Paw'd Defiance

Be the First

April 02, 2019 Season 1 Episode 2
Paw'd Defiance
Be the First
Chapters
Paw'd Defiance
Be the First
Apr 02, 2019 Season 1 Episode 2
Amanda Figueroa, Director of Student Transition Programs, and Yanira Pacheco Ortiz, First Generation Student Initiatives Coordinator.
A discussion about what it means to be a first-generation college student and the ways universities can support those students and help them succeed.
Show Notes Transcript

Amanda Figueroa, Director of Student Transition Programs, and Yanira Pacheco Ortiz, First Generation Student Initiatives Coordinator, talk about what it means to be a first-generation college student. Figueroa and Pacheco Ortiz relay their experiences as first-generation students and discuss ways in which universities can support students who are the first in their families to attend college.

Speaker 1:
0:01
It's not sufficient to just earn that degree. There's a whole set of cultural family capital that goes with making that degree means something.
Speaker 2:
0:11
Thanks
Speaker 3:
0:16
from U. Dot. Tacoma. This is part defiance. Welcome to part defiance where we don't lecture it, but we do educate today we're talking about first generation students with you, the Tacoma director of student transitions, Amanda Figueroa Engineered Pacheco, first generation student initiative coordinator. So what's your role for your university? What do you do?
Speaker 4:
0:50
I can start, sure, that'd be great. Yeah. Um, well my position is brand new. We started in January. Um, and thanks to the advocacy of students, faculty and staff at University of Washington Tacoma, they created this position, which the title is first generation student initiatives coordinator. So my responsibility is to develop, um, curriculum programming, um, that it will help advance the academic goals of our students are first generation students. But it's not only developing programming is also to serve as an advocate for students and oh, and also staff, faculty and staff who can, who are first generation also serve as a advisor for students to help them achieve their academic goals and their professional goals and serve as a resource for faculty and staff. So that would look like, for example, as a, as a way where I can provide them with data, um, latest trends and issues pertaining to first generation students. And I hope I can serve personally. I hope I can serve as a role model and also as a student at the same time.
Speaker 1:
1:55
Thank you. What about you Amanda? So as director of student transition programs, I say that we work k to gray to support big dreams. So that means that all of our work in student transitions is anchored in career. So knowing what, what success looks like for students after they graduate with a college degree. And then also new student programs. So orientation and then pack advisors who act as student leaders and orientation guides and then pre college outreach. So we have a position that focuses specifically on helping all of our community understand what our post secondary pathways and how do they identify right fit pathways for themselves. That is great work that you guys are doing. Um, so the topic for today is first generation students. The first thing I want to start off is what is first gen? What is first gen to you?
Speaker 4:
2:42
For me at first, and actually the way we're using it right now on campus is first generation student is a student that is the first in their family or the Co, uh, in their family to attend college and hopefully graduate from college. Also. Um, in my case, for me being a first generation student still means being a role model. I was the first one in my household to attend college. We were three. We are three kids, three kids in the household. Um, my parents, my father was in the military and my mom was not able to, of course she did high school and then she was trying to complete an associates, which is interesting because she was able to complete it after while I was doing my undergraduate program. She's a super woman. Yeah. She's a super woman. I love her. So, um, it means for me to be a role model, but at the same time to be able to pay it forward for those who actually were able to help me achieve what I have been able to achieve.
Speaker 1:
3:38
Yeah. That's great. I resonate with a lot of what you just shared. Uh, so for me, I'm also a first gen student, first and my family to go to college. Um, my dad had some technical training, uh, when he was discharged from the army and went to actually Bates here in Tacoma. And then, uh, he moved to Chicago. And when my family came back to Tacoma, um, my mom, uh, went from being a stay at home mom and going to Bates and earning a and accounting or bookkeeping. I'm certificates. So for me, being first gen is also, um, navigating and, and not only paying it forward, but making sure that that information gets back to my family. So actually my husband just started his college career last fall at PCC. Yeah. Shout out to the titans. And so it's been really fun to, to just continue to have those conversations and my house and with my nephew. And, um, it's just a, that's another, I think big part of being first gen is that you navigate and then you figure out how to widen those pathways and reduce barriers.
