THE TV CARPENTER : Home Makeovers with Wayne Perrey

Series Highlights 1-6 TV Carpenter

November 08, 2019 Wayne Season 1 Episode 13
THE TV CARPENTER : Home Makeovers with Wayne Perrey
Series Highlights 1-6 TV Carpenter
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THE TV CARPENTER : Home Makeovers with Wayne Perrey
Series Highlights 1-6 TV Carpenter
Nov 08, 2019 Season 1 Episode 13
Wayne

To celebrate the first series I choose my favourite nuggets of wisdom from the first 6 episodes.

Starting with 
*Gemma Gear as she tells us how Interior Design trends are forecast.
*Kate Savil and Tamara Bridge, winners of C5 "Great Garden Challenge" tell us how to create a year long flower bed and what it was like to create a garden at "The Chelsea Flower Show" for Jo Malone and Jo Whiley
*Emer from "Spark & Bell" shares her lighting designs with us.
*Anna Jacobs Designer and colour psychologist explains the colour wheel.
*DIY Doers Steph Bron joins me as we share some DIY top tips

   

Show Notes Transcript

To celebrate the first series I choose my favourite nuggets of wisdom from the first 6 episodes.

Starting with 
*Gemma Gear as she tells us how Interior Design trends are forecast.
*Kate Savil and Tamara Bridge, winners of C5 "Great Garden Challenge" tell us how to create a year long flower bed and what it was like to create a garden at "The Chelsea Flower Show" for Jo Malone and Jo Whiley
*Emer from "Spark & Bell" shares her lighting designs with us.
*Anna Jacobs Designer and colour psychologist explains the colour wheel.
*DIY Doers Steph Bron joins me as we share some DIY top tips

   

Speaker 1:

On today's episode of the TV carpenter. I'll be looking back at the first six episodes and picking out some of my favorite bits and I'll be chatting with Gemma gear as she lifted the lid on how trends are created in the interior design world. Tamara and Kate who were the winners of the great garden challenge, they share their garden design tips and how they created a Chelsea flower show garden with Jo Malone EMA from spark and bell tells us how we can all have a bespoke lighting in our home and Anna Jacobs designer and color psychologist. She talks to us about the color wheel and I'm joined finally by my DL. I do as business partners staff as we talk top tips and how to gain confidence with your DIY

Speaker 2:

[inaudible].

Speaker 1:

Hello, my name is Wayne Perry and welcome to the T V carpenter. This is a podcast where I interview all my friends from the world of interior design and garden make-over shows. I've been lucky, really lucky to work in the best interior design shows. So I worked on interior design masters, which is BBC and Netflix and into the great interior design challenge as well. And also I do garden makeover shows. So I'm currently filming. I love your garden with M Titchmarsh fire TV and guard rescue with child and mic and the rich brothers and Eric. What that enables me to do is I get to speak to some amazing interior designers, garden designers, product designers, anyone really who can encourage you to pick up the tools or inspire you to create your dream home. Then I try and get them on the podcast. So we've just completed a season one if you haven't already heard it, if you haven't already listened.

Speaker 1:

What I've done have decided to look back at the first six episodes of season one and just pick out my best bits from all these guests. As you heard at the beginning, we've got a jam packed episode, but what I've done, I can say I've pulled out some of them, the best bits from each of them. So you get a flavor of what the, uh, TV capita podcast is really about. And then if you liked the sound of them, you can always go back and catch them. They'll always be there. So we start with Jemma gear. Gemma is, uh, an interior designer. She's a stylist. I work with her on interior design master's, but also she works in the world of all the magazines. If you ever buy any interior design magazines, she's probably styled for them ideal home magazines and good homes and all of these different magazines. She's all over them. And she really is a rising talent and she kind of lifts the lid on how these trends are created. Do you realize that that's what you're doing? Do you realize you're slowly filtering it into stream mainstream, the kind of editorials you do? So

Speaker 3:

yeah, it is really to take that on as far as people to do that. For me, it's just really important that I'm kind of getting my side across that as well. Like good. We have study the, the trends, the interior trends that are coming up. So, um, this year we'll see like kind of the year was living corals. So that's how we interrupted that into that room set. Um, but it's kind of you want to help these brief, you get these to where you want to be creative, but you always want to add your touch and your style and your flag to it whilst appealing to a huge like demographic. Um, you know, you kind of have to think you want to appeal to male and female and the older generation, the younger generation is quite vast. Um, and it is, it's so nice to know that people are seeing your work. And as I say, when I went back there to the show, I T I went back there a few times whilst it was open and I'd just go back and look at the room, set the gun and take it all in. Cause obviously, you know, some weeks a bit mad you don't reach,

Speaker 1:

I can't see the wood for the trees.

