Talk Wealth to Me

#107 Squid Game: What Did I Just Watch, and Why Do I Want to Avoid Debt More than Ever?

October 22, 2021 Felipe Arevalo, Chase Peckham, Katie Utterback Season 5 Episode 5
Talk Wealth to Me
#107 Squid Game: What Did I Just Watch, and Why Do I Want to Avoid Debt More than Ever?
Show Notes Transcript

Netflix was on the cutting edge of streaming television in the early days but had seen the competition take much of the market share in recent years but that may all have changed in a flash as a new phenomena has taken over. I have to admit, I never heard of it until my wife mentioned my son's friends had watched an episode and parents were talking. Squid Game! On the surface, a very violent show from Korea that is nothing more than games to the death with endless violence. But it is so much more than that. The Talk Wealth to Me crew gets together to discuss the depth of the of the show and how financial circumstances of the characters and society in general is at the forefront of the show.


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Chase Peckham:

So Squid Game , uh , I had no idea what this was until we got an email from Felipe. I think it was Friday.

Felipe Arevalo:

I think so.

Chase Peckham:

Talking about that, our pig from our , our awesome , um, logo is now like really, really, really popular on Netflix.

Felipe Arevalo:

Yeah.

Chase Peckham:

I had no idea what you were talking about.

Felipe Arevalo:

The Debtwave pig is a celebrity in Korea.

Chase Peckham:

It is, except that it's clear and it gets filled with money.

Felipe Arevalo:

Yeah. Not the same pig, but it must be a cousin.

Chase Peckham:

But of course Katie knew of this phenomenon, right?

Katie Utterback:

Yeah. Well, my husband used to sell , uh , Korean horror films at the mall and like one of those kiosks.

Chase Peckham:

Really?

Felipe Arevalo:

Oh wow.

Katie Utterback:

So his friends were all texting him constantly because this is a Korean story.

Chase Peckham:

Right.

Katie Utterback:

Like you have to have seen this, tell us about it. And my husband hadn't watched it yet. So he

Chase Peckham:

Had he heard of it though?

Katie Utterback:

He hadn't really heard of it. He loves true crime kind of stuff, but it was just, it came out in September. It's October right now. He just hadn't heard of it yet, which is shocking because there's millions and millions of people. Who've seen it.

Chase Peckham:

Yeah.

Katie Utterback:

Like the number one show in 94 countries.

Chase Peckham:

Well, there's a couple of , there's so many different ways that , that financial finances play into this whole phenomenon , um , including the story, which I think we should talk about because it's, it's very relevant , um, in the world that we live in. And I think obviously the, the filmmakers , uh, had a distinct idea of what they wanted to say about our world that we live in , um, without just coming out and saying it. Um, but also from the idea that, you know, Netflix since streaming, they were, they were the first to streaming, really. Like they were the pioneer, but they've been hit pretty hard by it by the competition and other companies coming out and doing it.

Felipe Arevalo:

And this might be, people are saying, they're big saving show. I mean, it's worth 900 million. Now. They spent like 20 something making it. And it's literally something where , um, I , they were releasing the numbers of how many people have watched it and, or at least they got the, how many people have watched at least two minutes of the show. And, you know, it's, it's impressive. It's something where, you know , the reports show that over 142 million households worldwide have watched it that's households. I watched it with Sara. Katie , you watched it with AG, you know, and there's people watching it with their kids.

Chase Peckham:

Oh.

Katie Utterback:

Are there people really watching it with their kids?

Chase Peckham:

So many, we got to talk about this ,

Felipe Arevalo:

Older kids I hope so.

Chase Peckham:

This, I don't know where to go with this. And this is going to be an interesting conversation. And I'm really glad we decided to discuss this because there are so many things that I have felt , um, since literally Friday Felipe. Your email.

Felipe Arevalo:

That's why my email had a disclaimer, don't watch it with your kids.

