AlongTheWay

From Kid’s Radio to Platinum Records - Bill Deaton’s Journey AlongTheWay 27

October 07, 2019 John Matarazzo / Bill Deaton Season 1 Episode 27
AlongTheWay
From Kid’s Radio to Platinum Records - Bill Deaton’s Journey AlongTheWay 27
Chapters
AlongTheWay
From Kid’s Radio to Platinum Records - Bill Deaton’s Journey AlongTheWay 27
Oct 07, 2019 Season 1 Episode 27
John Matarazzo / Bill Deaton

Nashville Producer, Bill Deaton, shares his life story of how helping record Kid’s radio led to working in a music store and selling a microphone to a man who would change his life.

His AlongTheWay moments include 

  • Children’s Radio program
  • Selling a microphone to a famous music producer and doors opening for him
  • Working with Platinum Recording Artists
  • Ilonka changed his life
  • Parenthood a second time around

Bill Deaton’s Info

https://www.billdeaton.com/

AlongTheWay Links
Join My Email List
Email Me - [email protected]
More episodes and Social links for AlongTheWay
Watch episodes of My TV show RealLife

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/AlongTheWay)

Show Notes Transcript

Nashville Producer, Bill Deaton, shares his life story of how helping record Kid’s radio led to working in a music store and selling a microphone to a man who would change his life.

His AlongTheWay moments include 

  • Children’s Radio program
  • Selling a microphone to a famous music producer and doors opening for him
  • Working with Platinum Recording Artists
  • Ilonka changed his life
  • Parenthood a second time around

Bill Deaton’s Info

https://www.billdeaton.com/

AlongTheWay Links
Join My Email List
Email Me - [email protected]
More episodes and Social links for AlongTheWay
Watch episodes of My TV show RealLife

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/AlongTheWay)

Bill Deaton :

The thing to me that has eternal significance in it is the behind the scenes conversations that we get to have because we're not in the limelight. And it's time to do that. And I ran into a guy at church just a few years ago that I've worked with back in the late 80s, or something. I think he is a pastor now. And he just walked up to me and said, Man, I'll never forget the thing you told me in the studio that day. And I'm like, quarter that? I had no idea. A lot of people, I hope I was nice to you. And there was something I said about the Lord that stuck in his heart. And he reminded me of it and I'm like, Well, thank you, Jesus, that that happened. It was a big encouragement, and just showed me that as we do what we're doing, which can be a blessing, if we feel like it's worth dying for the Lord. And it's a fulfillment of what's in our hearts. But as we do whatever we're doing, the thing that really has eternal significance are the relationships and the things that we say and do with other people.

John Matarazzo :

Welcome to along the way. I'm John Matarazzo, your host and fellow traveler, thank you for joining me along my way is I try to become more like Jesus every day. I love talking with fascinating people and learning how God has met them along their way. For this along the way conversation, I have the privilege of talking with music producer and engineer, Bill Deaton. The list of people that he has worked with in the Nashville music industry is very impressive. He has many Platinum records for his work with people like Amy Grant, Bob Carlisle, and Michael W. Smith, as well as so many more. If you want to hear how God uses the people behind the scenes in the music industry, then you'll enjoy hearing this conversation. I'll get to that in just a moment. But I want to make sure that you know, you can hear all of my episodes, even the ones that you've missed by visiting my website along the way dot media, or simply subscribing to along the way, and your favorite podcast app. You can also find along the way on Facebook and Instagram. I'm starting and along the way email subscriber list. If you want to be known five episodes and any other special announcements, please consider joining my email list. The link will be at my show notes to reach me electronically. You can email me at John along the way at gmail. com. My social links and web address are in the show notes as well. I look forward to hearing from you. And now here is my along the way conversation with Bill. Bill, thank you so much for being on along the way. It's a pleasure to sit with you and actually interview you because we're both kind of behind the camera guys are behind the microphone, guys. But I want to just talk a little bit about how we've met through your lovely wife, Ilunga, who's been a guest on the real life program a number of times, and you've come with her. She's done music for us quite a bit. And it's always wonderful to have her and so we've become friends through the four or five times that you guys have been up. Thanks. So it's great to be able to hang out with you. Nashville trip here. I just kind of want to hear about your connection with with music, and how God called you into that. Yes, sure. Well, first of all, thank you.