Speaker 3:

Like when you kind of, you got, you've gone away, you've had a proper night sleep, you know, you go back and you're on the fresh mind and it's so nice. And I kind of see people walking around and looking at the room sets and um, some of the going, wow, there's wow, look at that. And sometimes I'm going, Oh, that's about out beverage. But again, just you kind of enjoy that.

Speaker 1:

You talked about um, um, the color of the year. What's that about?

Speaker 3:

So every year times I released that color of the year and it's kind of, um, a lot of trainings follow that. A lot of companies and brands follow that color of the year. And so this year it was living coral, which is like, um, I'm sure everyone knows, but it is just this quite warming, vibrant called color. And so we definitely, we felt like we needed to incorporate that into the room that somewhere and obviously in the kitchen diner [inaudible] perfect thing.

Speaker 1:

[inaudible] amazing. It's interesting how, you know, the public has slowly influenced by certain certain things. Like we were talk about trends. Where do you, where do you get your inspiration for, for trends or what magazines or what things do you look look at to, to see what's coming up

Speaker 3:

and so yeah, magazines. I mean it's funny now as I'm kind of a stylist, I do actually do a lot of the, the um, styling myself for magazines. So for me it really is all the design chain. So you know, you've got the shades in Milan, you've got Jack harassed, um, where all the brands coming together with that as they call that trend Bibles and almost seeing the future. I think I'm, I don't know, I don't know if I can really disclose this, but I know there is a company as well. They have a trend Bible which, um, it genuinely oversees the upcoming trends for the, for the next two years, which is just in fame to think that that, you know, is already full accosted. But that's how, that's how we put up our trends and things inspire us than even, you know, fashion as well. I know this sounds silly, but fashion can really influence interior transport in terms of colors than effective. What I mean,

Speaker 1:

I was lucky enough to work on channel five, the great garden challenge, which was a big competition to find the best pair of gun designers. And I was that, I got Kate and tomorrow who were the winners of the show on my podcast. And uh, I interviewed them separately and Kate's, some of the best bits that she was talking about is how to create, um, a garden boarder, but how to sustain him. So how to plant things in there that are gonna last throughout the season. And then tomorrow I picked her brains about what it was like to create a show garden at Chelsea flower show. And she, um, was come and Kate were commissioned together to do a Chelsea flower show garden with Joe Wiley and Joe Malone. So Joe whiny from BBC radio two and Joe Malone, the scent fragrance lady and she lifted the lid on how, how scent is really important

Speaker 1:

and is really interested in working on all the other garden shows. And things I didn't really think about is obviously some, some of these make-over shows they over plant. So they've got to get that instant reaction cause the, you know, the, the homeowner comes out, you know, on my show, they come out, like open their eyes and you want the wow factor and everything he needs to look like it's finished. But in realistic terms, I've seen like people like yourself doing, you know, home gardens you get to, and actually there's probably a third of those plans are, shouldn't be in there, you know, and the reveal gone because the garden has to mature, has to, you know, there's too many plants in there sometimes.

Speaker 4:

Definitely. And I think, yeah, that's a really hard balance. Again, I think more of an I, and we've had that experience with show gardens where you've got to make the garden look like a finished garden. Um, but likewise, you know, field planting, um, a blank canvas guard and it's gonna look really bad, um, for say five days. So you might want to overstuff something which are the like soft, fluffy planting, um, just for few years to give yourself some color and impact. You're not looking at there up until your shrubs. I see a bit more mature. So there is, um, there is sort of, you can do what the television programs done, but you could instead of, uh, over stuffing with perennials, you could use annuals, which basically means after the years finish to take them all up and then he start again next year if this, it's finding the balance and then often that comes down to the budget, which it, which is really important. But yeah, I think it's quite, um, it can be quite steaming when, uh, these gardens on Peleliu overstuffed and, um, super prissy. But yeah, you have, you've got to think about sort of seasonality of what the garden's gonna look like throughout the whole year rather than just that sort of snapshot in time.

