not clear at all. We're like, we just want to invest in real estate. And we didn't even know what numbers to run. We're like, okay, the mortgage is $1,025 a month, we're making like, 1100. Cool, we're breaking even like, basically. And that's not exactly like, really great number crunching. But once we saw how profitable it was, once we kind of got our footing, my goal was always to like, leave my nine to five. And it was like, How can we get there? So I would say we reached our financial freedom number in about three or four years. I wanted to quit then I'm like asking my husband like, let's just quit now. And he's like, No, let's make sure it's sustainable because you know, real estate, there's vacancy, there's repairs, there's all kinds of ups and downs. And so we actually waited until about year six, where we that's when we left our government jobs.

Rory Gill:

So for those not familiar What do you mean by your freedom number

Kendra Barnes:

Yeah, so we tried to figure out, Okay, how much is it gonna take for us to sustain our lifestyle? Right? Like, how much do we personally need in passive income per month to live? How much do we need in savings? How much do we want and you know, different investments. And once we reach that in cash flow and savings, that was like, okay, we can now, you know, leave our nine to five jobs,

Rory Gill:

The Saturday that you played Cashflow up until you when you hit your freedom number. That was six years, you said?

Kendra Barnes:

Yeah, it was about six years. Yep.

Rory Gill:

That's pretty fast. And when you say, retired have to ask, you know, what does it mean to be retired at the age of 32? Because you look like you're busy doing a lot of things. So what does it mean to be retired?

Kendra Barnes:

Yeah, I always say that I really retired from the nine to five, but I still work. The difference is now I'm actually doing something I love to do. And so I haven't stopped working like I'm not on the beach all day. But now I'm doing what I'm passionate about, which is helping others, you know, build wealth with real estate. Also, like for me, it's just, it's really the freedom to get up and like, Okay, what do I want to do what's important to me? What I thought the first year of retirement would look like, we were going to be nomads, we were going to literally travel the world. But we ended up finding out we were expecting and so what it really looked like was as being like new parents, which was interesting. And then the pandemic and like, all that kind of stuff. So it has looked a little different than we thought, but it's okay.

Rory Gill:

Congratulations. And parenting in the pandemic has been, it's been a real treat and surprise for everybody. I imagine then, certainly more than we were you were in charge of your own time in charge of your life. So yeah, what you've built in your retirement is The Key Resource, which is, if I understand it correctly, it's a compilation of resources and advice on those who are looking to get started, but don't necessarily know where to go with real estate investing. Is

Kendra Barnes:

Exactly. Because I remember like, back in the that right? day, real estate education was very kind of like, pie in the sky, like it seemed very unattainable. I remember there were always these like workshops on the weekend, you could go to these hotels, and afterwards, they try to sell you some big program, which there's nothing wrong with that. But it just wasn't like podcasts like yours were not, we're not readily available. Like you couldn't just go on Instagram and see young people and especially like minorities out here, like really sharing information and, and having that representation out there. And so I decided, once we started learning, like, there's no reason that I can't share this information with everyone else so that others are not making those same mistakes. And so that's where The Key Resource was born, I wanted to make sure that I was supplying the knowledge that I thought I needed, or that I knew I needed when I started. And so it's been really exciting. Like, just seeing people say, like, when I saw you talk about House Hacking, I had never heard of it. And now I'm on my third property or, you know, I bought my property because of the advice I heard you give. And now my brothers and sisters are doing it. It's like literally changing people's lives and their legacies through real estate investing. So it's really, really cool.

Rory Gill:

Well, what's great about some of your content, is it correlates to people how are just getting started. But you're having them ask the bigger questions out of the gate. What are your goals? Why are we doing this in the first place, which I think kind of gets skipped in a lot of the resources that are out there where they jumped straight into the specific tax advantages or, or the details of things. And that's important, but you're kind of like the first you like you have the first Helping Hand that concierge is helping somebody get into this space?

Kendra Barnes:

Yeah, I feel like with like the social media age that we're in, it's great because information is so readily available. But it's also it's kind of a two-edged sword because we can easily compare ourselves to others. Well, if Kendra said she had this many rentals, like, I just need to go do that. And it's like, no, what are your goals? Like? What are you specifically trying to do? So I'm really heavy on like leaning into that, and not comparing I mean, because I even fall into it sometimes, too. I have real estate investor friends who it seems like they're buying a new property every week. But that's not my story, right? That's not you know, what, what is going to fit for my life. And so it's really important to like, constantly remind yourself of why you're doing it in the first place. And don't just do it because I said it's a good thing to do actually something that's going to get you to where you want to go.