Bill Deaton :

Great hanging with you. I grew up in a small town in Kentucky, going way back and met a lovely lady named Dorothy lover who is really like a god mom to me. And she was a missionaries daughter and married to a doctor in town. And she had a passion for doing children's stories. And so as a young man of 18, I guess, when I started hanging out with them, and helping them record these children's stories that she would put out on our local radio station in this little town of you know, a few thousand people. So I gave guitar lessons to her children. Okay. And we recorded stuff, we realized we needed better equipment than we had. Yeah, so we took a trip to Nashville. Okay. This was in, gosh, 77, maybe 78. And to look for better gear. And so her two sons who were teenagers and a dad and a drop down here, we met a guy named Scott Hendrix, who's now the president of Capitol Records. So he did well, and just yeah. And we met him because we stopped at a place called Nashville studio systems to look for gear. And he knew I was interested in music and you know, been in some bands and work to the music store. And he's like, man, we need another salesman. So why don't you, you know, get enrolled at Belmont college, and then sell gear here will give you a job. And so I think this was just before Thanksgiving. And then by January, I'd gotten a grant for school, which was unheard of in the middle of the year. So God obviously opened that door, and got a job. And then started meeting people, you know, in the business. And one of the first people that I met was I sold the microphone to a guy named brown banister. And Brown had went on to produce everybody in Christian music. Amy Grant for years and years. I mean, it's just the list is quite an incredible one. Man, he's a wonderful guy. The band that he was working with, when I first met him and walked in the studio was a band called Pharaoh and Pharaoh, and you just met Bob Cheryl. lunch. Yeah, you know, so they were young. And you know, I think Jane was pregnant with one of their children at that point. But I think that was that had to be 1980, I guess 79 to 80. And I remember asking Brad, if I could maybe just hang out sometime and, and watch. Because the desire to record and music. That always been me, I was always into, you know, band and things like that. But being in that small town to backstab just a little bit. One of my desires when I came to the Lord, which was around 18, when that happened, was to be able to bring music into a small community that didn't really get great music, because I just discovered at that time who Andre crouch was to fill keoki was those records. And I wanted to, like expose the community to that. And biggest part out, we really had nothing to speak. So I went back to that, because that's exactly what God prepared me to do, you know, for the future. Just a long journey. So back to that, where I left off on the present story was a met Browns holding the microphone, I did get to hang out, started learning recording just by doing hands on experimenting. Even though I did take a class at Belmont for it. And down through the years, then as I got more proficient at that, and you know, bypassing the years of living on you know, peanut butter and white bread. There was just doors open, where people would say, Oh, hey, man, can you come and work with me on this project or that project? So by the time that decade finished into the late 80s and early 90s, then I was getting to work with Brian on lots of projects, you know, I mean from you know, Amy stuff to Mike Anglosphere stuff to Amy, Amy Grant, sorry. Sorry about that. And you know, Avalon stuff and point of grace and tala Paris and, and then with another guy that I had met along the way, another producer named Craig Nelson, who's a very learned classical producer, although produce pop stuff, too. But then we worked on all like the Sandi Patty, Steve green, big orchestra, you know, voices. And it, you know, blossomed into a career that I thought, you know, probably would never end, although it did slow down when I got much older. But it was a really joyous time getting to hang with a lot of people seeing the differences in their lives, and how much they really love the Lord, despite some controversies that Christians tend to always go through, you know, but in general, and I must say this, because people love to ask who were the nice people that you worked with. And it's like, 99.9% of the people were absolutely just wonderful people. And the ones that weren't, I've just forgotten about, I mean, it's like, you know, what it is because it was so few and far between. So the thing that was instilled in me at an early age, the love of music, from the time I was a child, hearing my mother sing hymns, she did all of her housework, through, you know, high school, junior high high school band and having a rock band in high school, playing bass and a southern gospel quartet at the same time. And moving here, it was just a fulfillment of obviously something, gotten it into my DNA, you know, which was just a love of music, has still have that love, and still, of course, work with a lot more than anyone now, Charles, of how God propel that into a ministry for her. Yeah. And it brings me through, I'm trying to make the story a bit shorter, that's fine. But through all those years of that opening a record company trying to do that thing, meeting along, being married, kind of a redirection at that point, and what God's really going to do with our lives, and now having small children, which is really,

John Matarazzo :

your children right now, one in 313. So you're in that diaper phase again,

Bill Deaton :

oh, yeah, we are, we're terminally tired, get those sleep. We would love to be up, you know, rocking the world with ministry and stuff. But we're we have babies. And it's an absolute wonderful, wonderful thing The Lord has done. And we can look back and just see his hand through all the restoration work and the bad choices that we've made. And the wonderful choices that we've made. The children being absolutely wonderful choices. And so for now, he has me doing something that's just more stable, which was working here. Franklin, First United Methodist doing technical work here, and a lot of being a mommy. And occasionally, I always still get opportunities to go minister, but it's we're concentrating on trying to grow two very healthy children.

John Matarazzo :

That's a very important ministry for

Bill Deaton :

sure. Well, there's nothing like having an unhealthy pass to make you want to have healthy children in the presence. Yes, yes, yes, we're thankful for that.

John Matarazzo :

I'm interested in your career in music. And I want to talk a little bit about that. Because, I mean, it's one thing to have music as a hobby and something that you're good at. And it's another thing to really make that your livelihood and some of the people that God has allowed you to work with, just in your office and taking pictures of some of the records that you have had your fingerprints on. Can you give me some of those people that you've worked with that? The audience might know?