Speaker 3:
4:35
So now going back a little bit too, like what first gen is, what are some of your experiences being in college? Because we oftentimes say, well, I'm a frustration student, but we don't want to think about our experiences during college. What was that like for you?
Speaker 4:
4:51
We're in my household, there was not an option. Uh, I was the oldest and the only female in my household. And the instructions given to me or the directions where either you go to college or you get to enlist in the military. Um, for me, I was always, my dream was to become a marine biologist. The challenge was that to do this I will have to move out of my household, which that was a challenge there. And also it meant that I would probably will have to pay more for it, which I couldn't afford at that point. So I remember many of my counselors and even family members suggesting, listen, you, one of your main concerns is how information is disseminated, who has access to information and how they use this information. Why don't you, have you considered a study, mass communications, even public relations.
Speaker 4:
5:43
Have you even considered that? And to be very honest, I never thought about that. I never thought that that was even, I feel Diana could be part of, um, some of my, uh, especially in high school, some of my counselors in high school provided me with some information and, and especially there were suggesting that I should do that. And not only that, it would allow me to stay at home, um, stay at home and did commute to campus and actually go to us campus that I could afford. And that's what I did. I register on campus were University of Puerto Rico and this was, this is a land grant institution actually and it makes it day one of their mission is to make sure they make it affordable for students to, uh, to attend school to attend college. Um, I did, I register and I was able to conduct my, uh, to my program, bachelor's degree in mass communications with facilitation and public relations.
Speaker 4:
6:35
But in the process I had to work with the idea that my father for my father was difficult for him to accept that his daughter was going to college. Um, to understand the process of what it meant for me to study in college. An example of that was I remember what I was at home. I will study very late until very late at night and even til the morning and my dad will come relate to them and my dad will come in the middle of the night and shut, turn the lights off and I will tell him that I'm studying. And he just finished his and he says, Mommy, Huh, you are wasting electricity. So you need to go to sleep. So it was telling because I couldn't challenge him. Yeah. The challenges I see like little small things and you're like, I need some time to study. Absolutely. And to explain to him what it meant.
Speaker 4:
7:23
Why did I have to stay late to study that it was not just one course, how many hours I needed to do that and I myself was trying to learn what it meant for me. Um, but those were some of the examples that I, that I had to do. I didn't have transportation. I dependent on public transportation, therefore group meetings from peers. It was difficult for me to go because most of them were off campus. Also, I had four jobs to supplement my income. Wow. Yes. That's a lie. And you know that when you work so many hours, that takes away from study at the same time. So it's like, where do I balance it? Right. So those were some of the challenges that I work with, but we were able to manage with some mentoring and help and, and, and all the time with the support of my family. I must say, yeah, all the time. My family was supportive. They knew that I needed to complete this, this, how can I say this journey and it was my responsibility to do so. Yeah. Thanks for sharing that. I would like to hear a Amanda Mandela. What were your challenges?
Speaker 1:
8:23
Yeah, I was really fortunate in high school that I went to a lot of advanced classes, but my parents didn't know how to go to college and there were lots of family things that were happening in my life at that time. And so when I graduated from high school, I got a job right away and then saw all my friends go off to college. And then I was working doing customer service for a garbage disposal company, one of many jobs that I would hold it before I finished college. Uh, and then actually about a year and a half after that was like, gosh, I am really living hand to mouth. I want to go to, I really want to, I want to find out what this is about. And so started going to school at night at Green River community college and got my Aa there and the whole time, like really interested in science, but I didn't know anybody who was a scientist.
Speaker 1:
9:11
And some of my major concerns as I was graduating high school was like, how am I going to have health insurance? Right? Like I gotta pay my bills, I got to care for myself. I got it right. And that'll like not even let alone support family. So, so I had some great mentors. I did some volunteering at the Seattle aquarium. Um, and that makes some great mentors there. And, uh, they encouraged me to go into the sciences and, uh, I had a family conversation with my mom and dad and said, I don't know how to get a job in this field, but I know I'm really passionate about it. And they supported me and said, let's do it. So I went down to Oregon State for a year for program, which was canceled like 10 weeks before the program was supposed to start because of budget crisis down in Oregon and then came back up to Seattle.