Speaker 1:

No, absolutely. And that's the whole seasonality thing again is something I learned. We do you remember Thea who was our garden producer on the show. Lovely. Then she, she is absolutely amazing. And, um, I remember just when we, we'd be planting some borders and things. Her job was to make sure that, yeah, it looks good now, but he, you know, she's, you know, cause we always film in the summer, she says if we're not careful you can do a gorgeous board and then in two months time the whole board will die and there's nothing to sustain it through the winter. So she's very conscious of going, okay, there needs to be more than just pretty plans for this month. It needs to, you know, need, cause there's some, there's my late flowers and early flowering so you know, for winter. So how important is that when you're with your garden design?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, absolutely. And that's key really. When you're employing a garden designer, they take that stress away from you. So they, you know, any good designer will basically create a planting pan, which is another service that's part of the package. And they can basically create a scheme that will give you flower every month and basically your and developed throughout the years. You've always got something interesting to look at or something that's new and exciting that's coming up and then well something's going over. You've got that sort of flow throughout the year with the new plants coming through. Um, and that, that could be actually just the seed heads at the very end of the year. Um, instead of chopping everything that keeping some of that sort of, um, the decay plants can look quite beautiful in, you know, when you've got a frosty mornings and you've got the seed had said some plants, um, that can look equally as beautiful and it's just having that dieting, um, of what to do. And that's what you'll get from a garden designer.

Speaker 1:

Um, I'm just interested the whole, cause obviously it was a, a Joe wildly sent gums. So Joe Wila was the presenter, the BBC too. But, so Andy was she involved, but then you also had Joe Malone, the, the fragrance lady that they, um, my wife loves her products. And so how much was she involved then?

Speaker 5:

Jaramillo was fantastic and actually really important in all design refinement almost. Cause we knew what we wanted the garden to look like, but we hadn't quite got there, you know, this is 24 hours. Um, and um, we went to go meet her and her peaceful, um, shop in Elizabeth street in London, um, done, got to know her. She talks about her way of designing her fragrances, what got her going, you know, the, the uh, inspiration behind her fragrances. And it was really interesting talking to her because she really explained the link between stent and our memories and, and really understood how that works. And so that she, you know, said it's the only sentence that looked into your memory. So that's why when you smell something it can take you straight back to when you were a child. It's got that sort of powerful effect. And for us that was the link. We were like, wow, this is definitely joining all the dots. And so for us that was brilliant. And then J why there was just the treat [inaudible] going around, the nurse do with us with all the plants and got stuck in and she wants to do, you know, I think if she wasn't dragged away by her teeth, she would some help to stop the whole thing. So for us it was really lucky and I'm really excited to such nice people.

Speaker 1:

That sense memory, that scent memory for me is like highest things remind me of my Nana there. They'd just take me right back. That whole Palm of violet. What sense and what memory do you have? What, Oh, what flower does that for you?

Speaker 5:

So the Zen garden itself was essentially constructed out of Payton. I've sent memories and I very much had memories of riding my bike really fast, stupid lifts when I was little, you know, especially through the puddles and you get that kind of earthy smell and those things sort of just caught flowers in the garden. My grandmother was always grabbing things in her garden and vegetables and, and roses and all those sorts of wonderful things. Take me straight back and remind me very much has her, and Kate was walking back from college with all of the art material and things, you know, and it the rain on hot concrete as she's walking back struggling with all this stuff, the high visibility still on their heads. We, you know, we've got the concrete in there. We had the woods got the um, sort of cuff style garden at the, at the back. So I think once you start talking about it to people, what's interesting is once they understand what you mean, everyone's got one relates to everyone. Unfortunately for me, my strongest wanted a funny Contini smell that reminds us it's all for school then. Yeah,

Speaker 6:

I said that no gag is to God,

Speaker 5:

but it's quite an acute, a bit of tea. I think that you can transform where somebody is simply by offering that scent.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. I live in London and the gardens in London generally are really small. Everyone's, you know, got a little postage stamp of a garden or try and cram things in. But then I went to see my parents who live in Leeds and live in this beautiful farm house and their garden is quite rambling and that, because I knew I was speaking to you, I want to speak to you more about the larger gardens. So if you had a, um, a huge garden, which also is really daunting but you haven't got a lot of money and you liked the whole meadow look on a budget, what kind of plants would you put into that, that could, that could give you that kind of lush feel but without having to spend an absolute fortune and over planted?

