CUSD Cares

Vaping from a Behavioral Health Perspective, Part 1

August 15, 2019 Brenda Vargas (formerly Ramos) / Jeff Wondoloski Season 1 Episode 6
CUSD Cares
Vaping from a Behavioral Health Perspective, Part 1
Show Notes Transcript

Brenda Vargas (formerly Ramos) interviews Jeff Wondoloski, Community Liaison from Aurora Behavioral Health regarding the effects of vaping on behavior. Jeff describes what vaping is. He also discusses the basic facts of vaping, the most common type of vaping youth are using, JUUL, how it works, the trend, social acceptance and myths and facts. 

Music:

[M usic] .

Brenda Ramos:

Hi parents. Welcome to CUSD Podcasts. This is Brenda Ramos, Director of Counseling. Today, we are incredibly fortunate to have Jeff Wondoloski with us. He is a community liaison with Aurora Behavioral Health. Aurora Behavioral Health is a community behavior agency. Welcome, Jeff.

Jeff Wondoloski:

Hello Brenda. Thank you for having me. Very honored to get to do this and hello to all those Chandler parents out there and thanks for listening.

Brenda Ramos:

That's awesome. I am just really excited that you were able to join us today for today's podcast. I know part of Aurora Behavioral Health''s mission is really to help support us, those of us that serve students and families and educate a nd outreach as it pertains to behavioral health concerns. Today's topic is on vaping and I know that is something that can be new for parents, however we know that, we do have, students that sometimes struggle with this and find themselves using vaping. But I want parents to be open just to know, right? Sometimes just to be in the know is important as a parent. Even if your student is not having this experience. But let's first start off with what is, what's t his vaping thing? I don't even know anything about it. If I'm a parent sometimes, right, I may not know.

Jeff Wondoloski:

Well , very true, very true. So that just kind of start off on what is vaping. It's the act of inhaling vapor produced by any kind of an e-cigarette or personal vaporizers . So you'll hear different terms for the vape, a vape pen and e-cigarette a JUUL. That's probably the big one. The one that everyone is going to be the most concerned about that is listening to this podcast.

Brenda Ramos:

I would agree. The JUUL one and that's spelled j u u l or is it three u's?

Jeff Wondoloski:

No, two u's.

Brenda Ramos:

Two u's in the middle. If you're looking that up or doing a Google search, it's two u's in the middle and it ends in an L. But that is typically what students, you know that we have found are using. So thank you for explaining that in all the different terms.

Jeff Wondoloski:

Absolutely not a problem. So, with that being said, I think it's important to know what is going on here. So the vape is a mechanism that heats up a liquid and when that liquid is heated up, it creates a vapor. So what I've heard in doing presentations is a lot of people will say, well, it's just vapor. It's not bad for you. All my kid is doing is, is inhaling vapor. I mean, what's the big deal? Right? So let's just break that myth right off the bat. It is not vapor. It's actually an aerosol. So, you know, I kind of picture a kid smoking a can of Aquanet hairspray, I don't know if you can picture that.

Brenda Ramos:

Yeah. Well most parents are in our age bracket and I think could relate to those Aquanet days or hearing of someone do their hair with lots of Aquanet.

Jeff Wondoloski:

Yeah . So we wouldn't want a bunch of kids walking around inhaling Aquanet and this is basically what's going on is kids are using these vaping devices to get nicotine and that is the active ingredient in most of these e-juices or e -l iquids or they probably have some other names as well. So they come in different shapes and sizes. The one again that we're going to focus on a little bit is the JUUL and the JUUL looks like a, like a drive that y ou drive that you would plug into your computer.

Brenda Ramos:

And that's exactly how I would describe it. It looks actually like a flash drive except it's a little bit flatter. And I remember when I came into contact with seeing one, I thought, what is that? Is that like a different kind of flash drive? Right? It's a little flatter. Some of them are a little bit longer, but they do come in different shapes and sizes.