Chase Peckham:

I , at the time, I'm like, what are you talking about? And then Saturday, I just kind of forgot about it. I didn't really think about it. Um, but Saturday my wife tells me, Hey, your son watched an episode of this thing called the squid game. And at the time Kerri thought it might be one of those , um, those real games, like, like, you know , Japanese made them famous and Korean ,

Katie Utterback:

The silent libraries.

Chase Peckham:

They have these, they have these like really crazy, you know , live games. And so Kerri wasn't sure whether this was actually a show or as we know now, it's a, pre-produced , it's a , it's a story. It's a show. But at the time we didn't know. And apparently it's really taken fire with teenagers. Uh , it's gone, it's blown up with , with younger people and they've all heard of it. And , um, you know , the thing. And so what I want to do is if you, to both of you watch the full season all the way through.

Felipe Arevalo:

Yes,

Katie Utterback:

Yeah.

Chase Peckham:

You have. Okay. I've, I've watched, I've watched a couple , uh, I I've seen most of them. I haven't seen the whole thing yet. And I , I don't know if I have it in me to finish it. Um, and for many different reasons. But so if you could, let's talk about what is the basics here of this story or this show?

Katie Utterback:

I have a summary from the LA times. I think they summarized it really well.

Felipe Arevalo:

Yes I like the LA Times one.

Katie Utterback:

Squid game is a gory dystopian series that follows a fictional contestants as they compete in a series of children's games, in the hopes of winning money to pay off mounting debt, contestants are killed. If they lose a game that is Squid game.

Chase Peckham:

Yes. Well, and that sums it up. And it is that, that first episode. And we'll get right into that. We meet a Korean man , um, who is obviously not doing well in life, is living with his mother who is working her tail off. Uh, we find out very, very early on that hits his daughter's birthday. Uh, and he, he's obviously struggled financially and he's a gambler. He goes to the track and he tries to win enough money to show his daughter that she can have anything she wants for her birthday. Uh, and they , they see all these little things into it. Like his ex-wife is married the second time pretty well for financially that the guy that and that they're slowly going to be moving. They're going to be moving to America. He finds out because of that , their stepfather's job. Um, and then we go , he meets somebody. And next thing you know, he's meets this van and he gets knocked out by gas. And then , then it's just amazing how quickly they get thrown into this situation. And we find out we meet all these well , who we are, we're going to assume are going to be the characters of the show, but we know nothing about them, except for we find out that the one girl's a pickpocket who pickpocket his money at the track , um , we know nothing about all the people that are there and how anybody would want to get involved in a game like this, which we don't know at the time. Um, when they mean eliminated, they don't mean you just end the game and a game that all of us, I think I don't, I don't know about you guys, but this was a game we used to play in the street all the time when we were children was red light green light.

Felipe Arevalo:

Yeah. And you had to be the first one that could cross the line or get past the red light green light person. And they're playing this game with it. And I, there must have been like, what 400, the number of. He is 456.

Katie Utterback:

There's 456 yeah.

Chase Peckham:

456 people that were, and that means after. So not to jump too far ahead. We find out that when red light means red light, you literally don't move or you get shot like a big bullet. And it is like, whoa, what that , first of all, what made you want to watch it? And second of all, what was your reaction to the first episode? Because I don't think that we could come to a conclusion about what the show was about just by the first episode.

Katie Utterback:

I only agreed to watch the show because my husband said, Hey, do you want to watch this with me? That was it. I had no idea what I was in for. And when they started playing red light green light, I sat with my hands. Like my head was in my hands. I couldn't look. I was just like peeking through the cracks in my fingertips. And then I was getting,

Chase Peckham:

You could hear the gunshots though.

Katie Utterback:

I literally was freezing. I was shaking. And then I was thinking like, oh my God, what would I do? What? I just freeze what? I just not move. And then at the end, when you see that that's not an option, you have to cross the line,

Chase Peckham:

Right they get five minutes to get across.

Katie Utterback:

I don't want to play this game. Like that was like, how do you get out of this game?

Chase Peckham:

I don't think they want to play this game either. They freak out. I mean, most of the people got killed in the beginning just because they realized.