Rory Gill:

So can you tell us some of the challenges that your clients are facing and some of the questions the most frequently asked questions that you get?

Kendra Barnes:

Yeah, I think one of the biggest challenges is money, like coming up with a down payment for a rental property is so hard. 20% in a lot of places could easily be $70,000, right? Like who has $70,000 lying around when you're trying to pay student loans and like all these things, and so that's why I like introducing people to house hacking, because it's a way to like bypass that. So if you're listening and you haven't heard of house hacking, it's basically buying a multi unit property. Living in one unit and renting out the other units, and by living in it as a primary residence, you're able to like bypass that really high downpayment and put a lower down payment down 3%, three and a half percent 5-10%, depending on the loan you get. And so I love introducing that because not only is house hacking a way to get a lower down payment, but it could potentially lower your living expenses, depending on how the numbers work out. You have tenants that are literally paying your debt for you. If you get a mortgage, that's debt, your tenants are paying your debt, you're living there for free, you're building wealth. And so that was a long answer to your question. I think funding is a huge factor that like keeps people out of the game. And House hacking is one way to kind of get around that.

Rory Gill:

The market that we're in right now where it's very much a seller's market, the rate of appreciation is a little out of control, making it tougher and tougher, especially for the first time homebuyer to get into this space. How has it changed the work that you're doing and working with your clients?

Kendra Barnes:

I want to make sure that everyone knows about the resources available to them as a first time homebuyer - there's so many grants and downpayment assistance programs out there that I wish I had known about. They can literally eliminate or lower your downpayment. And so we're talking about grants that are at a city level in a national level, right that can that will literally lower or eliminate that downpayment. And that's one of the biggest hurdles to homeownership, I really believe is the downpayment.

Rory Gill:

In my background, my father, my brother, my sister, oddly enough, not me. But they all went into house hacking without realizing that's what they're doing, you know, either bought probably in the case, my father duplex, or in the case of my siblings, a multi bedroom place and rented out the other bedrooms. And that's how they got the toehold and we're able to spin up their careers. You know, my sister's a teacher, and she used this income to really supplement the work she does and kind of free her up to take work like that not necessarily the highest paid W-2 job in the world. Yeah, I love house hacking. And I think it's something that I wish more of my own clients were aware of when they were going to the first time home buying space, what are the strategies are you encouraging right now?

Kendra Barnes:

Yeah, I really love kind of thinking outside

Rory Gill:

Love to hear what you know about the space because the box, like I mentioned earlier, like when people think of rental income, they think of just a regular tenant like but what about the different creative ways to rent your space out like doing what's called the location rental strategies. So renting it out for photo shoots, film shoots meetings, people are renting out their backyard spaces and making rental income. So there are so many ways. And if you think about the age that we're in, like with social media, there's so many content creators, people are looking for spaces that look really cool to film, YouTube videos, cooking tutorials. And so if you have a basement apartment, right, you don't have to put a long term tenant in there. What if you just rent it out to rent it out on Peerspace, and where you can rent it by the hour to content creators and things like that. And so just kind of thinking outside the box. One thing that I personally want to try is the shipping container home space. That's something that I'm personally looking into. So I think it's really cool. it's something that intrigues me. But in our area, in we're in Boston, Massachusetts, the the zoning restrictions and the code restrictions are so onerous that some of the more novel ways to invest are almost ruled out from the very beginning so that the smaller homes or container homes, I mean, I'd love to hear anything that you that you know about the space or what you hope to do.

Kendra Barnes:

Yes, and that's a huge thing is making sure the zoning of the land will allow it and also that the city will allow it because some cities aren't allowing like shipping container homes. I'm in San Antonio, Texas right now, like we started out investing. I don't know if I mentioned that we started out in DC. And we also have a rental in Baltimore, Maryland. But we moved to San Antonio right before the pandemic to be close to family. And in San Antonio, they do allow shipping container homes and I've seen some around the city. And so that's huge, making sure that it's actually allowed where you are. But there are also some alternatives to shipping container homes like already built like modular homes and accessory dwelling units and things like that. There are a few companies I've had my eyes on that are like shipping pretty much already prefabs like modular homes, which is also very interesting.

Rory Gill:

I followed a project in a nearby city was a six-unit condominium building, but it was largely prefabricated, actually in Pennsylvania and then trucked all the way up here and assembled on site. And I thought that was fairly innovative. That's not something we see too much around here. But I love the innovation in this space. So you know aside from Key Resource, you wrote a book recently and it's coming very soon. It's

available for pre-order:

Acres - Inspiring Stories of 25 Real Estate Investors who are Normalizing Black Wealth One Acre at a Time. When is this book coming out?

