The Simple Word for Kids

7. Naaman the Leper

March 23, 2020 Natalie Cone Season 1 Episode 7
The Simple Word for Kids
7. Naaman the Leper
Chapters
The Simple Word for Kids
7. Naaman the Leper
Mar 23, 2020 Season 1 Episode 7
Natalie Cone

Well, I’ve got a gross one for you today. It’s about a man named Naaman, in 2 Kings 5:1-14.

Naaman was the commander of the army of the king of Syria. He was a considered to be a great man in that day, and highly favored by the king. Not only was he highly favored by the king, who was named Ben-hadad, but he was also blessed by the King of Kings (God), who gave him many military victories over their enemies. What does it mean to be “favored?” (answer you’re looking for: privileged, liked more than others, preferred, given special treatment). Naaman was also wealthy and a courageous warrior.

But Naaman had a problem. A big, painful problem. He had leprosy. 

Leprosy is an infectious disease that causes sores all over the body.

Leprosy is still an active disease now, most of the cases being in Africa and Asia. Leprosy, nowadays, has a cure, but in ancient times, lepers were outcasts. So, imagine how desperate Naaman felt, being a man of prestige, coming down with leprosy!

During one of Syrian’s raids, they kidnapped a little Israelite girl, and she became the servant of Naaman’s wife. One day, the young girl told Naaman’s wife about a prophet named Elisha who lived in Samaria. The girl said that Elisha could cure him of leprosy! Naaman went to King Ben-hadad and told him what the girl had said, and the king not only granted him permission to go find Elisha, but also wrote a letter to the king of Israel.

So, the king of Israel, whose name was Jehoram, read the letter and thought Syrian King Ben-hadad expected HIM to heal Naaman! He ripped his clothes, and was basically saying, “What in the world? Does Ben-hadad think I’m God? I’m certain he is picking a fight with me.” If this were true, that would likely mean the beginning of war, and Jehoram obviously didn’t want that. Elisha heard about this, and advised that the king send Naaman to himself.

When Naaman arrived at the door of Elisha’s house, he expected to be greeted by Elisha himself. After all, Naaman was a very important person. Imagine his disappointment when he was greeted by a messenger, instead! What an insult. The servant told him of Elisha’s specific instructions to wash in the Jordan River seven times, and then he would be “clean”. First of all, Naaman was angry because Elisha didn’t even bother to greet him in person, and didn’t consider that Elisha may have had his own reasons for doing so. Secondly, he had a preconcieved idea of how this would all go down … that Elisha woul d wave his hand like a magic wand and cure him in a magical show of glory. Thirdly, how dare Elisha suggest he wash in the Jordan River, which was an Israeli river, instead of the Abana or Pharpar rivers, which were in Damascus, a place familiar to himself. A place that honored his false gods. In all his rage, he turned and left. 

Naaman’s servants spoke wisdom to him and convinced him to do as the prophet Elisha instructed. Naaman listened, humbled himself, and followed God’s instructions given by Elisha. When he dipped himself seven times in the Jordan River, God granted him healing! His flesh was made well, “like a little child”. From that day forward, Naaman declared the God of Israel to be the true God, and renounced the gods he’d previously worshiped. 

Support the show (http://www.patreon.com/thesimpleword)

Show Notes

Well, I’ve got a gross one for you today. It’s about a man named Naaman, in 2 Kings 5:1-14.

Naaman was the commander of the army of the king of Syria. He was a considered to be a great man in that day, and highly favored by the king. Not only was he highly favored by the king, who was named Ben-hadad, but he was also blessed by the King of Kings (God), who gave him many military victories over their enemies. What does it mean to be “favored?” (answer you’re looking for: privileged, liked more than others, preferred, given special treatment). Naaman was also wealthy and a courageous warrior.

But Naaman had a problem. A big, painful problem. He had leprosy. 

Leprosy is an infectious disease that causes sores all over the body.

Leprosy is still an active disease now, most of the cases being in Africa and Asia. Leprosy, nowadays, has a cure, but in ancient times, lepers were outcasts. So, imagine how desperate Naaman felt, being a man of prestige, coming down with leprosy!

During one of Syrian’s raids, they kidnapped a little Israelite girl, and she became the servant of Naaman’s wife. One day, the young girl told Naaman’s wife about a prophet named Elisha who lived in Samaria. The girl said that Elisha could cure him of leprosy! Naaman went to King Ben-hadad and told him what the girl had said, and the king not only granted him permission to go find Elisha, but also wrote a letter to the king of Israel.

So, the king of Israel, whose name was Jehoram, read the letter and thought Syrian King Ben-hadad expected HIM to heal Naaman! He ripped his clothes, and was basically saying, “What in the world? Does Ben-hadad think I’m God? I’m certain he is picking a fight with me.” If this were true, that would likely mean the beginning of war, and Jehoram obviously didn’t want that. Elisha heard about this, and advised that the king send Naaman to himself.

When Naaman arrived at the door of Elisha’s house, he expected to be greeted by Elisha himself. After all, Naaman was a very important person. Imagine his disappointment when he was greeted by a messenger, instead! What an insult. The servant told him of Elisha’s specific instructions to wash in the Jordan River seven times, and then he would be “clean”. First of all, Naaman was angry because Elisha didn’t even bother to greet him in person, and didn’t consider that Elisha may have had his own reasons for doing so. Secondly, he had a preconcieved idea of how this would all go down … that Elisha woul d wave his hand like a magic wand and cure him in a magical show of glory. Thirdly, how dare Elisha suggest he wash in the Jordan River, which was an Israeli river, instead of the Abana or Pharpar rivers, which were in Damascus, a place familiar to himself. A place that honored his false gods. In all his rage, he turned and left. 

Naaman’s servants spoke wisdom to him and convinced him to do as the prophet Elisha instructed. Naaman listened, humbled himself, and followed God’s instructions given by Elisha. When he dipped himself seven times in the Jordan River, God granted him healing! His flesh was made well, “like a little child”. From that day forward, Naaman declared the God of Israel to be the true God, and renounced the gods he’d previously worshiped. 

Support the show (http://www.patreon.com/thesimpleword)