Loan Officer Leadership Podcast

044: Business Plan: Guest Adam Outland, Mindset Matters...

December 26, 2019
Loan Officer Leadership Podcast
044: Business Plan: Guest Adam Outland, Mindset Matters...
Chapters
Loan Officer Leadership Podcast
044: Business Plan: Guest Adam Outland, Mindset Matters...
Dec 26, 2019
Steve Kyles
Show Notes Transcript

In this episode, Steve Kyles interviews Adam Outland, with Southwestern Consulting on business planning, mindset and the importance of the thinking process. Adam gives us 4 steps to changing how we think.

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Speaker 1:
0:03
Hey, welcome back to another episode of the loan officer leadership podcast. I'm your host, Steve Kyles and today you're in for a treat. Uh, we are joined by my good friend and special guest, Adam Outland, uh, who is a partner with Southwestern consulting, which is an international sales coaching training and consulting company. And, uh, Adam personally, coaches, sales professionals, uh, both in the mortgage space as well as the business space, uh, across the country. It's the top producers and the people that are making it happen. And so I'm super excited to have him with us. Not only is he a coach, but while he was in the business world, he consistently ranked in the top 1% of sales forces throughout his career. So not only is he helping people and coaching people, uh, where to go, but he himself has risen to the top of his sales field and I'm just delighted to meet him.
Speaker 1:
1:00
We met him back at, uh, insanely tactical and had become quick, fast friends. Uh, he is an industry thought leader and I'm super excited to have you here. Our conversation as we talk about strategies to break through barriers, uh, this next year in your business, it's more than just having numbers and a written plan. So much of it starts with mindset and your thinking process. And so with that guys, I hope you enjoyed this week's episode with Adam Outland. Hey, so excited to have our good friend Adam Outland with us Southwestern consulting. And man, I am thrilled to have you on the podcast. Uh, we met probably a couple of months ago, insanely tactical. That's right. Yeah, absolutely. So, um, and, and have become fast friends. You know, a lot of similar vision values and beliefs. Uh, love God, love people, love our families, love building business and making a difference together. And so, um, many of you listening to the podcast know in the Houston market, we have a loan officer collective lunch, uh, that is the second Friday of every month.
Speaker 1:
2:04
So make sure to stay a part of the podcast. But you came out to the collective, uh, this last month and man, we had record turnout and then you were able to share with the group. And I said, Adam, you've got to come be on the podcast. It's so, uh, here we are joining the podcast. But you know, you said some things, we've been really focused on business planning and in the business planning, here's what we know. It's easy to put it down on paper. It's a little harder to execute. And where most people fail is not in the creativity or a strategic plan. It's in the mindset to take the next step. So Hey, wanted you to come in today and just talk about what you shared at the loan officer collective. Absolutely. So welcome to the podcast.
Speaker 2:
2:47
Thank you. And thanks for having me on. And honestly, thanks for the invitation to the, to the collective. That was a great event. Um, great turnout, great engagement. And one of the things I really appreciated about, um, the uh, being there with you was making the Mike, uh, set up. Uh, one of the things I really appreciated about being there with you was, um, just the dynamic of the people. I mean, everybody was super engaged. People really wanted to contribute to the conversation. Um, you don't normally always get that at a luncheon. So that was pretty awesome. Hey, we'll tilt and do this. Also, tell people about your journey. Tell people about your story, where you know a little bit how you get started. Cause now you're a coach and at a high level helping so many people break records. So what led you into coaching and then your coaching in the mortgage space, which is even more unique.
Speaker 2:
3:37
So tell us your journey man. Um, yeah, I appreciate that. I uh, I got started when I was 18 years old and I'll, I'll jump around in my story, right? We don't need to hear the what, how much I weighed when I was born. Um, but I, I really got started my sales career when I was 18. I, um, jumped on this opportunity to do a very bizarre because it's so difficult summer program. And that summer program was me selling educational books door to door, um, 85 hours a week. I would sell these educational books, this sat preparation for high school kids starting around 7:30 AM eight in the morning. And I would not stop knocking on doors until about nine 30, 10 at night. It's crazy. Monday through Saturday. And uh, but I owe it to that company because they taught me all that I know about character in the face of adversity and everything that I knew about ethical selling that helped me get to where I am.