Jeff Wondoloski:

So the big purpose here is when these got created or invented the whole idea was to try to help people stop smoking cigarettes and it was created as a cessation program and it might be effective for some cigarette smokers in that realm. Now what has happened is it's also become a really simple tool for a lot of our young people to get sucked into a serious nicotine addiction. And without even knowing or recognizing that they're in that.

Brenda Ramos:

Yeah, because we definitely, I think you're g oing t o get to this Jeff, I think, for some students or some teens, because they have different flavors and I think you're g oing t o get more into that, that perception of the fact that there's very little to no nicotine in these. So therefore I c annot get addicted to it initially. I think, they could be persuaded to think that.

Jeff Wondoloski:

So there's a lot of myths and that's one of those about, about the e-juice. So let's just kind of talk a little bit about what is inside these. So you have a propylene glycol or you have a vegetable glycerin , and these are two of the major components that make the e-juice and typically that's mixed with some other flavorings. Flavorings are used in flavoring foods or artificial foods, things of that nature. Now we know the FDA has approved a lot of these flavorings to be okay to ingest, but the FDA has not approved these flavorings to be inhaled. So what ends up happening when a lot of these components are put together and then they're heated up, they create a lot of different active chemicals and Brenda, do you know the chemical formaldehyde?

Brenda Ramos:

I've yes. Not, not something that we want anybody inhaling, that's for sure.

Jeff Wondoloski:

No, that is very true. So formaldehyde commonly used as an industrial fungicide, germicide and disinfectant, and it's also a preservative in mortuaries. So this isn't something that we want our young people to be inhaling, but this is something that is going into their lungs if they're vaping. Now, the other active ingredient is nicotine. That's the big thing. That's the reason why a lot of people are wanting the JUULs or wanting vapes in the first place. Right? So the nicotine, the strength level, let's just talk a little bit about that. E-cigarettes can increase nicotine addiction among young people, and they may even lead kids to try other tobacco products and eventually they may even lead to them smoking cigarettes. So what was something that was created as a cessation to get people off of cigarettes has actually been become a gateway for our young people. And in some ways it will not just lead to them smoking cigarettes, but it can lead to them using and abusing some other substances as well. So I just kind of want to talk about nicotine for a second. And you know in a liquid solution, nicotine can just be extremely dangerous. Nicotine juice is dangerous. It's dangerous to kids. It's dangerous to pets if ingested. a nd nicotine poisoning can occur with a teaspoon of nicotine. A teaspoon of nicotine can kill a child that small amount a teaspoon, which is 10 milligrams. Okay? A nd I want you to K inda think of that 10 milligram number. O kay, so a tablespoon, which is 30 to 60 milligrams, can kill an adult or an or an animal. So those are, you know, big numbers, 10 milligrams, 30 to 60 milligrams. Now in a JUUL cartridge, you'll hear that term cartridge, right? They have five milligrams of nicotine in those. So five milligrams of nicotine in that little cartridge, 10 milligrams can kill a small child.

Brenda Ramos:

If you walk away with anything, remember that number, right? I mean twice the amount of nicotine in a JUUL cartridge can kill a child. And even though I know they're teens and they look like they've reached their adult bodies, they're still children cause they're still developing and their bodies and their brains are still developing.

Jeff Wondoloski:

And one other thing, because this has been a trend, is in 2011, 271 calls were reported to poison control that were about nicotine. And in 2014, 3700 calls were reported. So we've seen a drastic , huge , huge jump.

Brenda Ramos:

I mean I haven't done the research, but I would certainly think that has a lot to do with JUULs and vaping and what our students are experiencing.

Jeff Wondoloski:

Absolutely. And the, and the thing is , and we'll talk a little bit about this, but I think that we need to kind of hone in on something and that is that these juices, these liquids, the flavoring, whatever we want to call it, the e-juice, it's all in these fruity flavors and not just in fruity flavors, but it's packaged in a way that is very attractive, that is pretty centered towards our teens.

