Talk Wealth to Me

#052: What's a Will? What's a Trust? What's the difference?

August 28, 2020 Felipe Arevalo, Chase Peckham, Katie Utterback Season 3 Episode 1
Talk Wealth to Me
#052: What's a Will? What's a Trust? What's the difference?
Chapters
Talk Wealth to Me
#052: What's a Will? What's a Trust? What's the difference?
Aug 28, 2020 Season 3 Episode 1
Felipe Arevalo, Chase Peckham, Katie Utterback

You've likely heard the terms before:

  • wills
  • trusts
  • simple trust
  • complex trust
  • generational wealth 

But do you really understand what they mean or how these tools can help you and your loved ones financially?

Joining us on the show to help navigate the differences between wills, trusts, and how generational wealth can benefit your family is Dr. Gail Hamilton, owner, and principal of BeeConnectedLife.com, a service that helps private businesses and families establish trusts & foundations.

A will is a legal document that spells out your wishes regarding the care of your children, as well as the distribution of your assets after your death.

A trust is another method of estate transfer—a fiduciary relationship in which you give another party authority to handle your assets for the benefit of a third party, your beneficiaries.

  • A trust can be created for a variety of functions, and there are many types of trusts. 

The difference between a will and a trust is when they kick into action.

  • A will lays out your wishes for after you die.
  •  A living revocable trust becomes effective immediately. 
    • While you are alive you can be in full charge of your trust. 
    • And when you become incapacitated or die, the person you appoint as the successor trustee can easily step in and handle your affairs exactly as you have laid out in the document.

About Dr. Gail Hamilton
For more information on Dr. Gail Hamilton or her work establishing trusts and foundations for families and private businesses, visit BeeConnectedLife.com.

To purchase Dr. Hamilton's book, Wisdom From Queens: Vol. 3, visit DocGail.com

Questions for the show?
Email us at TalkWealthPodcast[@] gmail [dot]com 

Support the show (https://www.sdflc.org/help-sdflc/donate/)

Show Notes Transcript

You've likely heard the terms before:

  • wills
  • trusts
  • simple trust
  • complex trust
  • generational wealth 

But do you really understand what they mean or how these tools can help you and your loved ones financially?

Joining us on the show to help navigate the differences between wills, trusts, and how generational wealth can benefit your family is Dr. Gail Hamilton, owner, and principal of BeeConnectedLife.com, a service that helps private businesses and families establish trusts & foundations.

A will is a legal document that spells out your wishes regarding the care of your children, as well as the distribution of your assets after your death.

A trust is another method of estate transfer—a fiduciary relationship in which you give another party authority to handle your assets for the benefit of a third party, your beneficiaries.

  • A trust can be created for a variety of functions, and there are many types of trusts. 

The difference between a will and a trust is when they kick into action.

  • A will lays out your wishes for after you die.
  •  A living revocable trust becomes effective immediately. 
    • While you are alive you can be in full charge of your trust. 
    • And when you become incapacitated or die, the person you appoint as the successor trustee can easily step in and handle your affairs exactly as you have laid out in the document.

About Dr. Gail Hamilton
For more information on Dr. Gail Hamilton or her work establishing trusts and foundations for families and private businesses, visit BeeConnectedLife.com.

To purchase Dr. Hamilton's book, Wisdom From Queens: Vol. 3, visit DocGail.com

Questions for the show?
Email us at TalkWealthPodcast[@] gmail [dot]com 

Support the show (https://www.sdflc.org/help-sdflc/donate/)

Intro:

Welcome to Talk Wealth To Me, a safe space podcast, where we chat about anything and everything related to personal finance.

Felipe Arevalo:

The information contained in this podcast is for educational and entertainment purposes only. It does not constitute as accounting, legal, tax or other professional advice.

Chase Peckham:

Hello and Welcome to season three of Talk Wealth To Me. In this very first episode of season three of Talk Wealth To Me with Dr. Gail Hamilton. She is the owner and principal of Bee Connected. And today we discuss what is a will versus a trust, a simple trust versus a complete trust and her passion to discuss generational wealth and its importance. And not just that, it's the fact that anyone can do it. Not just the wealthy.

