BRAVE NEW YOU TRIBE

Henrietta Thompson

July 10, 2019 Season 1 Episode 3
BRAVE NEW YOU TRIBE
Henrietta Thompson
Chapters
BRAVE NEW YOU TRIBE
Henrietta Thompson
Jul 10, 2019 Season 1 Episode 3
Meredith & Lou
Henrietta Thompson and her team at Harth are creating a new sustainable way of living with beautiful things without having to buy them.
Show Notes Transcript

Henrietta Thompson, design writer, journalist, author is the co-founder of Harth, an innovative concept for sustainable living. Interviewed live to an audience at the Radio Roof Top cafe, ME Hotel, London, she gives her insightful and inspirational perspective on how passion, purpose, people, place, highs, lows and big dreams have all channeled her creativity into an Air bnb style of renting and sharing beautiful things in order to give them a new lease of life. She believes that in a world of increasing 'stuffocation', repurposing through lending, is a more sustainable way forward. 

Thanks to Create Lab films, Electra Film & TV, Zone, Radio Rooftop at ME Hotel, and everyone who came to the event. 

Thanks also to Kuljit Bhamra for the music



Speaker 1:
0:08
Wow.
Speaker 2:
0:08
Come to our brave new year. Try podcast today. We would like to welcome Henrietta Thompson, journalist, author and Co of heart, the new concept for sustainable living. Varied. Very pleased that you agreed to come and join us. I'm just gonna tell everyone there's a very big list of things that you've done in your life. And very impressive. Um, she's a design writer, author of five books, editor, commentator and forecaster, editor at large at wallpaper magazine, cofounder of copywriting and communications agency naked on the piano. And you also have a new venture, um, which was primarily, we're gonna be talking about today. It's the concept of heart. This is really interesting and very timely. Um, it's, um, what you can explain that is, it's, uh, it's an online tech platform, um, and it's, um, it's coming at a time where everybody is beginning to think, think about this.
Speaker 2:
1:10
We look at what your passion and your purpose is. And we sort of hear those two words banded around quite a lot now, but really looking at what that is and what it means for individual people building their businesses or in their personal lives. So we're going to look at passion and the oversee of writer, creative person. Has that always been part of your life? How has that been sort of the thing that's driven me forward? I think so. Yeah. I mean, art was always my thing when I was little. Um, and, and I guess, yeah, sort of writing stories when I was really little, actually writing in a kind of more, um, critical journalistic sense didn't really, that wasn't, that wasn't interesting to me at all until I was much older. So, um, when I started writing essays for art history courses and things like that, it was just, um, and I, I put that down to having the, you know, really great teachers at that point and, um, and it became something that was, that was fun and it was subjects that interested me and yeah, so writing came a bit later.
Speaker 2:
2:15
Um, but, but the, yeah, I guess, um, creativity, art was always, always something that I was encouraged in a lot and I loved it. And so, um, you explained about a bit about what half is and, and the fact that you're kind of a sort of submersed in, in art and, um, yeah, all things creative as part of that. So how is, um, as, uh, my new business, which I co founded with my husband, um, and it is a new platform for, uh, for sharing or renting furniture and art. So it's a place where you can go and you can either, um, you can either upload your own pieces that maybe you would otherwise be, um, keeping in storage, uh, or it's place where you can rent, uh, furniture and art directly from galleries, from brands, but also from other people. So it's just, it's a way of using, using what's out there more and better rather than constantly consuming new stuff.
Speaker 2:
3:20
Um, and it's, it's, it's about, um, I guess answering the problem that is people's lives change, our tastes change. We want different things. Um, and instead of having, you know, half the time, we know that, you know, but when you know that you're only going to want something on a temporary basis, we're sort of forced to buy it anyway and then resell it. Um, which just makes no sense from a sustainability point of view, but also just, you know, a mental overload, a overload of stuff. So it's, it's, uh, we're trying to, we're trying to address that, but also, um, uh, to create a platform which is aspirational and gorgeous and somewhere that people want to spend time and get inspired by all the new stuff up there. So it's a brand and it's, um, and it's, it's a place that, you know, we're, um, yeah, from a, from a creativity point of view.
