Communications Academy

The Five Discrete Categories Of An Employee Intranet

April 12, 2019 Season 1 Episode 1
Communications Academy
The Five Discrete Categories Of An Employee Intranet
Chapters
Communications Academy
The Five Discrete Categories Of An Employee Intranet
Apr 12, 2019 Season 1 Episode 1
Staffbase
In this episode we discuss the different categories of how to engage, share, and communicate through an intranet.
Show Notes Transcript

It's not just a magic pill. You don't just add water and you have this amazing communications channel. It really has to be thoughtful and it has to build trust.

It has to meet the users expectation on so many levels and if it does... it's transformational.

We have customers who, six months into a project have 85% employees adoption and 75% of those people are using it every day. That has transformed how that company communicates. The shift is on personal phones and they've got easy access to the things that they want to find. But again, it's got to be just that right combination of understanding the personal context. Giving them stuff that's valuable to them. Communicating and launching in the right way. It’s not easy. There's no guarantees. But it's transformational if you get it right.

Speaker 1:
0:03
Hello and welcome. Thank you very much for your time today. Uh, today we have Peter from staff base and a, we're going to talk about the, this idea of an intranet, right? And, um, there's the, I think what people get confused around a lot and what you, why you're here today. What you're going to talk about is there's, there seems to be, I think you're going to touch upon several different buckets that the word intranet get us gets associated with. And it's important to pull them into their respective buckets to acknowledge that they exist and to make sure that you're not trying to fit it all into one respective buckets. Um, and understand that each of those buckets have their, their purpose, rightly so. Um, so yeah, that's it. And Peter, thank you very much for coming and let's talk about these buckets. So when someone says, I have an intranet, does your brain just explore?
Speaker 2:
1:09
Yeah. What happens? Yeah, but basically, okay, what does that even mean? Yeah. Turn to, um, is it is an interesting question. Yeah. Um, oh look, the, the, the word you use buckets are breaking this concept of, of the Internet down and into some component pieces I think can be really helpful because as we'll get into the conversation about intranet gets confusing really fast. And the conversation especially about how does the intranet, how does your idea of what an intranet work in the world together with office three 65 or how does it work in the world together with slack or how does it work in the world together with other things, um, gets really confusing. So maybe the first place to start with what an intranet is is to think of the historical intranet. Like where did this come from? Sure. W what, what did the old word intranet mean?
Speaker 2:
2:07
And I think there, there is a couple of ways to come at it. I mean one way is to think about almost like the, the origins of the, of the Internet as a way to come into understanding the origins of the intranet, right? So when you think of the Internet, the original Internet was the worldwide web, right? So if you think like the first website you ever saw, this is, it's a website, it's a web page and everything about this is centered on the page and what you could do with the page was basically just text, right? And it was big innovations that allowed us to have images that allow us to have video. Anything interactive over the web wasn't there in the beginning. Right? So I think the concept of an intranet and it's oldest incarnation is sort of just like a web page.
Speaker 2:
2:58
But for a, another way of coming at like the old idea, the oldest idea of what an intranet is, is to think about, especially this sharepoint, the concept of is sharepoint intranet because sharepoint is so dominant in the market and the Microsoft, uh, collaboration tool suite is, is so great and as so well used and welled up by so many companies. Um, the sharepoint intranet has its origins in sharepoint, the point where you share things. So originally it's like a collaboration platform or a place for sharing documents and managing documents. So instead of emailing you something, Jason, I might just say, Hey, I'm going to throw it up in the sharepoint and that's this web page where you and I both have access to it and we can both grab the file off of that webpage. So if you think of that as like intranet 1.0 is basically just a site, you know, and then the sharepoint intranet is like this little wrinkle on top of that is sort of like a site together with some documents that also go with the site. That's the old world of intranets and where they come from.
Speaker 1:
4:09
Interesting. Yeah. It's like when you're talking about when you're painting these pictures of the Internet and the intranet, you know, I, I immediately start to think, okay, well what, what is trauma? What is trying to be solved here? What are, where were we, where is the problem? And it sounds like that, whether it's either trauma or her version, you're using, what you're trying to find a way to do is to simplify a way to present information. Right. A lot of it might be documentation. A lot of it might be images. It could be anything that is useful to an organization or whoever it is intended to be in front of this platform. Yeah. Um, and I think that applies to the turn or the trial. Um, that's right. And that's really interesting. So, so talk to me, I think that when we expand out and now that we have that, that down, yeah.