Katie Utterback:

Thank you so much for joining us today.

Dr. Gail Hamilton:

Thank you. This is my first podcast, so yes, that's fantastic. That's awesome.

Katie Utterback:

Well, we'll hopefully make this a very enjoyable, memorable experience for you. So , uh , I think just to start out the show, maybe you could just kind of help us get to know you a little bit more. Um, Dr. Hamilton, just kind of share a little bit about you , um , where you are, and how did you kind of fall into this world of talking about wills and trusts and generational wealth,

Dr. Gail Hamilton:

right, right. Yes. I thank you. I am 65 years old. My last career was I retired from the military and prior to that, I worked in for profit and nonprofit entities and I've been in the world of , uh, health and human services. Um, my, my lab. So I worked , uh, community action agencies, et cetera. My last technology, I forgot to turn off my phone. Um ,

Katie Utterback:

it happens and we're an always be recording podcast ABR.

Dr. Gail Hamilton:

And , uh , so I'm always, I have, you know, 40 plus years of experience at the local state and federal level. And , uh , I've done some things internationally , uh , since retiring from the military. I had 21 plus years there.

Chase Peckham:

Congratulations. And thank you.

Dr. Gail Hamilton:

Thank you. And I was, I was part of the United States public health service, which do any of, you know , are familiar with that branch of the military?

Chase Peckham:

I have to admit no, and we work a lot with the service.

Dr. Gail Hamilton:

So a commercial break go service is one of their seven uniform services, and everyone is familiar with the forearm services, you know, Navy Marine air force , uh , Navy. So, but the seven includes coast guard, the United States public health service and the surgeon general, which everybody sees and no are they asked or not? So there are seven uniform services. So I spent 21 years in a public health service and we're the best kept secret. We're all healthcare providers trained all officers and we develop every process and protocol that has to do with health in the United States. So we are the best kept secret because no one, no one knows about us. So I , I spent 21 years there , uh, was responsible for, for over like a billion dollars in grants and contracts. And so , uh, I, once I retired, I moved to Jacksonville, Florida. My, my daughter is in the Navy, was in the Navy at the time and had one grandchild. So I had to move to Jacksonville in order to spoil him. So that got me to Florida out of the D out of the DMV and out of the cold. Uh , and it was quite by accident. As I started to develop my business, which is Bee Connected. I realized there was a disconnect between people who were trying to start businesses, people who had families and businesses and wanting to make sure that their wealth continued. I, there was something that was missing. Uh, and I just happened to have a cousin that I'd been working with Gerald Maze and Lauren Green . And I said, what do you know about trust? And I said, well, just, you know, the ones that, you know, may have a lawyer, you draw up and they said, no, we're talking about complex trust. I said , uh, nothing. Uh, and so usually the company that they're working for will work with companies that have 10 million assets, et cetera. So I was brought to the table when I was listening to help them. And I said, you know, we need to share this with everyday people who have assets and who have businesses and want to make sure that their wealth, that they've accumulated and assets is around for the next generation. So how can we do this? So we came up with a model and that's Bee Connected in which we share with people, how everyday people can set up a private family trust, private business trusts and private foundations. So no longer the information that the Gates and the Rockefellers and the Chase, and Bezos have, we're now trying to share it with everyone.

Chase Peckham:

And I think that that's so important because all of us have family that are going to ultimately retire and they're ultimately going to pass away. And , but that generational wealth that you're speaking of is so important for the legacies of our families. And, and , and that goes for every single person, no matter what that legacy is. Can you talk? I know that a lot of people, you know, we , we hear about wills . Like if I pass away, I want to make sure that people get this. There is a giant difference between wills and trusts. So can we really discuss the differences between those and why trusts are so important beyond just the will?