Speaker 2:
4:16
Um, it's been really, it's been so much fun, you know, setting it up because actually creating something which we want people to be drawn to and excited by and inspired by, um, means you have to be excited by it and inspired by it yourself. Um, so that's been for me the most fun thing. Yeah. And the, what's amazing for people who are wanting to hire stuff is that you have access to, um, stuff that is, is truly, um, beyond most people's means or, um, being able to get hold of them artworks by really interesting people or furniture or, absolutely. I mean we have, we have one off pieces as well as, um, as well as manufactured pieces. So it could be anything from a Tom and coffee table through to a, um, Swarovski chandelier or, um, or an artwork that maybe was made for a film.
Speaker 2:
5:13
Um, it's, you know, we've got a huge manner of a huge array, huge range of, of, um, of incredible pieces. Yeah. And in this sort of culture of everything being online, the, the, the concept of, um, popups is increasing and you know, that's a temporary spaces that need to be filled with thing. Absolutely. And popups are one of our, one of our sort of biggest early consumer groups, um, for us. So there are some of the, um, the, uh, we got a lot of borrowers who are finishing a popup or furnishing a, an event space. Um, because it's very clear that they have this need and where prop houses might be quite expensive. Um, we're not, we just want to, you know, get things moving and get things alive and, and allow the things themselves to start telling a story as well. So it used to be the way that, um, it used to be that if you rent something, it's kind of a second best to buying it.
Speaker 2:
6:11
It would be something that's, um, that's maybe going to be a bit battered or, you know, you would just wouldn't, you wouldn't know where it's been. Um, and we're trying to challenge that. I guess by saying actually sometimes when a thing has a story and a history, it can be more valuable. And we recognize that with antiques at the moment, but not so much with things that, um, that we don't know where they've been. And so one of the things with harp is that we're trying to make that, uh, life cycle transparent. So you can, if you rent a table, you can see where it's been before, who had it before, just that you can with airbnb. Um, you know, you see the kind of history and I like the idea that things then have a soul because you know, that, you know, that was it.
Speaker 2:
6:53
Seven size pots, you all speak, oh, that was on this film or that was, um, you know, and this is how they put it in their house and doesn't that look lovely. Um, but you know, the, I, I think it's nice that things can tell stories too. And so they have, they go through different lives. Yeah. Um, and you're part of that journey. That's the idea. There was, um, a story that someone was telling me about books that in New York, uh, when you finish reading a book, you leave it on the train, but you put your, your name in the front and what you, something that you thought about the book and then it's someone else picks it up, reads it, and then puts it back on the train when they've met. So at the beginning of the book is the whole kind of a really lovely book.
Speaker 2:
7:36
And, uh, so in a sense it's the same for it is it is very much. And I think, I think that that's much more meaningful and much, much lovelier. It's nice. And so how, uh, how do you show those stories on the website? So currently we're just in, in very basically two mode. So all you can do on half at the moment is you can upload your things and you can see what we've got and you can borrow it and everything else happens offline. But we are starting to build out the stories of where things have been. So version two point naught, um, well we'll add everything. It'll be a lot more automatic from that point of view. The moment, you know, you can see, um, a best of each items history, but, um, but that's all to come. So in a sense, these pieces have a personality then.
Speaker 2:
8:22
Um, yeah. Yeah. And so, anyway, um, and I really liked that idea. You know, the, the idea that, I mean at the moment where, um, we tend to celebrate pieces that have, um, maybe they're made of natural materials like wood or stone because we're kind of drawn to those materials because they, they were better with time. It's like leather and you're kind of, you know, that idea of a pattern, which is really nice. You know, I, I love, I think it's just, it's one of the, the biggest thing we can do in terms of sustainable is make things that last longer, that fare better with time. Um, and with, yeah, we're trying to champion that because people who say they come temporarily to the UK for three months for work, you know, they can just go and buy a bunch of stuff from Ikea or they can rent a few beautiful pieces that nothing against Ikea. Ikea, I've done a lot, um, for, uh, for interior design in the way we furnish our homes.
Speaker 2:
9:25
But, um, I do think that it has become a kind of default, um, go to when people need something temporary because they can just throw it away again afterwards. And we throw away so much furniture. Um, even just in this country alone, I think there's, um, depending on whether it's reusable, it's at 1.2 million tons a year is thrown away of furniture and like sort of large objects every year in this country. And I think 300,000 tons of that is reusable, so you know, should be going somewhere else. So, you know, if we can just reduce that a bit, that will, that will be a contribution. You know, we're not gonna, we're not going to save the world, but we yet, well, so that goes on to, um, your sense of purpose and um, what drives half the business, what, why you and your partner are doing it.
