THE TV CARPENTER : Home Makeovers with Wayne Perrey

Wayne chats with Lynne Lambourne about giving up single use plastics in our home.

October 11, 2019 Wayne Season 1 Episode 9
THE TV CARPENTER : Home Makeovers with Wayne Perrey
Wayne chats with Lynne Lambourne about giving up single use plastics in our home.
Chapters
THE TV CARPENTER : Home Makeovers with Wayne Perrey
Wayne chats with Lynne Lambourne about giving up single use plastics in our home.
Oct 11, 2019 Season 1 Episode 9
Wayne

This week I discuss creating a garden for a little girl called Isla in Folkestone on Love Your Garden with Alan Titchmarsh.

I interview Lynne Lambourne about her campaign to help people to become plastic free and learn how to be a "Warrior On Waste".

Guest details: Lynne Lambourne
www.warriorsonwaste.co.uk
www.lovenellie.co.uk
www.amazon.co.uk/shop/lynnelambourne 


Sponsor: To take advantage of the generous 15% discount from my sponsor Thorndown, please visit http://bit.ly/TVCarpenter. Discount code: TVCarpenter

Contact me: Wayne Perrey on Twitter and Instagram.

Music: "What's the Angle" by Shane Ivers

Show Notes Transcript

This week I discuss creating a garden for a little girl called Isla in Folkestone on Love Your Garden with Alan Titchmarsh.

I interview Lynne Lambourne about her campaign to help people to become plastic free and learn how to be a "Warrior On Waste".

Guest details: Lynne Lambourne
www.warriorsonwaste.co.uk
www.lovenellie.co.uk
www.amazon.co.uk/shop/lynnelambourne 


Sponsor: To take advantage of the generous 15% discount from my sponsor Thorndown, please visit http://bit.ly/TVCarpenter. Discount code: TVCarpenter

Contact me: Wayne Perrey on Twitter and Instagram.

Music: "What's the Angle" by Shane Ivers

Speaker 1:

On today's episode, I'll be talking about working with anti-itch Martin and love your garden as we traveled to [inaudible] to create a fun sensory garden for a lovely little girl called Eila. And I'll be talking to my good friend Lynn Lamborn as she gives us all the top tips so we all can become plastic free so we can save the environment on TV. This week was an episode of Olivia garden Titchmarsh and we filmed this one in Folkston and if any of you watched it, it was a, a garden for a lovely family. This husband and wife, you had a little girl, they had three children actually, but I'm one of their little children. The oldest daughter was called Eila and sadly she had this rare form of epilepsy. So when she was about one years old, she had a major seizure and it meant that it left her with severe brain damage.

Speaker 1:

So we wanted to create this amazing sensory garden that she could use and that she could explore. Um, but also the rest of the family could enjoy it. And the NPO, you know, love your garden style. They always have zones and areas that normally looked after, you know, so the presenters have an area and that, you know what Alan w was in charge of roses and the living area for the family. Um, and Katie for example, was in charge of this swing and Dan and play area for Eila and, and it was a garden that was meant to be, you know, used for the whole family and it was all sh I, I was in a wheelchair. It all had to be accessible. So it was a quite a tricky garden. Um, but when you watch it, it was a real tear jerk. Obviously I met the family and I know the show, but even when I watch, I sit there and, and you know, it's almost blubbering or like lump in my throat.

Speaker 1:

I couldn't speak. And it was such a beautiful garden for such a, a gorgeous, gorgeous family. There's things that you don't always hear about. So when we were chatting to their mother and she was really lovely and she was quite shy, but she was just saying that, you know, her daughter I think is six now and is in a wheelchair. And you know, up until one years old until she had that seizure, she was totally fine. She wasn't, you know, she was a healthy little baby doing everything that a baby should be doing at one. And then you have the CGIAR and then all of a sudden you're, you've lost your child. You know, it's like you've lost their, what your child could have been. And so we were all just really wants to create these amazing gardens. But also there's the fear that if she has another seizure, it could make her worse or she could even die from the next seizure.