Speaker 1:
9:57
And actually finished and got my bachelors from U Dub Seattle, only attending there three quarters. So I kind of have some similar pathways where I like didn't really know where I was supposed to go. I didn't know that you could attend like field courses at other universities as a student at one university. And so a lot of similar challenges. Um, and then when I went on to graduate school, right. So I graduated with a degree in biology and then, um, was networking my butt off because I was so worried about having a job and landing a job. Right. Because my family is like, yes, we support you in going to size with like, I have to get a job when I leave
Speaker 5:
10:33
and it's already a hard field to gain in. So that's one of the challenges like stem, yes. Women in stem and all that is very hard. Yes. But then when I went on to go to graduates
Speaker 1:
10:44
school, it was, it was an even, it was a step further outside of my family's wisdom. Um, and so my parents actually did not support my decision to go to graduate school until a year after I started, um, in the sciences. And a lot of students don't know this and a lot of fields in the sciences, they actually pay you to go to graduate school and then you can get research assistant assistantship. I didn't even know the history and teaching assistant ships. Um, and so I have those lined up and I was accepted and my mom was like, she did not believe me that someone was going to pay me. Right. Because when you're working two, three jobs, you see your family, you see how hard they work to make it, and then you're like,
Speaker 5:
11:25
mom, someone's going to pay me to look at fish gonads all day. And they're like, what? You're making that up? How much are you in debt? What are you doing? They see those little things like who's gonna pay? Who's gonna Watch that? Right. And I'm like, mom, people would do that. Okay. They paid for those little things that sound a little bit ridiculous, but they do pay for it. Absolutely. And sometimes that makes you doubt yourself. Yeah. Process too. Yes. And not that right. Not that she didn't love me, not that she didn't, but she had no knowledge of how do you navigate in the, in
Speaker 1:
11:54
these fields. And I had gotten great mentorship who said, if you want to grow, you need to go to graduate school. So I went and got my master's and I'll never forget, like I was so steeped in academia by that time I was like, I don't think I'm going to go to the ceremony. Oh, I'll be fine. But mom's like, no, you're going, you're going. And I will never forget like graduating and seeing her come across the field with just tears streaming down her face. And then I got this huge celebration basket for my family in Texas. It was, I mean,
Speaker 4:
12:29
because they see all the effort that you put on it yet and, and, and, and how the effort, but it's hard work. It's hard work books because usually that's what you think of is just books. No, it's vaguely. So a lot of hard work. A lot of words.
Speaker 3:
12:48
Hey everyone, it's Maria. I wanted to take a moment to talk about first gen fellows. The program provides support and I just do first gen students, but to all students, I edup Tacoma First Gen fellows, hosts a number of activities and workshops is signed to help people successfully transitioned to college. In the past, the fellows have hosted bonfires, career workshops and stress release sessions. If you want to know more about the program, visit the Youtube's of Cooma website and type first gen fellows into the search bar. I want to talk a little bit more, you know, like what, what happened after college? What was that like after college? Because we do think about like, okay, applying to colleges and then once in college, but what happens after college? What was that like?
Speaker 4:
13:36
So my story is very similar in terms of that. I, I finish, I was working on my undergraduate program and I was noticing that, um, I was, uh, I was scared. I was thinking, who's going to give me a job, where I'm going to find a job, especially in media and communications. We're back home. I noticed that it, unless you were with the right groups and the right networks, it was very difficult to find a position. Needless to say, even an internship. I unfortunately, when I was in college, I didn't have a mentor. I didn't have, I didn't know that I even had an academic advisor who can help me in the process. I had to navigate everything through my peers to be very honest. They were the ones who helped me. And in the process, I remember one counselor from another college, um, she had heard that I was interested.