Felipe Arevalo:

Trying to run away.

Chase Peckham:

Yeah.

Katie Utterback:

Right. So after the first game, they, they come back and they say, all of you in this room have crippling debts and are now on a cliff edge. Do you want to go back and live out your pathetic lives, running from creditors? Or will you seize the last opportunity we are offering?

Chase Peckham:

Which is why we are talking about this on this podcast.

Katie Utterback:

Yeah.

Chase Peckham:

That at that point, when I saw that part, I went, aha, this is why Felipe sent this to us. This email, this there's , there's a financial component to this and it, and it , uh , society. Um,

Felipe Arevalo:

Yeah,

Chase Peckham:

I guess it's like hunger games too, right there . These games where the people can die for the enjoyment of, of the masses.

Felipe Arevalo:

Others.

Chase Peckham:

Right. and those cases where this we don't know that.

Felipe Arevalo:

Or in this case just a small one right,

Chase Peckham:

Right.

Felipe Arevalo:

Yeah. See, for me it was it seeing it like everyone's watching this. I know what it's about. I don't know . That's not normally the TV. I like love pulp fiction, Quintin Tarantino managed to put violence and gore into the movie and still make it a classic. So I was like, you know what? I'm always down to give a show, a try, millions of people can't possibly be wrong. So I told Sarah, I was like, look, this show is going to be violent and you might not like it, but I'm going to give it a try. Do you want me to wait? And we can watch it with you? Um, or do you want me to just try and watch it on my own? And she's like, oh no, I'll watch an episode. And then I wasn't sure I was going to watch the whole series. But then when I realized there was such a big money component, even before the game starts, I was like, well, now I have to watch the whole thing. And cause as you're meeting him,

Chase Peckham:

Right.

Felipe Arevalo:

You're sitting there and you're like, oh, this guy is desperate. And he's like signing away his organs, you know , as collateral, which apparently.

Chase Peckham:

But they didn't know that.

Felipe Arevalo:

Underground lending in Korea,

Chase Peckham:

And to China.

Felipe Arevalo:

before he went into squid games.

Chase Peckham:

Well, we find that out Earlier.

Felipe Arevalo:

Yeah. He, he gets caught at the track by his bookies or illegal lenders and he actually signed away his organs before.

Chase Peckham:

Oh I missed that.

Felipe Arevalo:

He even gets into the game.

Chase Peckham:

That's right.

Felipe Arevalo:

So he's already at like a huge thing. And then.

Chase Peckham:

That's when he did the thump print and blood?

Felipe Arevalo:

Right. And in the LA times article that I read about it , um, they, they, they noted that the richest man in South Korea and I, my Korean is non-existent his name's Seao, Jon Jin, he's the founder of a pharmaceutical company. And you know, it was, he's said in multiple interviews that he has said he had in the past, signed away his organs as collateral to borrow from loan sharks to keep this company afloat in the early two thousands during the financial crisis.

Chase Peckham:

Oh my gosh.

Felipe Arevalo:

So this is like apparently a thing in Korea. So now I'm reading this, like some people are actually doing this and now there's a show. And , and , and I was like, well, now I have to watch the whole darn thing.

Chase Peckham:

I think that, okay, this is, I don't know if it's a class warfare, like it's discussing the haves and the have-nots and how far the distance is between the two. Um , I'm thinking there's a bit of that, but it's also the desperation that people will go to when they're in financial turmoil. And we see that , um, not , not anything like this that we're aware of. Um, but when we work with individuals that are stressed out to the max, because of their their finances and the desperation, they will reach out to like when they're reaching out to us to all fix something very quickly, when we can't necessarily help them fix something very quickly. But we do our best to try to get things in order and help give them knowledge, to make things better and make better decisions and those things. But when you're in a time of desperation and you feel like there's no way out, people will do almost anything. And for me, when they talked about, do you want to go back to that life? And we find out in episode two, which is brilliant filmmaking, by the way, which for me at least was that they didn't take the whole first episode and try to introduce us to all these characters and get slowly. They get to it. They got right to the gore and they got us right away. Right. Um, which gore is not a good thing for me. I didn't love that. In fact, I didn't really want to watch episode two, but for this I did. And I'm glad I did for the mere fact of, they vote as a collective group to get out. And.