Speaker 1:

So they always feel like they're living on borrowed time. So we were determined to make this amazing garden for them. But what you didn't see in the garden as well, which was really tricky, is the garden. There'd be shots of the garden, one part of it all where the, um, they had like a big garage that was like raised full of rubble and mud and muck and I think they, I think they removed something like six, um, cubic meter squares of rubble and clay. And then also whether, you know, they do a site survey when a workout where everything's going and there was a big manhole in the middle. So what you was going to be Katie's area, which was going to be the big Dan and the living area, actually big den and swing area ended up being really small. So that fell on me because they wanted to utilize the current swing that they had.

Speaker 1:

And there was like, okay, with what materials that we fought around, what can we create? So me and Katie, um, literally would dragging this swing around, can we cut it off? And it was a bit of a kick thing. So you were able to move things around a little bit and we managed to create a pretty cool Dan and the idea was that in her wheelchair she could be wheeled in. And then we had the idea of having plants climbing up it. But my [inaudible] was, because at the back we, I don't know if you saw the show there was, it was like a, a laddered effect of flowers all up the front. I was really concerned that it didn't become a climbing frame. So at the back we had to put a vertical timbers rather than horizontal. So the kids couldn't use it as a ladder at the back.

Speaker 1:

And it looked really, really good and we were really, really happy with it. And it was fun. Me and Katie had laughing there, just, you know, she was asking me if I've ever made a den when I was a kid. And of course I have, I love making dens. Um, so yeah, it was nice to make a big den for a gorgeous child. And then I got to have fun creating a living area with Allen. So he wanted these huge oversized bookshelves that were made as scaffolding boards. So, you know, they would weather well outside. There were these huge, big chunky pieces of timber that we created. I don't think it was scaffolding board actually now. I think it was huge joists that were massive and really, really heavy and we, dr, we created three of those and create a fire half as well. And we mirrored that with some bookcase cases in the entrance as you walked out the door.

Speaker 1:

And it was really lovely and the space was quite limited. So we were stepping over each other quite a lot. And we had resin floor and we had a decking area and we had paving. The problem with the resin floor is once it's laid you can't, you can stand on it for 12 hours, it has to be done at a certain time. You can't get it mucky. So in these gardens we have five days to build them, you know, two days are the landscaping and then after that it presenters come on board and then it slows everything down cause at the camera crews are there and you can't make noise. And so you try and everything done in the first two days as much as possible, but you can't do too much because they need to film you doing lots of it with the presenters, with Allen and with David and with Katie and Francis. But it was a really, really lovely show to do, really lovely episode. And uh, as we're really pleased that the family got the garden that they deserved

Speaker 1:

has always want to give a huge shout out to my sponsors thorn down paint. And without them I wouldn't be able to do this podcast. They've kindly agreed to sponsor this podcast and what I love about them is they're a family run business. It's run by Caroline and Ben. And I've met both of them working on the Alan Titchmarsh Olivia garden show. I first met Ben about two years ago when he supplied all the paint for one of the gardens there and he was there painting away and I didn't actually realize he was the owner of the company. He was just very passionate about this paint and he was talking me through it all. And what I loved about this paint is it can be used on lots of different materials. It's primarily a wood paint, so it can be used inside and outside on wood, but also it can be used on metal, on terracotta, you know it can be used on plastics, on PVC, but also because it's a water based paint.

Speaker 1:

This paint can also then be in down so you can thin it down and you can create a stain with it and you can create as many colors as you like with it. If any of you watch last week's episode of Olivia garden, you'll have seen a Caroline Ben's wife. It was also a Corona of thorn down paint. She was there helping us paint all the wooden structures that we had there. And she did get into the back of the shop putting on a funny face at Allen as a, he was being made fun of about a Dalek that he was creating. I have topiary, but in all seriousness, while I was there chatting with her, she was telling me again about the joys of working with peelable glass paint. I've mentioned before the, I've used this when working with my daughter, we were having some fun in the garden and we were painting a huge mirror and we created some art on there.