Dr. Gail Hamilton:

Yes. Chase. Thank you. Thank you. Um, you know, everybody's happy if they get a will, even if they even get to that point to have a will. And so if you think about it this way on the continuum, a will is D and D disperse your assets when you're deceased. And that's the purpose of a will. Inheriting that also is that when those assets are dispersed, there's inherited taxes , et cetera, probate. So there's costs, that's eating up. Anything you may have accumulated and put into a will. Then there's the simple trust, simple trust or statutory and developed by attorneys in the state that you reside. And therefore, again, their DND disperse your assets once you're deceased. And it's only good in the state that you're in. So if like when I lived in California and had a simple trust and then moved to Louisiana, it was not any good. The complex trust is a con is a contract and recognize national and internationally, a complex trust . You can control the assets now while you're living and they stay there for your legacy once you're deceased. So that's the difference will, simple trust, complex trust. And so in the complex trust, you're able to still control those assets. Like Rockefeller said, own nothing, control everything. So by putting your assets into the trust, you still have control as the trustee. You're still able to generate wealth well, it's a different tax structure, because one of the things we teach you is what's important to generational. Wealth is putting your wealth in the correct tax structure. And most people, it's not, we know the 10 40 form and I'll, I'll come back around until the 10 41. And so by putting your money in the trust, you own nothing. You control it. And it's still taxed because people say, Oh, it's avoiding taxes. No trust is still taxed, but you have to know, we help people set up a series of interrelated trusts. So that money in motion makes money, right guys, so that your money is flowing from one trust to another trust of your foundation, because you want your tax liability to be zero. So we can get it down to 5% versus 39 and a half. Um , that's the advantage. So that , that's the, that's the basic difference between the three.

Chase Peckham:

And that really goes for property as well, that you can put all of that into your, into that trust as well. So by when you say avoiding taxes, not really avoiding taxes, but you can grandfather the tax bracket at that property or other business entities might be correct.

Dr. Gail Hamilton:

Correct. That's a great, because we want to make sure in terms of term terminology, you cannot avoid taxes. Correct? So

Chase Peckham:

As much as we'd all love to.

Dr. Gail Hamilton:

So the trust is still it's taxed at 39 and a half percent. But what you want to do is to keep your wealth. If you have property, you, you put the property into the trust and therefore the tax liability is different. If something happens to you, you own nothing. So when no one can get your property, and that's another advantage, if you have zero assets, but your assets in the trust, they cannot pierce the trust because the trust has a separate EIN number. It's not tied to you. You are just the trustee. So if everything's at a trust and heaven forbid, something happens . Somebody come back to you, you have nothing. Now your trust may have land property, gold, silver, but that's not yours. You're the trustee. And so that's how people are using trusts to protect their assets. So you can put in,

Chase Peckham:

Which is the most important thing you can possibly do for yourself and your family

Dr. Gail Hamilton:

In this litigious society that we're living in, where people will Sue you for , for , for everything liability follows, title. So everything you own can be taxed and taken away from you. So you want to move your , uh, your life insurance policies , um, land , uh, houses. And even if you go in a house that has a mortgage on it, say to the house of chartered thousand, it has 50,000 in equity. There's a way that you can place a leak . The trustee, the trust can place a lien on the 50,000. So now you still own nothing. The bank and the trust owns the money in that property. So no one can come after you and say, Oh, you have 50,000 in equity. We're good . We want that.

Chase Peckham:

And isn't that interesting when you say that, you know, our goal is to, in my dad, used to say this all the time. My goal is to own nothing at the end of, you know , at the, towards the end of my life. And, you know, even w as trustees with family, our family trusts , we basically all own nothing. It's all into the trust. We just are trustees. And that way we, one , everything is protected. And that, especially if you're starting your own company, especially if you have all those things, how, you know, anything can happen. And as you mentioned earlier, you can get sued, but then they can't take everything from you to , to , to settle that, which is incredibly important. And you want to talk about peace of mind, talk about that. When you go through and work with clients, or you work with people, when you get seems so complicated to them at first, I would imagine. But once you get it all put in order, what is the relief that your clients have once it's all set in motion?