Felipe Arevalo:

Right.

Chase Peckham:

I never saw that coming if they do, if they get out, then how do they keep the show going?

Felipe Arevalo:

Right.

Chase Peckham:

But then they do leave. And now we get to see the backstory basically of what all these individuals are going through and what they have to go through. Like the financier that was cheating, his good friend of our main character who was cheating his, he was like this big investment banker, whatever. And he's been cheating, his bosses , um , swindling money or whatever. So he he's, he's in deep trouble. Uh, then you know, the pickpocket who is from North Korea. And so she's trying to save money and she's just trying to survive to get her parents, to South Korea, all these different. And then there's a , there's a bad guy in there, like a hoodlum or a, I guess he's a gang leader or he's, he's in the underground world. Um, and then you've got , uh, Ali who is an immigrant. Um, probably I think the only non Korean ,

Felipe Arevalo:

I believe so.

Chase Peckham:

In the show in the show, which is, you know, it brings it together and we get to see you almost.

Felipe Arevalo:

It's another aspect.

Chase Peckham:

Now you feel, you're like looking at these people going, oh my God, they're in deep, deep trouble. I mean, for whatever reason, they're all in financial turmoil for different reasons, right ? And yet here, they all are as this common place. And they all end up wanting to go back.

Felipe Arevalo:

You see , the first time they went in, it was the financial, it was the guy playing the little, It remind me of like pogs or he was trying to flip the other person's card to get them money. And then he was slapping him in the subway and they don't really know what they're signing up for. The ones that went back they were signing up for .

Chase Peckham:

They know that's right. Well non of them knew what they were getting not initially.

Felipe Arevalo:

Not initially no. So it was something where, well they knew you get slapped around apparently, cause he didn't have any issue with it in the train. But , um, it was something where the people that went back and I think it was, I don't remember the exact amount, but it was like a huge percentage of the people that left actually came back to play the game. They knew what they were getting into. They were just so in it in a bad way. But when I left, then you meet the cop and now it's like, oh, now it's a police procedural. That's my shows. Now I'm even more hooked and I can't stop watching .

Chase Peckham:

Right then they talk about the organ donning , uh , where there's a former doctor that's in there. And he got ruined because he malpractice , um , and he, somebody had passed away on his table or something like that. So he was shunned. And now he's in the black market for organ donning to China, which, you know, it's bringing up this whole, other side of things that we don't see. Uh, at least I was never aware of. And it's obviously the makers of this show are kind of shedding a light on what the underground world could be, but also the disparity between rich and poor. Uh, and whether these people are the created this one , they believe that everybody should be the same. Because if you notice during the games, they don't give anybody any chances of knowing what's coming up. Although there , you know , we find out later that there are people that are cheating because there's, you know, like I think it's just a messy, the whole that it seems like the person that set up this game has this disdain for unfairness and a disdain for the disparity in wealth. Yet here he is the powerful one, controlling the people that are the have nots. So it's ironic to me that, cause there's , it's pulling at both sides that this person obviously wants things to be fair.

Felipe Arevalo:

Yeah.

Chase Peckham:

Yet he's pulling strings that doesn't seem to fair.

Felipe Arevalo:

And it's great that you've only watched half of it because you don't know how it ends. And you're sitting here saying it and it's like, oh Chase, if you only knew,

Chase Peckham:

Oh , I'm going to , I don't want to guess, but I , I keep trying to figure out what the end game of this is, is what most people are going to look at through. This is the violence. The fact that people are, these people were thrown into a game and they live or die based on the way they perform.

Felipe Arevalo:

I actually found it.

Chase Peckham:

It's a lot deeper than that.