Speaker 5:

Well I think, um, if you're sort of going with the idea that we were in a big garden and it's sort of, you know, mentally type lurk around you, then again we were straight back to trees, you know, use trees in a way you can frame views, you can take away the boundaries. They would, I don't always like is seeing a book for the garden and if you plant trees and shrubs that just sort of stuffing the edges, you can almost imagine that space is going to continue on. Um, and my biggest trick of all, if I'm honest, I've given away my top tip now is um, if I designed a garden and you've got your sort of lawn area, you've got way the piles are going, the borders, et cetera, et cetera. Sometimes you can't always do it all in one go. And so what we did is in Mark it all out and then you simply cut the grass and you allow some bits to say short and then other areas to stay long. So where you've got your ideas for where you want your borders, the grass is longer and sometimes that's all you need. If he then stopped planting constants that long grass, they roses, you can have some wonderful perennials that will cope with that. Suddenly you've got this very, very beautiful space that guides the iRound and you can walk around it like a garden. It really does work. But what we've had to do is Mark out cut the grass. It's free

Speaker 1:

because I think we're so conditioned to go, well you can't have grass there. You've got to, if you want to take that out of the borders. But you know, if grass inhabits any of your borders, it's almost like [inaudible] invaded in is we did it. But actually if you use that as as some kind of sculptural clap of grass, then that, that helps that border to look, look full.

Speaker 5:

Yeah. And it does change from year to year. So if you have a wet year, a hot dry yet, you know, it's going to vary. But same in the garden. I'm looking at my now and I'm set out and it hasn't been all summer. I'm in exactly that fashion. I know where I want my borders. I just haven't had the time to get in there and sort it out. And, um, it just gives me something to the cat and look forward to as well rather than just the, uh, kind of blank counter

Speaker 1:

working with interior designers on TV or even with my private carpentry. I get to um, come across some amazing product designers, particularly some amazing lighting designers. And I was first introduced to this lovely lady called [inaudible] who has her own company called spark and bell. Now spark and bell have now been featured in all the major interior design magazines. They were featured quite a lot in interior design masters and she, EMA is just passionate about her design and it's really simple stuff but looks really beautiful and high end. And I interviewed her and she gave me the insight what it's like to have accompany where she can create things bespoke for her clients. So if you like particular light but you want the flex a certain length or you want things adapting slightly within reason, she can do that. And she's able to do that because she likes to do everything in house and doesn't sell wholesale. And I really admire for that. So have a listen to see how EMA creates beautiful bespoke lights for her clients. If your buying a light or your design wanting lights for your room, is there any rules or any tips that you would give our listeners when, when choosing what kind of light to have in the room

Speaker 5:

and material obviously is one of the main things and sometimes I get asked as well. I mean we inherited a lot of rooms with Chrome and sometimes customers are worried about the clash of brass and Chrome but I wouldn't worry too much about having everything matchy matchy like my kitchen, I've installed my bras lights but I'm not going to replace the cooker or the sink or anything like that. And I mean that felt to be kind of quite specific to the consumer. I'd also got to think of classically in terms of what's gonna last you the longest to spell. I'm a big believer in buying kind of warrants well and then hopefully it will work with your changing interiors again, getting it right. I got a lot of comes them people get in contact and I'm send me ceiling Heights and stuff. I've done, I've written a blog posts about it to help then my customers, but getting the length right and thinking in terms of, well how can I adapt this specifically for the space?

Speaker 5:

And so that I think the height of the is very important. You don't want this directly in your eyesight or you want to be able to make sure that are no one told total up your hives. They're not going to knock their heads. Um, and again, just, I think it's very much about personal taste. I have to eat a Walnut and I love brass on trying to sneak more wellness into my highest house. They, um, like, you know, I've found in terms of like designing lights, if like, if I keep to the very kind of, um, obvious colors of black white bras, but they are the ones that, that worked the best for spaces. And sometimes when I deviate off color-wise, it doesn't work as well, and that's fine. But I've, if you stick to the classic colors again, it's probably gonna last you the longer it's gonna probably save your space.

