Reporters without quarters

Tunisia- to coup or not to coup

August 15, 2021 Simon, Mirco and Stephen Season 1 Episode 10
Reporters without quarters
Tunisia- to coup or not to coup
Chapters
Reporters without quarters
Tunisia- to coup or not to coup
Aug 15, 2021 Season 1 Episode 10
Simon, Mirco and Stephen

Boom! We're back - and how.

Sadly, we're missing that doyen of the international free press, Stephen Quillen, (bedtime/recording overrun) but, what's this? We've only got Haythem El Mekki in his place.

Holy moly. 

For those less that copacetic cool cats, Haythem is a well known commentator and satirist from Tunis. 

As he says, his daily radio show on Mosaique FM draws audiences of 1.5 million in a country of just under 12, so, y'know, "phew." 

Haythem's show taps directly into the bloodstream of Tunisian politics and, after the events on the 25th of July, well, you can imagine.   

The views here are pretty explosive, so we're going to throw it open to some of the parties mentioned to respond, in the meantime, a few pointers for all who are not so familiar with events in Tunisia.

 25th of July: President Kais Saied dismissed the prime minister, suspended  the parliament for 30 days and lifted immunity of its members.

 14th of January: that's the date in 2011 when Tunisia's former autocrat, Ben Ali fled and everyone declared the revolution complete.

 "2013:" that's the period Tunisia experienced an earlier crisis following the assassinations of politicians Chokri Belaid and Mohamed Brahmi 

Ennahda: these are the self styled 'muslim democrats' who have played a significant role in the majority of governments to have ruled Tunisia since 2011.

Rashed Ghannouchi: Ennahda's founder 

A Nahdoui: a supporter of Ennahda 

Abir Moussi: Notorious opponent of Ennahda, known for her verbal assaults and, after being physically assaulted, showing up in the parliament wearing a helmet and bulletproof vest

That was a lot, wasn't it?  

We will continue to  follow events here closely and, (try) to get a programme together with guests from Tunisia and the region in our office in downtown Tunis. 

Follow us on twitter: reporterswithoutquarters

 

Show Notes

Boom! We're back - and how.

Sadly, we're missing that doyen of the international free press, Stephen Quillen, (bedtime/recording overrun) but, what's this? We've only got Haythem El Mekki in his place.

Holy moly. 

For those less that copacetic cool cats, Haythem is a well known commentator and satirist from Tunis. 

As he says, his daily radio show on Mosaique FM draws audiences of 1.5 million in a country of just under 12, so, y'know, "phew." 

Haythem's show taps directly into the bloodstream of Tunisian politics and, after the events on the 25th of July, well, you can imagine.   

The views here are pretty explosive, so we're going to throw it open to some of the parties mentioned to respond, in the meantime, a few pointers for all who are not so familiar with events in Tunisia.

 25th of July: President Kais Saied dismissed the prime minister, suspended  the parliament for 30 days and lifted immunity of its members.

 14th of January: that's the date in 2011 when Tunisia's former autocrat, Ben Ali fled and everyone declared the revolution complete.

 "2013:" that's the period Tunisia experienced an earlier crisis following the assassinations of politicians Chokri Belaid and Mohamed Brahmi 

Ennahda: these are the self styled 'muslim democrats' who have played a significant role in the majority of governments to have ruled Tunisia since 2011.

Rashed Ghannouchi: Ennahda's founder 

A Nahdoui: a supporter of Ennahda 

Abir Moussi: Notorious opponent of Ennahda, known for her verbal assaults and, after being physically assaulted, showing up in the parliament wearing a helmet and bulletproof vest

That was a lot, wasn't it?  

We will continue to  follow events here closely and, (try) to get a programme together with guests from Tunisia and the region in our office in downtown Tunis. 

Follow us on twitter: reporterswithoutquarters