IdeaScale Nation

All the Data in the History of the World - Orange IoT Studios

August 21, 2019 Season 1 Episode 5
IdeaScale Nation
All the Data in the History of the World - Orange IoT Studios
Chapters
IdeaScale Nation
All the Data in the History of the World - Orange IoT Studios
Aug 21, 2019 Season 1 Episode 5
IdeaScale
How is the information revolution informing the future of the internet of things.
Show Notes Transcript

The cost of technology has dropped so drastically that new information gathering and processing possibilities have led us to the Internet of Things. Mike Vladimer, Co-Founder of Orange’s IoT Studio, talks about the data revolution and how IoT data and personalization can be harnessed to provide real value to humans and how one achieves this goal at Orange's IoT Studio.




Speaker 1:
0:00
Think about all the information that you've ever heard about or seen
Speaker 2:
0:04
about. Like when you go to your museum and you see like you know Egyptian papyri with like whatever they wrote down, like you know the grain that they grew or, or what, who is the Pharaoh at the time? So you go back like thousands of years and you start adding up everything that's ever been recorded. You know, you hit around 1500 of the Gutenberg printing press now people are really starting to record data. You know, you jump ahead to like 2007 Steve Jobs introduces the iPhone now where like, you know, we have mobile devices and we're recording all this data. You add up all that data from ancient time up until just a couple of years ago and it still pales in comparison. The data gathered just in the last two years. Yeah it is. It's mind blowing.
Speaker 3:
0:55
[inaudible] [inaudible]
Speaker 4:
0:57
all right everyone. Welcome to our idea scale nation podcast where we talked to change makers, innovation program leaders, futurists and intrepreneurs. This week we've got a great guest. It's Mike Vladimer, the cofounder of Oranges Iot studio. And A, if you're not familiar with orange, silicon valley is the bay area division of Orange, which is one of the largest telecommunications operators in the world. Um, they are headquartered in France, but orange silicon valley is specifically focused on nurturing disruptive innovations. Their Iot studio that was co founded by Mike is an open program that explorers and prototypes, um, the Internet of things. And Mike is going to talk to us about some of the work happening there. But one of the great things about Mike is that he's got this really great focus on Iot data and personalization in order to like provide real value to humans, make choices, even make things like that.
Speaker 4:
1:55
Um, it's really inspiring, great human centered. And, um, I wanted to invite you onto this program. Like not only because you've got a really great program, but because I think anyone working in the field of innovation needs to see how the Internet of things is going to relate to their strategy and get a better sense of how it's gonna help us serve truly human needs. But, uh, before we get into that, could you just tell us a little bit about yourself and your background? Why did you find the found the Iot studio? How did you end up there?
Speaker 1:
2:26
Oh Wow. So Jessica, thank you so much for that really kind and warm introduction. I'm sure I'm happy to give a little background on myself. So I like to say I speak business and I speak engineer. I've studied both. Um, so I originally started out, uh, as an engineer working on, uh, what are called micro sensors. These are like computer chips with little moving parts. A, you remember those old Intel Pentium processor commercials where people were wearing a bunny suit in the clean room. I was literally that guy, which was really fun. Um, and what was interesting, that was like 20 years ago, amazingly. Um, and what's interesting about microsensors, um, over the last 20 years, they, they've, the cost of micro sensors has dropped dramatically due to the economies of scale that come from smartphones. Um, and so just to be really specific, like everybody knows that, you know, when you turn your smartphone and the screen knows which way is up, uh, that's cause there's a little microchip inside that has a little piece that's vibrating and it vibrates differently depending upon, you know, how it's oriented with gravity and that that change in vibration is how your phone knows which way is up.
Speaker 1:
3:38
So this way, you know, when you rotate, that's so interesting. It's a little vibration. Yeah. Yeah. Um, it uses something called resonant frequency, um, which is, you know, if you have a kid on a swing at the park, you know, and you push that kid on the swing, uh, the kid, no matter how hard you push, always comes back at the same frequency. It doesn't matter if it's a short push or a long push. Um, and that, that's a really interesting and useful phenomenon and lots of stuff. It's the technology that's behind clocks. Um, but for, uh, your phone, what it means is, um, when the sensors in the plane of gravity, when, when gravity acts equally through the whole time, it has one effect. But when it's oriented such that it's like fighting gravity some of the time, uh, cause you know, every time that it tries to push away from the earth, that gravity is pulling it back just a little bit that, that it changes the resident frequency just lately.
