Chuck Shute Podcast

Liz Miele (comedian, author, podcaster)

September 08, 2022 Liz Miele Season 4 Episode 277
Chuck Shute Podcast
Liz Miele (comedian, author, podcaster)
Show Notes Transcript

Liz Miele is a comedian, author and podcaster. Her new stand up special “The Ghost of Academic Future” is out now for free on YouTube.  We talk about the new special plus her time on America’s Got Talent, doing the Adam Carolla Show, going to therapy, the dating apps, her cameo in the new George Carlin documentary and more! 

00:00 - Intro
00:57 - New Special "Ghost of Academic Future" 
02:20 - Not Drinking or Doing Drugs & Fun 
05:22 - Socializing at Weddings 
06:30 - Breaking Up 
07:50 - Therapy & Self Development 
13:45 - Customer Service 
18:05 - Moms 
23:02 - America's Got Talent 
25:43 - Comedy Business & TikTok 
28:02 - George Carlin 
29:15 - Podcasts & Adam Carolla & Audience 
32:40 - Frustration Towards Comedy Industry 
36:30 - Financial Growth 
38:08 - Telling People You're a Comedian 
42:21 - The Dating Apps & Meeting People  
48:03 - Cats 
52:30 - Two Non-Doctors Podcast 
53:45 - Lizrd Mail App 
55:25 - Dramedy Script
56:15 - Charities 
57:24 - Outro 

Liz Miele website:
https://lizmiele.com

The Jed Foundation website:
https://jedfoundation.org

Dyslexia Advantage website:
https://www.dyslexicadvantage.org

The Foundation of Hope  website:
https://www.foundationofhope.org

Chuck Shute website:
http://chuckshute.com

Support the show

Thanks for Listening & Shute for the Moon!

Chuck Shute:

So if you follow the show for a long time you remember comedian Liz Meili, one of the most popular episodes we've actually ever had. And she's back. She's got a new comedy special, the ghost of academic future, and the full specials available for free on YouTube. And lots of great comedians are doing this. Now, some of my favorites like Fahim, Anwar and Mark Normand who have had both on the show also Sam Morell, they did the same thing where they uploaded their specialty YouTube for free. It's kind of the new trend where to comics take charge. And Liz has certainly done that and build up a great career. And we're does we're going to discuss a lot of different topics. It's a fun interview. And as always, it's through zoom, which can sometimes cause technical difficulties, so just bear with us with that. Until we have that dream studio but Liz Meili, coming up right now. Okay, um, great. Well, welcome back. It's been a while, a couple years. I listened to our old episodes like that. It was only like the 20th episode I did. It was so cringe. I mean, not because of you, but just because of me. So I thought, Alright, let's let's do a second one. Let's make this better. It'd be slightly less cringe for on my heart. So

Liz Miele:

happy to help you love yourself again.

Chuck Shute:

Yeah, well, congrats on the special. It's getting a great response. We watched it last night. It's called the ghost of academic future. Yeah, yeah. So tell it tell us about tell my audience about it's only it's less than an hour. It's free on YouTube.

Liz Miele:

Yeah, I mean, I would say that about 70% of it was written during the pandemic, which is kind of crazy. I like, worked on it via zoom shows, and park shows and rooftop shows. And when the world opened up again, I was like, Oh, these aren't good. And I had to make them better. So it was very much a longer weirdly, a longer process of fixing them. But it's also, I think, one of the more relatable ones, because everybody went through the same thing. I feel like everybody went through a pandemic breakup, or at least hating their partner during the pandemic, because they were locked in with them. And everybody was kind of scared and worried about money and worried about being sick. So, you know, the whole thing isn't pandemic related. But I think the pandemic sparked a lot of thoughts, like the fact that, you know, I have a joke about not drinking, and it just became very obvious that I had to handle the pandemic differently, because I don't drink or do drugs and how weirdly, it always feels a little unfair, that I don't do those things on a normal time. But that's like, you go out with friends and everybody's drinking and you're not drinking. But then when everybody's like, Oh, well, I just you know, the line for the liquor store. Every time we went to the grocery store was so long, and it was just so obvious. I was the only person in my neighborhood not drinking, and that's where like, and that's where like a lot of my jokes sparked from was like this, like we're all in this together. But also I feel like I'm missing out somehow.

Chuck Shute:

Yeah, so what do you do? Because I think you mentioned that last time you don't drink it's not because of religious thing or anything. It's just like you have a gluten allergy and you're like, alright, well, I just I'm going to cut out booze so what do you do instead? To kind of like relaxed you meditate or

Liz Miele:

I don't relax. Where did you even come up? That was awful assumption you made. I don't drink I'm allergic to yeast. So it's even worse than gluten.

Unknown:

thing? I don't know.

Liz Miele:

I thought yes, I'm allergic to yeast. And I actually think I might have a gluten intolerance regardless, drinking just isn't fun for multiple reasons. Now.

Chuck Shute:

What about animals? Do you try the weed edibles is that can you do have a new joke

Liz Miele:

about how they're the worst thing that's ever happened to me? I just have like major panic attacks while and as a kid like when I was a teenager, smoking weed. It made me think I was chill. Like, I didn't realize I was like self medicating my anxiety. But as I've gotten older 70 to 90% of the time I smoke weed, I have a panic attack. So that's also I've just I'm not fun like you. You kind of just accepted at some point like some people like just know they're not fun, and some people eventually become unfun. I've just, I had to discover it on my

Chuck Shute:

comedian. How can you not be fun?

Liz Miele:

I'm funny. I can take sadness and make it funny, but I'm not a good hang. Like I just don't you know what I mean? And I'm not. We're like, if you want to play board games, if you want to go rock climbing, if you want to complain, I'm the best. Okay, I'm great with activities and I'm great with bitching. But if you want to just like chill on the beach. I'm so unfun to chill on the beach with I don't like sand. I'm worried about sharks. I'm burning. Like, I'm just There's typical fun activities. I'm not fun. So I don't I would say the best way I relax. I mean I run again, my relaxing is things that most people don't want to do so like going for a run, you know, during depressive episodes, I like to binge movies, but I don't do that. Unless I'm depressed. You seem sad. You seem sad to find out this information. Oh, no, I'm

Chuck Shute:

just I'm just I'm taking it all in. Okay, well, what about so because you bring this up in the special the, you went to seven weddings in 2019. So you have to interact and you have to be social, you can't drink. So well. How do you handle yourself at those kinds of events?