Bill Deaton :

OJ? Well, of course, baby, right. Amy Grant? Yes, my. And her husband Gary at the time to and about Carla, Rebecca St. James. I did her first record co wrote a bunch of those songs over and covered some stuff with Bob. But just down through the years, oh my gosh, you know, people on the countryside like Alan Jackson, Paul over straight Steve Warner. And then back in the Christian world, with Amy and Michael W. Smith. Particularly the lead you home record with Michael and his Christmas, I forget which Christmas it was I'll have so many Christmas records, right? Yeah, the one that I hear playing on the radio every Christmas, I did a bunch of those ads with him. And a very, very wonderful and delightful person. Meredith Andrews, lately, we did Avalon stuff, we did point of grace, we did a bunch of records beforehand. So there was a bunch of the 90s artists, because I will say Greg Nelson and brown banister, we're producing the lion's share of the big records in that era. And I was working pretty consistently with both of those guys. And loved every minute of it. Except we work too much.

John Matarazzo :

Yeah. Now there's a lot of really good music that came out in that time period to all those names that you just said. People recognize this. I mean, their household names if you grew up in a Christian home and Phil KV.

Bill Deaton :

Yeah. And the and also Keith Urban that is Keith Urban in the in the ranch record, which was his very first record. And that was that was fun to do. And what what would your role be working with these

Unknown Speaker :

records?

Bill Deaton :

Well, with some of with Rebecca stuff, and Bob stuff, and a band called Super chick I was, you know, engineering producing, or exec producing like, was super cheap. Because we, Max, the main guy really was the genius for right that we met it on another Music Project, he kept sending me demos of this band aid put together and I kept encouraging him to not let it go away. And it finally culminated into a record and, and a career because at that time, true love waits was just becoming very famous. They were looking for a band to travel with, right. And the cool thing about knowing the super chick people was that they really live to what they were singing about. You know, and it was very new and you know, beaten, you know, urban, yeah, all those very cool things. So I remember calling the guy with true love yc just say, look, if you're looking for a band, and you don't want, you know, mess ups on the road and stuff, this is the band you're looking for, and they got the gig, so they traveled with them. And, you know, started their fame and fortune with that a super Jake actually did a concert at my church. Oh, cool. Yeah.

Unknown Speaker :

Yeah, so we have good memories of that.

Bill Deaton :

That's great. So the big difference between the kind of The Wonder Years of, well, anyone who was in music, business 70s 80s 90s, or even the in the 60s, was that the the, the normal procedure was, you spent days, weeks or months with an artist and with a great band and great musicians, and one, or maybe a few different locations, but you were with people that were creating music. And

Unknown Speaker :

that method,

Bill Deaton :

you know, began changing as computer technology increase, right. And now the people that I know that are working on records, and the records I work on myself, are generally done in other people's houses, one at a time, someone will program some loops, for instance, keyboard thing, somebody with a guitar. And there's less and less of the, the golden years of being able to be in the room with great great musicians and singers on a continual long basis. And I don't think that will ever come back. So when, you know, guys that have lived through those years, get together and talk about it. The the thing that we love mentioning is that we live through the best years of the music business, doesn't mean it's not the best years now as far as how much people love music or how popular it is. But in the creation of music, it really is the best years because it's amazing at this church that we're in, we just had Reggie Young's funeral, who was the guy on drift away that played the great guitar riff that and he was an guitar player magazine and he's played on a worldwide and so the people that comes to through my know who his name, but they never got to sit in a room with him for days and days and days watching him do guitar parts. And I felt so blessed because I had gotten to do that, you know, on records. Those are the things that are I think people will miss about the new era music.

John Matarazzo :

I've seen like movies of people, you know, in a studio and it kind of you know, it's romanticized, or that's where the fight is going to happen. And one of my favorite movies is that that thing you do and have any fun when they finally make it into that studio, that's where everything falls apart. So that's kind of where I think about studios. And so to hear you talk about the romance of the studio, and being together with, with other musicians, there's like a magical thing there. It's we're now it's being relegated to people's homes and bedrooms, or wherever they can record. And I'm sure for ease of business. That's that's makes a lot of sense for them. But you missed that that heart behind it.