Speaker 1:
5:04
Sharepoint itself is something that gets talked about a lot, especially today when it comes down to trod knit in Toronto. Um, and, and it was still at the, at, at its core that it sounds like that's still spot on. Like we're trying to figure out a way to have a repository of everything that is important to an organization. And if it's your first day, you need to have these key and you'd click, you use the key to get into the door and then while you have access to every folder and shelf and book that you've ever needed to have access to specifically to you, Peter, cause it's your first day. Right. Um, but the problem is, I think, and you can talk a lot more about this, is that when that door is opened, it's not as easy and wonderful and magical as it sounds. It might be a little bit, there might be more challenge
Speaker 2:
5:58
left to than meets the eye. Yeah, I think that's right. I mean, one way to think about it is the development of the economy itself, the development of software tools and categories is all at that specialization. And what happens is over time we get more and more specialized tools that find ways to do things in a more and more sophisticated way. And I think the, the, the, the challenge with sharepoint, you can, you can simplify it pretty well into these two requirements. Sense. Okay. The one requirements that being for managing documents and the other requirements that being four pages that display information in a way that's easy to consume. And the problem is that there they are, these are two different requirements sets and they have different like features that you might build against them, um, and different ways that they get used in the organization.
Speaker 2:
6:56
So talking about the, like the document management, that part is going to be, you know, originally the sharepoint with just this one point between you and me. But once you have a company with 10,000 people and they're all using it, um, it just gets maddeningly complex. Just this one thing of sharing things on a point. You have a folder hierarchy of how, of, of how the information is organized. You have version control. So if I make changes to the document, you make changes to the document which wins out. How do we recover a document that's been lost, um, permissioning into that. So your new, which folders do you get access to on the sharepoint, on your first debt. And you can just see how you can build an entire product development organization around solving this one problem really well of managing documents. And then on the other hand, you have that displaying information originally just on a page, but doing this in a more and more intelligent and beautiful way, which itself is a very challenging problem.
Speaker 2:
8:00
Uh, targeting the content of figuring out, oh, I want to prioritize this content over that content. Um, visually having it be more engaging. I think of some of the early innovations of like just the news carousel on an intranet homepage, right? Um, that was one of the first like big innovations on that set of requirements. So because you have to kind of different big tangled problems that you're solving, I think you ended up with, with sharepoint, the core problem of the document management is something that, that they just got better and better and better at. And this other problem of the communications or layer was put it this way, our prospects come to us and tell us all about how much effort they put into making what's available on sharepoint. Now I'm good enough for their needs for that layer. And there's an entire ecosystem of companies, consultants that are out there that have their whole business.
Speaker 2:
9:06
The entire ecosystem is built on, on top of sharepoint, like improving or customizing sharepoint to the point where it more effectively solves that communication problem. So in the end, this, this sharepoint intranet is sort of a hybrid of two things, the document management system and the communications intranet and it needs a lot of help on the communications intranet side to meet the needs of uh, companies that are out there. And even with that help, a lot of the projects just don't have the levels of engagement that people are looking for. So they bit, they invest, they have sharepoint, did they bring in a consultant or a development shop that, that um, does lots of custom beautiful pages on top of the sharepoint and still their readership is 15% or they have non desk workers and it doesn't matter. You have lots of beautiful pages, but they're on a desktop computer and these people are in the field, they're on the factory floor, they're there in the stores that they are on locations there. They're not going to be looking at the those intranet pages. So this historical intranet for various reasons was just not a really meeting all of the needs of internal communications and companies
Speaker 3:
10:29
like what you're seeing. We hope so. If you'd like to learn more about staff base and what staff base offers, please go to staff.com and click on schedule a demo. We'd love to show you the product now back to the podcast. Enjoy.