Speaker 2:
4:31
And so it was really fundamental for me. I was never a champion at sports. That's my wife. Right? I think you brought her up. She's a, she's a NCAA champion, division one athlete, all American, right from university of Maryland. Um, this guy, I was just really good at eating food. So if I, if I got an award for that, he would win. I would win. I would win it cookies. Sports wasn't, wasn't my gift. Um, academics. I was okay, but I wasn't great. And so when this came along, I wanted to see if I could really shine in the space to sales, if that, that might be what I was brought here to partly do. And, um, I think with the right conditioning and training I got there, but to be for, for all the listeners out there, um, I'm a big believer that sales is not something you're necessarily born with.
Speaker 2:
5:15
You might have a natural gift with people. Um, but I was the third, I was the number one worst person in my organization of all the students out there selling my first three weeks of my first summer, the number one worst, the number one worst, something to be really proud of right there. Um, but it was, it was week three where um, mentorship and guidance and a really good leader helped me, um, turn around what I was able to do. And the, the fourth week I was number one in my group and I stayed number one. Um, and the group of about 30 students I was with throughout that year. Um, and I would go on through hiring a coach my junior year of college and it sounds like a weird thing to do, but I actually hired a professional coach. I knew I could earn some great income over the summer. Um, you know, help pay for school
Speaker 3:
5:58
and I could, I could learn quite a bit if I hired somebody. And so that junior year I paid somebody to coach me through the whole year and the result was me being number two, um, uh, company-wide out of, you know, closer to 3000 people and having the number one organization and the top, top three, uh, team production that all in one year. So that taught me that coaching also has tremendous value. It makes a difference. Absolutely. It is absolutely a game changer from being good to great man. And so well, how did you get into the mortgage space? So, um, kind of just through the partnership. So fast forward, uh, about nine years, right? And then I joined Southwestern consulting. Um, and, and when you join Southwestern consulting, you go through a certification. You know, it's a rigorous interview process. You've got to have a history of being a top 1% or in some industry.
Speaker 3:
6:45
Um, and we had a lot of internal training to teach us about the ins and outs of the mortgage industry. Um, and then, uh, I was a partner together based on behavior type and needs with multiple ellos. And what I think we came to understand is that, um, a lot of industries can do a lot of um, incestual training where you're only learning from, um, the space itself. And what we found is that a lot of external practices that other businesses have that I have nothing to do with mortgage, have incredible practices to duplicate in mortgage that no one really does. Um, and so we found a lot of lift through just the psychology of selling and then the mindset and the principles that help other successful business owners grow as well. That's significant. Well, and you, you don't really think about it when you immersed in one space, you think, well, let me get to the top of that space.
Speaker 3:
7:32
They'll coach me up. Right? Not necessarily removing yourself out of the industry and finding somebody who see it a little different and see if you've probably seen it too. But I've actually seen people jump careers to become loan officers. They used to be maybe an insurance or financial services or vice versa. And, and a top producer in one space is likely to become a top producer and a totally different space. Athletes, you have the millet, people that have been in the military because of their strict discipline. Yes. It's amazing to see how they can jump into the mortgage space, use those daily disciplines. Applied slightly different and rise to the top. Yeah, significant. We see a lot, you know, I think about Adam Delmonico who was with us just a few months ago, his third year in the business, two and a half years and he's funds 42 million, but he was a college athlete.
Speaker 3:
8:17
And the challenge is, you know what's not challenge? It was a huge benefit is the daily discipline. He knows what it takes and you do it every day and you keep getting better a little bit every day. So don't say that. Cause my, my, my wife's might become a loan officer. Hey, come on. We love that. No, that's awesome. We would love that. Right. Hey, we'll talk. Okay. So now let's talk about this. We're, we're really focused on business planning and people have great goals, lofty goals. Some of them just want to grow 10 or 20%. How do we bridge that gap? You were talking about I'm thinking differently in 2020 is a large portion of what your business plan should be. Sure.