Speaker 4:
14:24
I wanted to travel and I told her and one of my peers, one of my friends actually introduced me to her and she said, listen, have you heard about national student exchange? And I said, I have no idea exactly what does that mean. And then my second question is how much is it? And she said, I think that we might be able to make it worth your while and we might be able to help you to, uh, um, cover their costs or maybe even partially partially funded. But I think you qualify, you want to learn more about your areas in communications, you want to learn more about other places. I know right now you won't be able to do study abroad, but at least you can work in this program. You can actually travel to another unit, a university anywhere in the United States or their um, um, Hawaii including how wire, Guam, you can go take credits in your field and at the same time practice English.
Speaker 4:
15:18
And I say, I'm sold. And she said, plus you can go to Canada. And I said, we're done. We're done. We're done. Actually that was my thought. So we're going and she truly helped me in the process to find funding and to take credits. Actually I was able to get, I did it throughout the summer while I was there. I was exposed to, I was at the Suny Oswego and I was exposed to some faculty who actually said they saw it. They told me, they say you have certain talents that we would like to be able to connect with and through you connect three year university. No one ever while I was in college told me that I had talents, that I had skills, he had skills. Bagley cause it's more about like what can you not do? Correct. What do you not know how to do satellites, what can you contribute?
Speaker 4:
16:06
It was more of a deficiency model rather than what I, what was I contributing to this institution or to the field? Um, I still was a junior so I said I don't know where to stand. He said, well the first thing is we were going to get too connected with a speech communication association and B because your areas in public relations, how about you help us develop a conference on in your campus and you will be our connection. You tell that to a student in pee, in public relations. I'm thinking, what did he [inaudible] presentation and now you're telling me that I am going to, I didn't have any idea what a conference man, how to organize it and how to be a liaison because that's what she was selling me and I was not even faculty or even staff in the university. And she said, we'll teach you but you will be our connection.
Speaker 4:
16:55
First of all, we want to make sure we have a lot of students involved in this process. And I said, fantastic. So I was taking classes with this professor John loverage Sanborn Matsu I will never forget. And wherever she is I will always shout out. Thank you. That's right. That's right. And she will, she got me, she paid for my membership in the organization and she taught me while I was there, she gave me the instructions of what I needed to do. And when I came back to Puerto Rico, University of Puerto Rico, I help her in the process. So I serve almost as a liaison, but at the same time as an ambassador for students. And he was one of the best experiences in my life. The interesting thing about that is that actually gave me an opportunity for people in my college to see me and what I was bringing to the table.
Speaker 4:
17:38
Um, unfortunately there were other faculty in the department that we find more people in my path. I found more people who instead of lift to up. Yeah, they just Dave opposite. Exactly. Unfortunately. Oh for, to me, I remember her name too, but I'll never forget when I went to, to meet with her to look at what were my car, I needed courses to finish for my senior year. I'll never forget when she said, you're never going to make it. I don't think you have the skillsets to say to be in this field as that moment. Of course I'm young. I didn't know, first of all, it was the level of respect. You have an elder, you're not supposed to contradict what they're saying. So they're supposed to be wise, you know, and they're supposed to guide us. And that's where she said saw at that moment.
Speaker 4:
18:28
I took it for, that was my reality. But I was very fortunate in my mom is a very strong woman and she has never given up on anything in life. And I remember that I had her support so I'll never forget that. At that point I threw her and and with my friends and my family, especially my grandmother, they say, you are going to come to whatever he said that you were going to do, you're going to continue, you're going to finish it. So I got connected what I was there doing, my national student exchange, I also connected with other peers that were going to graduate school and you're like, I can just talk to you guys. And they were saying, why don't you were going to graduate school? How about do you go to credit schools too? And I was like, that's not for me.
Speaker 4:
19:13
I don't think I can do that fairly do an Undergrad and for what? And they say, listen, they will pay for your studies. And I think, I don't think that's true. I thought they were lying to me. So, and what else are you good? Good, right. One of my jobs, somebody I received a call and they say, hey, there's a recruiter from Iowa state university who wants to talk to you. And uh, so I had took the phone call, not only the, they wanted to talk to me, but the person spoke Spanish. And I'll never forget when I answered the phone and I see this, his name was high made of Nandes and he was explaining to me, he says, we, somebody mentioned that you're interested in coming to graduate school. This is what we can offer you. We can offer you an assistantship, we can offer you also, uh, um, tuition remission and all that good stuff.