Felipe Arevalo:

Where it was like, it was a lot deeper than that. And it was actually really good storytelling. Like I need to figure out who these producers directors are because it turns out to be, if you can put up with the violence, actually a really good storyline that, that it just kind of is littered with violence because of the type of game it is and whatnot. But

Chase Peckham:

Do you think they showed the violence to grab us though? I mean, why would so many people in this world be so taken by a show like this? When all we hear about the and the word of mouth was, oh my gosh, it's crazy. It's so bloody. It's so violent. And we all go, oh, I think I need to check it out. I

Katie Utterback:

Honestly think it's because more of us have been struggling and dealing with debt. And we're fearful of the consequences of having that debt and not being able to pay it off. And it's, I think it's more a millennial generation kind of feeling that we've had this anxiety about money, our whole lives more than any other generation has before. And you can see globally, this show has grabbed millennials everywhere, like 94 countries. It's the number one show, not even on Netflix, it's number one show. And so

Chase Peckham:

Well especially for that demographic, right?

Katie Utterback:

Yeah. I mean, I think it's a show all about scarcity mindset, you know, not just about debt, because these people are convinced that their only option to get out of debt is to play this life or death game. And that's so much of what happens when you experience crippling debt and countries like South Korea. They don't have social safety nets like we do in the United States. So with all of the faults that the United States has when it comes to finance and all of these holes that we have in our safety nets, we still have much more of a safety net than any other nation,

Chase Peckham:

For sure .

Katie Utterback:

And that's why in the LA times article that Felipe and I keep referencing, they pointed out that the people going to these loan sharks and taking out these high interest loans, some of what I think the average interest is like 421%.

Felipe Arevalo:

Yeah something like that.

Katie Utterback:

So these shark loans show up every day to these business owners. These people who have jobs that they only will lend to you, if you have a job to begin with, and then they show up everyday to collect that 421% interest or whatever it is. So these people literally get stuck. And if you've ever been stuck are just so depleted or exhausted. It's easy to understand why somebody might think like a life or death situation or even suicide is the only way out. And that was another point was, was that South Korea has one of the highest suicide rates in the entire world. And part of that is due to the large debt.

Felipe Arevalo:

It's something where they had the story in that same LA times article where they were talking like a business owner actually had someone ride up on ride, past them in a motorcycle and throw a business card at his feet and a very bright business card with a number so that he could call and get a loan from this loan shark. Like he actually had a business card tossed at them and here's a loan and that's, you know , then, then he had the biker guys show up and, you know, collect interest and go over the terms. But it started with someone riding by on a motorcycle, just tossing a business card at them . I was like, gosh, that's a lot like the movie where they get the business card.

Katie Utterback:

That's what I thought too . Oh my God.

Felipe Arevalo:

I was like, oh, wait, I don't know if I want to keep reading this story.

Katie Utterback:

It's too real.

Felipe Arevalo:

Don't tell me it's real.

Chase Peckham:

You mean payday, you know, today's payday loan shops. Um , these different places that will prey on those already very highly debt to give them just enough to get by and then make them more and more and more in debt. Uh, even though legal here is, you know, we can argue very highly on whether these places are morally , uh, should be there. Uh , I know that the government forever has been trying to figure out a way to make it illegal. Although, you know, they can't make something illegal. If it's in plain sight, you're signing a contract, but they're taking people in desperation and people that are signing those things, those payday loans where they, you know, they have to pay it back every 15 days. I mean, it's, it can be up to 500% , uh , by the time they're all done. Now, it's not like a typical loan, but the chances of getting out of that debt, it's almost non-existent that they're going to pay them off.

Felipe Arevalo:

Well , the people in the mo in the show had a contract and it was right there at like the easiest to read contract ever. There's only three rules. Um,

Chase Peckham:

Yeah.

Felipe Arevalo:

And, and you know, they , they referenced the clause and they get themselves out so they can go home, which was a big thing for me. I was like, are they gonna fall, honor the contract when it doesn't work for them? And surprisingly the weird guys with the PlayStation logos on their head,

Chase Peckham:

The circle and the squares.