Brenda Ramos:

That's pretty good marketing if you ask me, right? And let's talk about that marketing and what it looks like and why they're choosing to ma nufacture i t i n this fashion, because it certainly is targeting our youth.

Jeff Wondoloski:

Well, they're targeting our youth in a number of ways. And we've seen a serious social media climb for JUULs, for a lot of things, you know, but with JUUL , when I was doing research looking this up what I came across was there was actually hashtags that had to do with sitting in a class room , having your picture taken of you with a teacher in the background and you taking a hit of your JUUL. And this was, these are the types of campaigns that are happening. So there's two different ways that they're marketing. So you have the one kind of way that is this grassroots , these kids that are all talking about it, they're posting these pictures on social media that then, you know, it's looking fun, it's looking attractive, and then you have Jethis other more traditional kind of marketing that we're used to. And, there was a time when cigarette companies would market this way. You know, we all know the stories of Joe Camel, the cartoons, things of that nature are marketing towards kids. That all went away because we stood up and did something. So now another one is when I was researching this, I found this, I don't remember these, but cigarette companies where they would have a picture of a doctor that would say this doctor approves of smoking Camel cigarettes. Right? And which is just an insane picture to me. Well today they have JUULs marketing the same way. Today JUUL is marketing doctors approve of smoking these JUULs.

Brenda Ramos:

So they're taking these tried and true methods that were maybe 30, 40 years ago that were tried with cigarettes and they're actually using them with these e-cigarette types of ways to attract our youth in the same fashion it sounds like, except through a different vehicle. And that is social media, right? Through Snapchat, through Twitter, through Instagram or Finstagram or some of these other ways that our students are actually receiving communication, not just from their friends, but obviously if you follow someone and someone's hashtagging doing and practicing this kind of activity, whether it's in a classroom outside of a classroom or wherever the setting might be. But it's the cool thing to do. Right?.

Jeff Wondoloski:

Absolutely.. And you know, people have clued onto this. Actually when I was researching all o f this, I signed up for some of these different websites to get the information, JUUL being one of them. And actually on my drive here today, I got an email from JUUL telling me to w rite my representative that the government is trying to take away my freedoms to vape. So I think that this is important.

Brenda Ramos:

Well, I think you bring up a very important point and thank you for sharing with us pretending to be someone that actually uses the JUUL and subscribing to them because that's what I'll be doing in order to know what kind of information that students are getting, but I think it's important for parents to know A: to be in the know and that that's how they can obtain the information in order to stay a little bit ahead of the curve , informed. And so that when those situations or conversations come up with students , I think you would surprise your teen right? or your teen's friends , if you did have that information. You know , so , very interesting. very, very interesting. But factors of social media implications are like none other, definitely not the way you and I grew up. if they're inundated with these types of messages.

Jeff Wondoloski:

Absolutely. and one thing to know too is we're not just talking about something like out of fear, you know, this is something that has become an epidemic, especially with our young people to the point where our Surgeon General came out and issued a warning and advisory for vaping and this happened back in December 18th, 2018 and so if you wouldn't mind, can I just read what that?

Brenda Ramos:

please do. I mean it's important for us to know what this warning states and possibly even I would hope to share this with our students.

Jeff Wondoloski:

Absolutely. All right , so it reads, e-cigarette use poses a significant and avoidable health risk to young people. Besides increasing the possibility of addiction in long term harm to brain development and respiratory health, E-Cigarette use may also lead to the use of regular cigarettes that can do even more damage to the body. So that's pretty black and white in your face.

Brenda Ramos:

The medical implications I'm sure are huge and will be going into that. I mean this is just the start of our series.

Jeff Wondoloski:

You know, the previous two warnings that the Surgeon General came out and did were in 2018 for the opioid epidemic. And then the last one was in 2005 and this one kind of blew my mind. There was a warning issued regarding the effects of alcohol, the effects alcohol has on pregnancy and prenatal development. So this is a huge deal so the last two were about opioids and about the effects of alcohol o n pregnant women. So I just wanted to sidebar that really quick.

