Your Career Podcast with Jane Jackson | Career Coach | Entrepreneur | Start Your Own Business | Careers Podcast Artwork Image
Your Career Podcast with Jane Jackson | Career Coach | Entrepreneur | Start Your Own Business | Careers
25 INTRODUCE YOURSELF WITH A GREAT VERBAL PITCH
August 26, 2015 Jane Jackson
Your Career Podcast with Jane Jackson | Career Coach | Entrepreneur | Start Your Own Business | Careers

25 INTRODUCE YOURSELF WITH A GREAT VERBAL PITCH

August 26, 2015

Jane Jackson

Episode 25: Who are you and what have you got to offer? If you approach anyone regarding a job without knowing how to position yourself, you’ll do yourself a disservice and you will waste a lot of time. Let’s spend some time on your approach and what you are going to say. You will need an introductory statement when speaking with recruitment consultants, potential hiring managers and with your general network. No one will know what you want and how he or she can help you if you are unclear when talking about yourself. Most of my clients have told me that creating their introductory positioning statement is the hardest part of the job-search process. Why? Because most of us feel uncomfortable talking about ourselves when looking for a job. Many of my clients have told me that they don’t want to sell themselves, they feel awkward and they don’t like ‘big noting’ themselves. What about you? If you feel reluctance, too, all I can say is that if you don’t express yourself clearly and let a potential hiring manager know what a great candidate you are, you won’t get very far in the process! If you don’t sell yourself, who’s going to do it for you? But don’t fear – talking about your suitability for a role does not have to be a hard sell. It’s about stating facts, highlighting the skills and experience that are relevant for the role, and letting your personality shine through. What would you say if someone said, “Tell me about yourself”? The 60- to 90-second introduction is your answer. This introduction shares your employment background and aspirations, including your title, speciality and accomplishments, and also shares your current situation, which means your listener knows how they can help. Delivered well, your introduction can pique your listener’s interest. And, at under 90 seconds, you will stay succinct and to the point. When can you use a 90-second introduction? ♦ To respond to the question, “Tell me about yourself” ♦ During an informational interview/networking meeting ♦ At a pre-screening interview ♦ At a job interview ♦ In social situations ♦ Whenever there is an occasion to market yourself These are opportunities to clearly articulate your career goals and, at the same time, create a positive, lasting impression with the listener. So how do you do it? Past experience Present the ‘big picture’ and your listener may ask you to elaborate on anything that is of interest. Include your most recent career history, an overview of the type of work you have been performing and the type of company, industry and functional experience you possess. Current situation Here you explain why you are looking for work. Talk about this in a brief, matter-of-fact way and focus on the positive side of the change. It’s important to have made the internal emotional transition so you are able to focus on the positives moving forward. Future If in a networking meeting, talk about your target industry, position, function or role. Mentioning the names of organisations you are targeting or meeting with can be helpful. It is easier for people to make connections and offer support when they have specific information. If it is in an interview situation, focus on the skills and knowledge required for the role for which you are being interviewed. Question For example, “As you’re familiar with the industry, in what other areas do you think there might be opportunities for a person with my experience?” “This role you have open sounds a close match to what I am looking for. I’m looking forward to learning more about it.” Asking a polite question promotes a two-way discussion. It is the component that will most likely change depending upon the reason you are using your Introduction. For more information visit www.navigatingcareercrossroads.com or email jane@janejacksoncoach.com and request for a copy of Verbal Pitch Template.
Episode 25: Who are you and what have you got to offer? If you approach anyone regarding a job without knowing how to position yourself, you’ll do yourself a disservice and you will waste a lot of time. Let’s spend some time on your approach and what you are going to say. You will need an introductory statement when speaking with recruitment consultants, potential hiring managers and with your general network. No one will know what you want and how he or she can help you if you are unclear when talking about yourself. Most of my clients have told me that creating their introductory positioning statement is the hardest part of the job-search process. Why? Because most of us feel uncomfortable talking about ourselves when looking for a job. Many of my clients have told me that they don’t want to sell themselves, they feel awkward and they don’t like ‘big noting’ themselves. What about you? If you feel reluctance, too, all I can say is that if you don’t express yourself clearly and let a potential hiring manager know what a great candidate you are, you won’t get very far in the process! If you don’t sell yourself, who’s going to do it for you? But don’t fear – talking about your suitability for a role does not have to be a hard sell. It’s about stating facts, highlighting the skills and experience that are relevant for the role, and letting your personality shine through. What would you say if someone said, “Tell me about yourself”? The 60- to 90-second introduction is your answer. This introduction shares your employment background and aspirations, including your title, speciality and accomplishments, and also shares your current situation, which means your listener knows how they can help. Delivered well, your introduction can pique your listener’s interest. And, at under 90 seconds, you will stay succinct and to the point. When can you use a 90-second introduction? ♦ To respond to the question, “Tell me about yourself” ♦ During an informational interview/networking meeting ♦ At a pre-screening interview ♦ At a job interview ♦ In social situations ♦ Whenever there is an occasion to market yourself These are opportunities to clearly articulate your career goals and, at the same time, create a positive, lasting impression with the listener. So how do you do it? Past experience Present the ‘big picture’ and your listener may ask you to elaborate on anything that is of interest. Include your most recent career history, an overview of the type of work you have been performing and the type of company, industry and functional experience you possess. Current situation Here you explain why you are looking for work. Talk about this in a brief, matter-of-fact way and focus on the positive side of the change. It’s important to have made the internal emotional transition so you are able to focus on the positives moving forward. Future If in a networking meeting, talk about your target industry, position, function or role. Mentioning the names of organisations you are targeting or meeting with can be helpful. It is easier for people to make connections and offer support when they have specific information. If it is in an interview situation, focus on the skills and knowledge required for the role for which you are being interviewed. Question For example, “As you’re familiar with the industry, in what other areas do you think there might be opportunities for a person with my experience?” “This role you have open sounds a close match to what I am looking for. I’m looking forward to learning more about it.” Asking a polite question promotes a two-way discussion. It is the component that will most likely change depending upon the reason you are using your Introduction. For more information visit www.navigatingcareercrossroads.com or email jane@janejacksoncoach.com and request for a copy of Verbal Pitch Template.
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