Dr. Gail Hamilton:

Well, this is the first thing. When I start, it's a mindset because we've been taught, like your father said, we never thought we'd see the day where we were to own nothing. We're taught to buy, buy own, own, and own stuff. And now it's a completely different mindset. So that's why we have this education to give , because we're not telling them this. And then they go, Oh, right. Yeah. And then they sleep on and they come back and say, now, what did you just say? So it's a completely different mindset that we have to work people, and it takes a while to get there. And then when they start seeing reading, like , uh, the creature from Jekyll Island , uh , and some other information that we have them look at and just look at the 10 40 that they've been filing as w2 wage earners versus the 10 41 that you file when you have a trust. Because then the first thing, Oh, this is a scam. There's something wrong when we go, no, no, no. Here are the documents. And here's what you do. And then after they do it, they they'll go, well , why didn't we know about this before? No , they didn't teach us this in school. Nobody's talking about this. Um, so I suggest to people who've been watching Hamilton, for example, the musical y'all have probably seen it, watch it again. And listen, plus I'm not getting paid or anything by them, but there is a debate between Jefferson and Hamilton because, you know, Hamilton has credited my , my great, great, great ancestor with developing the , uh, our current financial system. So if you listen to the debate now with a different ear, they're talking about the banking system, owning everything. And Jefferson is saying now, I don't think that's a good idea. So that's the debate that, that system was set up, going back to when the U S was first established to have a system. And I have quotes from when they were setting up the banking system that says, you know, people gonna wake up and find themselves homeless in their own continent, because the banks even know if you have a home right now, do you own it? Not if you have a mortgage, we don't own anything. And if you have a house you don't own the land under it. So it was set up to be that way from the beginning, and then the federal reserve when they got to Jack Weiland and made sure that the 10% knew about trust, et cetera. So it's been perpetuated. So we have, once I can get people to move from the 10 40 to the 10 41 sort of mindset, and look at, what's been done with other people with , with the private trust, et cetera. It's like, why didn't I know this before? You know , why didn't I know this before?

Katie Utterback:

Can you, we briefly mentioned it, but generational wealth. I realized when you were talking, it's a term that I've heard and I've used before, but I, I'm not sure I know exactly what it means or what the point is of generational wealth. Um, especially for someone like me, who, I guess I don't identify as being wealthy or someone I'm not a Rockefeller, I'm not Jeff Bezos. So I guess for me setting up a will and a trust almost kind of seems like I might save some money on taxes, but I guess how life changing is this. If , if I'm trying to pass on generational wealth.

Dr. Gail Hamilton:

Right, good question. So, even if you think about a Katie in, if someone in your family had passed away and you had $5,000 because of right, you know, we're not rich, right . Would that have made a difference? Would you have been able to college, you know, buy your first car, buy your first house? So every piece of dollar that you can pass on to someone to the next generation is an asset. And so that's why I was excited to branch off from legacy management to help everyday people to say, Hey, yeah, you work at a , you know, where wherever you work and your w two wage earner, and you're putting your money in the bank because we've been taught, take our money to the bank and open a savings account. And I screenshot how they offered me a high interest savings account paying 1.5%. [inaudible] I told my friend, I said, you could've just saved the price of a stamp. Um, so, so what, I'm happy to work with everyday people to say, everything is a store that you can pass on to the next generation. Right now, we leave this world. We leave nothing, not $10, not anything. So along with setting up your trust, we are around for a year providing consultation with ways that you can generate income in your trust and interest. That's above 1.5% through endowments. For example, now you would think, Oh, I need a half a million dollars. Well, you have to going to go to Harvard and want to do an endowment, but we have organizations like boys and girls club that will take five and 10,000 and then pay you interest for the rest of your life, through your trust. So there are ways that you can have an impact on your community , uh , by setting up and downloads , which is one of the ways we talk about generational wealth and you want something that's going to constantly pay you interest forever. And so the Rockefellers , et cetera, still earning money on stuff that was set up years ago. And so you want your family, your nieces and nephews generations from now to still be earning interest on the endowment. You set up with the American red cross, and it may be four or 5%, but that's coming every year and you're not getting it from your current bank. So that's one of the ways when we talk about generational wealth, and there are some other ways , uh , infinite family banking, et cetera, but I'm going to stop there and see if there any other questions. And then we can go into it when you're in a little more in depth.