Speaker 2:
8:56
Talk about that. Um, so, you know, maybe we start with the, uh, the definition of insanity, right? Which is, um, you know, doing the same thing and expecting different results. Um, that's the common term that we know for insanity. Um, I changed that definition just to here by saying more specifically that it's not just, um, what you do, but it's how you think if you plan on being the same person up here in 2020, that you weren't 2019, but yet you're expecting huge growth numbers. It's, it's not gonna happen. Like you're not going to grow if you don't change your way of thinking. Yeah. And, and so one of the things that we really believe in at Southwestern consulting, it's something I personally believe in cause it happened to me, is that we have to start transformation at the level of thought. Um, and if we have a second, can I share that story about the less time, you know, I did this, it hit me like a ton of bricks that what we do is a good thing.
Speaker 2:
9:54
When I was on a Southwest flight from Atlanta, I was coming back to Houston and a really good friend of mine and, and client at the time, his, his company had been using our coaching for over a year. Uh, we ended up boarding the same plane, totally unintentionally, just divine divine intervention. And, um, he sat next to me and we got an uninterrupted, you know, two hours together, which is hard in the world of business to have. And he drew on a napkin and he said, Adam, this is, this is what I've come to realize in growing an organization that's now got I think over 1500 to 2000 employees, right? That's who he's in charge of. And he said, what I learned is that if you focus on results or you have a results based culture, um, what's going to end up happening is you're going to end up with a lot of burnout people because if you focus purely on results and you don't understand the activities that get you there, it's like the, the loan officer that knows they need to see, you know, how much they need to close in a year, but they don't understand the fundamentals of creating those realtor partnerships.
Speaker 2:
10:51
Like the actual controllable steps. They're gonna put a lot of stress and anxiety on themselves because they don't feel like they're in control of their destiny. Right. Yeah, for sure. Um, results frustrated when you focus on the results. Um, so activity is what you focus on. Is that right? Yeah. So what proceeds results is activity. Okay. Yep. And, and then activity, I would say is a great motive. I mean, it's great for motivating. It's great for tracking your metrics, knowing what your conversion needs to be, how you can get better. Um, but what I would say about activity is that if you're only focused on activity, you're cracking the whip all the time to motivate yourself to go out and do the job. If you're a branch manager or you lead a team, you feel like you're the one cracking the whip for all your people to get out there and do the job.
Speaker 2:
11:40
Yeah. And by the end of the year, you feel burned out. You feel emotionally exhausted because you're driving, all you're doing is driving. So how, so how do we change that in 2020, what are the things that you're coaching your students and people and saying, okay, if thinking is big piece of how you're going to accomplish your goal, where do you start? Yeah. And so, um, completing that circuit helps lead us there. Um, what less illustrated in that example is he said, what proceeds, um, activity is how you feel. And, and by repressing feelings, we don't really get anywhere. Right. Um, you actually spoke to that really well. I can't remember exactly what you said at the collective, but you, um, I think kind of opened up and you were vulnerable about the fact that of how you've grown personally, professionally, so much of that had to do with, you know, admitting certain feelings so you could overcome them.
Speaker 2:
12:23
Right. Um, and that was powerful when you shared that. I was like, man, that's, that takes a lot of confidence to, to, to even share that. And so I appreciate that. I think that says a lot. Um, and for me it was understanding that, um, if we feel underconfident next year, especially if you're sitting across from a top producing realtor that you really want to develop a relationship with, your transference of emotion is you're transferring your under confidence to the realtor. He's not going to be confident in working with you. Right? Um, if you feel unmotivated in the morning, if you feel crappy, you're sick or unhealthy, like that's how you're going to show up for the day. You're not going to put in the activity. And so to your point, um, what, what we need to address, what Les shared with me is what proceeds feeling is thinking.