Speaker 1:

And this peelable paint is brilliant, is very much aimed for children. Um, some of the paints are called things like goblin green or mermaid blue or um, OGA orange. They're really strong and vibrant and we had fun creating some patterns and flowers. But what's great is if you make a mistake, you literally let it dry and then you, if you rub it with your finger, it peels off a bit like a face mask. And it just peeled off. My daughter had fun with that and then we started again. They have 24 opaque colors and they have 14 translucent colors. So you can either create things like staying glass effects like we did to my daughter, or you could block out whole windows in colors. If you've got a greenhouse or a conservatory that you know it gets really hot and you just want to stop the glare of the sun, you can use this paint to literally roller it on and block out the sun and then once you're bored with it again, you can just peel it all off.

Speaker 1:

The reason why I'm passionate about Thorne down paint and why I'm so pleased that they're my sponsor for the podcast is because of their eco credentials. They really do try to be as kind to the environment as possible. So if you are needing to buy a paint for your garden, for any woodwork or for like a say for any metals or a terracotta pot or even the Peterborough glass paint, if you want to get a product that says as healthy to the environment as possible, then thorn down as the one to try. And again, they're peelable glass paint is even made from 100% recycled plastic resin. So if you'd like to get some more information about Thor down page, check out their color charts and all the information from them on thorn down dot code at UK and you can get a 15% discount on any online purchases and all you have to do is put in the discount code, the TV carpenter.

Speaker 1:

I am super excited that you guys get to hear this. Next interview is with my dear friend Lynn Lamborn. Now I first met Lynn when we work together on GIBC, which is the great interior design challenge. She was a contestant on that show on the first series and we kept in touch. We, we've worked together quite a few times. We've done various trade shows, like grand design live together. We built sets for that. And then last year we partnered up and we worked on the ideal home show and we code designed and built a show garden there. I knew when I was doing this podcast that I would get her involved. She's done loads of different things. She's created a company called warriors in wastes where she teaches kids to up cycle. She is an Annie Sloan paint ambassador, so she teaches people how to use chalk paints.

Speaker 1:

But what I really wanted to pick our brains about was the whole idea about single use plastics, how to banish it and how to like try and live more sustainable really. And she does main talks on the idle home show about this subject. So when I knew, like I said, it was crane, this podcast that she was always going to be one of my guests on it. So I hope you enjoy this and I recorded this whilst we were in her beautiful house and I hope you enjoy all the information that she shares on how to save the planet.

Speaker 2:

The number one. Thank you for agreeing to be on my podcast. No problem. Talk, delighted to talk to you. I, uh, when I decided to do this podcast, you were the first person that, well actually I was with you when I decided to do it cause we were doing the, I don't am show, I'm doing the garden and I thought I'm going to have on the podcast mainly because I thought I could speak to you about so many different things. We've known each other for so long and there's so many different things you do will come to that threatened podcast. But we first met when we did the great interior design challenge together. How many years ago?

Speaker 2:

Just the first series, wasn't it? It was one of the first episodes of the first series. And yeah, so time has been, and so would your background in interior design that Nope. Never done anything. Interior design was, in fact, that was one of the sorts of the qualifications for getting onto the show was completely amateur. Um, no, that was my first disaster in interior design. You got, you went out as well. Yeah. Luna absolutely hated me. But to credit, she's actually an amazing interior design. But you had the homeowner from hell and who were the only people? We never showed their response to it because he is, he or she, he was approved.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. Um, he wouldn't come back and do the reveal with me. Um, I left me sort of, in fact, I think they looked me in one of those pods where we hide the furniture and then he wasn't even invited to the, yeah.

Speaker 2:

Casey. Yeah. So she went out to work. Um, but then subsequently we met along the way you worked with Sophie Robinson that the AMCOM show you then rang me and asked me to work with you. Was it Graham designed? Yeah.