Speaker 1:
10:43
So there's also a lot to that too, that it seems that when we as an organization that presents a employee engagement platform, that's one way of looking at it. There are many ways of looking at what staffbase is. Um, but I do hear a lot that this idea of there's this, I guess a frame of mind that we're coming into to replace something. And I don't think that's true. I think it's, we're trying to certainly improve an experience and primarily because we've identified that all that communication piece that you've been talking about, the way that people expect to be communicated with and have access to information is so vastly different than it used to be. However, the way that documentation is stored and organized and administered is pretty good and it doesn't really need to be changed that much. How it's available, searchable and presented is a very different conversation, right?
Speaker 1:
11:51
So integration really becomes key, I think. Yes. And, but let's, let's talk about the different types of intranet that we see today. Yeah, I think that now that you've sort of, you've really did a nice job putting rails around what was, where we are and when, when this, I think how you put it, the, the window, uh, the nice window that was placed in front of sharepoint in order to make, start that journey of making it easier to find information that alone has evolved exponentially, especially because of the different channels that are now available in terms of what Internet really is.
Speaker 2:
12:31
Yes. So it's evolved a lot. One of the first steps that it took along the way where the so called social intranets, and this was if you've ever, um, had a platform like Jive, I worked at a, at a company that use gy for their intranet and jive was, was kind of taking, um, this concept that was over from sharepoint, have like documents and then communications of pages and then mixing in the spice of all the exciting things that were happening with social media, which didn't exist before. Then. Right? So, um, social media comes on the scene and Jive as a company and some other companies that are coming into the space or thinking how can we add social to this thing that had been going on. So now it's not just a website but it's it's users. You have a user profile. I have a user profile.
Speaker 2:
13:26
Maybe there's some interactions, some ways that we can chat with one another. Um, and so this, this created a new class of intranets that are sometimes called social intranets or even evolved versions of this that we see today that I would term as like collaboration intranets. And the way I describe it as like this, they're looking to take that old idea of the webpage that that conveys information really well. And to add this, this other spice to it, either of like social media style, things like comments and likes on top of that content or collaboration tools like stuff for getting work done. And this is where the confusion really starts to settle in. So as if it weren't confusing enough documents, shop window there and the desktop, you know, communications experience. Now you have this idea of collaboration tools and hear what, what we really mean is things like, um, Microsoft XL or a slack like chat that's not meant for communicating at the organization wide level, but it's meant for communicating among a small team like you and me.
Speaker 2:
14:41
If we were going to work on this, this podcast or some project together, we could just use this tool to do, it's a day in, day out type tool. That collaboration suite is something companies have tried bundling in together with the communications layer. It's that you have the page which displays the information and some of these tools that come along with that. And what we see is that this approach, it gains some traction in the SMB space. So for smaller companies who may be, don't already have a big enterprise, um, arrangement with Microsoft where they're buying all the Microsoft suite or they're, they're not on the g suite, then for them it could make sense as this kind of a low cost alternative. Oh, I can get some collaboration tools that are workable enough for my company and our needs and I can have that desktop communications experience.
Speaker 1:
15:37
Hmm. Yeah. So it's like the, that's very interesting. It sounds to me like most organizations, and when you, when you, when you took a step back and said, you know, for the SMB space it is, you can accomplish that task, right? You can collaborate, you can create a Google slide, you can share that slide through slack. You can have a one on one conversation regardless of where that person is located from peer to peer, it's, it's, you can do this and you could do it with a team of a hundred. You could do at a team with 150, maybe even to 200 potentially starting to get a little bit more challenging though as the teams are growing and the as are the documents,
Speaker 2:
16:16
a repository. Uh, yeah. Great Point. Right? So the insight is like all of the problems get more complex with scale and they, they all get more complex at the same time. See your document management problem is a lot hairier it's like an apples to oranges difference when you move from 100 people to a thousand people. And that's just the document management component. The communications component also has this element to it, um, as does these collaboration tools. And so this is kind of where we'll come around to our vision of the market is especially where we want to serve more enterprise customers that are a bit larger is you have to have best of breed and you can't, you can't have a jack of all trades, master of none approach in any of these spaces. So if it comes to your collaboration tools, we think there's a best of best of breed right now I'm in, that's especially Microsoft to a lesser extent, the Google, Google suite.