Speaker 1:
4:36
I mean we're talking like, you know, very, very small changes, but they're measurable changes and that that's how the phone knows. So Anyway, point being, uh, that was like one of the first products I ever worked on. And at the time there was such a small market for these things that, you know, the, the first product that I've ever worked on was a missile guidance system. Um, yeah. And I w and the same technology today is in dog colors. So you can, everyone knows, you know, the fitbit pedometer, they have the same thing for dogs. And the thing that I like to say, just to highlight, you know, how much the world has changed in 20 years is the cost of these sensors has dropped so dramatically that we've gone from missiles to dog collars. Yeah. Um, so that's, so the reason that I see your point of like, how am I in the Iot studio, whatever.
Speaker 1:
5:25
Um, the, the reason that I'm here is historic. For the first part of my career, I was working on this really expensive technology that was fascinating to me, but you know, so expensive. It was basically useless. And then cause the smartphone revolution, you know, all of these components to smartphones got really, really cheap. So we're talking about the sensors, we're talking about the communications, uh, you know, the wifi chips, the LTE chips, all this stuff. And so all of a sudden the internet of things was possible. And so orange wants to open, uh, or more specific. So orange juice for people that aren't familiar with us, the easy way to think about orange is like Verizon or at and t, but for Europe and Africa. Um, and so, uh, here at our silicon valley, our, uh, innovation lab here in the bay, uh, we, we, we try to work on different cutting edge technologies and they wanted to open up an iot studio.
Speaker 1:
6:15
And so yeah, the right backgrounds, they brought me on. Um, one of my friends, uh, was here, so he actually recruited me, which was Kinda cool. Um, so yeah, so the reason that we create the Iot studio is because, you know, there's this change in the market, uh, what used to be so expensive, it was prohibited now, now as a affordable. And so there's all of these new proliferating technologies and the question is what do you do with it? Uh, and that's, that's in a nutshell what we're trying to do it, uh, the Iot studios to try to figure that out. You know, yes, we could build so many different products, but what's worth building?
Speaker 4:
6:51
That's, I admit, it reminds me of how, you know, aluminum used to be this like super valuable, precious metal. But then once we've figured out how we could create it, you know, then all of these new industries and use cases popped up for it, which is why we can now like wrap our food in it instead of treating it as a precious metal. It's like once the cost drops, you get all of these new possibilities.
Speaker 1:
7:12
Yeah. I, I love that. Um, that I, I actually heard the funny story about that where, you know, if 500 years ago you visited the King of France, um, if, if they liked you, they would put out the gold silverware for the meal. You really liked you. They put up the aluminum self-awareness cause that was so fast
Speaker 4:
7:35
about, it's like a joke. It's like really, right. Yeah.
Speaker 1:
7:38
Let's buy lunch set, which is a little bit foil also.
Speaker 4:
7:41
So, yeah, I mean it's like those, you know, the systems used to guide missiles. Now what, you know, how are they going to be wrapping our food later here? You're right, it's dog colors, right. Great path for that. So, so
Speaker 1:
7:53
I can give you my kind of core philosophy about this. A, and I'll probably hit this a few times as we talk. Um, but to me, when people think of Internet of things, they often think of, you know, the pedometers, the, the, the connected pedometer, the Internet connected thermostat. And the, the thing about those technologies is there, you know, slight tweaks on existing technologies there, there there's an increase in cost, there's an increase in complexity, there is some increase in value. Like it's nice that I can, you know, control my air conditioning from my office in America district and my house from anywhere in the world. But it, I don't think it's game changing. And I think the, the real promise of the Internet things that, the thing that we definitely focus on here at the Iot studio is this core belief of the real promise of Iot is that we can measure things that we've never measured before to solve problems that we've never solved before.
Speaker 1:
8:46
And the goal is to try to figure out those problems. So for instance, um, with this idea of you know, measuring temperature, I'm sure we could have an iot connected thermometer or somewhere but what and not so now not only can I tell you that the temperature outside is 72 degrees, but I could show you, you know how it varies over time. The thing that I think that's much more interesting is that we can use that data not just to throw more information at a consumer, but we can actually try to understand what their real question is and answer that. So sure. I could show you that time series, graph of temperature or I can tell you, you know, what does go like go wear a jacket today. I know, you know with the temperature over time is I can do some prediction about where that's going to go in the future.