Katie Utterback:

Yeah. You know, I , I want to ask you about this just because I I've been studying a lot about what good people do with money. And it seems like this is something where I just, to be honest, I was the one that I was uncomfortable with, the idea of ever being rich, because I associated negative stereotypes with wealth and rich people. And so I love this idea of this is just another way of you can do good with your money Now.

Dr. Gail Hamilton:

you can do good with your money, right ?

Katie Utterback:

Yeah. Right. I had no idea. This was even a thing.

Felipe Arevalo:

No , I didn't realize that there was such a low barrier of entry. And like you mentioned, and I was like, you know , you don't need the half a million dollars to start. Um, which I think is, is definitely eye opening. I didn't realize there was such a low level of, of entry available for organizations that we've heard of,

Dr. Gail Hamilton:

Right. Legacy management has partnered with. And if you come to us and say, Hey, I'm interested in this club in my community. I want to do something we'll work with you. But there are organizations who are happy to take five, 10, 15, 20,000. And what an endowment does, you all understand? They take your money and put it with all the other money. And they get a million dollars and invested in they're making 30, 40% interest on it, like the banks are doing. And so they don't mind splitting the interest with you. If you say, I want 4% of 5% interest forever. They're like, okay, well, we just made money off your money. So that's, that's the way it works. And so that's, again, why I'm excited about Bee Connected partnering, because a lot of us have, you know, a few dollars just sitting in a savings account that will never produce generational wealth.

Katie Utterback:

I'm just going to ask, how does this work? If I wanted to work with you, Dr. Hamilton at be connected, do I just go to your website? BeeConnectedLife.com.

Dr. Gail Hamilton:

BeeConnectedLife.com.com, right? You go there and you set up an appointment. And so we talked to you because it's not for everyone. Some people are in , in stages where they're just beginning. So we do a, what we call a qualifying call to see where your are, what your interests are, whether you have assets, whether you have businesses, whether your business is an LLC, S-corporation SQL operation, et cetera. So we do an assessment and then we come back and say, okay, it looks like you, you may just need a family trust, or you have several businesses. So you need a business trust, or you have an LLC, but it's a sole proprietorship. And in order to, for your business, trust a benefit, let's make it a multi member LLC, so that you are now directing money from your LLC into your business trust. So they'd go to bee connected, life.com, make that appointment. We have that conversation with them and start to tease out where you are and what would benefit you most. We then do, if this is something that's of interest, we then do another call and we send you some more forms to get more detailed information. And then we send you a proposal. We set up. It is you, you may need , uh , and by the way, you can have more than one business trust or private family trust. You know, you can have as many as you want. Um, and let me throw this in for businesses, for instance, who may have a transportation company or a trucking company, we have what's called high risk assets. And one of the things we teach you is separate your personal wealth from your business wealth. And I'm sure you've talked about this with your listeners. Uh , and so we also separate out your business trust from your family trust, from your high risk trust from your foundations. That way, if you have a trucking company and something happens, that's not setting in your trust is it's in a separate trust with that insurance policy. So if someone sues you, all they get is whatever that insurance policy would cover. So those are the things we work with you to do, to look at what your situation is and what you need would be.

Chase Peckham:

I think also one of the things that is so important about what you do is can you talk a little bit about the fact of just being prepared for it, even though you don't want to look towards end of life, but just the idea that you're prepared and organized so that your family members don't have a big mess that they have to try to put together, get together at the end, that it's all kind of wrapped in a nice, with a bow on top and say, okay, so dad passed away. This is the way it goes now. And it makes it simplified for the next generation.