Liz Miele:

If I know people that I'm catching up with people, and I'm, I'm, I would like to think the only thing I'm good at is having a conversation. So um, yeah. And then while everybody's drinking and dancing, eating cake, like you find you find your groove, you find the thing. I like, I like sugar all hanging out with you near any kind of sugar. Yeah, I don't know. I don't know. I don't know what I do. I don't know how I get through the day.

Chuck Shute:

No, because I've listened to a bunch of interviews. You're always fun in interviews. I mean, it's, I think the problem is people don't sit down and want to have a real conversation. They just

Liz Miele:

Yeah, and I can do that. I can have a funny conversation. I can have a thoughtful conversation. I can I can sit next to you and read a book. I you know what I mean? Like I, I have cat like qualities. And I've just embraced that. So if you want to sit next to each other and ignore each other, or if you want me to like play with your hair. I'm super fun.

Chuck Shute:

So is that what happened with cuz I know you how are you talking about this, and especially at a boyfriend in the pandemic and you guys broke up? Is that you just drove each other crazy? Was he into the like drinking,

Liz Miele:

playing with his hair too much? What was your question?

Chuck Shute:

Just what hat? So what happened with the with the boyfriend? What was the Why do you think?

Liz Miele:

Just I mean, it was it was our third breakup. So you know, we had issues and then I don't know where two people that traveled a lot and made time for each other when we were home. And then I think we spent a lot of time together and realize that I think we didn't like each other. I don't know, I care about him. I use him an important person in my life. But I think if I'm being really honest, I don't think he actually liked me. So, you know, yeah, I was just like, and that's what I told him. I was like, I think you might not like me. You're gonna be like, like, I think you all do it. Yeah. Okay. Yeah, I think he loved me. I think he cared about me, and I care about him. And I think he's a wonderful person. But at the end of the day, I just didn't feel like he actually wanted me around. And I kind of was like, I deserve to be around somebody that wants to be around me. Right. So I think for I think the pandemic, fast forward, it's something I would have realized in another year or two.

Chuck Shute:

Gotcha. Well, yeah. So talk about you, because you said that you went to therapy, it was nine years, are you still in therapy?

Liz Miele:

Technically I am. I don't go as consistently I don't, I almost lose us therapy is like a, like a, like a checkup like. So you know, when I first started, like, 10 years ago, I was at the beginning, I was going twice a week, I was like an absolute mess. And then I started going once a week. And then I would say, in the last five years, I was going every two weeks. And now I probably go once every two months, maybe something really stressful is happening, or something I can't seem to solve on my own. And I just need like another thought. But I I mean, between she moved, so she's no longer in New York. So I think it's a different experience over the phone. And so when she does come back into the city, which she does, occasionally, I always see her in person. But then also, I have 10 years of tools, like now when I'm upset, I'm like, I think about her all the time. I'm like, oh, four years ago, she said to do this, maybe I should do that again. Or, you know, this, the reason I'm upset about this is because XY and Z and I probably am not going to never not be upset about this. But I also know this doesn't affect my overall happiness. And I can I need to just let this go. So it's like, I also have like 10 years of tools, the same way that if you went to school to become a doctor, you don't need to keep going. I mean, you take classes and you always have higher education to get better. But like, you don't need to relearn a thing that you know, every day. So I feel like she did a good job. There's a lot of stuff I worked through the first three to five years and I am just a I'm a happier person and I'm a person that can take on the stress and the shittiness of life in a more authentic way. I don't even know like I just don't. I'm not I'm not the same person. I used to be where I would like fly off the handle every time things didn't go my way.

Chuck Shute:

Do you think some of that just comes with age too? I noticed for me at least like really?

Liz Miele:

Not in my family. Okay, is a it is a skill where somebody has to hold your hand the whole time, because I see the difference in my siblings that don't go to therapy my parents, like, I guess some of it might come with age. But I also think, I don't think you just get wiser. I just don't think that's true. I think you have to actively be somebody that reads and looks to grow. There's so many people that fight growth and fight, change and fight, self reflection and self awareness. And you might stumble into it, maybe something bad happens to you, or somebody says something that changes your mind. But most people I actually don't think change unless they are forced to or are open to

Chuck Shute:

Yeah, no, that's a good point, I think, yeah, for me, like, I don't go to therapy anymore. But I do a lot of like, well watched like YouTube videos, or like podcasts or read books. And I learned so much that way. Like I listen to this podcast called and if you've heard of the mindset, mentor, that podcast is a mess. I changed my life. It's like 15 minute episodes, but they're amazing. He makes you think about things. You're like, oh, I never thought about that, like probably things that are normal for probably most people. But if you didn't have that kind of background growing up, it's like you don't really learn from it.

Liz Miele:

Absolutely. And I think that's a great way to stay, like focused on it and stay sharp, because I think we all can become complacent. And I think we all can kind of morphed backwards and, and maybe not be the consistent best version of herself. And stress always throws everything off. And everything right now is stressful. But I think the same way that you move out of your parents house, because you don't need them to help you anymore. I think you can move out of your therapists house like I think you can be like I've learned enough like, not that I've learned them off, and I'm done learning. But I've learned enough that I can do the rest of the learning on my own. Because I think about what my parents instilled and what I learned in school, and most of my bigger learning since then has been not in school and not feel my parents. So it's just about your openness to continue to challenge yourself.

Chuck Shute:

I love the I don't hope I'm not spoiling this job. But you said you have a PhD in yourself. I like

Liz Miele:

Yeah. And I think that's that's where, you know, I I will never pretend I can fix anybody or help anybody else. I think we're all individuals with our own issues and histories and traumas and whatever. But don't you dare comment me and think you know more about me than I do. I've paid real money. I've paid so much money to know everything that sucks about me. There is no and that's, that's my favorite one. Like somebody on a YouTube comment tries to hurt me. I was like, you cannot hurt me more than my therapist has, like you cannot like there's nothing you're gonna say that I haven't already heard from somebody I give money to

Chuck Shute:

wait. So the therapist hurts you because I feel like I'm the opposite. I'm my own worst critic. That's why there's so many trolls me on a YouTube I go. Okay, you don't know, I'm my worst critic like you can't. There's nothing that you can say that's worse than my own thoughts. But you're saying your therapist would point out things you didn't think

Liz Miele:

I agree with that. There's I but I as somebody that's kind of grown past shitting on myself, and I don't want to live in that headspace. More the things that I learned that suck about me is from my therapist, where she's like, Well, that seems like something you did five years ago when XYZ happens. And I'd be like, All right, all right. All right. All right. So like, I know, my therapist has, like, pissed me off. Like when I'm mad at her. I know. She's like, hit a wound. Like, I'll be mad at her for like three days. And I'd be like, Oh, she might be onto something. Wow, just therapy. Sounds good. She's amazing, genuinely amazing.