Speaker 1:
9:36
I know a little bit about you personally, you tend to run cold, you know, I could put all that together to give you like your personalized recommendation. And so the big idea would be, you know, even if you, the question that you might ask a product team is what's the temperature outside and tell me as much as you can about the temperature. The reason that a consumer would say that is because that's the only question they've ever been able to ask. You can't look at a mercury thermometer and say, should I wear a jacket today? Uh, even though that's the real things, the real underlying questions. So the, so the thing that I'm really interested in and really focused on is how do we identify these new questions, new problems that have never been solved that we can now solve with data that we can never gather before.
Speaker 1:
10:19
Right. So, well, tell us a little bit about the Iot studio. What do you do there and what makes this orange program session short? So we have to, uh, I guess general focus areas to kind of feed off of each other. One is thought leadership. Yeah. The other one is just pilot projects. So thought leadership is stuff like this, you know, talking about what is Iot, what is good iot and why, uh, just trying to get our name out there as thought leaders around the Internet of things. Um, and that typically, fortunately for me will often attract, uh, especially startups that are, that have some kind of interesting technology that they want us to know about and that we do projects with those startups. And then we can talk about the cool projects and then it's this nice little virtuous cycle. Um, so one example of a startup that I'm a big fan of that we worked with is a startup called Sutro.
Speaker 1:
11:12
Um, so Sutro solves the problem of is your pool water safe to swim in. So historically, the way people deal with pool water is if you have a pool in your backyard, uh, you have to like tediously walk out to the pool. You take, you know, a scoop of water, you add some drops manually, it tells you what the Ph and the chlorine is. But then if to then do the calculation to figure out, you know, is my pool safe, you know, is the chlorine right level whenever, um, so Sutro solves all of that with an Iot Internet of things, uh, pool water monitor. So they have a device, it just floats in your pool. Um, and you know, once or twice a day it'll take a sample of the water figure out, you know, either yes, it's safe to swim or no, there's a problem, here's how to fix it. And it sends you an information through an app. Um, so for pool loaders, you know, it's much, much easier to have them have their pool. And a lot of them, interestingly, uh, I've, from working with suture, I've learned they also just like that the technology is really cool. They, they like that wizbang aspect of it, which I wasn't, I was expecting, uh, sutras core users to be more interested in, um, the safety aspect, but they actually really value the convenience and the coolness factor.
Speaker 5:
12:24
They like being able to hold their pool in their hand and like look at it from their phone and understand it.
Speaker 1:
12:30
Yeah. Yeah. That's cool. Um, and so the, the specific, so that, that's kind of Sutro, but so the way we worked with them is, uh, the, there's a bunch of new, uh, low power wide area networks, uh, coming onto the market. Uh, for consumers. I would say you don't even have to worry about it all. All this means as fancy as the term is that sounds is that your, your products are soon going to be much easier to use. So today if you go to an at and t store or if you go to an RM store, you can walk out with a phone that's connected to the Internet, you know, that has that LTE connection. If you go to the home depot or you go to best buy, that doesn't exist. Um, so the value of these new networks that are coming online or that, you know, for, for the Iot side of the market, for the things that you would get at best buy or a home depot, when you take it off the shelf, it's already going to be Internet connected.
Speaker 1:
13:25
It's going to be a much simpler process for um, for the consumer. And so orange is looking at a bunch of these different networks. One of them is called Lora, l. O. R a. L. S. It stands for Ella as long are as range. So it's long range, low power, low cost. And the basic idea is that um, a lot of the networks that were used a lot of the way we think about uh, connectivity, Wifi LTE is designed around the use case of the smartphone. And it's really, really cool that you can, you know, stream gigabits of video to your phone and your watch you tube, you know, on the train or whatever. Um, but the, there's a lot of costs and a lot of power consumption around that. When you think about something like Sutro, it's the, you know, it's a very different use case. They have very little amount of data that they need to said like temperature is 72 degrees, the chlorine is six, 650.
Speaker 1:
14:20
The Ph is 7.2, like, so we're not talking about gigabits of data, we're talking of like bytes of data. Ma Most kilobytes of data a day. Um, and, and with the additional constraint that people want to, you know, leave their Sutro in their pool and not have to charge it for, you know, ideally weeks and months, right? So whereas with our smartphone, consumers are totally fine having this power hungry data, hungry products because we value it so much that it does so much for us. With Iot, it's exact opposite. So we, I went to the suture a team and I said, guys, you know, you have this problem around data and we have this new technology. Let's, let's do a pilot project together where we could put a lora connectivity into your Sutro Pool Monitor that'll show, you know, the value of Sutro, the value of Laura and, and tell this really compelling story and know where the market's going to go.