Dr. Gail Hamilton:

Exactly. Because you all know that go fund me accounts have become life insurance policies. And so what we're trying to do is exactly exactly that get everything set up so that if something happens, everything is taken care of in your trust documents, you have who the trustees are, who the successor trustees are, who they are after that, you can set up a bloodline clause. We teach you that in advanced trustee training, versus you may say only my direct descendants will ever be able to be trustees, their wife, spouses, aunt , you know, you can specify that. So it just follows who will become trustees. So it's a great way to take the stress off of everyone. I started with a private family trust because my daughter and I tell everybody it , if something happens to me, she would be, she's not going to go get a Nissan, a car she's going to be at the Bugatti dealership in 24 hours. And my grandkids money will be spent. So that was what was of interest to me was making sure my grandkids had assets if something happened to me because I know my kids. And so a lot of people in that position, if you know your family members, this is a way guys, to make sure that that money is directed into how it , it should be used. So

Chase Peckham:

It's amazing the different clauses that you can put in. A , and I know that for instance, if there's family members and you have kids and they have spouses, you can put words in there or verbiage in there that they are not able to be trustees unless they are married for at least 20 years. Right? So I mean the verbiage . So , so that person doesn't automatically, it's not like a will, because they're married. You can put any kind of language in there that you want, that you can think of. Which to me is best kept secret. Dr. Hamilton. Yes, it is. It's an incredible way of being in peace of mind to set up the wealth that you have helped build through your life.

Dr. Gail Hamilton:

Right? Right. And, and so one of the things we want people to understand is when you set up this trust, once that document is formed, because they think, Oh, I'm going to be audited guys. We , we go back to that initial mindset. This was set up to protect those who had money. Do you know the 10 41 is not audited? When you do your taxes on your trust? It goes to the exempt organization , section of the IRS, which is a non collection agency of the IRS. And when you do your 10 40 on like all of us, who've done the , the, the, the 10 40 and the 10 41 verse . I mean, traditionally we would do our 10 40. We include a schedule C , we have businesses. We do our schedule a and we got to find all the receipts, not so would agenda 41 . You do internal bookkeeping, but as a one page form. And I , and I have PowerPoint slides, if we need to , it's a one page form, but look up the 10 41. It says, how much income did you have? How much did you spend? And what's the balance, that's it? No other detail is needed because they don't know what your trust documents is. Like chess says, chase it, it could include education for your kids education . He has changed my say, I'm going to pay to education for my successor. Trustees for Felipe may say, we're going to buy a property. I mean, so it's , it's a , it's amazing that they've been doing this, or you just submitted a little 10 41 and that's it. So if you change next year and say, we're going to do XYZ, you change it. You make, what's called a minute entry, get a notarize and you stick it in your binder. You don't say you don't send it anywhere. That's it. It's a whole different world. There's no attorneys that have to get involved. You make your changes as a minute entry and keep them with your original document.

Chase Peckham:

Oh wow. And anyone can do it

Dr. Gail Hamilton:

And anyone can do it. And that's what be connected life is doing right now is letting everybody know that anyone can do it. The everyday people.

Chase Peckham:

So happy that you're , we are the first show you've ever done, because people don't know about these things. And , and it's, it's really hard for most people to discuss anyway, because people say, Oh, well , I'll get to it. I'll put together a will and all that, because nobody wants to think of, you know , there being an end, nobody wants to feel like, Oh my gosh, I don't want to think about my , uh, my death when actually you can flip the mindset. Right. And think I am going to leave my legacy, that when I leave this earth will be there for the next generation.

Dr. Gail Hamilton:

FOREVER. Yeah. That's mindset. You're exactly right. We're trying to flip that. We're trying to flip that. I love it. Yeah. Yeah. I , um , I planned ahead and I even I'll , I'll tell you this , uh, I bought, I want to be cremated. So again, nobody in my family wants to talk about this. So I bought a cremation policy. I bought an international cremation policy because the way I travel , who knows where I might be. So what are you going to do is make a phone call and they'll get me back. And so I picked out the headstone and everything, you know, I'm kind of anal. Uh, and so it's been placed. And so my family is upset , it's like, Oh my God, you have your headstone. All right. Well , well, when were you supposed to wait until we in and let you pick out my dad's down? So my family is a joke right now that Gail has her headstone out on our mom. And my mom is mad that she has our headstone out there already. But yeah, you can start thinking ahead and plan all this out so that there's nothing to be done. No argument, et cetera.