Felipe Arevalo:

Yeah. When I saw that at first, I was like, oh, they got a little PlayStation , uh , cause that's, what's on the PlayStation controllers, but they let him out. And it was like, wow, they kept they're part of the legal contract, even though it's not a legal contract. Um, and I was like, wow, that read what you sign up for. Um , we did the SWYM live on that

Chase Peckham:

As you guys watched the show more and you got more involved in it. Did the, did the violence seem to dissipate? Did it seem like that it wasn't as big a deal to you anymore?

Katie Utterback:

I mean, the violence is always there. It's just like Felipe was saying, I was able to see the money piece of the show and that is what kept me watching it because I wanted to see if there was anything that would be a value for a blog or the podcast or whatever. And that's honestly what kept me going, because my husband, even with all of his Korean film background, wasn't really into it. So

Felipe Arevalo:

I was able to, like I said, the violence is always there. The gore is always there. Um, I was able to put up with it because I was enjoying the story at some point. And you know, at some point after maybe sometime in the second episode, I was like, you know what? I like the storyline. I can't wait to see where it's going. And I started to make predictions in my head about certain characters and like, Ooh, I think this is this. And I think this guy is this guy. And I think this is this , um, I got the main one. Um, you know , um , you know, I figured out who someone was not really being truthful. I missed on like all my predictions, but I got one of them. Right. Um, and I told Sarah, I was like, oh, you know what? That guy right there. I don't know. Um, I have a feeling, this is this.

Chase Peckham:

You talking about. Let me just ask, are you talking about the old boyhood friend of the main character who is the bank? The bank financier guy.

Felipe Arevalo:

No I kind of got him,

Chase Peckham:

Because he's the one.

Felipe Arevalo:

kind of , it's pretty easy. You can kind of tell like, oh, I know it wasn't, it was another player , um, that as you're watching the red light green light, I was like, oh, you know what? That just doesn't something about that character. Um, it was like, you know what? I think I got something on this one, but it, I don't want to spoil it for you Chase because it's,

Chase Peckham:

I don't care. Cause I'm probably

Felipe Arevalo:

I... Ok Spoiler alert. I will let you know then.

Chase Peckham:

Okay.

Felipe Arevalo:

Who, the characters? Um, the old man, his storyline, I was like, wait a minute. He's playing. red light Green light has got this giant smile on his face and he's just going for it. And I'm sitting there like oh the old man, I don't know about the old man. And it turns out the old man is, is, is , uh, plays a bigger role than you would imagine.

Chase Peckham:

Was he okay? That's all. You're going to say that doesn't tell me a lot, so that's fine, but

Felipe Arevalo:

So you can keep an eye out.

Chase Peckham:

So, okay. Cause everybody just, I would imagine just figures that he feels like he's got nothing to lose. Cause he's old and is, you know, his memory is starting to go, but that could be all just a play. This that could all be just, I mean, he could have been a part of the, he could have been the original winner. He could have , he probably in fact, now that I'm thinking about it, he might've been the guy that started these games a long time ago. And now he's a participant.

Felipe Arevalo:

Do you think so?

Chase Peckham:

No, I don't know. I just threw that out there, but um,

Speaker 5:

Are you going to watch?

Chase Peckham:

You know , after this conversation I was very firmly. Like, I'm just, I just don't love the violence. I don't, I , you know, but I'm also look at my generation and I might be the old guy get off my lawn and I don't mean to, but you know, I'm a , I'm a parent of a 13 year old and 11 year old and they have in their disposal, they have , you know, as much as we can try to block things as much as they're just, there's so much information at our children these days that we just have to be more open with them than ever, you know? Cause I've you , you discussed it. Are they watching with their friends? Well, we have some good friends of ours where they have a third, two , 13 year olds and they had heard about it and they said, okay. And they started to watch it without them, like they found out and they were, pissed but they said, okay, look, you know, we're not going to. So they watched it with them for one episode and then finally the kids were too disturbed by it and they, but they wanted to discuss it. So like, why did why was it you wanted to watch this because all your friends were talking about it because it made the rounds, but let's talk about why. And so they talked about the fact that it's fake and they talked about the fact that, you know, th that they're trying to talk about a bigger story here and that people can get, can do desperate things when they are in desperate situations. Um, and, and you could go in many different directions with that, whether it's , um, you know, kids that are in depression or, you know, they're , they have weird feelings, all those kinds of things that this show seems to bring up. And I think depending on people's backgrounds, they can get so many different kinds of feelings from this show. Um, I can't get by the violence, the ability for me to , to , to desensitize the fact that people are getting murdered on a , at a rapid rate. If we were to see one of those in real life, that would scar us for how long, how many of our men and women come back from Afghanistan or came back from war and saw their buddies, or saw anybody dead and it ruined. And it really screwed them up for a long time.