Speaker 4:
15:11
Mike, you were one of the first people that explained 5g to me in a way that I can understand how it was going to change things for, you know, consumers like myself. Can you talk a little bit about 5g, what it is and the role it's gonna play in telecommunications? And iot.
Speaker 1:
15:29
Sure. Um, so the thing that, the best way to think about 5g from a consumer perspective is what does it mean for me? I like how is my life gonna Change? And the, all that five g is really gonna mean is that the Internet, our Internet experiences are going to be more seamless. Um, so for instance, uh, one characteristic of 5g is that, uh, the response time, which is technically called latency, you know, when, when an request goes out to internet and comes back, it's going to be less than 10 milliseconds. And that 10 millisecond threshold is really important because that's the time roughly that, uh, you know, scientists have measured that people notice a delay. So if something happens at one millisecond or two milliseconds, like as for most humans, we're not going to be able to detect that change. If something takes, you know, a hundred milliseconds or 200 milliseconds, we are going to detect that change.
Speaker 1:
16:28
Um, and so for five g that that decreased latency, that sub 10 millisecond response time, it just means that the Internet is going to be, it's going to feel seamless. Um, which is, uh, something, you know, today, we, we don't even think about the time that we spend, uh, while our app does, you know, the spinning wheel. But, uh, but if you go backwards and when you see, you know, how old, how long the spinning wheel used to take it. If you think back to even to the dial up modem days, uh, it's just crazy. It's just a different world. It's a world like once things get easier, you're like, oh, of course it should be this way, then you never want to go back. So 5g first and foremost is all about seamless internet. Um, from a technical perspective, another issue, um, is in order to make that happen, um, the technical implementation is, is different.
Speaker 1:
17:22
So right now we have relatively few towers of four g LTE, um, that cover large amounts of area. And with 5g part of the ability that the telcos need, one of the things that the telcos are going to need to deliver five gs that are going to have smaller antennas that cover smaller amounts of area or sorry, many more antennas, uh, that are going to cover small amounts of area. And for, for consumers, I don't think it's anything that we're going to notice. Like, you know, occasionally you'll see a tower on the side of a building or on the side of a highway, but just a few more of those, um, which I think are being covered up better and better. So they're not even, you know, that unsightly. So, yeah. So that I'd say is like one of the biggest things with five g.
Speaker 1:
18:12
And, and so when it comes to, uh, the Internet of things, the, one of the things that really excites me is that the connect for a, this is what we were talking about before, but basically, um, the connectivity is going to be more and more seamless for consumers. Meaning, you know, it'll be easy, there'll be less work to get devices connected to the Internet. There'll be less work to maintain devices connected to the Internet, essentially, you know, over the last couple of two decades, it's taken a good amount of work for us to, you know, maintain our Internet connection and that's all we're going to get set in blur and just means by reducing that friction, reducing that cost for consumers, um, that will, you know, our devices will be able to deliver more value to, to people. They'll, there'll be, you know, easier to use and make us happier. It just works.
Speaker 4:
19:12
Um, well it's, it's interesting because you're, you're so human centered and, and the way you think about it. I want to, we ask this question of all of our guests because we work in the field of innovation management. So, uh, I'm wondering what you think about the word innovation. Is, does it resonate with you or is it just a marketing tactic? How do you think it relates to your job?
Speaker 1:
19:33
Sure. So, um, it's both. Uh, it's, it definitely has meaning and it's definitely a buzzword. Um, and so to me, innovation in it just means that we're going to back to this big idea with Iot. So again, my core philosophy with Iot is let's measure things that we've never measured before to solve problems that we've never solved before. Innovation is let's solve problems that we never solved before, um, and, and solve problems and really compelling substantial ways. Um, so you know, and easy, an example of innovation is flight, right? Like before, if you wanted to get from San Francisco to New York, you, if you were lucky, you could take a train or maybe you had to like go on horseback and then all of a sudden now you can fly across the country like, oh my God, you know, the time costs going from days and weeks down to hours is that, that to me is a breakthrough. That's an new solution that that's innovation. Um, the reason, uh, I'd say though innovation is also a buzzword is because a lot of technology today is not as tangible as flight. It's not as obvious. And so people can tell you, you know, this app is an innovation and it's not very clear necessarily whether or not the, the solution that they're claiming that they can perform actually works and whether or not it's that much of an improvement over the status quo.
Speaker 4:
21:00
Well, I was thinking about, uh, also some of the other things that you do and I see that you're a mentor for different programs locally and maybe even not so locally. Is the role that mentorship and collaboration plays in that innovation process and that breakthrough, uh, you know, problem solving. Is that important to you?