Chuck Shute:

Do you feel like because that's something you say in your, your specialty, talking about customer service. And that's something that I've really put a focus on, not just with, like retail and things, but I feel like everything like my doctor, my dentists, like I feel like a lot of things, businesses that I interact with nowadays. I feel like it's just seems like nobody gives a shit. And that's where I kind of disagree. You said like, oh, Americans have such good customer service. I'm like, I feel like it's the opposite. Right now. I'm noticing that it seems like nobody cares about their job anymore.

Liz Miele:

Um, yeah, I mean, well, keep in keep in mind, even now our customer service is way better than it is in Europe as somebody that's been to 35 countries. Really? You don't Yeah, you don't even know they do not. You think waitresses don't care. People that attend they do not care. So we put such a focus on customer service in America that even at our worst, which I agree we are awful right now. It's still better than Europe. Then the other thing that's happening that I have empathy for is there's a worker shortage and therefore the people that are working are being overloaded and treated like shit with no extra benefits or pay. So while I do complain, you know about shitty customer service. I do have empathy and understand that the people that do show up for work are actually showing up to work for three people and stead of one, and they have so like even something like things being delivered, you know, like FedEx, like I have like a new joke about being angry at like UPS and FedEx, but like they have like this thing where they have to have get so many things delivered in a day. So if they don't, they'll just lie and say something's delivered. And at first it pisses you off. But you're also like, I kind of understand when you can't be openly honest with an employee, and they're treating you like you're a robot. And there's a shortage or somebody didn't show up to work or like, you know, when I was a waitress, like, you can't just not show up to work, you have to get somebody to cover you. And if you can't get somebody to cover you, you still have to show up for work, or you don't have a job. So it's on you to find your replacement, which is exhausting and unfair, and you're being paid garbage. So it's like every job has its own bullshit regulations that we don't know about. And I have empathy in that area, on top of the fact that nobody's getting paid what they should be being paid. And, you know, look at the ones that aren't letting them unionize and stuff like that. So like, I can look at shitty customer service. And if it's a systemic problem, then you know, it's the upper people that are being pieces of shit. But also, sometimes someone's just having a bad day. And you'd be surprised how you could be like, you can fix their bad day and fix what you're frustrated about just by meeting them at a human level. And I try to remember that 80% of the time.

Chuck Shute:

Yeah, no, I tried to it just seems like it's not even like, the customer service type job. I mean, sometimes it's the management, like I said, like, I feel like, I go see my doctor, and it seems like he doesn't really care. You know, I mean, like, they just send you the bloodwork now, like online, they don't call you and say like, Hey, we noticed, like,

Liz Miele:

explain it. Like that's the craziest part. Like figure it out. Yeah. And you're like, my global lumens are seen high. And they're like, yeah, they do seem high.

Chuck Shute:

It's just bizarre. Have you ever been to Mexico, though, because I feel like that they love I mean, it's probably just because we have money, but they love you go walk into like a restaurant in Mexico. They they treat you like gold. They're like, Oh, come on in Senora. And they just they love you. And that's like the total opposite. I love going to Mexico.

Liz Miele:

Oh, the opposite would be Italy. You go to Italy and Italy like hey, can I get some water? And they'd be like, you could just leave and you're like, oh, sorry, I didn't. And I'm 100% Italian. And I was like, these are the most beautiful shittiest people I have ever met. Ever. Wow.

Chuck Shute:

I didn't hit him. My brother was in Italy for an army for a while. I have to ask him about that. I didn't I didn't hear that.

Liz Miele:

Yeah. Yeah, it just it was it actually was quite a bummer. And it might be because we're tourists and maybe they're nicer to other people. But I was like, I and I loved it. And I'll go back. I just try not to talk to anybody. But I was just like, we're, but yeah, I think there's I you know, I also have empathy as somebody that lives in New York City that like as a as somebody that lives somewhere and it's tourists everywhere. You're also just like what? Like?

Chuck Shute:

Yeah, exhausting. No, yes, that's for sure. My favorite joke, and you're special. I'm probably the only one that thought this. I was laughing so hard. I didn't think you paused for the audience to laugh, but I was laughing really hard when you talk about how your mom mailed you a sock? Yeah. Because that's such a mom thing to do. Like, I feel like that one

Liz Miele:

sock, really? She thought it was mine. Yeah, like, but she's, I think what makes me laugh the most about that is that, like, my mom is one of the smartest people I know. Like, my mom is so organized and so smart and just has her shit together. And then we'll do just things that you're like, What? What? Like, what, like, you didn't want to call first or send a picture or maybe asked me if I even cared about this sock like it was just, but I think she just loves the post office. And what's funny is like, I was asking people in the audience for like a year. Does anybody have like a parent or grandparent like this, and you would get one. Like every show you get like one person it was never more than one or two. But now that it's online, I'm getting so many messages from people that's like, Oh my God, my mom's the exact same way. And I was like, I knew it was a breed of person that just, they love the post. It's comfortable. Somebody said this to me. And it made sense. Like the post office is comfortable. Like the the the amount of it never really changes like it goes up a center too. But like it's kind of weirdly affordable. And it's a way to connect with people. And like you're there's something weirdly comfortable about the post office at least for like the older generation. And I'm that's kind of the thing I'm most excited about seeing with people watching it is how many people are like oh my god, my mom's the same way. Because it's just adorable to me, like what a weird trait to just mail. Or like, I know friends were like, instead of texting you something they'll just mail it to you like they'll read an article online then they will print it and then they will mail it like this old school shit that's just adorable. Yeah,

Chuck Shute:

no I think I don't know if my parents still use the newspapers, but they were. They were doing newspapers for like real physical newspapers for the longest time. And I kind of I kind of like it in a way. There's no popup ads. Like, it's kind of nice if you sit down and you

Liz Miele:

don't accept any cookies, you're just like, I don't even know what that means. And I'm just accepting it. I was like, Are you taking? Are you taking my social security number? Like, I'm just accepting cookies, so I can find out like who's winning elections?

Chuck Shute:

Yeah, no, I just think it's interesting. Because that just reminded me my mom like I, I picked them up. They flew into Arizona a few months ago, and I picked my parents up and my mom's unpacking her suitcase, and she pulls out this like plastic bag. And she starts taking out like, like a thing of lettuce. And I was like, Mom, did you put that in your suitcase? Like they live in Seattle? So it's like a three hour flight. She's like, Yeah, I'm like, I don't think you can put lettuce in your suitcase. I think it needs to be refrigerated. She's like, it'll be fine. Like, I just feel like the older I'm getting. I'm becoming like the adult. Like, yeah, like, I was the kid. And they were telling me not to do things. Now. I'm telling them. No, you can't do that. Like, I'm the adult. It's weird.