Speaker 2:
13:05
And if you can think different, if you can learn how to manage those emotions, increase your emotional intelligence, not just with yourself but in how you work with others. If you can, um, change your thinking patterns around the decisions that you make every day and how you use your time, um, and how you set your goals, you'll have a transformative effect in your life because it will affect your feelings, the activity and the results, right? So what are you doing to change your thinking? So that that's really, okay. Now we know the importance of what you're thinking about because really what you think about ultimately becomes the activity you're going to do or take or you're going to wake up and one day, if, if your thinking continues to be negative, you're not going to take that step because you're fearful yet how do you change your thinking?
Speaker 2:
13:48
What are you doing? So it's kind of like being an alcoholic, right? There's a step step pattern to step pattern to actually overcome that. And I bring up that example because the first thing is recognizing you have a problem, right? A lot of sinking problem. I thinking problem a lot of us don't realize that's what we got to address. And the thinking problem starts. Um, shad Helmstetter I'll give him credit for an amazing book called what to say when you talk to yourself. Very straightforward title, but it's amazing book because what shad breaks down in there is that there's levels to your thinking. Um, there's levels to your self-talk, what you say to yourself in your head. And I think this illustrates and helps us break down. Um, what are we're addiction and our problem is in our, in our thought patterns. Um, a lot of us are addicted to level one thinking and level one thinking is saying things like, I can't, I'm not capable. Um, and when we say I can't, I'm not capable. Um, what we're really doing is we're committing to the negative. We're not even giving ourselves our freedom to say that we could change or we could maybe evolve. Well, and how many times have you said, I can't, Hey, I can't call that agent or I can't do that happy
Speaker 3:
14:52
hour or I can't do that event. And then here come the excuses behind it. 100%. So if you say, I can't, that's level one and just recognizing it. So the next time you hear yourself say, I can't, recognizing there is a thinking problem in that area of your life. Absolutely. I can't lose the weight because I can't become more emotionally intimate with my wife because, right. Yes. And um, to be willing to be vulnerable myself, you know, um, none of us are coaches because we're perfect. Right. We're coaches because we're heavily on the journey and we're involved in our own self development and growth. We just want like being on that journey with others. Yeah. And my, my, I can't, for the longest time it was, I can't be organized. I'm not good with my time now in college, I was a purebred example of what failure was going to look like if I didn't turn the ship around.
Speaker 3:
15:42
Right. Um, and, and it was that self limiting belief that, that you're either born with time management skills or you're not, which is a load of, uh, I can't curse on here BS, right? It's just a load of BS. Um, and so level two is th the transformation or the change of thinking from I can't to, I need to, I should, I'll try. Um, there's at least a recognition there that you need to change something. So you've arrived there. Thank God you're, you're not at level one, level two. However, um, this is what we talked about at the collective is that, um, at level two, it's sneakier because we don't realize we're saying bad self-talk to herself because while we recognize the need for change, the worst part is that we haven't committed to that change. So you recognize it, but there's no commitment to change yet.
Speaker 3:
16:28
Hey, and, and while we're going to these levels to what we talked about on Friday was you don't have to be at a level one, two, or three in your whole life. It can be in certain areas of your life. Like you can be winning in one area, breaking through in business and yet be at a level one truthfully in your marriage or in your spiritual growth or in your physical health. So that was a huge revelation too, because we were trying to originally say, Oh, where are you at in your overall thinking? Correct. And it's not overall thinking. You can be in each area, you can be winning in one and losing in another, but identify it. Then we gotta go to step three. It's, it's just some commitment baby. 100%. It's a lot like a, it's a lot like golf, right? It's like the inner game of tennis.
Speaker 3:
17:13
I mean you, you want to say it's a lot like golf and you know, in a PGA bag you've got 14 clubs. Yeah. Why do you have so many clubs for all these different situations? You have all these different parts of life, these different strengths. And if you go out on a golf course, you've got some people that can drive their iron straight, but they can't putt, right. People that can put, they can't drive. And so it's, you know, you look at this, um, like you said, all these different parts of the life pie and even in your business, you look at your skillset and how you communicate with realtors is one part of the slice. You look at your time management and systems is another. Your motivation and vision is one. And someone can have great vision and great motivation, but they can be totally level two in their skills.