Speaker 4:
20:01
So I went to graduate school at what I was in graduate school. Uh, the person who hired me, who was my, became my mentor. And the funny thing is that he hired me to actually coordinate the program that, um, that recruited graduate students and providing them assistantships. So we had our budget of $1 million and he just said, here, work with that. Um, Amanda, a little bit of what, what did you do after college? What was that experience like? That transition from, okay, I'm done with school and then what do I do next? You know? Yes. Yeah. So, uh, the whole time I was in college, I was thinking about jobs, right? So, um, I had a, I was doing a lot of networking, um, to look for research positions. And so I was very fortunate that when I was in my undergraduate in Seattle,
Speaker 1:
20:48
wrapping up my degree, I got connected through a friend of a friend, uh, to the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. And so I met with the, uh, one of the investigators there and started doing things like just cleaning fish tanks in their lap. And then was really fortunate the timing worked out where I was able to move full time into a research assistantship there as a research tech in the lab and then got a lot of mentorship and was encouraged by, um, uh, my employer, her name is Catherine Pikal. Um, to then just collect stories. And she told me, when you have this job, you can do it two ways. Either ways, right? You can come in nine to five and go home. Or if you want to use this as an opportunity to think about graduate school, then we'll find a research project for you. You come to lab meetings, we'll send you to national conferences and then also help you network and you can go to a research talks and things like that.
Speaker 1:
21:46
So I chose the second option because I didn't really know what this graduate school thing was about. Uh, and through that decided I did want to go to graduate school. And when I was in graduate school, again at Udub, Seattle, uh, in their fisheries program, as I was entering that program, had an opportunity to connect with other graduate students who also identified as Latinex or native American and a help to cofound a student chapter of a national organization called [inaudible] Society for advancement of Hispanics, Chicanos, and native Americans in the sciences. Wow. And it was the last sale, but it's sounds really good. It's so good. And they have this great story about how they started at a scientific meeting where a native American and Latinex scientists were in an elevator. Going to lunch and they said, gosh, if this elevator crashes at this conference, all the Brown people are going, oh my God.
Speaker 1:
22:38
So, so it was an organization that was started, uh, from folks from particular communities for that community. And it's just how this really beautiful, powerful history. So as I was entering in and considering starting this chapter, I had an older graduate student, her name is Charlotte Lambert, Doctor Charlotte Leonberg. Uh, and she was like, Hey, you should come to us with this national conference is I can't afford that. Let's ask the school for money. And I'll say, can we do that? Can we ask them for money? And Yeah, and she got me funding to be able to attend and then it was over. And so in graduate school, one of the ways that I was prepared for success is that I had this really tight network of student leaders within a student organization who were really passionate, um, and we're in the right place at the right time where the university was like, how do we diversify stem programs and what does this look like? And so God is seated a lot of different tables about how do we do that in stem. Um, and how do we do that with genuine student voice in leadership and have just continued those lessons and um, went back last spring to celebrate the 10 year anniversary of the chapter and wow, I reached out
Speaker 4:
23:46
to the other founders and got video shout outs and encouragements to the current chapter students. So that has definitely been hugely foundational and how I think about my leadership.
Speaker 3:
23:59
Hi again as I know it would be a good time to talk with you about the, we're first generation project about 65% of EDF Tacoma students are first generation. We created this project both as a way to honor our students and to serve as a resource for those who are thinking about 10 in college. But I don't know where to start. If you're a first generation student or if you know someone who is a cruise you to visit the, you'd have Tacoma website and type. We are first generation into the search bar. Okay. That's it for now. Back to the show. So now with, based on your experiences, what do you do now? How does that relate to the role that you have at the university?