Liz Miele:

Yeah, very much so and like it. But I also love the aspect that I can teach my parents stuff like my mom. She says she is a competitive powerlifter. And she wanted to she had a trainer that was she moved. So she had a trainer still back where she used to live. And they would do. She would send videos of her weightlifting. And he would give notes and stuff. So she sets up a camera of her weightlifting. And then she wanted to put it on YouTube. And so she was like, I don't get the YouTubes can she she was like, how do I make a video? And I was like, Okay, and so I was just like, Alright, we're gonna AirDrop this to your computer. She's like, what's that mean? I was like, Great, let's okay, we're starting to fast. Like, you know what I mean? But then I show it to her. She writes it all down in her journal, which is exactly how I learned when somebody teaches me something. I have to write it down. I'm never gonna remember. She writes it in her journal. And then she she watches me do it. And she's like, can you watch me do it? I was like, absolutely. So then when I watched my mom AirDrop something she's like, where does it go? And I was like, great question. I mean, it's just nice to, and then and then like, she wanted a separate Instagram account. She has like a regular one for her friends. But she wanted one for powerlifting. She goes, How do I do that? And I was like, Okay. And she's like, I have three followers. I'm doing really well. You're doing great.

Unknown:

That's so cute. So she has like a powerlifting YouTube channel and Instagram. And

Liz Miele:

yeah, I don't know how many. I don't know how public her YouTube is. I think she just uses it for her trainer. And then her Instagram. What makes me laugh Is she genuinely has three followers, but she has five kids. So there's just several kids not supporting. Like, what I mean, like, it's just

Unknown:

oh, that's hilarious.

Liz Miele:

That's, she, she's I like that. I like that aspect of it. Or, you know, my, my dad knows pretty much everything about everything that seemed with my little brother. They're both just people that absorb information. And like, I literally could be like, what's that? And they'd be like, Oh, and 1868 that was invented and did it and you're like, Why? Why? Why is that in your brain? So even when I'm able to teach something to my dad, I feel good.

Chuck Shute:

Ya know, that's really fun being able to teach your parents things. Um, last time we were on we talked about like some of your TV stuff like how you didn't you almost got Letterman and that kind of stuff. But tell me the story. I didn't know the story about how you you were on America's Got Talent, but they never aired it.

Liz Miele:

Yeah, it actually happens pretty frequently. And I knew that going in. So so they say yes. Like in when you're taping it, they say yes, yeah, more people. And then from there, they kind of edit it down. But they don't tell you that. I only knew that because I had several friends that had done it before, got further and then got cut. And I tried to warn my mom because my mom loved the show. She came to the taping, they really they you know they interview your mom, they try to build it up. So they said yes, I was supposed to go on I taped something else. And then I didn't they and none of it ever aired and I didn't go any further. And I told my mom and she's like, I'm not watching the show anymore. And I was like I'm sure the millions of you I'm sure it's gonna show that has millions of viewers that you Terry are not going to watch this. But it's just it's actually oddly commonplace with these shows. Because it's you're not just auditioning your talent, you're auditioning your story and who they think you are. Because it's all about pulling heartstrings and getting people. So it's just like, they didn't like my story, or I didn't have a face they wanted or they already have somebody that kind of looks like me. Or, sadly, when it comes to comedy. It's like, Well, we already have a female comic, we can't possibly have two of them. So you just don't You don't know. But that's it sucks and it's annoying and it's a waste of your time and you don't get paid. But you get paid even now you don't get paid. You don't get paid. You do not also you don't want to win these shows by the way like the contract like I got far enough that I read the contract. It's like 100 pages. I read this contract and I'm a moron. But you You don't you don't want to win. You don't want to be in the top three. You don't even want to be in the top 10 Maybe because they own you for years. Everything you could be doing this. I've been doing this for 20 years if I want America's Got Talent tomorrow Everything I make going forward for the next three years, they have ownership of they have control of. And it's like fuck you, because what you gave me a little bit of an outlet, and sometimes those shows absolutely explode your career and it's worth it. But sometimes it's done to you. And now this thing that you don't even want to be a part of, is in control of your career. It has a benefit to get your name out there, but I would have wanted to be on there for two episodes, I would absolutely not want to be there and get very far on it. I just think it's, it's, it holds you back more than it at least in what I want to do, which is completely express myself authentically without being censored.

Chuck Shute:

Yeah. And you because you've already built this brand. You have the books, you have the specials, you have bits on Sirius Radio, you're already bringing money, you've turned it into a business. It's how you look at it, right?

Liz Miele:

Yeah. And I'm able to talk about what I want to talk about when I want to talk about it. Like I, you know, I post I post stuff on social media or whatever. But the thing with tick tock is tick tock has become more censored than like late night TV. Like, I can't tell you how many times I get polluted or get my Yeah, oh, it's awful. It's absolutely awful. And it wasn't like that in the beginning. But it's gotten so much worse. I got taken down for copyright issues. I own all my material. So I was like, so it wasn't somebody that they go, somebody alerted us, it's a robot, and I go your robots dumb. I own all my material, I can prove I own all my material. And it's bullshit that I'm being censored, but you can't talk to a real person. Or I got muted for explicit stuff. I just said the word sex by the way, I just said the word sex in passing. So and it was it was already blowing up ahead. 20,000 views in like, literally 10 minutes, and I go, Hey, I just said the word sex, please check it again. They check it, they unmute it. But it's it killed it and never went past 20,000. So, so it's just like, it's so fun. Like, if I'm gonna, like, support the Chinese government, I would like something in return. So it's like, you know what I mean, you're just like, if I'm gonna sell my soul I want. So it's like you. Everything has its its risk factors and its benefits, and you have to weigh it and play the game I've had, I've posted stuff and nobody's seen it. I've posted stuff. And it's the reason people come out to shows and I have a fan base and everything you do is a exploration and a risk. But when it comes to TV, it's so much more frustrating than even what I was talking about. Because I've built comedically my fan base off of being myself and when TV needs to sell bounty, you know, commercials and you know, shit for Tampax, all of a sudden, what I talk about has to be regulated. And I don't care about bounty, and I'm not getting bounty ad money. So why do I have to watch what I'm saying? And that's where I feel somewhat grateful that I build been able to build build a career without ever having to sacrifice who I really am.