Brenda Ramos:

Actually, that's a good frame of reference for parents to understand. If these were the two previous ones in which the Surgeon General highlighted as being something of importance to warn others, vaping has made that top of the list along with o pioid. I think that that's pretty important for parents to know and to kind of step back and, okay, what does this really mean and how could this impact my student if they were around this or if they were ever tempted because it's very socially acceptable, let's get into that.

Jeff Wondoloski:

Okay, so it is socially acceptable and it doesn't have the same implications that smoking cigarettes has. And that's probably majority of the battle that we're at that we're dealing with today, or let's say that if somebody is outside smoking a cigarette at a restaurant or outside a restaurant and a family of four walks by, everyone's kinda gonna look at that p erson smoking a cigarette and say "ew!" Maybe the kids will say, "oh, that's disgusting". Or "look, mom,gross!". This is how we handle people smoking cigarettes nowadays.

Brenda Ramos:

Yes, It doesn't smell good. Right? But with this JUUL or a different type of vape, what kind of reaction would we get from our youth if they saw someone doing that?

Jeff Wondoloski:

Well, there's a number of different reactions that could happen. One of which is they can smell good, they can smell fruity . Maybe, it's about "what does that smell like?" "Oh that smells like dessert" or a lot of different things. So one thing that I've gone and done these presentations with schools or with parents, there's always a question of, well how are they getting this? Or where are they coming up with the money to get this? You know, it is expensive, but kids have always come up with money to get things, you know? And that's never the thing to get to look at. That's always a thing to get stuck on because I'm inputting this information and I'm freaked out, you know?

Brenda Ramos:

Well, and parents need to know that even though getting the actual device might be a little bit more expensive, and when I say expensive, it's going to be more around more than 20 bucks, but the actual cartridge itself is maybe $5. You know that's pretty inexpensive. And that's something you would give your students for lunch money for the day.

Jeff Wondoloski:

Absolutely. In a pack of four pods, is 16 bucks. I'm sure that there's a lot of kids out there that are selling these. What I've come in contact with is older siblings, a lot of older siblings and just like when I was in school, we had parents that would buy us alcohol. That's the thing. And there's probably parents that are willing to buy their kids or look the other way, things of that nature.

Brenda Ramos:

What we need parents to understand is that this is not as safe as it's being marketed. This is something that can be very detrimental to the development of your son or daughter, and that it could have lasting Impact, especially from a respiratory standpoint. And I'm certainly not a doctor and we'll have a doctor on our podcast next to really discuss what that looks like. but what are challenge is is that students know how to overcome those challenges. And I think that's what I would want parents to know. Whether it's a cost, whether it's accessible, right? Because they know someone or heard someone. Online, they can find places that they can purchase these at or, or attain these. the ease of use. It's not that hard to use, and the fact that there is no shame behind it and I think that it's actually looked upon by our youth as being kind of cool or you know, something that not a big deal, right?

Jeff Wondoloski:

Well, if it's not looked at as harmful, then it's okay. And because we haven't really stood up to it and said, this is bad and this is wrong and we need to change this, that it doesn't have those same implications as smoking cigarettes does.

Brenda Ramos:

One, I think a large part of it is that we don't know. And so that education piece is really important. Once we inform our parents and people share with others in their community, their neighbors, hey, this is not what it is being marketed as, or this is not as innocent as it looks, even though it smells like strawberry. Right? I think once we start to have that open, honest dialogue and if you as a parent are experiencing your student , in this circumstance or situation, I mean, I know it's a very vulnerable place to be in, but to share with others, Hey, I had this experience with my student and here's how I handled it and this is what I did and let me just share with you. Right? Because they're kids, they make mistakes. They're supposed to make mistakes, right? And we as parents make mistakes too because I mean there's no last I checked, there was no manual to how to raise your kid. it's certainly one of the toughest jobs I think most parents would say is , to be a mom or dad. but what happens , and if i can turn to the next talking point Jeff, in regards to when nicotine is just not enough. What are you seeing?