Speaker 3:

When someone's live. Yeah. So it was a competition, wasn't it? To design a room set and I thought, well, I need someone reliable who can help you build Y. um, yeah. And I decided to do sort of set myself up massively there where everything was from a skip or from recycled materials or up cycled. So I had to kind of go out and find it for, I could come up with the design and upside clit and get it there. And it was like suddenly halfway through this, no wonder nobody normally does this. But actually it was [inaudible]

Speaker 2:

well we did one, it was six bills, wasn't man. We um, and we had like a two day build I think by day, end of day one begin to get down to, we were sat in the cups of coffee onset sandwiches and they were all rushing around and it looked amazing. There's lots of pictures on your, on your Instagram about it. And her award is actually in the downstairs loop. After my ward shout, you're always shot. Um, and then recently, uh, because of that collaboration, I think we realized we work really well together. And you've got the gig to create show gardens at this year's [inaudible] and then you invite me along to build. And we ended up co designing and building a garden that again, based on that sustainability. And that's this thing. So sustainability is really a trend at the moment, but for the last five, six years I've known you. It's been your thing. Anyway. Yeah, he's kind of being,

Speaker 3:

yeah. Even on the great interior design challenge, that was my thing. I straight away went in and everything was up cycled and repainted, and I've bent very little. I remember everyone else still going, I've got the budget, so learn me thinking. Actually, I mean if you get on the train to shops quite a lot, it's one with you. But yeah, that has always been my thing and I'm glad. I'm glad it's now gathering momentum. That's great. It feels like anybody else, you need to do that thing up. They're not. It's great. You've got to be relaxed about it because actually we're saving the world more people who think like this. That's what I've been banging on about. That's what I want is for people to think more like me. So actually it's great. Yeah,

Speaker 2:

it's great. And you're right. I've realized working in interior design world or even the gardening world, everyone has, you've got to have an angle, you've got to have your USB kind of thing and your unique selling. One has always been this sustainability recycled and well we got the gig for the ideal home show. Your brief was to create a beautiful garden and then it was, you said, I'll do it as long as I can do the sustainable sustainability and then your growth to me was I want to be sustainable but I don't want to look now. I want it to look modern. I don't want it to look like we've cycled a shitty thing in the corner. And that was what was brilliant because then our challenge was to find, and everyone who looked at their garden didn't know, half of them didn't know it was or a recycled sustainable, like the decking was recycled plastics. Yeah. We had rope made from bottle tops. We had made from milk milk cartons in the youth in the States, the American soldiers and the beautiful and everyone was at where can we buy those or that? Do you know they're white. And that's what I love about you and the fact that, you know, there's a lot of people who do the up cycle thing. It is just pallets and you know, you like a pallet, but it's not for me. It's not my thing.

Speaker 3:

It's not what is going to, my thing's always been, I want it to look high end. I want people to stop and think because you know, you, even though you buy from a charity shop, you don't necessarily want your home to look like that. So it's just about having a good eye and picking the right things and combining them. They're not all vintage pieces in my house. They're not all from charity shop. But then combining it with perhaps something which is made from research the plastics and a little bit more modern or the occasional new buy. Of course everybody does that. Um, you know, I'm a fan of, I care as much as anybody else, but it's just how you combine it together and by finding special pieces and, and making it look great. That's what I'm about.

Speaker 2:

So when we're at the idle home show, we're lucky enough we do, we do the garden. But also I, with the duo I do is we do talks on their main stage and yourself, you know, you're, you're also an ambassador for any Sloan to pester. You are doing a Hani Sloan workshop, but then you, you do a sustainable workshop and I remember we the DOR I do as we're wrong. Just after you. Yeah. I remember sitting backstage watching your slides and listening to all, all the products and things that a sustainable that can be used in the house. And that's what I wanted to talk mainly about with you today. I want to, because I think knowing you're working with you, you've had, you just filtered into my psyche trying to find a nice way. I'm a real name. Yeah. So already you've got me to change my toilet roll.

Speaker 2:

I'm like, you know, I met you today. We've, we've been in a craft fair today and I made sure I had my like water beat I used for coffee cup [inaudible] back in the house to go get it. Cause I'd fallen for you anyway. [inaudible] fuck, I remember when you have a headshot, I forgot to bring my water ball and there's a lack of discussion. I really felt like it upset you. So I want, I want to chat to you today just and to give people insight of where they can buy things on what all the little things we can do in our hot house that can help the environment and show people how easy it is. Absolutely. Okay, so where would you start?