Speaker 1:
21:19
Yeah. Um, I've always been passionate about teaching, um, for two reasons. One, I love explaining things to people. Uh, I just find it so fulfilling when somebody who doesn't understand something can get it. Um, partly I think just out of my own frustration, my own empathy for that. Like I, I hate not understanding things. I just love when it makes sense. Um, in a very Chris clear terms, you know, like, like, like give me a tool but give me it, put something in my hands. Um, and then the, the side benefit that I've found for sure that as, uh, come out of that is the, as I explained things to people, I understand it better and better myself. And, and again, like as somebody who just wants to understand how the world works, it's just been very fulfilling. Uh, so yeah, I've been, uh, mentoring through, uh, Berkeley through the alchemist accelerator, uh, meeting lots of startups that are just struggling to get off the ground.
Speaker 4:
22:14
Who is it that you get to work with? Is there anyone unexpected or,
Speaker 1:
22:20
um, so w with the Iot studio, we, we work with a variety of folks. I work with people internally here at Orange, uh, externally, like startups like Sutro, like I was mentioning. Uh, we've worked with software development houses. Uh, we just did a project with a really great shop called carbon five. They're all about agile software development and they helped build a, a open source project, um, around Iot that was really fun and relevant. It gathers environmental data for me. It all comes down to finding something interesting that we want to focus on and then building whatever, attracting whatever people we need to to, to go after it. It's honestly, it tends to be pretty opportunistic. Like I have a kind of a steady stream of folks coming to me asking for a different projects and when I find one that I think, you know, clicks, I'll go after it and pull in whatever resources makes the most sense. So for instance, right now I'm working with a colleague of mine here who's a data scientist and we're, we're analyzing um, temperature data for uh, beer kegs sunny and us.
Speaker 4:
23:25
Whoa.
Speaker 1:
23:27
It's a, it's, it's a bit of a story, but, um, some of our customers, uh, are trying to understand the conditions in their warehouses. Um, and we, we realize that, you know, nobody likes flat beer and so it's kind of a canonical use case that can be spread more broadly, but that folks can relate to like no one wants warm beer.
Speaker 4:
23:50
So you get to, you get to get exposed to all of these different ideas, all of these different projects and technologies. What is your vision for the future? What's going to change in the next 10 years?
Speaker 1:
24:03
That's a really interesting question. Um, sure. So, so the way, um, that I like to try and think about that cause I think it's really, really hard to figure out what's going on. I, I think we're in a, in a revolution right now, uh, around information and data and it's really hard in the middle of a revolution to understand what's happening. It's much, much easier to look back at a change and, uh, understand what happened then. And then just for me, I like to project results forward. So the way I, and I, I've Kinda gone through this as a mental exercise. The thing that I think that's really, really interesting is when people say, uh, data is the new oil, and it's kind of a cliche, but actually there's a lot of, um, a lot you can get from that metaphor. And so the question that's actually your aluminum quip point from the start, uh, the value of aluminum changing over time is what was the world like before oil, before fossil fuels, before coal, before, before essentially affordable energy.
Speaker 1:
25:08
Like, like I would argue that, well, so first, what was the world like 200 years ago, 2000 years ago? I, I looked into this, uh, there's some folks that do, um, historical economics and they, the, the, the studies that I've found say that it would take hundreds or thousands of servants per person for you and for me and for everyone, you know, to enjoy the quality of life that we have. So, you know, wow, I, I'm drinking a lovely cup of coffee. If you think about, you know, what it took to grow the beans and get them into San Francisco and to boil the water. And you know, today machines do all this work for us. But if you went back in time to, you know, the 18 hundreds, if you went to, you know, the, the year 1000, all that work would've had to have been done by a human.
Speaker 1:
25:57
And so the, the, the value of oil and fossil fuels is that it made energy affordable. Um, and so if you would, if you would've gone back, um, a hundred years ago and you would've said to people, you know, guess what, energy is affordable. All this, the, this work that used to have to do is now, you know, we can have machines do it. What, what do you want? Those people would've said, I want a, you know, a faster horse. I want a, you know, a brighter light. And today we recognize that what actually happened was, you know, not faster horses but cars and you know, not, uh, a better candle, but like flashlights and incandescent bulbs. Um, but you could, by looking at what their pain points were and what they would might've asked for you, you could see where the world is going. Uh, 90% of all the data ever recorded happen in just the last few years.