Chuck Shute:

No, that's super cool. And that reminds me because I was watching the George Carlin movie last night because I know that you're in it. So I started watching that was so good. It was the same thing. Like he he was like wearing a suit when he started and he was all like playing by the rules. And then he's like, You know what, fuck this and he's like, grows a beard grows his hair long. He's like, I'm just gonna be myself. And so what did you just have that one line in the movie with the letter because I haven't finished it. But

Liz Miele:

yeah, I read I read a little bit of fan mail. And then that's it for that mean, a couple of comics did that. I also Netflix had a podcast series called the hall. And they had different comedians that they put into this kind of comedic Hall of Fame. So it was like Joan Rivers and Robin Williams and George Carlin and Richard Pryor. And so in the podcast version of the hall, I was interviewed and have like five minutes on that. So and then I just did that Kelly Carlin George Carlin's daughter, I just did her Sirius XM show, and that's been airing every Friday. I think there's maybe one more airing. It's like every Friday for a month. They've aired our interview together because I did that a couple of weeks ago and she's wonderful.

Chuck Shute:

Do you get paid for that? Because I know you got paid for the the comedy bits you do on Sirius right? Didn't you say that paid your rent and

Liz Miele:

oh, yeah, Sirius XM. I'm grateful for it like that. You get royalty money every time your jokes are played. I have most podcasts and most interviews you're not paid for. So I think maybe two podcasts ever have given me money? It's, you know, it's a promotional thing. You know, a lot of podcasts don't make that much money. So I think in general, I see that as a promotional thing. And I'm because it takes time. I've said in the beginning I would say yes to most of them. And then over time, it's like I got I gotta I gotta do some work. I can't just keep talking about my work.

Chuck Shute:

Yeah, so I saw you did Adam Carolla show that's a pretty big one that the other day how was that?

Liz Miele:

It was good. The Booker saw me at the stand, maybe like a month ago and was like, if you're ever in LA, I would like you to come on the show. And I was like, Okay, I'm there in two weeks. And she's wonderful. She's a funny comedian herself. And then it was great. I mean, I know I don't think we see eye to eye politically. Yeah. Yeah. But I in the girl before me was a porn star. And it was kind of funny, the producer came out, and he's like, he will not be asking you the same questions. I was like, I will not be having the same answers. But what I didn't know is he's a big cat person. So

Chuck Shute:

I didn't know that either. Actually, yeah, I

Liz Miele:

was like, okay, so I was I was really fortunate. He asked me about comedy and cats. And that's all I know about. So it ended up being really good and really fun. And I'm grateful for it. You know, whenever you do anything, that you're not completely in line with that person's fan base, it's, um, you're gonna get blowback. But I think the truth of the matter is, is I'm not trying to gain much from it. I think I'm just trying to find the few people that already would like me, and just put myself out there to them. But I'm not trying to convert people that would have never liked me if that makes sense.

Chuck Shute:

No, absolutely. Yeah, I think that's cool. I like seeing different people that I think comedy is something that should add music to I feel like those two things are things that bring should bring people together. Yeah, I mean, unless I full on like, you know, there's some weird comedians out there that are like, far right, or far left or whatever, then yeah, then maybe that's different. But

Liz Miele:

yeah, and I think, as a female comic, there's people that just don't like you, because you're a woman. And you're, and then if they love comedy, and they don't like women, you are a threat to like, why does she get to do this, like, so there's some stuff where like, it's, I can't, I can't fix your pain. And if you need to throw it back in my face, by all means, but that's not my problem. So there's just this aspect of, you know, sometimes people are like, well, people, you know, I don't want to post something, because people are gonna be mean, to me, you're like, well, first of all, that's their problem. And second of all, they are they were never going to be a fan of yours. Regardless whether you're a comedian or friend at a party, or whatever, they already don't like themselves, and you're a reflection of something for whatever reason that they don't like about them. And they were, you're never going to captivate them. So whenever I see somebody that's like, this is garbage. I'm like, okay, it wasn't for you. Then. Like, I didn't lose a fan. I just had somebody exposed to me that was never going to like me in the first place.

Chuck Shute:

That's perfect. That sounds like somebody who has been through 10 years of therapy that you Yeah, right. It's

Liz Miele:

like, okay,

Chuck Shute:

that's exactly that's so wise. I think last time we were on here, we discussed like, you know, we said, your whole upbringing and how you paid your dues, with the barking and all that stuff. Was there ever a point where you thought during that time when you were just grinding it out? I know, you're still kind of grinding. But back in the early days before you were getting paid? Did you ever feel like you you should that you thought of giving up and maybe trying something else? What kept you going?

Liz Miele:

I mean, I think because I love it so much that and I knew from everything I've read and looked into that it took 10 years to find your voice and for people to know who you are. And I was fortunate that I had increments of success that kept me going. I started to get past that clubs when I was 19. So I started to make a little bit of money and have people see what I do. I got auditions, I got managers. I was on TV at 22. You know, I was doing the road in my 20s. So I think I had enough positive reinforcement incrementally throughout that kept me feeling like I was on the right path. It wasn't until about 10 years in where I felt I should be further and I felt like I was stuck that I really started to question not if I should be doing this because I always loved comedy but the industry side of things really made me hate my life in a way that like most people are like if you hate it so much you should quit and you're like well, I don't hate comedy. I just hate how my comedy is being judged or my lack of control and that's what's fun. Me completely doing my own thing like my anger towards the industry. And my feeling like I'm not being valued is where is the reason I am where I am I self. Not too long afterwards, I self released my first album which is the reason people know who I am. It's the reason I had my first viral video. It's the reason I became you know, started to headline It's the reason I produced another album. So reason I self produced my first special It's the reason I'm self producing my next special like everything from deciding to not let the industry depict my value change both my mindset and my value in myself as a person but also my mindset, my value in me as a comic and instead of waiting for the industry to pick me and decide I have value. I went and looked for the people that I already thought might like what I do, so that's why when I look at somebody not liking my comedy, I'm like alright, well. All you are as an industry person, not in that position. So you're just a guy I that doesn't like what I do. Luckily, you don't work at Comedy Central, like, you know what I mean? Like, but it doesn't, it doesn't, it doesn't matter. Everything I do now is just looking for the people that I think would like me. And then using that to continue to push my career to the next level and do the things that I want to do. And you can see that with people that are YouTube stars, or Instagram influencers, whatever it is, I'm not trying to sell soap, but at the same time, I am trying to sell my comedy and, and my silliness. And whether that's a book or you coming to see a live show, or you come in just watching my special, which almost all my standup is free. So really, all I'm asking you is to pay for the live version. And to tell other people about it, you're richer friends, so that I can make pay my rent. And I think that's the My favorite part is when somebody like criticizes the quality of something, somebody would be like, Oh, the the audio quality sucks, or, you know, I've seen this bid before and you want to be like bitch, you paid for nothing you have paid for you cannot complain about something you have never paid for. That is insane. It's like getting a free hotel room and being like the service wasn't good, but you didn't pay for it. So that's also the luxury of where I am, which is I'm making money in different facets that when somebody is doesn't like my comedy, somebody doesn't like something to their liking. I go, you have contributed nothing to the foundation of my career. I owe you nothing back. And it's freeing. No, absolutely.