Speaker 2:
10:21
Um, and through all the tough times, that's going to be the thing that sort of pulls you back over and over and keeps you going. Yeah. Well, I'm trying to create a better way, um, of consuming furniture and furnishing or homes. That's the ultimate goal. So something that, you know, whereby we don't have to compromise as much. Um, I think people compromise so much with their interiors, whether it's because they're buying something cheap and disposable because they knew they weren't going to need it for a little bit, or whether they're buying it because they'd buy something beige or gray because it has to, they, they, they're too frightened to make that decision about being a bit bolder and they think they're going to have to love it in five years time. Uh, it has to go with everything else in their house, whereas if you're only, you're only bringing something in on a temporary basis, you can have a lot more fun with it.
Speaker 2:
11:13
So I love this idea that actually you can, don't have to compromise as much. You know, I think that that's all sort of one of our original driving forces with that. Um, and, and yes, just frustration with how it currently works and just feeling like we could, we could do something better. But I remember within that first year of talking to people, we had a lot of, you know, people who I really respect and you know, business leaders who just said, you know, the an idea like this, you have to go big or go home. You know, you need to go straight out there, make it an almost or someone else is going to come and do it. And you know, the pressure was on to really do that. Um, but it hasn't, I'm really glad we didn't, we didn't do it like that. Um, we needed to, we needed to test it.
Speaker 2:
12:02
We needed to, to go it organically. And actually I think the market wasn't ready then. I think it's starting to get ready now, but it still feels like a very new concept to a lot of people. Um, it's still a little bit like, why would I ever want to share my furniture with someone else? Why would they ever want to rent a, a chair? Um, there's a, there's still a lot of that and I have to be aware as well that I, you know, my background is in journalism. I was writing about things that are six months ahead. And, um, I do a lot of work with forecasting agencies and I know that they're all talking about this now, but it's still, you know, I think we've got time. We've got time to take it a little bit slower. And also because of your unique knowledge and interest, it, it comes from you, doesn't it?
Speaker 2:
12:54
You know, not everybody could do this. They don't have your experience or your eye or your, they wouldn't do it in the same way as us for sure, for sure. Um, it would be a different thing. And the brand that we want to create, um, is very important to us that, that it's a lovely brand that it's, um, as I said before, that it's an inspirational place and that it's really fun. You know, we've, um, there's a lot that we wanted to do with it, but it's not about necessarily building this huge, great global thing because that may not happen and that's not what's important to us. And you hear a lot of founders who say where things have scaled really, really quickly. And you know, they were told to bring in the CSUITE, the, you know, the CEO and the CFO and what's it and they've gone.
Speaker 2:
13:40
And then suddenly they've sort of looked back and the thing that they were, that, that was theirs has sort of been taken away from them. And, and they, and they say, you know, really enjoy that time at the beginning when you're, when you're building it and you have a kind of personal relationship with the people and the things and the idea. Absolutely. That gave me shivers again. It's really, it's really funny. It just kind of, when something means so much to you and yes, we would, we would love it to, to really grow and to really be, you know, to be enormous. But at the same time, only if we're able to hold onto the vision for it. Because in those early days when, I mean it's still early days by a lot of people's standards, but um, you know, we, we changed the business plan and the business models so many times according to everybody that we, you know, every advisor that we had, every, you know, every, um, every hot shot that we spoke to who was like, oh no, you need to do it this way.
Speaker 2:
14:37
What you need to do it this way or forget about peer to peer or forget about, um, sustainability. It needs to be this or it needs to be that. And we shifted it so much that after that first year and we just look back on where we were right at the beginning. We were like, actually that was well, that's what we want to do. And we just rewrote everything same as it was right in the very, very beginning. And I'm really glad we did. And is that sort of going back to the purpose then? Is that because you know what the values are behind it and we're building something new? We don't, it's, you know, there's a lot of kind of gut feeling. And intuition here. Um, there's a lot of what we like to call magic. Um, and I think the pressure is to, to do something that's been tried and tested and we're not interested in that really.
Speaker 2:
15:28
Um, yes, that's, we, we can try what we are doing and we can test what we're doing, but it's, we don't want to build a furniture rental company. That's not what we are. We're trying to build something that, that really changes the way we furnish our homes. So that means sticking to sticking to the original vision. And so in terms of people who, um, inspires you, um, who's helped you, who supports you? How, how has that sort of been part of the journey? So many people, I'm really lucky in my inverted commas, Korea, um, in that it's been all about inspirational people. Um, they're writing about design and writing about, um, entrepreneurs. I've been lucky enough to meet these incredible sort of mavericks who think about things in their own way. And, um, and I think all of that has hugely inspired me along the way.