Bill Deaton :

Yeah, let me say that. It plays well in movies, and in the press to talk about the fights that they're obviously happen. But I've witnessed very, very few fights. Most of the people, especially in a tighter knit community, such as national, first of all, everybody knows everybody, right? You're, you're pretty nice to people, because you know that you're not you probably won't work. So I mean, you do develop a good, you know, personality, just staying in the business. And the people respect the, the musicians respect each other so much, because these guys are like, like, really, really good. I mean, after 35 years of watching this, absolutely amazed, like sometimes to tears in the abilities that these guys have. There's a dear friend of mine, Blair masters, who's a keyboard player. And we were, I was asking him one day about him practicing and he thought, Oh, I never practice. I don't really, I'm not even sure you took the lessons. Although you might have, you know, this guy can, you know, is absolutely world class. But there are so many people like that. They're just like the best of the best. And they can play anything. And they can do anything. And they can interpret any style you want. And they're all buddies and friends. And so there's way more laughter and fun going on in between the songs. Then there is arguing and hearing I think most of us have takes place in the record company. Yeah.

John Matarazzo :

Yeah. Well, I mean, speaking of, you know, some of those guys, literally, before we sat down to have this interview, we went out to lunch, and we went out to a place, you know, the next town over. And you look over my shoulder. And you're like, Ellen, that back room. I recognize some of those guys. Well, there's a bunch of these older CCM guys that have been in the industry forever. Yeah, they're just getting together and hanging out and having a good time. It's great. And so like, they didn't have those fights when they're still working together. And it's pretty cool. And as people were leaving, they were saying it was pretty cool.

Bill Deaton :

It's a good bunch. Brian Mason put that group together. And he used to do the CCM countdown and it was the stuff we all grew up on. really was.

John Matarazzo :

My jaw just dropped whenever Phil KE walks by

Unknown Speaker :

and oh, my goodness,

John Matarazzo :

yeah. Yeah, he would love that. Yeah. So from what we've just been talking about, none of this would have happened. If you had then starting a recording, that little church group is you went in to get some better equipment, and then you got offered a job. And then you sold a microphone to somebody that then got to use that to open up some big doors. They will, how did you first know that this is what God was actually calling you to do? It seems like you were just putting one foot in front of the other. But I guess maybe the better thing is, how did you What did God speak to you about this?

Unknown Speaker :

First of all,

Bill Deaton :

it was in LA, the love for music, and just kind of techie things was in my heart. And I got to travel with a friend when I was in high school, back sick bill Gaither studio up in Indiana. And he was recording, he played keyboards. And he ran a church camp guy named Bruce Martin, who has since passed away. That was a big influence on me musically, because he was a great jazz pianist. And but he was up there doing sessions, and I walked in a studio for the first time and was like, This is what I want to do the rest of my life. So it wasn't that I was really answering a calling, but I realized that it was just part of me. I mean, when God said that he together, you know, in your mother's womb, and I knew you before you were created, there's obviously things he knew about us. And I'm sure he knew that I would love music. Now. I was going to be behind the glass person, you know, I wasn't going to be I didn't really have it in me to be a star, you know, because when I get in front of people and men play, I sweat and I get nervous and tense. And I don't want to be in the spotlight, you know, but I love to be in the idea forming, formation of things and the brainstorming of things, more of the creation, rather than the the performance of it. And that's what he blessed me to be able to do. And looking back to all those steps. Yeah, one thing led to another and sometimes you know, things that I would pray would happen may not happen. But something just as wonderful was a byproduct of whatever I just done before seem to there seemed to be a connectivity through it. And it was definitely the Lord. And I will say other than just the joy of getting to do that. The the thing, to me that has eternal significance in it is the behind the scenes conversations that we get to have because we're not in the limelight average time to do that. And I ran into a guy at church just a few years ago, that I've worked with. I remember back in the late 80s, or something, I think he is a pastor now. And he just walked up to me and said, Man, I'll never forget the thing you told me in the studio that day. And I'm like, quarter that had no idea. A lot of people I go I hope I was nice to you. And, and there was something I said about the Lord that stuck in his heart. And he reminded me of it. And I'm like, well, thank you to Jesus that that happened. Yeah. And so it was a big encouragement, and just showed me that as we do what we're doing, which can be a blessing if we feel like it's worth dying for the Lord. And it's a fulfillment of what's in our hearts. But as we do whatever we're doing, the thing that really has eternal significance are the the relationships and the things that we say and do with other people. And, you know, I mean, it's not always a bed of roses, not always perfect, but still looking back, there's been a couple of those instances that have just been dear to my heart to hear, you know, yeah. And I do remember, I will say this. So we're working on a rock and roll project up in Indiana wants and the guitar player who was from it was not like it was very nice, kind of like nicer than most Christians. You may, but he's not really maybe not a Christian. However you want to, you know, percolate that in your, in your mind. But we're standing in the back of the room listening this, and there's a lot of john Mellencamp band was playing on this on this record. And he came in as a guitar player, and we're just sitting back and listening to great, great music. And he leans over to me, he goes, Hey, man, you're Christian, aren't you? Cool? Yeah. I mean, did I say something or what? And it wasn't really anything. I said, I wasn't even trying to be like Mr. You know, Mr. Four spiritual laws, guy tracks in the bathroom. But I'm like, wow, Lord, there's something that shows through even no matter what, you know, working on. And I was amazed about that. And I'm not trying to paint this holy holy picture, because I've had my share of, you know, pitfalls along the way to that we've always been open about letting people learn from our mistakes as well. But it's obvious that that my life has been on a plan that God has either either redeemed, rescued or directed. Sometimes that's all in one for him, right?