Speaker 5:

Even if you changed your furnishings around you, those classic and materials and um, and colors are gonna, you know, stand the test of, you know, I think in insurance there's a lot of changing sides. It's like the fashion industry that kind of turnover in, in materials. And I think the way that I'm trying to do that, I know that I'm obviously looking and seeing what the materials are working, but they all generally are from classic design. Yeah. So if you think of cane, you're looking back at the 1920s and thirties brass, I think even though it's very popular at the moment, I think at the very Catholic material that will withstand the kind of, the changing trends and again, woods and things like that. So I'd be careful with going with anything that's a little bit too, um, pod like that might change too fast for your interior and therefore you'd have to invest in new lighting. And yeah, it's very much about your, your taste and style. I'm so lucky that I have amazing customers with amazing style that they talked me in their photos because I'm asked to be spoiled on Instagram. All these amazing interiors by all these have very, uh, creative customers that just have such beautiful homes. I think that they work very well in them

Speaker 1:

because your a workshop where I know that Nicki spoke to you in the past where she's rang you and said, okay, I want to use this. Or you know, they can actually talk to you and say, well how, how long can the leads be? And can we have it really long is for the shop window for example. I need it this length because I know he's going to be in the display window and you can make things be spoken, tailor things. We spoke. You think that's, uh, an important part of your business?

Speaker 5:

Yes, definitely. And, and again, when I was kind of doing that, my first has um, I was, I was, it was making something very specific for certain parts of my daughter's room and to be able to kind of pick the length and, and there are some amazing, I love him companies out there, but a lot of their lights might be just kind of off the shelf and boxed and ready to go because on the small workshop on, on, on a maker or such on that, all the parts here ready to make each order as they come in. It is no problem to make a longer lead on something or slightly change the width of something I might have to order a part of math might take a bit longer. But to me that's just part of my service in terms of the ability to be able to kind of custom make it to fit.

Speaker 5:

Exactly. And that's why I always encourage people to measure for spaces, but simple thing of making a wall, like beside your bed and measuring the distance from the light to the T to the switch so you can just very easily reach out from your bed and turn it off. All those things. I always encourage customers to kind of let me know because then you're just getting exactly the right life. So yeah, I think, I think that's definitely the advantage of, you know, he walked into, that's IBA. Jessie doesn't do fantastic ones up. Don't walk into any more, but orders, they have beautiful icing, but they're all packaged, ready to go. Yeah. Um, so yeah, I think the advantage of this situation is that I can work with, with them that makes them just honest like Nikki or completely just, you know, regular consumer buying for their house and I can have a chat with them and it's usually not that much bother for me to adjust something. But yeah. So they, yeah, definitely very handy. I think

Speaker 1:

my next guest and clip is from the lovely Anna Jacobs. This was probably one of the most successful podcasts, um, of the first series I think because not only is she is amazing, um, artists and um, lighting designer and product designer, but also she's a really clever color psychologist and she makes it really easy to understand. So I decided just to pick out the little bit about the color psychology and how to use the color wheel. But if you do get chance to go back and listen to this full episode, I highly recommend it. Just her journey and her story is amazing. Some of them will be interested in polling colo in their house. Obviously glace that color psychology. You can spend the whole week doing it, but what's the, what's the bones like? What, what, what's the starting points of it and give us some top tips around it. Yeah,

Speaker 7:

I think the most important question you need to ask yourself, and this is what I used to ask my interior design clients as well, is what do you want to feel when you walk into the room that you're putting color in or you're designing or what do you want to feel when you walk into your apartment or house? And that's the most important thing because our home and how we feel in our home is incredibly important for our wellbeing is one of the most fundamental things that will support us feeling happy and healthy. So for example, when I was working in the law firm, it was really intense. I was working really long hours and I was working with color all the time. It was in, you know, it was just stimulating. I was talking, talking, talking. And when I got home, all I wanted was no stimulation whatsoever.

Speaker 7:

I just couldn't cope with anything. So my house was completely white and that was really important for me, for my wellbeing. Whereas now, when I'm a single parent of young children, when I opened the door, now I want it to be bright and colorful and happy and feel creative. So now my flat, it has lots of bright color in it. So it might be a different thing whereby for example, when you go into your bedroom, you might want it to feel really peaceful and calm. So then once you've discovered what you want to feel, then it will immediately start indicating where you want to look in terms of certain types of colors. So for example, then you use a color wheel, which is really easy to get. You can look it up in Google, get them on Amazon art shops, lots of different places, and you start looking at the cooler colors, which are blues greens, some of the cooler purples.

Speaker 7:

And they actually having have a physically calming effect on you. And this is not just um, a kind of airy fairy where we kind of theory, it's actually scientifically they've actually tested. People buy logically and found that people's heart rates actually lower when they're in the context of blue or when they're looking at blue for example. So it's very real. This is not just in the mind. Yeah, yeah there is really good color for stimulating your mind for example. So then, but if you want to feel sort of more intellectually stimulated, you might have yellow in your study or your office and you'll quite often find that sophisticated businesses will have yellow in a room where people are having to brainstorm for example. But I think what I'm particularly interested, and you know you can learn a lot about this color psychology is it's about how you combine colors together.