Speaker 3:
17:51
Saying like, I'm not a good sales person. I'm not good at communicating. Right? And so it's better to split it up because it allows you to focus on the areas that you're under confident in. Wow, that's great. Hey, and let me say this too, but for our listeners, uh, I'm joining with Shane McGraw in January we're going to do a, um, a business planning webinars. So you guys be looking for that because we're going to address the seven areas of life. Love it. And then what we can do is come back and say, how's my thinking in each one of these areas? That's huge. That's a big one. Okay. So we're at level two, which is, we've acknowledged, but we haven't gone to number no. Level three which says we're coming. Yeah. Level three. So I realize I got to go workout, I acknowledge I need to workout and I should.
Speaker 3:
18:33
Yeah. Now how do I get past I gotta I should be working out more. So level three is kind of like this middle step and it, and I would call it the beginning of effective self-talk and effective thinking. Um, level three is when you say, um, I never, however, what you're doing is you're committing to change. So you're saying, I, I never procrastinate. Um, you're saying that, um, I'm not late, I'm not someone who's lazy. And so it's your first level of commitment. It's just formed in the negative. And so I'm gonna, I'm not gonna spend a ton of time on that one cause I think you can rope that into an effective affirmation for yourself. But level four is where we really want to be, which is the, I am, and I do the, the language of committal self-talk, right? They will go back to this only affirmations.
Speaker 3:
19:15
So is that really level three is, and I love how you do that. You flip it to the negative. I'm not perfect. I'm never not procrastinating. Is that what you said? Yeah. I will never procrastinate. Procrastinate. So really you're just trying to build yourself up. And I know it sounds silly, but sometimes you've got to, yeah. Yes. Shad in his book says that one of the ways is a psychologist. He helped people overcome their addiction of smoking. The psychological aspect was every time they pulled out a cigarette smoke, um, he would teach them to say, I'm not a smoker. That's just not who I am. And it was first creating that disassociation, that cognitive dissonance with that action that helped him overcome a psychological addiction. So now go to the level four. Yeah. Level four is I am and I do, and I am an I do is, um, the language where you're fully committing and putting your integrity on the aligned to accomplish something and you're living into it.
Speaker 3:
20:07
I am a runner. I am yes. A salesman. I am saying, yeah, I'm a top producer and it can be even, um, we, we say things like, uh, I'm, you can even use the phrase some people have trouble with affirmations and self-talk cause they feel like they're lying to themselves by saying that. Um, so a different way to change as you can say, I am getting better every single day that my time management because that's something you can commit to. Right. You might not be able to commit to being an expert time management person. Yeah. You can say every day I'm getting more organized with the details of my life. I always start my day with a plan and I accomplish my goals. Right. That's great. That's all first-person commitment. Yeah. Hey, and do you have any affirmations that you have, like some general that you're using or you have written [inaudible] what would you be willing to share it with the group?
Speaker 3:
20:51
Absolutely. Yeah. Would you post it in the loan officer leadership? Yes. Okay. So loan officer leadership Facebook group, we'd love to see them. Just some affirmations that you're currently using or that you share with others. Just to help kickstart the mindset and beliefs. Absolutely. And, and they come, I think they start to come naturally after you've written out a few. Yeah. But you know, some of us, you know, poopoo affirmations because maybe we grew up with self-help and we're like, ah, you know, I don't believe in it. Um, but the reality is your brain is a computer and you're either wiring it towards ineffective thinking or you're wiring it towards the way you want to live life. And I believe affirmations are a critical part of changing your thinking. Well, you know, and I'll tell you one. So I, with my son, I take my eight year old son to school every morning and we do a creed.
Speaker 3:
21:34
We say together today, I'm here to serve in love people. I mean, it's a whole deal. And then one of the things John's John Maxwell said in one of his books, and here's what's really helped me, is he said, say do it now 50 times a day. So do it now. Do it now. Do it now. Do it now. And what you begin to realize is if, as Ethan and I have begun to do these affirmations in the morning where procrastination was a bigger deal, you realize the first thought is, we'll do it right now. Don't wait. And so it really does over time begin to help you take more action, uh, in things that you otherwise would procrastinate in. And that is, that is an awesome example. I mean, um, the fact that you're bringing conversations to your son, he hates it sometimes, but I'm like, bro, we're pulling up and we got like two minutes to school in SAR, let's do it.