Speaker 4:
26:53
It's so funny that you act like it was, if you were going to bring it up. I was going to bring it up from the uh, article that you wrote that I just love that stat. It's crazy to think of everything that's cool. 90% was created in the last two years.
Speaker 1:
27:05
Yeah. So for folks that didn't read the article, the way I like to contextualize this is like, think about all the information that you've ever heard about or seen about. Like when you go to your museum and you see like, you know Egyptian papyri with like whatever they wrote down, like you know, the grain that they grew or, or what, who was the pharaoh at the time. So you go back like thousands of years and you start adding up everything that's ever been recorded. You know, you hit around 1500 the Gutenberg printing press. Now people are really starting to record data. You know, you jump ahead to like 2007 Steve jobs introduces the iPhone. Now we're like, you know, we have mobile devices and we're recording all this data. You add up all that data from, you know, ancient time up until just a couple of years ago. And it still pales and comparisons the data gathered just in the last two years.
Speaker 1:
27:53
Yeah, it is. It's mind blowing. Um, and so the F my argument and, and I, this is a very long winded way to answer your question of, you know, w what's the vision for the future? Where are we going? I, I would argue that if a hundred years ago it was the beginning of the age of affordable energy. Today we're in the age of affordable information, so much more, um, that we could improve. Um, and, and so to me it's a, yeah, I very much look forward to, to those types of improvements. So I can give you like one small example of, of a vision for the future that I would love to see. Um, so this is a bit of an Internet of things example. Uh, maybe there'll be controversial for some folks, but so be it. So, uh, the thing that strikes me is that this shared scooter revolution I think is amazing.
Speaker 1:
28:47
Absolutely amazing. And you know, somebody who believes in climate change and believes in creating more sustainable living. The thing that catches my attention is, you know, transportation is something like a quarter of all our greenhouse gases are because of transportation and something like half the population in the u s and globally or in the u s lives in cities. So if I were to tell you that, you know, huge numbers of people that are trying to get around, they have these 2000 ton or sorry, 2000 pounds, like two ton, uh, cars that uh, take up tons of space, consume tons of energy that we could replace them with lights. Uh, oh, electric driven, ideally, you know, renewable power, uh, light mobility, which are these shared scooters. You know, wouldn't you want to, to make that change go from, you know, this carbon intends to carbon light transportation that [inaudible] and I'm not saying like get rid of the cars.
Speaker 1:
29:51
I don't believe in that at all. I think people are going to need cars, but like we can design cities where cars are not the centerpiece of the city. We're there, you know, a minor thing where a few folks that, that, you know, need them for disabilities or accessibility or something, you can get it. I, I, we can't get rid of the cars, but for most of us, um, th this new type of transportation, uh, just as an example of these shared scooters, I think it would solve a lot, a lot. It would meet a lot of people's needs. Um, and where the information side of this comes together. If you could not have shared scooters without the Internet, um, payments needs are, are now seamless. You, you know, you use your phone to pay, you can, you can look at your phone to understand where is the scooter, you know, if you didn't have that, that all, then also these wouldn't work.
Speaker 1:
30:45
Um, we were talking about 5g earlier. I could imagine. Um, you know, so, so one of these, the challenges with the scooters is battery charging. So I could imagine a fleet of scooters that, you know, every night at 10:00 PM goes to a dock, uh, you know, within a mile or two of where they're located gets charged. Then, you know, at 6:00 AM in the morning goes out, like a fleet of scooters just goes out and positions itself wherever in the city is most likely to need the scooters. Right. Um, and so to do that, I would imagine that you'd have basically like scooter highways where you have towers that are community that, that have 5g connections, um, cause and they could just route the scooters along the highway. So it would be, you know, an expensive tower would be able to route, you know, hundreds or thousands of scooters and put them in place and tell them, you know, stop, you've got to let the old lady cross the road or, you know, keep going. It's safe to go ahead. Um, but yeah, the, this to me is, is just one small example of living in the age of information, using it to optimize a really important problem and hopefully making people's lives substantially better.
Speaker 4:
32:01
Well, I love it. I think that the optimism and positivity is absolutely necessary to some of the changes we're going to have to make 'em as part of this information revolution. So thank you for, for sharing that. I think we're at the end of our time here, but it's been really great to hear some of your ideas and have you explained the Internet of things, uh, in a way that I think was really accessible. Thanks so much for coming on, Mike.
Speaker 1:
32:26
Thanks, Jessica. Really Nice to be here. Thanks for having me.
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