John Matarazzo :

I just love the fact that these little steps have been how God's led you to where you are now, things haven't always been peachy keen. We were just talking about that on the drive over here. But God brought someone into your life, who's now your wife. And you've, you've talked about a lot. And the kids already, can we talk about that story, how you guys met and where she's from, kind of give a bit of background with that?

Bill Deaton :

Well, I'll give her background, just a quick overview. So she grew up in South Africa, and she started her music career when she was 12. So at the time, she was in her 20s, she had had, you know, over a decade of singing and acting, she started much younger than that. But professionally, she started at 12 Associates hanging in 10 bands and stuff like that. And she and her mom moved to to Nashville, actually, and I think in 2000. And she put a band together and married guy here, and he was in the band, and they actually had a really great band, and I had to record company at the time and saw our play at a climb. Just thought this girl is really great. I mean, she was like a young person of Steven Tyler. I mean, she, you know, jumping, kicked and danced and sang and was full of energy. I thought as a business decision, this is something that I can direct and nurture, and build into an artist that I can sell to a bigger company, hopefully retire, or because I you know, hang on for an a&r guy or something for a couple of years and do my thing. What

John Matarazzo :

does AR mean for people to understand that?

Bill Deaton :

Well, let me say, as a business professional for 37 years, I actually don't know the exact definition. We always call it artists and repertoire or artists relations. And it encompasses all that it is the liaison between the executive branch of the record company and the artist. So he's the guy that hangs with him and make suggestions and things like that. So but that's funny, that certainly should know the exact Webster definition. I'll get letters, no. So anyway, so I signed her to a deal did a record honor and we had great musicians, we had Vinny Kelly, who had played with staying, and even so many, so many other bands, I think, either Frank Zappa or someone like that, and he's now this one of the world's best drummer. And then Steve, trying to give his last name was Mr. Mr. The guitar player, play guitar on it. And Blair masters is about a dear friend, keyboard player played keys on it and got him Spencer Campbell played bass. And we did this great rock and roll record. And about the time that Paul was putting together all the distribution deals and trying to work out just great networking, and you know, paying great consulting companies and promotions companies and tried to line her up and all the appropriate steps. In the midst of that you realize that this is a general comment for everybody in the music world to launch a music career is like pushing a very big boulder up a hill, a very steep hill. And it's very expensive and very time consuming, and encompasses lots of effort by all kinds of different people to get the ball to the top of the hill,

John Matarazzo :

you're going to be pushing in the right direction,

Bill Deaton :

we were we were pushing, we didn't quite make it to the top. And once you get to the top of the ball starts rolling down the other side, it tends to be much easier, because then everybody knows your name, right? You know, and I always use Taylor Swift is a great example of that, that At first, she was a little blonde girl a lot of people didn't really like and they worked very, very hard to get the ball up the hill. And now everything she touches, you know, girl turns to go. So actually, I'm glad for her. Very, very glad for that. But that method really applies to everything and apply. So whether you're in country music, Christian music, or whatever, it's a long path to get to where you can kind of put your career on cruise control, and people want to book you and they want to have you in for concerts. And the people that have done that. Now I realize, you know the depth of work that I've done. So with that being said, I back to the story is that I've signed the locker, this rock and roll deal. And so the company kind of crashed and burned at the end of that through a lot of unforeseen, generally financial problems and pressures and stuff. And, but during that time, we, you know, we were both going through a divorce, and we talked more and more, and fell in love. And so that began the process of God taking something very sticky and, you know, muddy and trying to make something beautiful out of it. And so, in both of our lives, he really turned us around me way more focused on him. And she became a believer during that time, and has a remarkable testimony which you have heard, because he's been on your show for some time.

John Matarazzo :

And I'll definitely make sure that I get an opportunity to do it along the way with as well. Yes,

Bill Deaton :

yes. And you should. So the last decade, what's going on, you know, 12 years now since 2007. The Lord has given us amazing opportunities, one to spend a few years of just resting in him and learning and, and getting life and our spiritual lives in order. And then a lot of ministry across the United States, because of her story that involves trafficking.