Chuck Shute:

So I mean, you have all these facets. You have the Sirius and then you have your cat book, and you have the live shows. And then you I mean, you have a lot of YouTube subscribers. So I'm assuming you make some money off YouTube to them, right?

Liz Miele:

I do. Yeah. So you put ads on your stuff, and I make some money from that. So that's pretty consistent. And I would say like, I how I make money is 50% the road and 50% royalties whether it's Sirius XM, or people buying my album or YouTube stuff, and that's where my financial growth and stability came from, because it used to be 100% the road and it's unsustainable, okay, because if you don't work, you're not making money and think about Luckily, I was able to financially stay myself before the pandemic, because if I was where I was five years ago, six years ago, and then when the pandemic happened, I would be screwed. So and not okay, and that didn't happen. So luckily, I was still making money from Sirius, I was still making money from YouTube. And things took off during YouTube because of specials and stuff, that that the fact that I make 50% of my income, not ever even leaving the house is why I can be an adult. Like I was not a physically or mentally Okay, when all my money was coming just from standup it's just not sustainable. Maybe if I was Jim Gaffigan, and I'm making, you know, who knows how much money per theater gig, but that's not where I am. I'm still a working comedian. And I, I I do okay, but it's, it's still cobbling things together?

Chuck Shute:

No. So when you when you meet people for the first time, do you tell them? You're a comedian? Or do you make up a story of something else? Because you're sick of the same questions and stories you have to tell?

Liz Miele:

I won't tell people unless they ask. So if you ask, I'll tell you. I'm a comedian, whether that's the woman like threading my eyebrows or somebody I meet at a party. I mean, friends, just it's like, this is Liz, she's a comedian, like, you're just like, No, okay, all right. You're like, okay, but I won't lie to anybody. I did online dating for a little bit. And I didn't post any pictures of me on stage. And I said, I was a writer, because I'm very Google bubble. And I didn't want dudes to get to know stage, Liz before human lives. And I think well, my stage persona is very much a part of me. It's not 100% Who I am and I, that's not how I want somebody I'm dating to get to know me. So I shielded that in that aspect, but I don't lie to anybody but like, so like, if I am in a situation where somebody is just like, like, getting my eyebrows threaded. So I'll go into what is eyebrow

Chuck Shute:

threading?

Liz Miele:

I don't know what that is, you know, eyebrow

Chuck Shute:

waxing? Oh, yeah, I've heard of that. Yeah.

Liz Miele:

So threading is they take a thread and it's almost like they pluck, okay, but they're doing it with a thread. It's called threading. Okay, it's just more efficient. I mean, I haven't done in a while so my eyebrows look like shit. But I'm telling you next week, they'll look gorgeous. And you'll be like, Tell me your ways. So

Chuck Shute:

I think your eyebrows look fine. I think I thought like, the thicker eyebrows were in there.

Liz Miele:

No, they're fine. This is this shape is fine. But if this is what 1080 If you go 4k into these eyebrows, it's just chaos. You can't We can't see. You can't see what the issues are. Okay, regardless. I gotta get my eyebrows threaded. It's 2pm on a Tuesday and the They'll be like, Oh, are you off from work? And I'll be like, I work at night. So that's what I say more often is I work at night and if they assume I'm a waitress or a prostitute, not my business, say, we might think you're a prostitute and I don't care. That's not my problem. Okay? Um, you know, I don't, I don't. There's people that find out, I'm a comedian, and it makes their day like I was in I was in a cab, I was in an Uber in LA. And it made this guy's that he was so excited. He couldn't wait to watch my specials. He's like, it's an honor to have you as like, you don't even know if I'm good or famous, or whatever you want. So nice and sweet. And and then some people find out and it's just like, you're somebody that doesn't have a job. Like, you're just somebody's not contributing to society. And they're not wrong, either. So it's just like, I don't

Chuck Shute:

want you contribute. You make people laugh? That's the most important thing in the world.

Liz Miele:

Yeah, if that's something you value being this, you have you ever met somebody that doesn't like music?

Chuck Shute:

Pretty rare. But yeah, I

Liz Miele:

guess I've met them. They're weird. They're, you're just like, I don't even care if you don't like popular if you just like jazz, or somebody that snaps like, but to say you don't like music is crazy. So it's the same way I feel about humor, where they're just like, well, you know, I don't really like comedies. And you're like, what? Yeah, what? Like, what, even somebody that watches like serial killer shows all the time still likes comedy, like, that's crazy. So I think I would say about 70 to 80% of the time, people are just excited. But also, I don't want to do a podcast every time I have a conversation with somebody. So it's not always I don't lead with it. Because the questions are all the same, as opposed to, if I have an authentic conversation with somebody, and then at the end, they go, what do you do, and I'm making them laugh the whole time. And that's actually the best or they don't understand why I'm so funny. That's the best. So we have this authentic conversation. I'm making jokes, we're laughing. And then they might be like, Oh, what do you do? And I go, Oh, I'm a comic. And then you just like, kind of fade into the night. And they they never knew what happened to him. Yeah, that's, to me, that's more enjoyable than somebody asking me at a party like what do you do? Oh, you do comedy? Who's your favorite comedian? What do you feel like is your influence? Do you make good money with that? You're just like, I can't I can't do this.

Chuck Shute:

Right? Well, you mentioned the dating apps. I want to ask you about that. Because I feel like I missed out. I've been in relationship for the last like, I don't know, 11 years or something we missed out on the dating app. So tell me what that's like, is it it seems so superficial, that you look at a picture and you just say yes or no, based on the first picture. I mean, I would suck at that I, I would be nobody of everyone would swipe the other way. For me. It's like, well, that's really stressful.