Speaker 3:
22:23
And I make him say it with me every morning and it's, it's eight sentences that really talked to the character in his identity in Christ. Man. It's so, it's powerful. So it's awesome. Yeah. So it's fun. It's a great way to do it. That's really great. Hey, and so Adam, as we're talking, you know, just any other thoughts on business planning? You know, we've got guys here that are anywhere from 5 million a year to people that are listening, uh, over a hundred million a year in production. Sure. What, how, what are some of the other things you're encouraging people to take a look at as their business planning and really focusing on 20, 20 pod? There's a lot that we can cover there. I think, um, the general focus I've had with a lot of my clients, especially right now as we get into the holidays, is um, to really consider, um, not just your annual plan and get into the details and break down and reverse engineer all your metrics, but take a deep breath and look at your 10 year vision.
Speaker 3:
23:19
And, and the reason I think it's so important is because we always say begin with the end in mind. Really good at doing that in the context of 365 days. Like we all do a yearly plan, um, or we should, uh, but not most of us really start with ultimate and end in mind. We're not reverse engineering our life from the, the epitaph we want to see on our tombstone, the kind of impact we have with people. Um, very quickly I'll share a really powerful conversation I had yesterday and, and I the one delivering this advice by the way. It was actually, um, uh, up in spring, Texas. I was sitting down with an incredible leader for a healthcare company. And, um, he told this to me and it like, it was moving. He said, um, a few years ago, his son passed away and that moment, uh, him and his wife totally changed their way of thinking because any time of really traumatic life event like that, um, causes you to ask yourself, what, what the hell am I doing with my time?
Speaker 3:
24:15
And um, it didn't cause him to change his career, but what it did cause him to do is live with intention every day because he thought he saw his life. Now he, he, he overcame his fear of death. And he said, my life is truly about serving people and just life itself means that I'm living with abundance. And if I can give people just a little bit more, um, that's, that's giving my son a worthy memory right now. Imagine starting your year with like that kind of powerful vision where you don't care, you're not attached to the results. Yeah. You're attached to a greater mission. And um, and I, you know, we talked about this before coming on this podcast, but I feel like, um, you know, with maybe without the traumatic event, I don't know, but you, you've, you've had that transformation, I think you've come into this year with a really powerful new vision for yourself and for others.
Speaker 3:
25:04
And how that's changed your actions, right? Oh, 100%. Well, you know, here's what I have found is I think we struggle sometimes in life to come up with a vision, but sometimes in life I think your vision is cloudy and unclear for a purpose because God's working something out on the inside of you. So when you can't see, yeah, just move. And then I believe that the vision becomes more clear. All last year I didn't have a vision man. Really. I just kept moving. And what I realized was there were opportunities in divine appointments, like year one, there were other people. And you just realize, okay, if I can just keep moving in the same direction, I may not know what the outcome's going to be, but here's what we learned was life moves at the speed of relationships. And if I'll just stay connected, then I know I'm moving in the right direction.
Speaker 3:
25:58
And then what happened was the latter part of this year vision began to become super clear. But it was because I didn't disconnect. Most people at them disconnect at the point of loss of vision. Yeah. And they say, well, I'm not sure what I'm going to do with my life. And they back away from everything that they've built up to that point. And they said, well, it's not working. Well, it's not that it's not working, it's that they quit too quickly or too soon. And the breakthrough was a lot closer than what they thought. And here's what happens is we can't control the outcomes. Yup. But I can't control the input. Yes. So, regardless of whether I can see if I'll keep moving love people, then it will become clear at some point you just don't make decisions and peaks and valleys, you know. Um, maybe we stay on point for a second cause this is really, that's really amazing.