Speaker 3:

I probably first start by saying, Oh we're about to leap into talking about shopping, but the first thing you can probably do is think twice before you shop. It's do you need it? Sustainability. You know, at the moment there are lots of shops popping up and everything saying we're sustainable. The most sustainable thing you can do is not buy it in the first place. So really question yourself before you go shopping. Do I need it? Could I, you know, someone says let's store a of cereals in jam jar in 'em storage jars, but could I use a jam jar? Could I use something that I've got already. So that's my first point is really think carefully before, you know, rushing off from buying. And then second day if you can buy locally, always go for local. It's, it's difficult at the moment because lots of these sustainable products aren't in our shops locally.

Speaker 3:

But always try and do that if you can. And then look for things that are made ethically, made sustainably recycled materials, things like that. Um, and then, you know, buy bamboo toothbrushes and those draws all of these, everybody knows about them. It's just putting it into action and thinking twice, thinking a bit more carefully. Um, your weekly shop, you know, there's alternative take bags, you can take money. Nobody ever gets a plastic bag anymore. Now it's just so every time T's, you know, water bottles, everybody knows all this stuff. This is so well documented, but it's about changing a habit and it's about doing it two or three times. That becomes second nature. Like you running back into the house to get your cup because that's just something now that you do. And I want people to feel bad. Actually I want people to feel, Oh my God, that's embarrassing.

Speaker 3:

I'm walking around with a plastic water bottle. The hell is wrong with me because to me it's just so uncle. Yeah, it's really cool. It has become that. And I don't think it's just my circle of Instagram friends or my separate Facebook friends. I see it across the board and people are realizing, you know, a plastic water bottle isn't great or that carry bag. I remember we, we were guys and we put it out as I'm sure a few times now and we were there and use a kickoff about the plastic stuff going on and this year it's changed. They changed. Yeah. They've been, um, I think it's taken me three or four years of nonstop moaning and they just eye-rolling at me. But this year we are, there's showed the whole show is much more sustainable. They're really asking every single person who books at this show think about their sustainability, think about what they're bringing into the site.

Speaker 3:

And also I'm working with them to showcase some sustainable brands. There's going to be a sustainability section where I'm going to try and showcase as many of the brands I work with and some of the charities that I work with so that we've got a little elements that people could come down and get a snippet of, you know, a snippet of information if you like, and see some of these amazing brands that just doesn't seem to be a showcase venue at the moment for them. And often they're very small and it's hard to get out there because they've got money to do that. They're small startups and if I can support them, then that's exactly what I want to do. Really. Um, you know, I'm constantly being sent brands or meat brands in my work and I just wanna be able to pass that on in a simplistic form to people just say, look, come to the Idaho show. These guys are here, or you know, on my website, they're there, or I've got this new Amazon marketplace as well. So that's brilliant. I don't have shelter on board this year. So you told them about your websites, what is your website? What about too, while the complicated. So I've got love nature designs, which is my interior design and my sustainability side of things. But then I've also got something which is sort of a little sideline passion, which is I'm more is on waste.co. Dot. UK, which would you say? Sideline

Speaker 2:

and passionate, but that's if I'm being honest, I know you more for that.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, it's taken over my life. I started it as something I taught kids to up cycle and that meant that we were tying trash to treasure. And then I thought this is the perfect opportunity to teach them a little bit about things that I'm passionate about to do with the plastics to do with living more sustainably. So we started talking about that and then I thought, well, I'll make a movie. Um, and I'll rope in some help. What's the movie called? What have you done today to save the world? And it's actually on my website. You can click from the website through. And so I made it. Yeah, I've made it so that children could really understand it and this could some hard hitting things in it. There's the turtle with the store and those as the whale that dive and actually everybody I contacted was so brilliant and just said, yeah, use offer chips, use this, don't worry if it's to do with plastic.