Speaker 2:
17:17
Um, I mean, what are the other players? Do you really want to compete with them and do you want to try to solve that problem at the same time as the document management system problem, sharepoint or Google drive if you want to compete with all of that set of features. And then the communications were, so in our review, all of this stuff has got to be a best of breed approach. So you've got best of breed for your document management, which for most organizations is going to be sharepoint. Um, best of breed for your collaboration tools, which in a lot of organizations again is going to be the Microsoft suite. Um, uh, plus a constellation of other like point tools and things depending on your, a team of designers or you're a team of marketers or whatever it is, you're going to add those solutions, the best of breed solutions into the mix.
Speaker 2:
18:00
And then what we really think is the best of breed also enterprise communications platform. And not just when I say that, not just taking, um, the concept of the page, the old internet intranet webpage, um, and, and focusing on that for the enterprise, but adding in this brand new thing of the APP and being on the phone. And so really with the way that the world has changed on top of all the other changes we've been talking about, it's got to be best of breed focused on communications or focused on each problem, a best of breed approach. And then it's got to incorporate this new channel that's changed everything, which is the phone, smartphone adoption now 80% at our reached 80% in 2016 three years ago. Chanel basically everybody's got one and that changes the game for internal comms.
Speaker 1:
18:55
So it's safe to say that with 80% a number like that in 2016 that if you are employed and working for an enterprise, you have a smartphone,
Speaker 2:
19:07
it becomes a viable channel for the vast majority of organizations. I mean at staffbase we grew up working with a lot of companies that had non desk workers and the reasons for that are pretty obvious. Like you can help close a communications gap and solve your problems that are associated with communications and um, and cultural transformation with this kind of best of breed focus that I talked about. But if you're talking about like adding a mobile channel where previously the person didn't even sit at a desk and a literally didn't have access to your intranet, that's a game changer. That's not just, you know, um, increased performance from increased focus and a couple extra good features. But that's really like a brand new channel. So this is like the area of the, of the world, the type of company that we really focused on right from the beginning.
Speaker 2:
20:05
So we've worked with a lot of companies, um, where yeah, people don't have email addresses. Um, and you're closing that big gap. And the truth is that there are still a lot of people who don't have mobile phones. I mean, in the United States for example, we've got 300 million people living here. Um, they're probably 10 million adults or something like that who do still today, they don't have a smartphone. But the essential point is it's reached a critical mass and it's reached this place where, what are you comparing it to? You know, even if you work in an industry, and we, we talked to folks like this all the time where like they don't think they know for a fact that not all their employees have smartphones meet. Maybe they think the number's like 75%. And this would be like an outlier situation, like an incredibly low number, right? Right. 75% of our employees have smartphones and the other 25% don't. But the truth is, your alternatives don't approach 75%. Right? Your alternatives are like email and you're reaching 15%. Right? And that Delta, that's 60% delta between them, um, is still so valuable that, that that's what the penetration means. It means viability in almost every circumstance for almost any company. Interesting.
Speaker 1:
21:21
So yeah, we're talking about manufacturing plants where there are people that they're on the floor, they don't have a desk, they don't have a desktop, they don't have a laptop. Uh, we're talking about truck drivers. We're talking about people that are on the field repairing things that, you know, there, they may have a tablet, they may have a sparkle, uh, a communications device. So they can talk to their family. Yeah. Right. That's, that's their how they, how they get that accomplished. And so enter the idea of layering an app that can then integrate and expose all of that information that we talked about earlier. Communications, documents, storage, uh, social, all of that together into this one solution that is accessible to 75% of the organization. Yeah.
Speaker 2:
22:10
And then that's the, that's what we, well we had staff, they see that this is the, this is where the world is going that you're going to end up with as best of breed approach in all these different areas including communications. And your communication solution should not be just desktop but it should be mobile to, and it should be one communications platform. Cause after all communications is all about like being connected. And the most connected way to be is that it's, it's a single platform. Even if the however you want it to use, for example, staffbase alongside an existing sharepoint intranet, the connections between them become essential for this to work really well. So that's where it as you'll see in in in our other staff based content on our website. Like this is a big focus for us that we connect really well. Whether it's with existing sharepoint, sharepoint, intranets or with the other best of breed solutions to connection points actually become a part of the specialization that you have to have as the communications specialist.