Speaker 4:
24:38
I will say, um, through my, I've been working in student affairs for 19 years and I have been very fortunate to have very strong colleagues that believe in opportunities for students, especially first generation students. Um, programs that I have worked with. We, we have been able to work with from the middle school school students, opportunities for middle school and high school students all the way through their tenure in college and guiding them through the past to graduate school. The process. Um, I will say that one of the areas that I would like for example here I would like to emphasize is providing opportunities for students where they can have access to those, um, internships, research opportunities or different needs according to their classification here. Because each student has a particular need according to their growth. For example, a fresh, the needs of a freshmen students, first generation freshman students are going to be very different for the sophomore, junior, or senior.
Speaker 4:
25:43
Where are you still work? Uh, I was able to coordinate a program. It was a George Washington carver scholarship program where we were able to provide a scholarship, a full scholarship for students. So all throughout their tenure in college doing their undergraduate program. And to be very honest, as scholarship give a scholarship to a student, it's very easy. Yes, they're easy. The most difficult part is to make sure that you as a student can keep that scholarship and make it grow and grow yourself holistically. And that should be the responsibility of the institution. We can give a scholarship, but our responsibilities, make sure that the student, we can retain the student and graduate. And my hope is that while I'm here through collaborations with different units on our campus, that we can create those pathways for the students where they can succeed. And not only that, that they can grow holistically as a student and as a civic minded human being and that they can see that their experiences, their past, the current and past experiences are an asset to are an institution that they're contributing to the history and the culture of this particular institution wherever they may be.
Speaker 4:
26:50
In this case you'd have Tacoma. I again, I would like to be able to provide those through connections and collaborations, opportunities for students according to their classification here for seniors and juniors that they can experience. What is research to publish, to connect with faculty, have a mentorship for freshmen and sophomore students. So for them to start thinking about study abroad maybe. Yeah,
Speaker 5:
27:12
nationalists dynamics. There's a lot of things that they don't know about solutely
Speaker 4:
27:16
but our bottle also to be able to give them an information that they don't know that they don't know. Resources, connect them to resources, guide them through resources. Cause I can't tell you, hey, you might want to go to the office of global affairs and think about it and get this information. But it's better if actually I can say, let me connect you with so and so in this particular office. This is what you can expect to when you visit this office. Actually, I even have one of your peers who has user services and these are what it, this is what they gain. But I would like for both of you to meet. So maybe develop a peer mentoring mentorship program where the students actually can have people who can relate to them, who are going through the same situations of experiences that they can trust at the same time.
Speaker 4:
28:01
So those are some of the programs in my hope also is that we get to know who are freshmen are first generation students on our campus. Who are they? What are their needs? What are they bringing to our campus and what services do we have already they can meet those needs and what services we can actually develop to actually help them and help them to succeed in their career path. Um, and instead of having this mentality, because most of the times it will need institutional. We will have to change our institutional mindset. Whereas most of the times where most folk mostly focused on is the student prepared to come to college. We're focused on that instead of preparedness rather that it's our institution prepared for us food. That's exactly. Yeah. So I know it will take time and I know we're ready. I mean, through the advocacy advocacy of our students, you all did a fabulous job. You continue to do our great job. They had advocacy also faculty and staff. You all have been able to create this possession. You all have been able to have actually have a space for the program. Um, there's no stopping you all now, you know. And the important thing is that I respect the legacy of those who have worked so hard to develop, to be where we are right now and make it grow.
Speaker 5:
29:18
Hmm. Hmm. Amanda. Yes. What are some things that you know, that because of your college experience you have implemented now though you had a position at the university or what are some things that you want to change in the future as well? Oh Gosh, that's a really long question. Do we have another hour? No. Okay, that's fine. I'll be short. Uh, so, so many things. One of the things that
Speaker 1:
29:42
I did not appreciate at the time, um, my graduate degree is in aquatic and fishery sciences, but along the pathway, through softness, through my networks, I got connected to learning scientists as well. And so really study that intersection of how do people learn and specifically how do organizations, individuals create equitable learning environments and think about culturally sustaining education. And so taking that framework of understanding how people learn, understanding how humans have evolved to be learning machines and we are learning all the time in formal settings and outside of formal settings that that's a lens that I bring to my work. Also thinking about first generation experiences. I have my own, um, you know, my own set of experiences. They don't intersect and all the ways that other folks do, right. So I always remind myself that my experiences are not everyone's experiences, but I know that my experiences did not line up with the majority of folks who have been successful in that system.