Jeff Wondoloski:

So what we've seen is when nicotine isn't enough, people are smoking , or using THC, you know, and THC is the active ingredient in marijuana. So, typically that's where people are going and that's what they're using. Haven't seen a whole lot of other stuff other than that, but that's been the majority, the red flag there.

Brenda Ramos:

So Jeff, as we talk about nicotine not being enough, and I know that sometimes we as a parent are trying to assist our students sometimes and finding something or even cleaning their room, which , I don't even, yeah, I 've, it's pretty yuck. especially for a t een. I guess what I w ant t o say is how do I know when I do find a JUUL or a vape that what's in there is o kay or isn't o kay. Like how would I know as a parent that whatever liquid is in there, because if I take it apart, If I'm even that talented to take it apart and it smells like green apple, I'm going to assume if I approach my student, right. And let's say there are situations, I know that our youth can be dishonest and possibly not be completely truthful. And they tell me it's just green apple smell or whatever that JUUL juice was supposed to smell like. is it, is it green apple?

Jeff Wondoloski:

Well, that's a great question and I think it's safe to assume the worst in this situation. You know I think that the majority of teens are thinking that maybe they're just smoking vapor or I'm sorry, maybe they're just smoking flavor. Maybe it doesn't have any nicotine i n i t. And actually something interesting that happened was here in Arizona, the Attorney General went to several schools statewide and they collected thousands of samples. So when a kid was caught with their JUUL or with their vaping device, it got confiscated. The Attorney General's office came in and took those. And then they did they have the labs, they did the t est, they look at everything. And what they found was 96% of them contain nicotine. The other four tested for other substances. And guess what those other substances were?

Brenda Ramos :

Let me guess. It's going to be probably marijuana.

Jeff Wondoloski:

Yes. THC. So 96% were nicotine, 4% were THC , none of them were just flavoring.

Brenda Ramos:

So it's safe to assume that whatever's in there is going to be harmful?

Jeff Wondoloski:

Exactly.

Brenda Ramos :

And there's really no way from a parent lens to be able to decipher what exactly it is, what's in it. I'd love to be able to give parents a little hint like, hey, if it's really waxy looking then it's this. Unless we had our own labs to be able to test it, but let's assume that, let's assume it is either nicotine or something worse like marijuana.

Jeff Wondoloski:

I think that's a safe assumption. And I think that majority of of families aren't going to have the lab to go back to fall back on. But I think this is a good, interesting thing and just to kind of discuss why teens vape. When a dults a re asked this question there a re some common answers and peer pressure is one of them. Others want you to try vaping. This is what parents/adults believe. Why teens vape -image- to look cool, older, more grown up or to f eel popular, relaxation, even though nicotine has the opposite effect, nicotine is a stimulant. So just to clarify that, or addiction, once you start, you can't stop. So teens have been asked why they vape and the reasons that teens came up with w hy -to cope ,numb the pain, relaxation, depression/anxiety, some to get that high feeling and they don't care about the consequences. So I think we've kind of talked about a lot of these things, but I think those kind of stick out to me, cope, numb, the pain, depression and anxiety.

Brenda Ramos:

Yeah. We have to be realistic and honest with ourselves, with what our experiences that our students are facing. What are their struggles right now? And I know that , through our lens at the school , what we can be doing as far as on a school level to help support students through these episodic things they're experiencing, whether it's anxiety or depression or finding a way to cope. I know that there'll be an opportunity where we can share it another time, but through our mindfulness movement i s teaching skills of mindfulness to students. But even beyond that, just having someone to talk to and have somebody available through our school counselor. But I'm so glad you talked about the two different perspectives. This is what parents or adults, what we see, because I probably wo uld h a ve n oted some of the ones that you just mentioned. Image being one of them an d p eer pressure. and then from the teen lens and why they're really using it. It certainly is eye-opening and it's something that I think we all as adults, whether we're a parent or not, but have kids in our lives can sit and think and really think and ponder this through to see what we can do to, to mitigate. So they're finding healthier ways.