Speaker 1:
23:14
It too, cause I another layer of intranet was there is a piece of intranet that can be a, a gateway to either your other applications or your single sign on solution and that just that removes a barrier of entry, right? Yeah. Cause I, I've, I've worked with people, I've talked to people that they get confused by how, what it is that they're supposed to be accessing, how they, how they access it. And by making it as simple and clear as possible, I'm on my mobile device, I pushed the button that looks like my logo. I see the information, I start to understand those different buckets that you were talking about. Whether it's community
Speaker 2:
23:57
location or it's storage or it's easy access to those other pieces that are critical for me to get my job done. Yes. And this is what I mean, all of these tools, right, aren't focused on ease of use. All of software around the world is trying to become easy to use. So if you're a Google drive or you are sharepoint document management, you're trying to make yourself easier to use. But we really believe that this, um, this thing that you're talking about, this one stop shop, this ability to be the one place that you go and easily find what you're looking for that's really close to the core competency of communications itself. And that's why we think that responsibility is best placed in that same place we've been talking about this communications a intranet or that communications platform has that best of rethink, separate from your collaboration tools, separate from your document management. We think that's also where your front door to your digital organization should live. It just seems to be the most natural home for, um, a connection point of bridging of gaps, right? So these tools, of course they're going to make themselves easier to use, but they're never going to master connecting to the rest of the world because at the end of the day, that's not their core function. But Communications is connection. That's what, that's what we did.
Speaker 3:
25:23
Like what you're seeing, we hope. So if you'd like to learn more about staff base and what staff base offers, please go to staff.com and click on schedule a demo. We'd love to show you the product now back to the podcast. Enjoy.
Speaker 1:
25:37
Interesting. So I think that really helps understand the complexity and the common confusion that that happens when someone says, I have an intranet, which is where we started this conversation. And it's, it's, it's very, it's not uneasy when someone says, I have an intranet. The, it's not an easy one to three question path to understanding what that even means. Yeah. Um, but it is good to recognize all those different buckets and how, what intranet means, too many different organizations. But I also think it's important now that after you explaining it, it's, I think all of those buckets relate and are important to every organization period. Whether you're a startup growing into the SMB and the IBM or you're into the enterprise now at the end of the day, their organizations are still desperately trying to find ways to be engaged, communicate and humanize the culture. Right? And this is what this cultural transformation comes from. Right? And I think those buckets are huge indicators of finding where you can have be successful in that transformation. Yeah. Are there, so if you had to just narrow it down to those to five, the five points, could you just re re repeat that for me so I can just hear them again and just draw out that bucket in my brain? Okay,
Speaker 2:
27:12
sure. So if we think thinking about five points as like a five discrete categories, sure. And let's, let's put this in the, in the present tense or maybe even like in the next, over the next few years. Okay. That these are really like the categories that, that you see where you want best of breed for each. I think one point, um, would be like document management and storage. So this is information that you need to store, organize really well, retrieve, etc. That's 0.1. Point two would be these collaboration tools. So this I need to get work done. So I'm going to chat on slack and I'm going to send you the file that you and I will be working on later today. Um, that kind of a team getting worked on those tools. That's a second sort of category. I think uh, communications, the communications intranet, this thing that we've been talking about that will become a third discreet point.
Speaker 2:
28:15
Mm. All to its own. Okay. Um, and I guess now that I'm thinking of it, well, you know, looking at like a few possible future state, I don't know if social for example, gets its own category and I don't know if mobile has its own category either. And these are two things that I think today we see examples up. So let me, let me say more about that please. Social, this is like um, Yammer, which is basically Twitter for work. Yeah. So you have these platforms where they're like, they're just trying to be social, social media, but in a work setting, I don't know if that really becomes important for businesses any more. I think it gets kind of subsumed into that communications point, that 0.3 mm. And the same with mobile. Today you have this space and we've been called it for much of our five years of existence and then an employee app where the focus, uh, of the descriptor is, is the APP is just saying the mobile piece and we think that's too narrow in scope and, and that's not going to survive this transition to the one communications enterprise communications platform because it's got to, of course it's got to be mobile first, but mobile can't exist as a category standing on its own.
Speaker 2:
29:35
It's got to be all communications. It's got to be the whole digital enterprise in one sort of category.