Rory Gill:

So the long title of the book, there's the word

Kendra Barnes:

Yeah, so it's available for pre-order now it won't ship until the summer and actually self-published it, which is why like the long lead time, I want to make sure I know like how many to actually put out there in print. But I'm super excited about it. Because I just feel like in the black community, there's a lot of bad news all the time. But I started seeing this shift where so many young black investors were like, just killing it in a real estate game. And I wanted to shine a light on that, because I know that representation is very important, right? And people need to see themselves represented in the stories that inspire them. And so I wanted to really just showcase I mean, the people in this book are doing normalizing black wealth one acre at a time. And the term amazing things. You'll hear stories about people that went from homelessness, like sleeping in a car to owning multimillion dollar real estate portfolios. Another couple went from six figures of consumer debt to owning multimillion dollar real estate portfolio, people flip houses wholesale, all kinds of different stories in there. I'm excited about it, because it's history, right like this. This is history. And I'm humbled to be able to bring those stories to the world. normalizing caught my attention is that I think your prior answer touched on that a little bit by Can you explain the word normalizing in there? Yes, I really want it to not be such a surprise. And this comes from personal experience, like when I go and do business around the city, and we're, you know, getting permits or just whatever needs to be done for our properties. Whoever we're doing business with behind the counter is like, well, who's the owner, we actually had police come to one of our properties one time and to talk to us and that's, a whole other story. And they they're like, well, who's the owner of this apartment building? And I'm like, It's me. And they didn't believe me. So I had to literally go to my file cabinet, get the deed for the property, show them. That wasn't enough, I had to get my ID and then show them yes, this is me, this is my name on the deed, then they asked for my husband. They're like, Where's your husband? So then I had to get him to come home from work to prove to the police that we actually own the building. And I'm like, okay, so it's not normal. People don't just immediately believe me when I say yes, I'm young. And I'm black. And I own this property, our own multiple properties. I remember when I worked a nine to five, telling my co workers what we were doing, and they were just like, Did you hit the lottery? Like, they just couldn't fathom. And so this is what I mean, by normalizing. Like, I want it to no longer be a shock, or a surprise or something that is out of the ordinary. And so there are so many stories out there that prove that, you know, this is the new normal.

Rory Gill:

Is that experience common among those you profiled in the book?

Kendra Barnes:

Yes, yeah, we all always talk about it. It's like always such a surprise, and not even from those who are outside of our community. I mean, even talking to people who are also black are just like, what, like, how did y'all do this? Like, did you hit the lottery? Are you are you like, you come from money. So I want to make sure that everybody can see what we're doing and to inspire others. Like, you can do this too. Like, if I can do it, I literally had bad money habits all like well into my 20s. So I have not always been good with money. I was not born with money, like, so if I can do it, literally anybody can do it. That's that's the story.

Rory Gill:

Can you also preview some of the other themes and lessons that are in the book? I know, some, we don't necessarily wait until summer to hear the whole - to get everything. What are some of the other themes that that you touched upon in the book?

Kendra Barnes:

Yeah, it's really just showing how each person kind of like the trajectory of their real estate career or you know, their real estate journey and talking about how they went up against like a family being naysayers, like you can't do this, like this is crazy. Talking about how they got creative, like finding funding, right? Once you when you're a new real estate investor after like the first or second or third deal, you start really running out of money. Like it's like, where do I get the next amount of funds from? So talking about like battling the naysayers, you know, getting creative with money, how they were able to overcome some of those hurdles, it's all in there. So the book is not only meant to be like inspiring and empowering, but they really give some really good educational gems in the book. And so that's what I'm excited about as well.

Rory Gill:

When you put together the book, how did you identify and locate these investors?

Kendra Barnes:

I have been following a lot of them on Instagram. And it's funny because when I first started The Key Resource, I would just DM people that I saw, like other young black investors, like hey, can I repost your information on my page like this is so cool. I've always wanted to shine a light on what others are doing because what I realized really quickly is the way that I invest in real estate. I'm a buy and hold investor, but my audience may not. That might not be for them. And I want to make sure I was showing them a diverse, you know, diverse ways to invest in real estate. So I'm like, Hey, can I repost this Can I repeat And then what I started doing was hosting online summits. I'm like, let's do an online summit to really show people different strategies. So it's just evolved. And now I'm like, well, let's put this in a book. But not just any book. Like, let's put this in a coffee table book that's like a really heavy, beautiful piece of art. That's also educational that will also like, stay with people for a lifetime. It's a conversation starter, it can. It's a beautiful decor item, right. And it's also educational, inspiring. So what I did was I started just reaching out to some of my friends in the space and people I admire on social media. I did audio interviews, just like we're doing now got them transcribed, and then I kind of summarized it down into what kind of reads like a feature article in a magazine for each person. And so it's also coupled with like beautiful, beautiful pictures of them standing in front of their properties standing on land they own, standing with their families in front of these properties. The really cool thing too, is I'm using the proceeds of the book to go to a scholarship fund for where I went to undergrad, which is North Carolina A&T State University. It's a historically black college, there was literally the college was founded as an 1890 land grant university, the 1890 land grant universities, land was set aside in 1890, for the schools for Native Americans and black Americans who were not able to get into schools, like they should have, like they should have back then. And it's just so cool. That's a full circle moment of book about normalizing black wealth is going to be giving scholarships to a school that was literally founded because black people couldn't go to school. Couldn't get that, that higher education. And so like I said, I'm humbled to be sharing these stories. But I'm even more humbled to be giving, like back to students at my alma mater, so super cool. Sorry, I'm just like going on.

Rory Gill:

I love that. And I didn't have more questions. I want to end just kind of on that note right there. But in interviewed all these people and summarize the work, was there anything that surprised you?

Kendra Barnes:

Was there anything that surprised me? At the end of each interview I asked for, like words of wisdom from everybody. And there is just this common theme. And I don't want to ruin that either. But it was just interesting that everyone's so different. The ages are different. They're all from different parts of the country, they all invest differently. But all had something pretty similar to say as far as their words of wisdom that they learned from being in the real estate industry for several years. And I thought that was really, really cool.

Rory Gill:

What's coming next for you? What are you working on next?

Kendra Barnes:

So besides this book, I'm actually wanting to make this I want Acres to be like a series, I want it to be volumes and volumes, almost like those encyclopedias back in the day. That's how I envisioned this, because this is only 25 stories. Like there's so many more stories to tell, I'm just scratching the surface. And so as soon as I get to a point where I can start working, working on Book Two, I'm going to be doing that. Also, I'm the mom of a two year old who was home with us all day, and that's literally what I do. I would say homeschooling, but she's two but like, basically, that's it for me right now.

Rory Gill:

Okay, that's a lot. Um, now's the part of our program where we we ask the same questions of all our guests. As we head to the wrap up. If you had to speak on one topic with little or no preparation, get up on stage and speak for 20 to 30 minutes. What's the topic you can speak about?

Kendra Barnes:

House hacking? Definitely.

Rory Gill:

Alright, can you tell us something that happened early on in your life that affects your life and career today?

Kendra Barnes:

Yes, I would say, definitely, the entrepreneurship in me. My mom allowed me to set up a store in our house like years ago and learning about the value of money and like reinvesting the money, like that kind of thing. Even though we didn't talk about investing. I still learned early on I think, like buying candy for this much and then reselling it for this much and the profits and going back and buying more. And so I think that always stuck with me.

Rory Gill:

Finally, what's something that you're reading, watching or listening to these days?

Kendra Barnes:

Yeah, I just finished listening to on Audible, a book called What happened to you about how things in your life like impact you and things like that it's by Oprah and I forget the other author's name, but it's really really good.

Rory Gill:

Great. Finally, you know, you're working on a lot of things right there. How how can our listeners find you?

Kendra Barnes:

Yeah, you guys can find me on Instagram at The Key resource or my website, thekeyresource.com If you have any questions or just want to say hey, you can definitely DM me and let me know that you found out about me on this podcast, and I cannot wait to chat with you guys.

Rory Gill:

Thank you so much, Kendra for joining us. Kendra is the founder and creator of The Key Resource and the author of Acres. My name is Rory Gill. You can find me at NextHome Titletown nexthometitletown.com, or UrbanVillage Legal, urbanvillage egal.com Thank you for so much for listening like subscribing all that and we'll see you next time.

Announcer:

This has been The Real Estate Law Podcast. Because real estate is more than just pretty pictures. And law goes well beyond the paperwork and courtroom arguments. were powered by NextHome Titletown greater Boston's progressive real estate brokerage. More at nexthometitletown.com and UrbanVillage Legal, Massachusetts real estate counseling serving savvy property owners, lenders and investors more at urbanvillagelegal.com. Today's conversation was not legal advice, but we hope you found it entertaining and informative. Discover more at realestatelawpodcast.com Thank you for listening!