Speaker 2:
16:26
Very lucky to have a kind of frontline, um, access to two amazing minds. And, and then on the other side, um, my family and, and that I guess, belief that ultimately that's what's important to me. Um, and it, it's, the pursuit of inspiration can be really big, but it can also be, um, right under your nose. Something a three year old says can blow my mind as much as, you know, I'm a billionaire, multinational business owner and, and because you work with your husband, um, the whole thing of family and children and business is all very intertwined. And you know, I think we are moving away from this concept of work and home and the two are, you know, we don't, we spend a lot of time working so home because kind of tagged on the end as a sort of a bit of anathema.
Speaker 2:
17:27
So how, how do you sort of allow those two things to kind of intertwine? Um, do you know when I first met my husband, he, he was in corporate it and nothing to do with design or, um, or art at all. And I was quite happy about that because I was like, here's somebody who I can get to know without ever working with them and then look what happened. Um, but it's, it works for us. It's um, you know, when you're doing something you really love and are passionate about, you're always going to bring that home. So, um, you know, well on this, we often talk about when we were asking this question, we would say, oh, ads, the business brains, he's the tech side and I'm the more kind of creative side. But actually we were both really similar. It's not as cut and dried as that.
Speaker 2:
18:22
Um, we both just kind of muck in and get on with it. Um, it's really, it's really fun. Um, and yeah, we do sort of mix it, mix up the sort of family life and work quite a lot. Um, which works for us. I'm sure it wouldn't work for everybody and it's not without its challenges, but it's what works for us. And do you have, um, a mentor, somebody that is, is sort of in your field who you can ask questions? I'm not an official one, but I think lots of unofficial ones. So there's lots of people who I really look up to and who are always there and helping me out. Um, I have, I have a fairy godmother who's not an official Godmother, but you know, uh, and I have a, um, uh, somebody else who is, I guess, you know, similarly trying to balance family and businesses, multiple businesses, um, who just does it so amazingly and with such serenity, I'm always like, how do you do that?
Speaker 2:
19:35
Um, so yeah, there, there are people, I think it's important to have those people. Um, so people are really important places, really important. You know, we could be holding this in some kind of planned, um, conference room, um, with no atmosphere without, that doesn't kind of make us feel anything when we walk into the space. But here, you know, we look, we can, we're at the top of the world. We're looking out over London. You know, the, the way it's all put together, it's a kind of a half space. It's a half inside, half outside. Um, there's something about how it's put together that makes us feel a particular way. Um, I like that it's sort of a quite an enclosed space that allows us all to kind of be quite near each other. Um, there's a psychology of space and it really matters in our daily lives.
Speaker 2:
20:25
Um, so that the kind of important aspect to when you're looking at how you build a better life, better quality of life for yourself, place is so important. And I, I, I do believe that our surroundings affect our souls. Um, they affect our mood and they affect how we are. Um, and that can be where you live, can be where you work, but also it can just be those places that you, um, find yourself in. So I loved what you were saying about the importance of this space being as it is and with these incredible views. And it made me think about how much I love traveling. Um, not necessarily always because of where you're going, but for the airport and kind of in flight experience where you're in that sort of halfway space. So it's, it's, um, it gives you that sense of perspective when you're neither one place or another and it's a sort of no man's land.
Speaker 2:
21:25
Um, and I wouldn't want to spend too long there, but it, it's often where I guess I get ideas or, um, you start, you get a certain perspective on, on life. And how do you, how do you kind of build that sense into the business then? So the idea that our surroundings affect us souls is absolutely key to have. Um, it's, it's the number one premise that we're building the brand from. So, you know, it's like don't compromise with your space. It's, it's, you know, don't put up with, if you're renting a house or an apartment, don't put up with the landlords choice of furniture if it's not what you love. Um, it's, it's about, you know, making sure that you feel comfortable and inspired by your surroundings every day and, um, and enabling that. Really. Uh, so building a businesses is, um, not a bed of roses all the time.