Speaker 7:

It's about color palettes because it's all very well knowing the yellow stimulates your intellect, blue calms you down and red gets you fired up. But how do you actually apply that in the context of a room? Cause you can't have everything just blue for example. So then what you want to do is you, you can dial up or dial down the sort of calmness or energy that you want in a particular room. By combining it with different colors. So for example, if you want something really calm, you might do it all in blue, but what you need to do is vary the blue. So you want darker blues and lighter blues and you want brighter blues and you want dollar blues and it's all about contrast. And you'll know when from all this work you do. So much of good design is based on contrast with rough and smooth light and dark and all of that.

Speaker 7:

So you want to build that into your color palette. But if you then decide, actually I want to little bit more energy in the room, I don't want you to do that kind of calm and flat, then you might go look at your color wheel and look at the color next to blue, which will be a green. So then you start adding a little bit of green in it and that's just going to lift that color scheme and make you feel a little bit more stimulated next to it on the color wheel. Now want to say yes? Yes. So this is, so this is, so if you want to just dial it up a little bit, yeah, go to the color next to it. But if as you were saying, you want to really feel, um, really happy and energetic and more stimulated, then go to the color on the opposite side of the color wheel.

Speaker 7:

So on the opposite side of blue is orange. So then you could do your room half and half blue and orange and that is going to be really full on. It's gonna, you know, sort of make you feel quite energetic but doing half and half is pretty full on. So then once you've gone down there, even think or maybe gone over the top, so then you dial it back. So then probably what you would do is a base of the cooler color, which is blue, which is a slightly Carmen color. And then maybe do just a highlight of orange and that will be fundamentally canned, but with a bit of stimulation. But then you can dial it up. The more orange you add, the more energy it's going to have. And of course what's great about orange is that it's a really happy color. So most people will find that it brings a smile to their face when they look at orange.

Speaker 7:

Well, it's one of those Marmite colors. So what I always say to people is there's no point going by the theory of color psychology and say, Oh look, I want to feel happy in my room. So that's where I put orange in it. But maybe you hate orange, so you putting orange in your room, it's not gonna make you happy, it's gonna make you miserable. So with all of these things you have to take into account your personal response to color. Also, the color psychology that you can read about. What I find really interesting is that our personal response to color is affected by so many different things. It can be affected by, um, particular events in our childhood that have been associated with the color. It's not the school uniform. A lot of people who have a really intense color for their schooling form, it is a color that they really disliked for quite a long time. As an adult. It might be that you grew up in a house that was just all yellows, oranges. And therefore as an adult you have a reaction to that. So whereas yellow and oranges have posts to make you feel cheerful and happy, actually it will make you feel, it will kind of push you away or make you feel repulsed in a way. Yeah. Because you want to move on from that sort of childhood state. So

Speaker 1:

yeah. That's, that's so interesting. Cause I remember, I remember, I can't remember where as he were saying that I remembered listening to an interview of this, this girl who loved, who painted her house and always had yellow in the house and she couldn't work it out. Yeah. And then she spoke to a color psychologist and they realized that she lived in a terrorist house in a, like in Sheffield and her front door was painted yellow. She on the streets, she was the only house and mum was quite wacky and painted it bright yellow. So when she got home it was home and she felt safe. So she hadn't realized that until she looked back. And when that's what I've always got yellow accents or yellow of where because I feel home and I feel safe.

Speaker 7:

That's really interesting. That's exactly it. So I would say the three things you want to take into account of um, well four things really when you're choosing colors in your home, you've got a psychology is how do you want to feel? Yeah. Um, look at the theory of color psychology and it's really easy to look up all that things like, you know, orange is supposed to make you happy. Blue is supposed to calm you down. Yeah. You look at you, you get experienced with your own personal response to colors. So it's really worth just going through magazines and going to colors and just just listening to your own body and your own mind and see how you respond. And then the final, really important part of the jigsaw is the direction of the natural light in the room that you're decorating. Because that also then completely affects the color in the room.