Speaker 1:
30:48
And so remaining curious, um, I really, uh, in the last few years have really embraced this concept of gracious space. And, and part of that talks about inviting the stranger, which means you're actively intentionally seeking out folks whose experiences and perspectives are different than your own. And that's definitely something I try to practice as an educator at Udub Tacoma, some of my dreams for, you'd have to coma. Oh my God. [inaudible] comes the dreams. Some of my dreams is that as an institution that we shift our framework a lot. Like, um, what you Nieto was sharing. Um, and so that we don't just talk about students graduating, but we talk about them graduating with multiple offers. Our data are very clear that our students are coming to us because they understand that earning a college degree will positively impact their future. And so I really had been, um, singing, I don't know, beating a drum, singing a song, however you want to say it, about, um, really inviting the campus to be thought partners in what happens after they earn that degree.
Speaker 1:
31:57
It is, it's not sufficient to just earn that degree. There's a whole set of cultural family capital that goes with making that degree means something so that you get to where you want to get. And I'm not just talking about the wages that you earn. I think economic mobility is a large part of it, but there is a particular kind of privilege that you have when you can take your education and then you understand then how to utilize that to make your own definition of success. And then then you understand the steps and you understand, um, kind of the dominant system pathway so that you either choose how to navigate within those or say, forget those pathways. I'm going to create my own pathways because you take it with you. It was like education is like I have my own little, like I'm taking that
Speaker 4:
32:40
with me every time I go, I go down the street, I go to the store. Yes. It's everywhere. You know, it shapes. Yeah. He'd really shapes you and is interesting because it will always be with you and you're able to see how it opens. And I know it sounds like a cool shape, but it opens many doors, windows open. It provides you with many opportunities and at the same time I think it's your responsibility to wireless send me tougher about myself, I think is my responsibility. At the same time as I was, there were paths available for me, um, an already created that I should do the same for those who are coming after me will be to make it easier for them. Yeah, absolutely. And actually at least to make it fair, at least to make it a fair, um, to carve that path for them, Eh, if as best as I can and with the resources that I have.
Speaker 4:
33:31
Um, I think it's my responsibility at this point just at least in, in two. And we can all work, walk and work together to achieve those calls and get them, like you say, Amanda, to that stage that is not just graduating. And then what can people find you if they need to reach out to Guinea route or Amanda? Oh, excellent. So we actually, we got our new space. We're located in the mat building, mattress building and room to 13. That's on the second floor. Uh, it's, it's the office that he used to be financial aid office right now. So that's where we're going to getting very confused about right. Walking into financial aid, like knowing this freshman fellows, which actually is a good thing because then we get a lot of people who were not expecting that space. And then we gives us an opportunity to explain who are we, what we do, how can we help?
Speaker 4:
34:17
And how can they be part of the program? Um, so we're located in the second floor math two 13 and we are on the first floor of the mattress factory and ran one zero six and so you can connect there with our career development. We've got a drop in hours with our career prep consultants. We've got the pack advisers who work out of their orientation programs. We've got a lot of opportunities including access ambassadors who work with our pre college visits and we usually have food around our table. So always, always, always the best part. And I will also say sometimes when folks think about career development, they only think about jobs. Um, and to just step back for a moment, when I say students walking across the stage with multiple offers, also graduate school, as part of that grouping, our students understand that graduate school is a really great pathway and that the career development office also has resources to support that. Thank you. You Nira and thank you Amanda for coming in and like talk a little bit about your experiences. I know it's something very personal. Um, and thank you just for sharing that with all of us and thank you for all the work that you do at a university. Thank you for your leadership, Maria, you are so much worse on the campus. Thank you.
Speaker 4:
35:33
Thank you to our guests. And if big thing get to our senior lecturer, Nicole Blair for letting us your music on
Speaker 3:
35:38
the show. Thank you to moon y'all recording studio. And thank you for joining us today.
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