Speaker 3:

And they were great. And then I've got a lovely local film company who put it all together and professionally did it for me. Living room films in Henley and um, yeah, I'm so that's on the website as well. And I started doing that and it gathered momentum and the ideal home show, we actually the first peak and they said, could we show your movie? And I've thought, Oh my goodness. Yet for me that was, there's some very powerful music at the beginning of it. And I remember being in the idle home, Shannon purchase huge and just somebody to hit play on the button during one of the sort of run throughs of it. And this music came on in this huge venue and I just thought, Oh my God, I'm really doing something now. I'm really making people change. And then it was Helen Shepherd who's there, one of the compares who runs. He came over to me after she watched and she had tears in her eyes and she said, Lynn, I'm never using a store again. I thought, Oh, people are starting to listen and it's gathered momentum from there and it's just been fantastic.

Speaker 2:

And that, that never used the story. Like at the moment, we were talking earlier today, that activity went out today and we were saying how at the time when you did it two, three years ago, you were the person who was telling me, why is this tool, we don't need straws. Or if we were out somewhere we'd go for a meeting. I don't know what shops and that serve as a straw and you let, can I speak to your manager things, you know or you know, if it's a big chain you take, you'd hashtag their Brandon and slowly and surely you've got people to read the shops that will, they'll email you back.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, hotel chains. I mean the audio home show there, but just in the Hilton. And I've kept taking photos of all the products in the shower and now, not just because of me, but I'm sure you know all of us together and making a change. But things like that. And I think as a consumer we should be the people who are saying, hang on a second, I don't want this. What are you, what are you going to do to make this change? Why are you still serving these things? And the more people who call them to question, the quicker they're going to make the change and realize that it's not what we want. You know, the power is with us, isn't it? The power is with where we place our pound, where we choose to go, and we have the absolute right to demand these things for the world, for our future, for the kids' future, for everything.

Speaker 2:

Well, I know as well as I went to an event yesterday, quotes displays that the upcoming trends, whether it be cards, products, how and where wallpaper, I came across this really lovely, um, company collect 44 and they, uh, they've already got one brand and it's a Razor's just disposable razor. Yeah. Because the idea of disposable plastic raises, you can't, you can't be cycled, you know, single use plastic, the packaging that's included in them, all of that. But in her talk to me, the, one of the first thing she said, she says, you know, the disposable razors are becoming the new plastic storm issue. And I love that. You know, people are using that as a marketing tool.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, yeah. I mean, straws actually it's, it's strange because stores, when we looked at the whole global sort of single use plastic problem stores with the smallest thing that really the smallest problem, but they represented something so big and it was, I think it because children had drinks with straws in that it became such a focal point. I mean really by limiting limiting the straws, we'd done very little in plastic pollution situation. But it's just become a visual and it's become something that everybody's clung onto as a start of a movement. As the start of, it's something to talk about and it's something that resonates with the children. So it's become a symbol of change if you like. I mean the is now a paper. We really don't have a store issue. We need to stop talking about the stores, but it has started something.

Speaker 3:

And if forever, you know, we should really be grateful for the stores because that's made us all think, you know, and now we're moving on to other things. We've got nappies, you know, nappies aren't plastic, but they've contained plastic and they are the huge big problem and tampons and sanitary ware and things that people don't really like to talk about. But we've got to face these facts now and we've got to start changing. And, and talking about them. Raises are a huge issue. These are things we use everyday. Toothbrushes, you know, and the straw has kickstarted us or given us a big kick up the backside. And that poor turtle has changed the world. I mean we all thank David Attenborough.

Speaker 2:

Going back to shopping side of things. So I, I again, the razors, I've changed my razor that, you know, the company lane 44 and I've mentioned those again because not only are they, you know, it's about using a single razor to metal razor. Um, they'd be 5% of their profits to mat men's mental health. It was a nice time as well. So they've got quite a few things going on. Things, what are, what else I love, um, I've changed my toilet roll to is it give a crap? Yeah cause it called. It gives a crap who gives a crap and they're brilliant. So we will, our family as a whole using social toilet incident, we buy it all. It all comes, every part of the packaging is recyclable and they give percentage of their profits as well to making toilets in third world countries, things like that. Making those kinds of changes. And they used to cost a fortune, but actually I find them using less. It's actually working. Right. You know, the raiser situation. I've, you know, I haven't changed my razor in over a year. The blades are cheaper so I'm saving money. The toilets and papers say fucking block shampoo,