John Matarazzo :

And when you say trafficking, some people don't understand what that means. Could you just to explain that a

Bill Deaton :

little bit? Well, they're probably understand more now than ever, it's a good thing meaning human trafficking or sexual trafficking, trafficking, and she was the victim of a predator in South Africa that held her in bondage for a few years, doing whatever he wanted, although it was a musical thing, supposedly. But that was it the threat of you know, him killing her, her mom. Yeah, brothers. She was from a single family and her mom worked very hard to take care of her. And so that was about the most fearful thing a person could have said to her is I want to take you away from your mom, you know. And so, after her working through, you know, intense therapies, and under really good, good Christian counseling, from those horrific memories, she realized the call on our life was really to do really to do women's ministry period. And that started off with a lot of concerts and working, you know, speaking at churches, and sharing her story, encouraging other women to share their story. And that, thank God has become a bit more commonplace. I mean, in the news, you know, we have all these movements that are telling women to speak up tonight, tolerate abuse, protect your families, to be more aware, to know what's going on in your neighborhood, to forge good relationships with authorities, and you know, police and rescue operations. So if you see something that is bad that you could, you know, encourage or direct someone to do something about it. And that's taking this up to the present where now we have babies, and we're taking care of babies. Yeah, thank God.

John Matarazzo :

Yeah. So whatever happened with the people in South Africa,

Bill Deaton :

we did get to go back a few years ago, and actually press charges against the perpetrator. And that it was really amazing in a in a place where there's a lot of turmoil and a lot of racial tensions. It's hard to speak about racial tensions in a public forum without being labeled one way or another. Exactly. But just saying like it is, we were at a very overcrowded police station, and were to provide people with an with everyone being black police officers. And we thought that probably would not listen to us, just because of the tension that South Africa went through in their history. And I remember the police lieutenant reading her report. And he turned around to her and said, first of all, let me just apologize to you on behalf of all man, I blew me away. And then the detective assigned to us. There were two detectives, one was a Christian, the other was pastor, as we were talking, they're like, because I asked us what we did. And we're like, well, we, you know, saying and traveling, yeah, talk about the Lord and, and they're like, Oh, I run a church down here, you know, and that blew our minds. So talking about saying the Lord's hand and that, and in such a restorative way of going into a situation where we think that we're going to be certainly the minority. And there's going to be a bit of hatred against us because of that. And finding out that it was not that way at all. charges were filed, the police went to the guy to arrest or whatever they do. And we kind of had to leave it at that. Because if you really want to conduct a legal matter between two continents, you gotta have a team of lawyers here, you gotta have a table lawyers there. And it's an astronomical financial burden to bear unless you're just rich, I mean, you're not going to be able to do it. And but what happened was a very big light very quickly got shined on that situation. And hopefully, it changed any other vulnerable young star from going through the same thing. Yeah,

John Matarazzo :

I know, whenever I lived in South Africa, during my radio school, that's when I first found out about what trafficking was the youth of the mission center there that I created my radio school. The one of the ministries that they really focused on was awareness about human trafficking, and doing whatever they can to educate people with that as well, especially in some of the townships. And while I was there, we actually worked together to help raise funds so that they could create these videos that were going to be played on the big screens on the stadiums outside during the World Cup, which is going to be in 2010. It was something that was totally new to me, and then to be able to hear, you know, a longer story, I promise I will get on long the way at some point, just to know somebody that has actually come through that because most of time you just hear horror stories. And you don't know the ending, just to know that God's brought redemption into her life is remarkable. And God used us to help with that, too. So that's really cool. So Bill, we've talked about a lot already what has happened in your life that just showed you that Jesus was walking with you, but you might have not known it at the moment. But when you look back, you can see it now.

Bill Deaton :

Well, well, in the turn of events, just through thinking my life was going to be one way as I said, I was going to start this record company mega successful and sell it or up, we call it up to a bigger company, I get a part of a bigger company, and really going through personal disaster, financial disaster, political disaster, a couple of years before that, and thinking that, you know, are we in Forrest Gump squirrel, just a feather, you know, just out there on the land. And then seeing, looking back and seeing what God put together and out of all those pieces, and focused it in a way that we can really say our life's work, kind of through music has been making the world one just aware of Jesus, I mean, with our personal lives, and to aware of using our personal testimonies to encourage people along the way. And that could be anti human trafficking, although there's many, many things and events that we've done that have nothing to do with them. And it's just been sharing, you know, Jesus with people getting to travel to 72 different churches across the United States. And finding out there whether you're, you know, Baptist, Lutheran Pentecostal Assembly of God, you know, Presbyterian, Methodist, that you always, we would say us, we would always run into a core group of people that loved Jesus, and they were sold out to Jesus. And if you took that little group of people from all those different churches and put them in one church, that would seem like, let's say, one day nomination, which I think is what is supposed to happen anyway, they're all just, they were lovers of God, the lovers of Jesus, and all the idiosyncrasies that exists between those particular denominations, kind of pale in comparison to just that were out there following the Lord. It made me appreciate each of those churches and their own way. That that was the big the big thing, just knowing that he was in control. And then seeing our lovely children. Now, he says, that goes to a depth that that I haven't got to experience in that depth before, it's really amazing,