Speaker 2:
22:31
Um, what have been, uh, the, the real tricky things that you've, the challenges that you've come up against? There's been a few. Um, I would say I would say, uh, staying, staying true to the vision. Um, I think it's, it's always tempting to think that somebody else has the answer and to believe that everybody else knows better and that they can tell you what to do. And if you follow their advice, then everything will be right. Um, I think that's, that's been where we've really learnt a major lesson, um, that yes, you know, other people's advice works for them. And it's very important to us to get all of that and, you know, set the, you know, sets the sort of landscape of what lots of different people think that we should do. But ultimately we always have to make our own decisions. And that's, that's challenging cause that's, you know, then it comes down to you and it's, it's, um, gets a bit scarier that, um, and yeah, there's some days where it does become very challenging.
Speaker 2:
23:39
And, um, you know, we have, we have, um, an amazing team behind us, but it also, we have a responsibility that team and we have investors and we have responsibilities to those investors. And suddenly, you know, their responsibilities just mountain the mountains. And it's, um, you know, there were some days where that's, that's very frightening and you're just saying, I want to get off now. We just go on holiday like everybody else. Um, but we keep getting because, um, because we can't not, it's, it is, it is fun and for every, for every sort of responsibility and, and, and, um, if those on that side, there's also, um, people who, who really believe in what we're doing, who lives we're changing in some small way, um, who, um, kind of Cherisse along from the sidelines. And, um, and that is as a lot more powerful on the other side.
Speaker 2:
24:39
Really is. And then just trying to have enough patients, you know, we really want to build this quickly, but we have to do it quite slowly and um, and that's a good at the end of the day. But I just want to, I just want to show everybody what I have in my head. The other thing actually is, is kind of as transparency and honesty because I do believe that it's very important to, um, to have that kind of honest relationship with your customers, um, or with the people who are engaging in your brand and business. Um, and I never realized quite how difficult it would be. Um, purely from a, I mean, just the, one of the things that we're going through at the moment is that there were, we've had a lot of, a lot of attention from the press about what we're doing, a half, which has been great.
Speaker 2:
25:33
But as a result of that, I think that the kind of, the feeling is that we're much more established than we are and that we're much more kind of a finished product than we are. And so my challenge at the moment is actually to kind of communicate that we're, we are really early days and there's, um, there's, you know, yes, it's a, it's a struggle and there's a lot that we know we need to do. Um, and also with every interaction with every customer, we need to kind of, you know, we need to hold that hand, but we need to also set their expectations. Um, and that's, yeah, that's something we're kind of learning how to do. Yes. Managing the amount of managing expectations. Yeah. And, and the customer journey, I mean, you've got you in a sense, you've got two sides, haven't you? You've got the, the lenders and you've got the users and yeah.
Speaker 2:
26:22
And both of them have to be happy. Um, one of the things that I, so I learnt art through, through you and people. So people have, I mean, everyone says what an amazing idea, amazing concept. And, and then they say, so, uh, how'd you feel about your paintings going out into the world? And people you don't know. And so that, so that be a question that you get, get us. How do you, how do you manage those? Uh, the synergistic really isn't it? It's, yeah, there's the logistics. Um, so logistics, insurance, you know, what happens if it gets damaged, what happens if it's that all sort of water. And I think the more transparency that we build into the platform, the less those things will be a worry. Um, I think as, so one of the questions that you were asking earlier about, um, the market being ready, I think that's changing as well.
Speaker 2:
27:16
I think people are, people's relationships with their stuff is changing. Um, so actually, you know, yes. If it's a, if it's an heirloom sculpture that you would really mind if anything happened to it, maybe don't put it on half, but if it's something that otherwise is going to sit on in storage and that, you know, actually you would like to see it living a life in someone else's home and you know, you can, you can always see who's wow, this is, you know, version two. You will have that convenient transparency and set of, um, you'll be able to see, see who's going, who you're interacting with, who's going to be borrowing your back. And you can always say no. That way you can kind of say, yeah, five star that well, yeah, BNB. Absolutely. Absolutely. Yeah. You can very much know you look at someone and go, well they look like they going to have a lot of parties and all you can, you know, whatever it is he can, um, he can say, I don't want to lend it out to an event where, you know, maybe the, um, the way people are going to interact with it will be slightly different.
Speaker 2:
28:22
Um, but you know, you have complete knowledge so you're able to, to lend and borrow with, um, with full, you know, full picture of what is going on. That's the idea. And, uh, so when you have these challenges and pitfalls and the two of you are at home and okay, Oh God, now this next thing, how are we going to deal with this? Um, and, and inevitably that, you know, there's going to be all the whole way through the whole journey, it's going to be sort of ups and downs. So how do you, do you have tools in your survival kit for keeping going maybe with building them? Um, we kind of, yeah, we're packing our survivalK as we go. Uh, the holiday has always been the thing on the horizon. I think they kind of the no work laptop, free holiday, um, the summers off, that's the dream.