Katie Utterback:

You're actually, you're actually illustrating a huge part of the show that you haven't watched yet, which is there's, there are players like you that are saying, we don't have to do this. Like we can do stuff together. There doesn't have to be one person on top. So it's also like this message about greed too,

Chase Peckham:

Of course, I think there is,

Felipe Arevalo:

I think film and TV,

Chase Peckham:

It's art I get that.

Felipe Arevalo:

And it's something where it's a business. So they're trying to sell and make things as popular as, but do you, are you against movies that have violence say , uh , Pulp Fiction?

Chase Peckham:

I'm not.

Katie Utterback:

It's not just you. I mean, truthfully, I only watched squid game because I thought it would be beneficial for my job.

Chase Peckham:

Yeah well that's why I watched it.

Katie Utterback:

If it was just me and my personal life, I would have turned it off or not watched it with my husband, because my speed truly is more Schitt's Creek.

Chase Peckham:

Yes there you go.

Katie Utterback:

That is what I want to live in. If you want to talk to you about money or debt

Felipe Arevalo:

Which is an upcoming episode we should do that one, I'm about to finish it. So give me like another couple of weeks.

Chase Peckham:

Fantastic show. Well,

Felipe Arevalo:

I'm on the last season,

Chase Peckham:

You're right, Katie , I watched it because, you know, for our show for, for what we do for a living, it said a lot. It was very, it just, you know, in a very different way,

Felipe Arevalo:

It's good storytelling. I'll give them that

Katie Utterback:

As dark as it is. What my biggest takeaway from Squid Game was, was that all of the work that I had done on my own money mindset was paying off because I was seeing how they were trapped in the scarcity mindset, where this was their only option. This is the only way out. And when you're in that scarcity mindset, you do go to the payday loan lender. Like that's your only option,

Chase Peckham:

Or you spend $50 out of the, to go buy, you know , 50.

Felipe Arevalo:

Scratchers.

Chase Peckham:

Scratchers. Yes. And , or buy lottery tickets. Because you think that the grand old one-time payments going to be my way out, because you don't want to, where you just don't feel like if the time that you put in or the hard work that you put in is going to pay off eventually, because you just don't see it down the road when it can.

Katie Utterback:

Right.

Chase Peckham:

You just, it takes baby steps. There's no, as we always say, if it's too good to be true, it probably is.

:

Yeah.

Chase Peckham:

But we were talking about this light. We , those thunderstorms that we had here in San Diego, which we don't get much. My kids had never seen lightning before. I don't think like that. And they were saying, oh, we're going to get hit. I said , and I said, well, the chances are, you do get hit by lightning or better than winning the lottery. So they got them to get out from under the tree. So , um , anyway, I I'm , I'm stuck between the fact that I love movies and I love good storytelling. And that, I think that this was really pretty from what I've watched so far was fascinating, especially watching episode two and how they went back. But , um , those implications, I just don't know if I can get past the.

Felipe Arevalo:

So the jury is out on if you're going to watch the rest?

Katie Utterback:

I, you guys have sold me a little bit. I'm more compelled to watch it through now than I was before. I'll say this, you , you read the LA times article and you still want to watch it, watch it. If you read the LA times article and you feel satisfied, you have your answer.

Chase Peckham:

Ok that's what I'll do.

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