John Matarazzo :

even a time machine. And we could go back to a point in your timeline. And you could give yourself some advice. What's happening in that timeline? And what's going on in your life at that point? And what would you say to yourself, Oh, my gosh,

Bill Deaton :

I think first of all, would be like, here's a bunch of mistakes you're going to make, please don't make that would be the big thing. I think not being afraid of failure, and reaching out and doing what's really in your heart and doing it as soon as possible. I say all that knowing that it's going to take years for God's work to really permeate all that and do something creative with it. But those would be the biggies. Certainly in music, I was always afraid to say no to anything, because it was afraid it wouldn't work. Again, if I ever said no. Looking back during the years that I worked too much, I would have said no more often and not been afraid that it would lead to unemployment. Would I probably listened to myself? Probably not. I would hope that I would, but not comparing myself to King David. But I look at his life. And I've certainly read through that a whole bunch. And I'm sure you feel the same way if he went back to be okay, your man after God's own heart, don't do all these scripts. But people seem to be trial and error people. Those are their spiritual life and both life in general. And so, you know, we watch death, and we run into a wall and we go, we're not supposed to go this way. So we back up until we run into the other wall. And I suppose if we were living in better communion with God, then we wouldn't have to run into quite as many walls. And I point that out to myself and hope that I would, you know, believe that, do you have any tips

John Matarazzo :

on overcoming the fear of failure, because you just said it, that was a big thing that you would not want to be afraid of? I

Bill Deaton :

think the only tip I would know is that just know that tried and true, saying of God's got your back. But the thing that will help this is trying not to be bound by all the things that the world says that we are to be bound to. And with those things, I would say things like, you know, debt, and climbing the corporate ladder, and we get so busy. Because everybody has to, you know, buy a new car, buy a bigger house. And if you've got all this up my something even bigger and more. And I look around and find that people, people in general, are really burdened down with the cares of this life. And I think that's what that scripture refers to. And Jesus said not to do that. And so if you don't do that, it's going to give you a lot more freedom to concentrate on a great idea. And I think if you have a great healthy idea, chances are it comes from the Lord, because I don't think the enemy wants you to have any good, positive, fun or even lucrative ideas. He wants to destroy your life. So try to eliminate some of those negatives that might hold you back and and develop in the Lord this go for it attitude. Yeah, just like you're doing now.

John Matarazzo :

Yeah, yeah. What is it that God's teaching you right now I know, you said that you're in a season of your you're a new parent again. And you've gone through that previously, but now have a one year old and a three year old. So you're kind of going through that again? What is God teaching you through that? And also, what is God just teaching you? in general?

Bill Deaton :

Well, I think through that HTTP patients, which you never want to pray for, but when you're going through it, you just pray you get through it as quickly as possible, but it's just learning that he has you at a certain place. Because there's something you need to be telling. And with us right now, we need to be nurturing our children. And there's nothing quite like coming from, you know, more dysfunctional background, with both of our lives, then for the urge to be super parents, but hopefully in a positive way. I just want my children to grow up if the Lord will permit just no major crack ups in their life and abuse and things like that. So we're very careful to spend as much time as we can, you know, with their children, that was about previous children, I want to say that I have great relationship with them. And My only regret looking back because I've loved all of them so dearly, is that I just worked way too much. When my elder children, we're babies. And I think a lot of people like that mistake, but I just worked all the time. Because I was always afraid my career would end if I didn't. And now that I'm spending more time with the young babies, it makes me regret working so much. I would have spent more time at home.

John Matarazzo :

Yeah. So how does somebody do that? How do you I mean, I'm 34. I know life can get very busy. I'm at this point in my life. I'm not married. I don't have any kids. But that's a goal that I have. I do want to be married, I do want to have a family. What advice would you give about that? Because you're looking back and you say, Man, I wish I spent more time with a family. But you also still need to make an income you still need to provide?

Bill Deaton :

Yeah, I mean, it seems like since the garden, Daddy's work, you know, and not to be sexist about that. Because I mean, many women do too. But daddy's in general. You know, they go after they go after work. I think the more we realize that one, God does have a plan. And that he's he's got us, generally more than we have him that if we could really grasp that we would learn to go, I really don't have to spend 90 hours a week doing this to be a success, because God's gonna take me through this. I mean, he does have if we believe that God has a plan for our lives, so to speak, and we hear that so much. I think most Christians are familiar with that, then we have to believe that while he has a plan for our life, it's really not to kill ourselves with overworking at the expense of people that we love around us. And I think that's the one big thing is just learn to relax, and knowing that it all doesn't depend on you.

John Matarazzo :

Do you have a life verse of the Bible that just kind of sticks with you?