Speaker 1:
29:41
Interesting. I'm actually going
Speaker 2:
29:42
to, I'm going to break tradition here and I'm actually going to jump back into one point you made because it got me very interested in this. That's social elements. Okay. So when you talked about it, it really made me think, it goes back to what we were talking about earlier in terms of this desperation for engagement, but maybe instead of engagement, the real right, the right word is actually adoption. Like, so people are actually, this is maybe we're social has really come into play. It's like, well gee, a lot of people are communicating this way. Maybe if we communicate that way we'll have more people communicating that way. You know? And it says that maybe that's where it's like we're kind of grasping at straws, trying to find different ways to just please be engaged. That's where, that's where it goes back to engagement again.
Speaker 2:
30:34
Yeah, it does. And, and that's, that's a great point that you make it. And I think it very much describes the era, the era that maybe has been, and it is sort of passing now. I've, I've tried to chase that. That's a mystical creature of, of social media that's so captivated, um, uh, the, the broader world and like put that energy that's around social media the way that everyone's using it into an enterprise context. But it doesn't, it doesn't work to just say, you know, look at that over there. Like, let's make something that superficially resembles it in a work context. Yeah. Um, and we see that, that that's not really getting that much traction, but we know what does work and communications and what does work is relevance. Like when people get spam in whatever form it comes, like, it's just not going to work for them.
Speaker 2:
31:30
Right. If you're on an, an, all of the social media platforms operate on this same principle, right. They're trying to make it relevant for you. They're trying to make the advertising relevant for you. Sure. Because if it's not relevant, like you're going to tune out, you're, you're going to just stop. You can stop checking your email. You're going to stop reading those emails. Um, so we think relevance is essential. And how do you get relevance while you've got to be thoughtful about what do people care about? You've got a target. Things make it more local, more personal in nature. Um, so I think, yeah, relevance and then the other principal that's so important is reach. And what we need with reach is just like, are you in a place that you'll actually get to people? Right. We're not. Um, and social's been amazing because they have great apps that, you know, there you can get to social from anywhere.
Speaker 2:
32:23
Um, these, uh, a lot of the enterprise tools don't have the same reach and the reached challenge is more subtle in the enterprise context than you would think. Hmm. So let me just, I'm running and, and, and, and dive in a little bit more on this, on this reach topic, and let's talk about the mobile phone for a second. Okay. So the mobile phone, mobile phone penetration is so high for personal devices because people buy them and they use them for their own stuck for my stuff, right? It's not company mobile phone penetration that's reached 80 90% right. And this is really important distinction because the channel, we're not saying to companies like, Hey, by everyone in your company a mobile phones so that you can now communicate with something that's in their pocket. We don't even think that would work anyway. Because the whole key is that it is the personal phone on so many levels.
Speaker 2:
33:22
I mean, if you already have company phones, if you have Byo d that's working well for your organization today, then just leverage that existing channel, right? But in terms of creating something new, we're not saying start from scratch. We're saying actually go to the personal device where they are. And the reason I say this is this is subtle, is because a lot of organizations think like, oh, we're just going to add mobile into our strategy and they don't, in their minds, split mobile into this personal category versus a company category. Consider what would happen if they did, if they thought themselves, I want to add a mobile channel. Oh, but mobile is always personal and or company. Then they would see that their potential reach is like at most organizations cut down very low because most organizations don't provide everyone with a company device. Right.
Speaker 2:
34:20
When you're on the personal phone, now your APP is not mandatory, right? You can't force people to download it and this means the whole power dynamic is changed and the whole project isn't what you thought it was. It's not. I add mobile and just like my website, which I fully control, I just push it out. You don't control it. They're not going to download it. They're not. They're going to turn off push notifications. You don't control it. And in that way, the mobile channel is, is a personal channel is actually a big, a big insight that is personal. It's not owned by the company at all. And it means the power dynamic is different and it means that your relevance in order to achieve that reach that you, you think was as easy as, oh yeah, just like the website, I just add mobile. It's not that you have to add mobile in such a way that people will do it from their personal devices.