Liz Miele:

You didn't miss out. It's stupid. I think it's an inauthentic way of meeting somebody, I think I don't like who I am on them. In the sense of how I'm judging other people. And I don't like the way that I get judged back. I think it's, I when you think about the people you've connected with, whether it's friends or or or people you've dated, there has to be some level of attraction when you meet somebody that you want. That's just a part of it. But the way somebody smiles when you say something is very different than just seeing someone smile. Does that make sense? No, like physically in person? Yeah. Yeah. And how somebody reacts to you and the calmness that you feel in someone's presence, the excitement about hearing them talk or how they talk, like there's so many things that you pick up on both consciously and subconsciously when you meet somebody, because how often like, I my best friend, and I met in a bathroom when I was 10 years old, literally, we didn't even have a class together. I was in the bathroom. She said something, she made me laugh. I thought this girl was so funny. And then serendipitously, she lives next to a girl. I went to school like that I was in a class with in the fourth grade, and I went to her sleepover, and she was at the sleepover because they were neighbors. And we played the whole night with like, GAC. And just like stupidness I invited her to my sleepover for my birthday, like a month later. And then again, serendipitously, we had class together. We had all our classes together in the fifth grade in the sixth grade. And then she moved away and I moved away in seventh grade. We've been friends ever since she has two kids. I just spent a week with her. I see her every year she can't, we usually see each other like twice a year because we both travel for a living. And it's crazy to meet somebody when you're 10 and still be having the best time in your late 30s. But there's there's this thing and the reason I bring up a 10 year old friendship or like a 10 year olds meeting each other is it's not much different. As an adult, somebody says something and it makes you laugh, or somebody kind of brings something up and you're like, Oh, that's really interesting. I never thought of it that way. It's this kind of impulsive connection and That impulsivity, does it have toxicity in it? Absolutely. Because that's how people have repeated patterns of, you know, bad relationships. But there's also this to people seeing the authentic selves and letting them blossom together. And I think

Chuck Shute:

anyway, so yeah, so we were talking about authentic selves and I just thought like, I feel like the the dating apps that kind of take out the what do you call it? Like the meet cute, the cute meet whatever it's called, because you grew up on the Sandra Bullock films like, Don't you want a story like that for your husband, your future husband or something that rather than Bumble.

Liz Miele:

We want bad stories, even without the Internet. So I mean that I had an original joke years ago about wanting like they now call a meet cute but having the story. Yeah, I think everybody wants the story. But I forget the story. I mean, I think there's people I know I'm in, I'm in the house of somebody that met somebody on Bumble, so you know what I mean, and she has a husband and a kid. So like, there are people you can meet people that way. And I know several friends that have had success stories that way, I think between murder and fear of murder, and not having the way you dismiss people being unhealthy, or the way that you are connected with people being unhealthy. I think those are the two biggest things. I would say murder and not meeting somebody that you potentially probably would have liked if you actually had a conversation with them. Because the amount of people I'm like, your dog's ugly. No, no. You know what I mean? Like, I had one guy, he genuinely made me laugh. It his description said, not my dog. And then it was like a regular picture of him a regular picture of him a regular picture of him, and then him holding a dog. And then people will often like blur out or like put an emoji over a kid's face or somebody else's face. And it was literally him holding a dog with an emoji over it so that people didn't think it was his. You know what I mean? Like, this dog didn't give him permission to be on his dating so hard, but like, I wasn't like I wasn't interested. But I still wanted to just match with him to be like, well done, just well done. Like it just made me laugh so hard. But I just I don't it bummed me out and made me sad. I didn't like the way I was judging people. And I went off it i I'd rather be alone than waste my time on some app that is mostly going to make me feel like not a great person.

Chuck Shute:

Hmm. So you're totally off on the dating apps.

Liz Miele:

Oh, hold on. I was never on the very long by the way. I was on Bumble for three weeks, and I was on hinge for three days. And I was like,

Chuck Shute:

Oh, that's it. Okay. Wow. So you're Are you open to meeting someone? You're not looking to meet somebody?

Liz Miele:

I'm open to meeting somebody but other than showering and leaving the house, I'm doing absolutely nothing about it.

Chuck Shute:

Okay, all right. We will we got to talk about cats if I'm gonna have you on here. So my condolences I'm sorry, pasta passed away. But I heard you say also, you had a kitten pass away.

Liz Miele:

It was shitty. So yeah, pasta died. She had cancer for the second time. And she died about a year from today. And then I got a kitten named tater tots. I got him in December lessons are good, boom. Good name. And then somebody is just like, well name the next one that I was like, well, that's disrespectful. So tater tots. He was the runt. They found him in a storm drain in New Jersey. And he was a run and they basically were like he needs to fatten up so that we can neuter him he like was not he could not get over two pounds. So I'm like, fit and he was a good eater. So like looking back, I'm like, Oh, this and like, he was low energy. But he was he was just a good cat. And then of course, he stopped eating and he started sleeping more. And I was like, my parents are vet. So I was like Mom, I was like, he doesn't seem sick, but like this is weird behavior. And then very quickly, he got diagnosed with FoIP which is actually technically the corona like the COVID of cats. It's not it doesn't come out the same. It's been around before the COVID that we have, but it's it's it's terminal and cats. And if he was older, he might have been able to live with it. But he was so tiny and he was so young and he had such a weak immune system that within three days he died. And it was awful. I haven't been a little I haven't been like a little like sugar cup is like his ashes and there's still room in it because he was so tiny. Heartbreaking. Just

Chuck Shute:

imagine I had a cat pass away but a kitten that would be way harder. I feel like oh

Liz Miele:

god just like what does that poetry new shoe kids shoes never worn for sale. Like do you know that like it speaks volumes. It's like It's like one of these things where like, just one sentence is a full story. And it's like children's shoes for sale for sale never worn. And it's just like, Oh, you're just like this. So yeah, so he died was a mess about it. He was such a good cat and such a sweet cat and then and I had him a month. And then I got revenge jabs. Because you know, you go from sweet name to ridiculous name. So revenge jabs I got two months ago. Three months ago, I don't know he's almost six months, and he's huge now. Like, it's almost crazy. He was as tiny as tater tots, but he grew like I just don't you know, especially since I haven't had a kitten in 16 years. It was like, oh, so he's, he's six months. He's not he's not. I'm in my friend's office. He's not allowed in here because he would have knocked everything over. I woke up at 3am him bouncing off my head. He's just full kit and energy. Insane. Wow. So

Chuck Shute:

I gotta ask you a question because I got a new cat. I mean, it's couple years old, but my cat loves water. Like he

Liz Miele:

I've never had a water cat before.