Jeff Wondoloski:

Absolutely. and to me, the thing that sticks out is, is what is it, what do they have in common in all of those? And it's to feel different than they do right now. So that brings up why is my kid vaping? Or Why am I vaping? Maybe there's a kid out there that's listening to this and just a few things. I think it's important to talk about the adolescent brain. It's still developing, still creating new pathways. So what an adolescent is doing when they're vaping i s they're teaching their brain that vaping is a solution. And this we see time and time again i n the addict mind, the alcoholic mind, the alcoholic brain, the addict brain, your brain will get used to vaping and need more to get the same effect. You won't realize that you're addicted. The process of vaping is more addictive than the nicotine. And we see that a lot , where you're just sucked into the actual process. Some people could get into the sneak, so to speak, you know, the dishonesty, the sneaky behaviors, mom and dad are aware that something's going on and that can be a rush, you know these are things to think about. These are things to be aware of. And one thing that if I could hammer something home, it's smoking is harder to quit than heroin, methamphetamine or cocaine.And those are pretty big. So I think what does a parent do? You know, what does a parent do?

Brenda Ramos:

And what are the solutions? 'Cause it's, every child is different, every situation is different. And we want to make sure to provide at least some options for parents. So that they know at least either where to turn to and what are some things to put in place 'cause it's pretty hard to monitor. I mean you can't be with your teen or your, you know, your child 24/7.

Jeff Wondoloski:

And really you don't want to be, I mean to be quite honest and that's fine, but I think it's conversations. I think that we want to have conversations with one another. I think that we need, when having conversations, we want to have some solid ground rules. Listen with intent to understand. Don't worry about being understood. I think that's important. Don't interrupt one another. Be open and honest. If you're worried it's okay to share that. It's okay to, I think verbalize our feelings when having these conversations is extremely important. Listen, without reacting or judging, that's a tough one. Easier said than done. You know, express. Listen, be open minded. I think those are great, great tools in the tool belt to have when having these conversations. The more you talk about this stuff, the easier it is to do. and get to the meat of the problem. And that's the why. The why is typically, you know, if I'm not okay within, I am looking for something outside of me to be okay and smoking, vaping, using drugs, using alcohol present as a very simple way to deal with that. So what I'm asking is if you do get into these situations where your teen is vaping or you've found a vape or something along those lines, there might be something a little bit deeper that's going on. So don't get so focused or so worried about where is the money coming from to buy this device? Don't worry about that. Let's look at what are some alternatives. Maybe there's something going on that they're not talking about. Maybe there's something going on at home that's bothering them. This has just become an outlet to be able to deal with those pressures. You know, these kids are under so much pressure nowadays to perform. I'm grateful that it wasn't around when I was in, in school. So it's important t o, t o have that deeper conversation and not get so focused on what I would call the branches of it. But let's look at more of the root. You know, and I think when you can deal with the roots of the issues, it takes away a lot of the other stuff. So if you can actually have an open conversation and look into, maybe there is some sort of therapy or a counselor or a life coach or different situations. Different things like that solution oriented conversations that can be had.

Brenda Ramos :

I am so appreciative that you've brought this piece up of looking at the root of the problem because you're right, that's just been a way for your student to , cope through whatever struggle they're having. And sometimes some of them don't even know what it is exactly. They just don't feel themselves or they don't feel like they're in a good place. so getting them some professional help. I know a lot of parents start with their medical doctor as a possible starting point as well. If it's something that you know, a little bit more , either seeking some type of counseling outside of school. Something more therapeutic , in addition to , depending on what their concerns or what is unfolding as , that they need support.