Speaker 2:
35:16
And this means it's gotta be branded so that people trust it so they identify with it so they can even find it right in the first place. Like your, your employees don't know who staff faces. They're not going to care, right? Your, you're a big enterprise company. What? It's got to be branded on the outside and all the way through and it's got to have use on it that keep employees coming back and it can't abuse it's powers. If you're on somebody's personal phone and you start spamming them with push notifications with big company announcements coming from an office that's 400 miles away, guess what? They're going to turn push notifications off. They're going to delete it from your phone. Um, and I think this is some, this like twist that mobile is not just a tick box channel but it's personal mobile and has a different power dynamic and a different approach is something that we here at staffbase really understand in a way that it again, like talking about confusion, it can be confusing. Like having a mobile app versus an APP that gets the challenges of personal branding must be there. Those use cases must be supported. The relevance and targeting must be there. The governance of push notifications must be there because the user experience in this power dynamic of personal phones has to be tops. And if it's not, it's not a channel anymore, they'll take it out of your hands.
Speaker 1:
36:47
Exactly. Because the tolerance, I mean it's just like this, the moment you win a game, it's got you lead it. Yup. The moment something no longer becomes interesting to you, it's taking up space. Yeah. So you have to respect that, that zero tolerance, the impatience of mobility. That's right. Um, very interesting there. There was, there was one thing you were touching on to that. I just thought it was, it was really relevant to a conversation we were having with a prospect the other day talking about how these field workers, um, if someone is under the weather or, uh, needs, uh, to be able to share healthcare information, something as simple as that. You know, I, I could see that such a simple thing can be come very difficult to find under, in a situation like an emergency, a situation like that. But if under a, under something like a, a branded application on is very easy to access and to very quickly be able to share something like your healthcare information to your spouse or something of that nature. Um, I mean that's personal. That's, that's, that's I'm trying to help my kids, that kind of a thing and that, that there's another level of that dynamic where I trust and want this to be on this device that is personal to me. And then layer on top of that, that caution and carefulness and trying to communicate to your organization and respecting the nuisance of seeing information thrown at your face and not making it spammy is so important. Um,
Speaker 2:
38:31
yeah, yeah. The secret sauce. It's not, it's, it's not, uh, it's not just a magic pill. Right. You know, you don't just add water and you have this amazing communications channel. It really has to be thoughtful and it has, it has to build trust. It has to meet the user's expectation on so many levels. And if it does, it's transformational. Totally. I mean, we have, we have customers who, six months into a project, 85% of their employees have adopted and 75% of those are using it every day. That's, that's transformed how that company communicates. And those people, it's on their personal phones, but now they've got easy access to, to the things that they want to find. But again, it's got to be just that right combination of understanding the personal context, giving them stuff that's valuable to them, communicating and launching in the right way. It's, it's, it's not easy. There's no guarantees. Um, but it's transformational if you get it right.
Speaker 1:
39:39
And you're seeing that the organizations that buy into that, that are saying lit or treating it with the respect that it deserves are, are seeing the numbers, they're seeing the results they're getting, they're getting the return, right?
Speaker 2:
39:54
Yeah. They're, they're getting the return in a lot of different ways. They're seeing it the first place they're there looking for it. Honestly, it's just readership. Like they want to know, you know, in the old world, um, 15%, 30% of emails were being read and in the new world, 60%, 70%, 80% of important messages being read. And that's one of the first Aha moment, you know, Delta's that they're looking for. Um, even simpler than that, it's like we had non desk workers, we weren't reaching them, period. Not Enough. Then, um, to now we're reaching 80% of them. Um, so it's, it, this kind of, this kind of difference in the first instance. And then over time they're seeing things like turnover rate, seeing things like safety. For so many organizations we work with, safety's a key topic. The, using the APP to deliver safety videos to make it easier for people to find safety information and they're seeing results in their business operations from the fact that those videos are available. An example is that at Reiner logistics is a logistics company. Basically the run a lot of trucks and the trucks are driving, you know, thousands and thousands of miles. Um, some of the videos that they circulated on the app were videos about how you change the tires in the right way and those videos led to a 15% decrease in some of the safety incidents that they were having in their operations.
Speaker 1:
41:28
That's incredible. Wow. This has been great. Um, uh, Peter, I thank you for your time and look forward to having more of these discussions. I think we, we really dove into the complexity of what the word intranet means and why it's, it's not a one sentence answer to anyone, period. Um, and all the different layers or buckets that the different pieces fall into and where, what other buckets are we're waiting and that haven't been filled in yet. Yeah. Um, great. Thank you very much for your time. I appreciate it.
Speaker 4:
42:07
Okay.
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