Bill Deaton :

Well, there's there's been a bunch, but these are the plans I have for you says the Lord plans to prosper you. I'm paraphrasing, to give you a homeland, and I know he was speaking to the Jewish people, when he said that, but those kinds of stories which so many were in the Old Testament of see I've engraved in the palms of our hands, or could a mother forget her nursing baby, though she might forget, I'll never forget, she says the Lord. And so I can't get through a day. If I think about those verses, and not believe them. It's like this is just so profound that the God of the universe would say those kind of things to us. And of course, through Jesus, we are engraved in the palm of his hands deliberately. But that was spoken of a long time before he was nailed to a cross. Those made a big impact on my life. Now,

John Matarazzo :

do you have any books that you would recommend to me?

Bill Deaton :

Well, being a picture guy. I love CS Lewis, his writings. And I found that because of the path I've been on being in studios a lot and the work that I'm doing here and with children, I don't have a lot of time to read. Sorry to say, I need to be doing that. And I need to be reading my Bible more than anything. So I'm kind of

John Matarazzo :

a blank on that one. That's already obvious. You're reading it's good. That's a good thing. Yeah. Do you have any albums that you would recommend?

Bill Deaton :

Oh, wow. Well, I'm just gonna say my favorite record, okay, which was Peter Gabriel's solo record. And a lot of people may not know that, but it's a great musical journey songs like mercy, St. Some of those slower ballots that are very, very well produced and have great musical meaning to me. You know, I browse the iTunes list on the top 40 you know, these days to see what kind of what's current and out there. And I don't have a tremendous amount from that list that I gotta gotta have this. I'll leave it at that. Appreciate good music. You know what I hear it, but I can't recommend an artist, right?

John Matarazzo :

Yeah, I just threw that one and Taylor Swift. Yeah. Well, Bill, thank you so much for joining me along my way, and allowing me to learn from the journey that God has put you on.

Bill Deaton :

Cool, thank you, john, was pleasure.

John Matarazzo :

You never know how God will direct your next step, or who we will connect you with that will help you into your next season of life. And Bill's young life he just did what he was good at, and passionate about music and recording. I'm sure that there were times when he was recording those children's stories that he might have been thinking, Man, my talents are being wasted on this childish project. But rather, he took what he was entrusted with, and wanted to make it better. That led him on a trip to a music store in Nashville, which led to a job and school and then selling a microphone to brown banister, which opened up more opportunities than younger bill Deaton could have ever imagined. If he wouldn't have been helping with his children's radio program, he might still be teaching guitar lessons in Kentucky instead of the ministry and profession where God has called him to be. The list of people that he has worked with and helped succeed in music is remarkable. Bill doesn't have the notoriety of the people that he has worked with. But his work can be seen or rather heard throughout the music at the top of the charts. I like the way that he appreciates that he lived through the best years of music creation, not because the music today isn't good. But that the music creation magic happened in the studio over days of being together with a band, there is much to be said about the camaraderie of working on a creative project together with people all pulling in the same direction to achieve one common goal. Sure, being able to work from anywhere is convenient, and has its benefits. But let's not give up on working together in unity. I think the Lord is pleased when we do that. In case you were wondering, a&r does stand for artists and repertoire, we looked up the official term. I know that I said it a few times in this interview, but I want to reiterate that I will be doing an episode featuring Bill's wife Ilunga at some point, hopefully soon. Her story is remarkable. And the fact that she is now able to minister to the other woman is incredible. Make sure that you sign up to my email updates so that you don't miss her episode. The advice that bill would give his younger self is very relatable to me also, to not be afraid of failure. And don't be afraid to say no, I have a tendency to over commit myself and burn the candle at both ends. So I appreciate his wisdom, know that God has got your back. And don't be bound by the things of this world. That really sums up a lot of what he said, eliminate the negative distractions and develop a go for it attitude, concentrate on the great idea that God has given you. As he said, that's what I'm trying to do with this podcast as well. Bill worked way too much in his younger years and missed out on some things with his older kids. I pray that I will be able to find the right balance in my life. And I pray that for you to know that God does have a plan. He has got us more than we have him. God's plan is not to kill us by overworking us that is refreshing to hear someone say. It all doesn't depend on you. We need to trust in God that's just created vice every day, no matter what season of life you're in. Those are some of the biggest takeaways from my conversation. And I appreciate Bill's friendship. If you ever find yourself in the Franklin, Tennessee area, when Bill is hosting his monthly writers night outreach, you must check it out. It seems like a lot of fun. He hosts it once a month at the Franklin First United Methodist Church. But make sure to check their website for details. It looks like it would be a great time I would love to be there someday for one of those. Thank you for listening to along the way. If you've enjoyed joining me along my way, please share this episode with a friend who you think will be encouraged by this podcast. Also, please rate and review along the way on iTunes and give me a five star rating and helps more people discover along the way. You can subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or wherever you listen to podcast. And make sure to follow us on Facebook, Instagram and on my website, the way dot media. You can always email me at John along the [email protected] I hope that you've enjoyed this part of my journey. And may you realize when Jesus is walking with you along your way.