Speaker 3:
26:46
Um, what you said because what happens when most people hear the word vision and a 10 year vision, um, they almost think more like a 10 year plan and they try and detail it out as much as they do with their goals. Yeah. And actually becomes a problem because to your point, um, if you get too granular in your vision, I think it creates tunnel vision. Yes. And then you don't open yourself up to opportunities that actually help you live into it that are outside of your control. Right. I think what you did is you kind of have this general feel for what you're about in life, right. And that drives you to the right relationships. It guides you like a compass to the right people and the right ideas. And then it, it does start to become clear to you, but you're always kind of keeping, you find that the people who are most successful have a very open mind to things or the people that aren't, are very closed minded.
Speaker 3:
27:34
Maybe because they have almost too much of a tunnel vision. Does that sound, Oh, a hundred percent words. It's a lot like an airplane. It never takes a true straight course to its destination. It's constantly readjusting. The problem is, is if I've got it all figured out, it gives me no latitude to pivot. So what we learned this year was if you can pivot quickly, you can readjust quickly. Hey, and you know, and I want to speak to this too because I want to give people the opportunity to reach out to you. I love what you're doing at Southwestern consulting and as we do insanely tactical, 2020, you're going to be a big part of it. Um, but you know what, I've come to really come to understand yesterday, my wife and I spent a half day of coaching with a coach I hired last year and I met him at an event, an unbelievable coach.
Speaker 3:
28:21
I didn't know who he was, but he said a message. He did a seminar at um, John and Lisa severe's messenger cup. It was a Saturday morning session. And what he said, like, literally I knew it changed my life and I reached out to him. He didn't know who I was and I said, Hey, I feel like you one of the five people who are supposed to be in my life, would you consider coaching me? And he said, absolutely. He said, don't take a whole lot of coaching students right now, but I'll do it. And so for six months I've been paying him to be my coach. He spent half a day with us yesterday. Yeah. And what was so interesting is his question is, is if there was no restraint in money or resource, what would you do? Hmm. And I mean, we just began to work through that and, and it was interesting because Stephanie spent a half day just saying, okay, if it didn't, if there was no restraint money, no restraint resource, there's no obstacles, no barriers, what's the vision?
Speaker 3:
29:12
And and would you begin to lay that out? That's how you start to get crystal clear is okay, here's where we want to go at the end of our lives. And then you just start saying, okay, what's the mission? How do we do it? Strengths, opportunities, weaknesses, threats, and how does mortgage play into it? How does coaching play into it? And then you can begin to create a more broad roadmap. And then you say, okay, each year we're going to get more granular, but still being flexible to pivot. So weight has power. Hearing you say is get a coach that can hold you to taking the time to, it wasn't easy, you know, but we did, we just blocked a half day. And then here's what our pattern is too, is we're going to take three days out of the holidays and her and I'd just go away to our condo and Bravo man.
Speaker 3:
29:56
Cool. Well, but here's the thing, we haven't done it in five years, but we just realized that, you know what, we've got to live intentionally and on purpose. We need coaches and people that can speak into our lives. Absolutely. And just to last minute seconds on that is uh, um, the lady who wrote the um, latest biography for, uh, Abraham Lincoln. Um, it was called the, um, something of enemies or friends. Anyway, we can look it up later, but she is known for her famous documentaries on these past presidents. Yeah. In an interview, um, a couple of weeks ago, she said, um, a common trait of all these incredible leaders of our country, um, is that they always took time often with their spouses. Winston Churchill's wife was, uh, an amazing part of his success, brilliant woman. And sometimes getting away and just having that vision, that freedom to brainstorm and silence and that creativity come back in.
Speaker 3:
30:48
We all need creativity. If we're going to own our goals and be inspired, right? That comes in the margin. Most of us don't live life with margin and that's it. Here's what I learned about vision last year. What was interesting is there was no vision because there was no margin. Yes, you can't dream when there's no margin. And so you have to back away and say, okay, Hey, you know what else we really understood to Adam was we live with a lot of fear. If you like w w you're scared to dream. How many originators, how many mortgage people in this podcast, if you boiled it all the way down and you threw out that Beehag of a goal would be so scared to say that goal because there's so much fear behind it. I think we live in a fearful society, man. It's crazy. The fear of failure, the fear of rejection.