Chase Peckham:

You just hit it on the head. You're you're they don't have any clue how, how you are helping them avoid conflict. Once this is all over and, you know, Oh, do we do that? Mom wanted this, so, no, she didn't, blah, blah, blah. That it's amazing when you're organized and you are giving them details on what you want done, and it's executed the pressure off them. Now, they just, they can grieve, right? They can, they don't even have to do all of, not only are we grieving, but we've got, we've got to get all these things in order where if you're prepared, you're taking that away from them, which is great.

Dr. Gail Hamilton:

And that's one of the things we do with the trust. We walked through all of that because people are thinking about their legacy. And now they're more relaxed to talk about that phase of it. You know, feel some trustees, if you know, your two brothers never got along, then don't put the makeup trustees trust. So, you know, there's some things that people have to think about. Uh, so , uh, yeah, you want it to be that smooth. So you can just relax and know that things are taken care of.

Katie Utterback:

Are those questions that you help prompt people through when they're working with you? Or is that something that people need to think about outside of their work with you?

Dr. Gail Hamilton:

Oh no. We prompt them because you have to thinking about who's the trustee, you can always start out with one trustee because we've had people say, we want to put 10 people at trustee . Okay. Let's talk about that for simplifying, right. Family Thanksgiving and drama into your trust. So we talked to them about that and also every trustee has equal rights to stuff in the trust. So yeah, we have a discussion about that before they identify who they want their trustees to be and successor trustees so that we , and the purpose of is , is this is taxes and protecting assets and stuff. So we have that discussion. You rightfully so much, except for my Thanksgiving dinner all over again.

Katie Utterback:

We'll try to avoid that. So people can connect with you, add , be connected life. That provenance be like a bumblebee, right.

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Bumblebee because who knew, you know, the be is my sort of logo, you know, because I, I have a book, here's a plug shameless plug from e-commerce division. I have a book wisdom from Queens volume, three that's out. Uh , and so I came from , uh, you all look much younger than me. I grew up in the rules , segregated South. And so I came from that through desegregation and integration. And I came from being called colored to , uh , Negro, to black, to African American. And so with everything going on, I kind of made a comment that it was deja VU until some people said, you know, you should write about that. So I have a book right now, a wisdom from Queens , uh , volume three on , you can find all ofdocgale .com , which talks about how the lessons I learned from being put into that situation. We were forced busing forced to go to a all white school , um, policemen they're guarding us, et cetera, and how we took those lessons to strengthen us and move on and become successful so that you can take lemons and make lemonades. I know that's an overused cliche, but , um, so that's the bumblebee. That's why I'm making it .

Chase Peckham:

I would love to read it.

Katie Utterback:

Yeah. And you're , so your book is not available on Amazon, but it's available. Sorry, what was the website? I want to write it down. Go to docgail.com. docgail .com . I'll put that in our show notes too. So please buy it. You can go to Amazon, but here's the deal. Now, you all know Amazon, we have five authors. And so by the time everybody, Amazon gets this piece and the five offers and our publishers, I get a dollar. So if you don't mind go to dot, dot gale.com for the book. Amazon is rich enough. So yeah , if you go to doc, gale.com , you can purchase the book there and then I'll autograph it too . If you get it on my website. Ooh, I like that. Alright . I'm going to doc.gale.com to get mine.

Dr. Gail Hamilton:

Otherwise, Amazon shipped you one from the warehouse warehouse .

Chase Peckham:

Well, it's been very eye opening and we really appreciate you being us. Uh , I think for , for those of us who always feel like I don't have quote, unquote wealth, we all do. It's just that that term tends to get skewed in many different ways. So thank you so much for letting us know that all of us can take advantages of these things , uh , that we have right here in the U S of a

Dr. Gail Hamilton:

Correct. Correct. Thank you for having me. Thank you. Of course. Thank you .

Felipe Arevalo:

Thanks for joining us for your first podcast. Hopefully it was enjoyable and you'll just , yeah, hopefully. Yeah, you'll do a lot more. We'd love to have you back with tell us how the book did, right .

Dr. Gail Hamilton:

And we can come back and talk about the other four steps. Cause that's one of the steps in there . Four keys to wealth. So add me back to learn about the other three. Absolutely. Thank you so much. Thank you guys.