Brenda Ramos:

But I also know that if you're already connected with your church or religious organization of some sorts, I know there's a lot of supports in place as it pertains to that, but we at the school can of course support you as well if we know a little bit more where to direct you. So stopping in your school counseling office and speaking to your school counselor. if your , all our high schools have social workers. I know they can also direct you, but there are other opportunities in which we can certainly look at how we can support your student. I think one of the important pieces, and you touched upon this a bit, Jeff, in regards to not being able to be with your students 24 hours a day, right? They have some independence , is creating structures in place that your student is busy with the right things, with , positive experiences. I used to as a junior high counselor tell parents let's get them busy with some positive things. Otherwise they will choose to get busy with things that we don't want them to be busy with. And so creating those experiences, whether it's in your community, it's at your school, whether it's something as simple as something you do as a family and, or knowing who their friends are and being just very well connected with their friendship groups. Setting aside time so that , taking away that currency of that cell phone so that there's time for that to charge so that you can charge as a family or that they can have some quiet, even boring time, or to be outside and be active, whatever that looks like. You know your student best and if they're changing and evolving as a young adult and they need to reacquaint themselves with who they are, finding the right guidance to do that. We have services , that we can connect you with at the school that can assist a family with that piece. But we want you to take it seriously. If you do find yourself in this circumstance of your student vaping and we want to help support you through this process, however that might look for your student. There's no exact way to do it , because every single individual is different. But there are a couple of components that we want to make sure that we include. So please reach out and , we know that takes a lot of courage , and that it takes possibly on your end as a parent to be vulnerable, but , we want to make sure and get your student help so that it doesn't get to a situation where it becomes worse.

Jeff Wondoloski:

I'm glad that you said that Brenda and one of the things that I think about is dealing with this with your seventh grader, with your eighth grader, with vaping challenges is a lot better to deal with then your 13th grader.

Brenda Ramos:

Yeah! Once they leave high school and these coping skills have already been established. I would agree. And if you do have a student going into junior high having this conversation, even if this is not something that's a part of their world that they understand, hey , you might see or hear about this, right. And preparing them for that.

Jeff Wondoloski:

In preparing them and leaving it open like I want open dialogue between us, if there ever becomes a problem or if there ever hits a point where this is something that you choose, that you want to do, let's discuss it. You know, I just think that a lot of the issues that are brought up is we, if we can have honest, good conversations with things, we can deal with pretty much any problem that comes in our lives. So it's important to, to have that open dialogue of communication.

Brenda Ramos:

Well, and a lot of times they don't have all the information or the information may not be all correct . They're coming to a conclusion of making a decision and they're not well informed because their friends may have minimal information or the wrong information. So , I'm so glad you brought that up about the open lines of communication. It's always important. I know it's harder as they get older. it is, and you know, they think they know everything. I'm a parent of teens myself, so I get ya. Well, there is a lot more we could just continue to talk about. I mean, this epidemic as it pertains to vaping is one that is monumental. We want to make sure that we provide every single opportunity to parents to get education. And we will continue to do that. This is just the start of our vaping series. Parents, I know there's probably questions you might have or if you would like to connect with me. Please reach me through email at ramos.brenda@cusd80.com and I will be happy to connect you with Jeff or any of the other resources that we have. I look forward to parent presentations on this topic in the future. but I just want to make sure at least to start giving you the information that we are getting and share as much as we can through this venue so that you can at least continue Google searching at least from here on out and be good eyes and ears so that we can help your student. Jeff, thank you so much for being with us today. I know there's a wealth of knowledge that you have in you. We could go on and on for probably another two hours, but hopefully there'll be other opportunities that we can continue to share with parents.

Jeff Wondoloski:

Absolutely. Thank you so much for having me, Brenda, again, truly honored to get to be a part of this and thank you all the parents that are listening to this and supporting this cause.

Brenda Ramos:

Thank you CUSD parents and stay tuned for our next next podcast. Have a great day.