Speaker 3:

block shampoo laws for forever versus keeping having to buy a plastic container, you know with your shampoo in the normal. So these sorts of,

Speaker 2:

okay so those kinds of shampoo. My wife is a boots fanatic. Right? So she, she is [inaudible] that's sort of get back on again. She loves her toiletries. So if we ever go shopping because I need to pop into booths, I'll let you know what I'm just going to go for it man. How can I sell my wife the block shampoo cause he must use it then. So what, give me the sales spiel, why she should use that kind of stuff. Cause I think that

Speaker 3:

firstly it's, it's cutting down in plastics. That's the most important thing. Secondly, what you're putting your head normally that comes from plastic bottles full of chemicals. If you ever read the side of shampoo and you're putting that directly onto your head every day, I'm not sure that's a good thought. Good idea. If you look at what's in the block shampoos, especially if you get them from brands like lush, um, there's candy which are on my website who are lovely brand, just started off in one of the markets in London. Organic, you're putting something on that's organic, they last for forever, you know that absolutely brilliant. You take them when you go, you know, holiday and you're packing your wash bag and you're worried about leaking from, I just have little plastic container and I've got popped them in there. You take it and they take up no space whatsoever. So they're good for you. And it does take a while. I'm not going to lie, the first couple of times you wash your hair, it's just your hair getting used to it and then something just happens and your heads are used to it. And I think we are all, you know, over washing with all these chemicals and goodness knows, yeah,

Speaker 2:

I have the microbeads and all that other, that's all. So you talked about your website because I think what we realized as well, all this stuff is out there. It's available, but I know you use get hounded on your Instagram or how can, where can we find this work with that? So you've, you've created, and I was in shock, no websites tell me, you know,

Speaker 3:

well the West side, whereas in waste is very much an information site. So it sort of talks about why I do it. And then there's some information on how your school can go plastic free. It's got the movie and it's got an overriding kind of um, place where you can go and buy things. But then I was just, every time I talk on social media, I'm constantly asked us and I tried to get that to everybody because there's an interest out there and obviously on talking about it and I ignore them. That's defeating the object. But what's been made much easier if I'm, for me it's, Amazon has set up this thing where I can now list everything that I use onto one of their Verizon waste shops and people can go there. So now, and I don't just list anything, it is the brands that I work with.

Speaker 3:

So the things that I use or the things that I'm talking about on social media so that people therefore can just click in straight away. In theory it is something sustainable. A brand that cares a brand that's made from a recycled product or there's a whole section on that cycle stuff as well. So it might be a varnish that I use one day that I'm using or a particular paintbrush that I use. So, but he's all there just to make it easier for people because I think we're all time poor and somebody says, Oh, go onto block shampoos and you're, Oh well, where do I say? Well there's certain place on the high street like lush, but if you're not in the high street or whatever, and Amazon's brilliant. I would always say shop local if you can, but most of us, if we're honest, are using Amazon on an incredibly regular basis. So chat that thing that you need that sustainable product onto whatever else you're, and try and cut it down into one so it gets delivered at the same time and do it that way. What's, what's your Amazon website? It's just on the Lynn Lambo Morrison waste. So, and it will actually in the next few days we're going to put it in my bio on my Instagram accounts. So you've able to click, click in and shop till you drop

Speaker 2:

well what others? Well, in the notes of this podcast, I'll put all the details on that. I'm trying to go through that. Yeah. Normally at the end of my podcast I always ask just an interior designer to describe their, you know, their favorite room office garden or their favorite garden. And um, but my daughter came home from school the other day and she's already started secondary school and she told me she was talking about, they were describing the difference between a utopian society and a dystopian society and it's just brainy. I know that [inaudible] dystopia is what we're currently living in now within the plastic world. Right. Utopian is in an idealistic world. Yeah. So I want you to tell me in an idealist, cause that's actually what I love with the reason why I'm saying as well. I love this. I said to her, what's your show? Well, there's no plastics and she has to use the word plastic. And I was like, okay. So if that's the generalized form, give me a little bit more in depth. In an ideal world [inaudible] Korean society, what you know in let's say five years time from now, everything's perfect.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. What will have changed for you in an ideal world? Um, I think the key thing is not making it in the first place. We talk about recycling, but that still requires a lot of energy and all of that. I think we've got to find alternative ways of packaging things or not packaging things, buying, you know, like the lovely shop and Waitrose where unpackaged everything by going back to buy that way. And then when we do have to package something, um, I think we need to look at really good labeling system. So the consumer is given the choice that that package is going to be recycled and put back into the system. This package has not, and he's heading to landfill. So which cereal box are you going to buy it? So which packet of Christmas are you going to buy? And I think it needs to be unanimous across the country, across the globe if we can.

Speaker 3:

Um, if anyone got Donald Trump's number or anybody that I think that can give him a quick call, see if he's on board, I doubt it. Um, and then everybody knows and I think all companies should be accountable to that. And then the recycling needs to follow back from that. So across counties we need to have the same recycling program. It is so complicated, so difficult. And in fact on Morrison waste, what's one button they've popped in? So I'm one of the pages you can go in and type in your postcode and it will take you straight through to your local authority and the recycling rules and what you've been, what you don't know so that people can just have a read. It changes wherever you are, change to wherever you are, changes, you know, very regularly even when, when you know what you're doing. But you know, some places you've got to wash your white plastics and you can't combine them with your blacks.

Speaker 3:

Other places you can. And I think it's a bit like the highway code. Everybody should be really, you know, reading this and be completely up to date on it. It's rules to live by and I really hope that's what I think we need more clarity on the whole situation. It's really, really murky. It's as if nobody wants to take control of it because problem is just so big. Nobody really wants to have to put their hands up and say, okay, it's time to do this now I'm on it. I think you're on it. So give me the your website again. So worries on waste. It's www dot [inaudible] dot co. Dot. UK and uh, the interior design one is lovely to co. Dot. UK and they can find you on Instagram. Instagram, I'm there pretty much every five minutes. Yeah, they Lamborn yep. Chatting away. Interior design, sustainability. What I've had for breakfast, what I'm wearing, where I am, all those [inaudible] as a pleasure. And again, I'm sure I'll have you want to get into, cause we'll be talking about all the other amazing things working together again and doing more adventures. Thank you. Thank you.

Speaker 1:

There we are. We've come to the end of episode nine of the TV carpenter. I hope you enjoyed hearing about how we created a lovely sensory garden for Iowa on love your garden. And my interview with Lynn Lamborn. It's amazing isn't it? What one person can do. And like I said, I have known her for about five, six years and seeing what she's done with woes and wastes with the children and just by getting children involved. Like she said, the straw doesn't make a huge difference, but if you think about it, we've empowered children to, to think about the environment. You know, they're doing marches every Friday, you know, um, about climate change. They're actually making us think by just tapping into them. And she's seen that with her warriors and waste. And again, if you want to contact her, I'll put all her social media details in the notes to the podcast, but also you can go on her Amazon account and, and check out all the products that she's tried and tested.

Speaker 1:

And some of them are amazing. I remember seeing, she has a whole table for when she does her talks at the ideal home show and she talks about all the amazing products that you can use that can help relieve the single use plastics that we seem to be consuming constantly. A huge thank you as well to my sponsor thorn down who also are trying to help their environment with their eco paint. And remember you can get 15% discount by going onto thorn down dot code at UK and putting in the code T V carpenter. And just before I go, I just want to say a huge thank you to everybody for listening. The response to this podcast has been absolutely amazing. We're only on episode nine and already the numbers of people who are contacting me and saying hello saying how much they enjoy the podcast is overwhelming. If you liked this podcast, please don't forget to like and subscribe. Tell other people about it so they can enjoy it too. And if you want to contact me, I'm leaving a message. I am on Instagram or Twitter. It's Wayne Perry and they're holding a drill, wearing an orange t-shirts. You can't miss me. And once again, all I have to do is say thank you for listening to the TV carpet.