Speaker 3:
31:37
What if I lose it all? An interesting study? No, a hundred. 100%. You're right. And I, you know, even, you know, it happens to everybody. I meet myself, um, a really interesting study that, uh, John King, who's one of the authors for tribal leadership did a years ago, is they took these high level, you know, these are executive MBA grads who are in high leadership, you know, potential to be the next CEO of fortune 500 companies. And they had them do this blind, um, you know, non, uh, anonymous survey. Um, and one of the questions is, you know, what's your greatest fear? And almost unanimously everybody's fear, um, that they wrote down was the fear that maybe people will find out that I'm, that, that I'm not as great as they think that I am. Right. And as we transition and talk a little bit about leadership, I think one of the greatest fears a lot of branch managers, Harbor and even regionals, right, is, is in all of us that that lead a team is what if, you know, what if I'm not as great or what if people, um, you know, that really put me, lift me up and I'll find out.
Speaker 3:
32:37
I'm not as, as [inaudible] invisible
Speaker 2:
32:40
as they think I am. And, and it's a real fear and that fear does kind of hold us back sometimes from being as vulnerable and as real with people as we can be. Right.
Speaker 1:
32:48
Well, and I think that's why we have to the really, it goes back to relationships. You know, it's funny, uh, my hope is that our relationship, I encourage you and that, you know, being around each other, you're, you're drawing out the best. And sometimes when you don't feel it, you don't see it. We can encourage you a champion and keep her on and man, you're doing great. You're making it up.
Speaker 2:
33:07
Yes. You have to be in and around people who see what you can't see. Yes. Both blind spots are good and bad, so absolutely. Hey, well, any closing thoughts? Um, I, I think, uh, I think this has been a great conversation. I mean, I think, um, finding people who, uh, connect with exactly the values that you and I are talking about are the people really worth, um, spending time with and being around with. And this is the kind of message that attracts the right people. Um, I've been talking about, um, these things fearlessly lately because I realized that at this stage of my life, I get to choose to do business with the people I wanna do business with, right. And man, this week I was in Phoenix, Arizona. I was in Las Vegas, um, with different teams. And, um, it was so cool to see the right people connect with the right message and, and join in that journey.
Speaker 2:
33:54
And it just, it fills the heart and makes you feel like you're on the right path when that happens. So, um, so hopefully there's a bunch of you on this podcast that connects with you and listen and so join Adam, it's Southwestern consulting so they can tell them where they can find you. Uh, yeah, so in all honesty, um, connect with me on LinkedIn. That's, that's such an easy way. I'm, I, that's where I live. That's the platform I live on. Facebook is great too. Um, and you can go to Southwestern consulting.com. You can find my little bio in there and connect with me there if you Google it. So, I mean, you just Google Adam out, lay in Def. I'm a big deal on the internet. Luckily the last name makes it easy for me to be
Speaker 1:
34:34
yes. [inaudible] there you go. Well, and listen guys, y'all connect with him. He is a part of our Facebook group too. And we commit, we created that because here's what we realized is we needed a place where people could ask questions and engage and connect. It's a private group. So if you're not a part of it, just ask, uh, to be a part of it and we'll get you in. Uh, but we're so thrilled to have you. Thank you for your friendship. Thank you for what you're doing in the mortgage and real estate space. Um, but you know, I'm just thankful to be in and around people who are committed to make a difference in the lives of, of just this world. I mean, what we're doing, it's more than just making money. It's about making impact. I, I love, uh, we're not looking to be famous. We're looking to be effective. Right? And I'm thankful to be on the journey with you. And, um, you get to take us out. Well, one of the last podcast of the year, man. All right, let's wrap it up. Maybe eight. So listen, guys, remember this? Hashtag grow and grind. Be purposeful in your growth, relentless in your effort. Remember, anything worth doing is worth doing. Just
Speaker 4:
35:38
get started. So you
Speaker 5:
35:59
[inaudible].
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