Speaker 7:

So, for example, in a North facing room, you are going to have quite a bluish cold colored light, which has, would be quite a gray light and it's also going to be much darker most of the time. So for example, if you've decided I want to feel warm and cozy when I want to walk when I walk into my living room. And the problem is it's North facing, so therefore it has a blue light. What you want to do is counteract the blueness and the grayness of the natural light with the warm colors of the color wheel. Because those warm oranges, reds, yellows, pinks actually do have a nurturing, warming effect. So that's how you then start doing it as well. But it might be, um, this is all might sound too complicated.

Speaker 1:

That's all you've made it really simple. Yeah,

Speaker 7:

he wants to feel welcoming and warm in your north-facing living room. But you hate reds, orange and yellow. So this is what we have to take into account everything. So then, then you look at other ways to make, um, a North facing room warm. And it might be that you have a blue base in there, which is sort of Cami cause that's the colors you like. But you warm it up with warm wood colors. So you really look at the words and the the stones and all the hard materials as well. They use more metallics. You might then use golden copper, which brings the warmth in a different way. It's quite a subtle thing in a way, but you can really do it yourself. And the the thing that I would advise everybody is to plan it all out on paper first. Don't stop buying lots of things and spending lots of money and painting lots of balls.

Speaker 7:

We really experiment and it will say you so much time on money. In fact, one of the things I suggest people do is rather than going up buying Christians and taking the backs and not quite the right color, or you know, to see working out what kind of colors you like in a room, just take a piece of clothing, go into your kids' wardrobes, go into your wardrobes, get a tee shirt and plunk it on the sofa and go, Oh, okay, actually read, really works in here. Or Oh my God, that pink looks awful. And just start trying out things like that. And you're really soon start getting to sort of familiar with how the light and the color is working.

Speaker 1:

And finally I decided to include a clip from my business partner, Steph Bron. Together we created the DIY doers and throw out the whole series. We every now and then drop in and give some top tips. Um, we just showcase some of the stuff we've answered for the Sunday times how a magazine or I picked out some questions that we'd answered on our Facebook group, the DIY do as club, which is there to encourage people to pick up the tools and empower them so they're not scared to learn. DIY. And this one was a really interesting little top tip. It was just something silly. Someone couldn't unscrew a screw out of water. I think about four or five screws that she couldn't get out of a wall. And we had loads of different responses on our Facebook group. And I just thought this was a really simple way of explaining how DIY is achievable even when you're at a loss, but also to talk about how sometimes just having a support group like the DIY do as Facebook group and how having that there to help you can really empower you to be the best DIY do or that you can be

Speaker 1:

interesting. You're on our website. Um, the DOD has website where people ask for advice. So there's this one woman who did an amazing makeover in her bathroom, but she had one of those like, um, you know, those handrails that you have for an elderly person. And she'd, she'd said, I'd done, she done all this work and she just wanted to remove that and there was one screw that she couldn't get out. And she was, she was really struggling with them and it was lovely because we, we hadn't got a chance to answer the question, but all of a sudden, I think we'd like seven or eight different responses to have this experience. But yeah. And there, there were like, with their willing her, I think she'll let three or four screws to get out and each day she kept coming back going, I've got them all but not this one.

Speaker 1:

What you recognize it, it was like a, a winning battle and it was brilliant. So a lot of people like mentioned, like spraying WD 40 into the screen. That was one. Yeah. Um, what was interesting, um, there was, uh, we do something I learned is rather than, you know, lefty Lucy to on Titans, you lefty loosy to tighten it and righty tighty to tight and left elusive to and do, which is a great mantra to remember, but people say tighten it first to unscrew it, right? So you slide by tightening it right. You know, you've probably got more grips, turn, turn it the right way and it gets it moving and then it's easier to unscrew it. Yeah. Yeah,

Speaker 8:

definitely. It's the same, have a lot of things that actually, um, it's why, uh, we always tell people when they are opening their stopcock not to fully open it. So if you've got a stop tap and it's a brass tap and you have to righty tighty it to have it off and you should do that every, you know, year at the very least, um, then when you open it, you shouldn't fully open it because if you've opened it all the way, you don't have that lefty loosy wiggle room to then turn it off. It is invaluable. It's an invaluable way of getting it going. So there was a really interesting one that I've learned from this that was to do with an elastic band and what they were saying was to put the elastic bands, elastic band head into imagine it's a cross screw, the sort of flat bit of a big elastic band into that cross and then the screwdriver and I would actually recommend probably using a hand held screwdriver rather than a power tool because it will give you a bit more traction. Um, and pushing that on top of the elastic band and then turning, I thought that was really good

Speaker 1:

cause you've got like a rubber grip then he's made your screwdriver and it, it was one of those things like you know, you can in this game you kind of feel like you've heard it all. And I was like, I would never thought of that.