Speaker 2:
29:22
But at the moment, um, at the moment really it's, yeah, it's, it's communication. Do you find that you, uh, the either of you panic at different times, so the other one kind of can bolster and the other one can for sure. How does that then, uh, so when one of us Hispanic and the other one isn't, so yeah, it's very, you've absolutely hit the nail on the head there. Um, it's kind of the way we have to be. And so, um, and you sort of, you allow that ebb and flow a little bit, you know, so the, the good times, the, the things that you, where you really feel like it's, it's hitting, um, the bullseye, you know, and this is the last really two years. Um, what have been the highlights for you? Um, it has been, it's been really the reactions from, uh, from people.
Speaker 2:
30:22
So, um, I used to get very excited about press, but not so much. No, I think, you know, it's, it's, it's great and it helps us. Um, I love it when we get approached by, um, by big businesses saying, can they get involved? Can they come and talk to us? You know, so perhaps at big, um, big partners, you know, who, who wants to come and work with us. That's, that's wonderful. Um, in terms of big numbers of users, that's not that, you know, that's not really an, the forecast for the immediate future anyway, because that's kind of consumer thing that we're not, which not ready for. Um, but yes, when you, you know, even when we just have a family who have rented something successfully and they've really enjoyed the experience and it's changes the way that they feel about, um, about things, you know, it makes a huge, does it, it's, it's really nice.
Speaker 2:
31:16
Yeah. It just, it's, it's more of the little things in the big things at this stage. Um, but you, but there are enough, um, uh, peaks to feel like this is this going well? Yeah. Hmm. Yeah. There's always, there's always something exciting happening in the next few days or in the next week. And, um, you know, at the moment we're very excited because they're going to have our first physical space, um, which will be a three month pop up, um, house of half. Uh, and so the planning of that is, is super exciting at the moment. And then to look to the future. Um, you know, we'd, we know that it's really important to live in the moment and appreciate the moment, but it's also too great to dream big and have goals and look forward and, and um, see how you are going to fulfill your potential, what the possibilities are.
Speaker 2:
32:09
That's what makes life exciting and drives you forward. And so looking to the future then that, uh, can you describe your vision for the future? How you want it to grow, how that's going to work for you personally and your family in, in your partnership. So there's the vision for how we want half to be. And, um, and I, you know, I've, I have a very clear picture of, of the brand and the way that I want people use it and the functionality that we want it to have. Um, we would like to see it grow into other cities. At the moment. We're just sort of London in the surroundings and we would like to see, uh, to see it grow to other cities, but also to other countries. Um, territory is, I think we calling them. Uh, and I would really love to see the way people furnish their spaces actually changed. So people being much braver with their decisions, whether that means, you know, putting a swing in your front room because you can, and it only has to be for the weekend. Um, yeah.
Speaker 3:
33:17
All right.
Speaker 2:
33:17
Whatever it is, you know, I'm just making, making more fun decisions, having more fun with it. Um, so there's that and how that, you know, how that actually translates into our working lives. Um, one thing that I'm really enjoying at the moment is building a, building a really strong team culture. Um, so the, uh, the team has, um, it's, you know, we've been, so not sure if it's lucky, but it's more, you know, we have, um, we have been lucky enough to find amazing people and, um, they are incredibly talented, dedicated team. Um, and it's, it's lovely to see that kind of working culture come together and sort of closeness. It's almost like a second family. Um, so that's incredibly rewarding and I would love to see that grow and to build. Yeah. Um, it's not just the platform, but also the brand and also the, the working culture. Um, very, um, inspired by the potential for that. Um, the, the, um, the hypothetical holiday, um, will be really nice and um, yeah, we'll see where it takes us. Right. Brilliant concept and I hope it will. It will go. Stella. I know. Thank you very much.
Speaker 3:
34:44
Thank you all for coming and listening. Yeah. Wow.
Speaker 4:
34:49
Thanks Henrietta for your inspiring words and encouraging us to look at sustainable living in a different way. Thanks. Also to create lab films, Electra Film and TV zone, m e hotel, and everyone who came to the event, bye for now and see you next time.
Speaker 3:
35:07
Okay.
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