Chuck Shute:

This is weird. They they put his head under the bathtub faucet and he gets it all over his paws. And then he comes and lays on me and He's soaking wet. He doesn't try to shake it off. Or I don't know

Liz Miele:

i This is my first water cat loves sleeping and sinks. Loves like, like watching me shower loves getting in the shower. Like plays with like, I have like a little fountain plays with the fountain. I cannot tell you how many times I pick them up and I'm like, why are you wet? Why and it doesn't

Chuck Shute:

vote I thought capsulated water.

Liz Miele:

So I just call it a water cat. I think there's just some cats that are so fast. I also call them science cats. Like they just love. Like, they're like, What is this? Like, this is so crazy. And they're just fascinated by it. So I think because there's all those like imagery of like tigers like bathing and like playing in water. Like I think there's just some cats that like it. Um, but it's under their control, by the way, because if you try to bait them, they're still like, go fuck yourself. But like, if they decide to go in the water, they're just like this is I decided to take a bath. And this is what I'm doing. Yeah, I'm still exploring this because I've never I've never had a water cat before. It's weird. It is

Chuck Shute:

really rare. It's excited. kind of exciting, though. Does it smell weird to look sometimes it smells like kind of moldy? Almost like would they just have the water on their feet? It's kind of a weird smell.

Liz Miele:

Most cat he doesn't ever try to look at dry. Like most cats. I know. Like, at the very least when they're wet. They'd like they lick it dry. Which is kind of a weird oxymoron,

Chuck Shute:

right? Yeah, no, totally. Now you still do your podcast to non doctors. I was going to ask you about the guests though. Because like I heard another comedian say that. There's so many people. Every comedian has a podcast now. So like asking other comedians to do your podcast is kind of like the new like asking your friend to help you move. Is it awkward to ask comedians to do your show?

Liz Miele:

Well, we only are we're only asking for 15 minutes. And we just asked one quite literally Oh, how are you? What did you google this week? Do you want to plug anything? So it's kind of not that big of an ask for us because we keep it so short. And it's like very quick and silly. So they tell us what we Google we make fun of them. Then they tell us they tell people to go watch their special or whatever. And they're out. And we've had a mix of both comedians, we've had runners, we've had writers, we've had health people because it's a health podcast. So

Chuck Shute:

you had Ben Folds. I thought that was pretty cool. Yeah. So

Liz Miele:

Maria's friends with Ben Folds. He's a big fan of her comedy. And he was great. And so we've just had anybody that we thought would have like an interest in Google and be down to hang out with us.

Chuck Shute:

Okay, cool. So we got the podcast the specials out now. Your stand up dates are on your website. What else do you work? I heard you talk something about an app that you were going to make for traveling for comedians, or what was that?

Liz Miele:

Yeah, so I have it. It's called lizard male li zi, RD, Ma, IL. And it's basically an app that helps onboard fans onto your mailing list. So I use it about 30. Other comics use it. And basically, if you go to see me live, I'll tell you, I'll put these little cards on the table and I go, Hey, if you text cats, to 206275422, you'll get a text that asks for your email, you'll get a text that asks for your zip code, and then you'll get a thank you message. And then I'm never going to text you again. All that's going to happen is the next time I'm in your city, you'll get an email that's like, Hey, I'm here, come see me. So it basically takes that email takes that zip code puts it in a CSV file. And then if you're on MailChimp, it puts you puts it right into your MailChimp and if you're not on MailChimp, you can just take that CSV file and upload it wherever you want to. And so that way, like you said, you're in Arizona, right? Are you to for near Phoenix or?

Chuck Shute:

Yeah, South Scottsdale.

Liz Miele:

I don't know where that I don't know anything about Arizona.

Chuck Shute:

have you here? Just gonna be the first time you come? I think so. Oh, that's exciting.

Liz Miele:

Yeah. So like if you were on my mailing list, and you were within 75 Miles have the zip code of that club, you would get an email that says like, Hey, I'm coming in a month, come see me. So that's pretty much how I do it that way that you're not getting emails about New York City or you're not getting emails, like the only time I email everybody is when I have a special. But after that everybody gets one or two emails a year. That's like, Hey, I'm coming to your city. Come see me.

Chuck Shute:

Oh, that's perfect. I love it. That's awesome. And then anything else? Did you write a script or something to hear something about that?

Liz Miele:

I am working I'm I finished it. And then I got picked up by a production company. And I got a bunch of notes. So now I'm rewriting it. So I You're always doing something. We'll see what happens with it. It's my baby. I wrote it during the pandemic. And it's incredibly important to me, but this business is this business. And we'll

Chuck Shute:

see what happens. It's a movie or TV show or short or what is it?

Liz Miele:

It's an hour long drama at drama

Chuck Shute:

it okay. I hope it happens. I mean, yeah, you just might have to put yourself just like you did with the specials,

Liz Miele:

right? I hope not. It's so much work.

Chuck Shute:

Well, hopefully somebody will I mean, you could recruit some film students or something? I don't know. Yeah, well, we'll see. Okay. All right. Well, I'll let you get going on last thing I was in with a charity last time you promoted the Jed Foundation, dyslexia advantage in the HOPE program, you want to promote those three again. Um, or another one.

Liz Miele:

I mean, I would like to help I just don't know I'm I was looking at charities for helping people in the drought for Pakistan, or not the drought, the flooding for Pakistan, but I saw that I was Korea, but I wasn't able to like I was literally because I want to do checks and balances before I just, you know, you want to make sure it actually goes to the people. Yeah, let's just do those three because I didn't do my research. And I apologize.

Chuck Shute:

No, I probably forgot to remind. I just assumed it'd be the same. So

Liz Miele:

ya know, you can get out there. All of them are great charities.

Chuck Shute:

Okay. I'll look for Pakistan thing if I maybe I can. Yeah. If I appreciate it. At least we're mentioning it. So people are aware. And they can no Yeah,

Liz Miele:

no, it's really bad. Yeah, it's heartbreaking.

Chuck Shute:

Yeah, definitely. All right. Well, thank you so much for doing this. Again, the specialist called ghost of academic failure, future ghost of the future. So great stuff. Hilarious. My girlfriend laughed a lot, too. So funny stuff. Thank you so much.

Liz Miele:

Thank you so much. I appreciate it. All right.

Chuck Shute:

Bye. Thanks, Liz Meili. Again, check out that special on YouTube. She has some other specials on there as well, some short clips and more. And she also has her podcast to non doctors. Her book, why cats are assholes, and to have more fun stuff is on our website or follow her on social media. Same goes for me. We have all the website links in the show notes. And make sure to subscribe to the show wherever you listen so you'll be notified of future episodes. Thanks for listening. Have a great rest of your day and remember to shoot for the moon.