Speaker 8:

Somebody just thought, yeah, that's a great idea to just get a bit of grit and it works. She's like, Oh that's sure

Speaker 1:

all out and she will let you, I think like I said, I think the thumbs up went crazy.

Speaker 8:

I mean I just sort of jumped onto this thread and like the problem was solved and the everyone had just, this is what's so lovely about the DIY Zeus close because the sense of community spirit, you know, we've said this so many times, but it is the reason we created that group because you and I both have experiences of building forums and it is, it's a, it's a terrifying place to venture into. And even I look at um, forums on Screwfix, you know, kind of general, not trade specific somewhere that general public could have access to. And I do think that the internet can be a dangerous place for information, you know, because the, the source of that information needs to have a viability. And what, what's nice is we sort of scaled all that down, taken really ordinary everyday issues, you know, for wanting a better way of describing it because it's, these are things that are perfectly within everybody's capability. There is no reason why you would hire somebody to take a handle off your bathroom wall. It's essentially removing four screws. But in that moment where you are unable to remove the screw and then the sort of confidence drops and then you think, I haven't got the right gear, I don't know how to do this. And you are able to jump onto a place where you can ask for help and advice. But without any sort of judgment or opinion that might make you then feel even less confident in what you're doing.

Speaker 1:

Nah, I think I'm acquire an adapt. You know, I'm, I'm quite, uh, Abel carpenter, I've worked quite a lot, but there's a carpentry, um, forum. I won't go on, I won't ask the question because as soon as you had were like, well, why don't, you know, you know, and you're like, yeah, which is why we set up the DOI ideas and that spirit of learning there.

Speaker 8:

And I think what's so nice about this as well is that people are teaching other people from their own experiences. And because it's in a domain where there isn't, you know, we're not talking about kind of dealing with regulations or you know, huge amount of safety or things that people shouldn't be touching in their home. We're talking about like it's quite general day to day issue. Um, and I think even when I visited the odd sort of plumbing for him or anything like that, I, I have been able to obtain really useful snippets of information. Um, but what's quite interesting is the way that it's the way that it's told can be quite well I wouldn't do that because if he did that then you know, this is going to turn to that. And that can be a bit course of leaks where whereas, because I've got a trained, you know, and for somebody that you haven't, you have that experienced knowledge when you read something like that.

Speaker 8:

When I read something like that, we're able to go, Oh, that's a great idea. Actually. It's probably not great to connect a flexi hose onto an ice nighter because you haven't got the olive in there and it is chamfered on the edge, which is meant to receive or not. But for somebody who's not doing that daily, that's a hugely overwhelming piece of information that could just make you spiral into. I don't, you know, so I think I'm going to go there. It's really nice to, and, and again, part of what we were promoting was the, the knowledge to know when to not do it as well. It's completely fine and it is acceptable. And these trades exist for a reason. Regulations exist for a reason. It's important to educate yourself in that way. Um, but when it comes to things that you are able to do yourself, quite honestly, save the money and don't pay for somebody to come along and do the simplest of tasks. And even if that just comes down to securing your home in an emergency, you know, knowing rising tide to turn the stopcock off nowhere, the stopcock is nowhere. Your fuse box is no how to turn it off. Know how to deal with these things because it otherwise you, you're vulnerable really aren't you in your own home without even really realizing.

Speaker 1:

So there we are there some of the best bits of episodes, one to six of the TV carpenter. I hope you liked all those top tips. Um, and if you wanted to hear anything more from those guests, don't forget the back catalog of the TV. Carpenter is there for you to listen to, listen to the full episodes and hear their full stories. Um, but also listen out for season two, uh, series two. We'll have lots more interviews. I've already lined up all the winners and the contestants from interior design masters from BBC and Netflix show that was on recently. I've got some interviews lined up with love your garden, Katie Rushworth and Alan Titchmarsh and lots, lots more. If you have any ideas of any guests that you'd like me to interview, let me know. You can contact me on Wayne Perry on Instagram or Twitter. Don't forget to send a review like and subscribe to the TV carpenter podcast so you don't miss those future episodes. And all that's left for me to say is thank you for listening to the TV carpenter.