THE TV CARPENTER : Home Makeovers with Wayne Perrey

Wayne Chats with Frank, contestant from 'Interior Design Masters'

November 29, 2019 Wayne / Frank Newbold Season 2 Episode 16
THE TV CARPENTER : Home Makeovers with Wayne Perrey
Wayne Chats with Frank, contestant from 'Interior Design Masters'
Chapters
THE TV CARPENTER : Home Makeovers with Wayne Perrey
Wayne Chats with Frank, contestant from 'Interior Design Masters'
Nov 29, 2019 Season 2 Episode 16
Wayne / Frank Newbold

Welcome back to season 2 of the TV Carpenter

For this episode I chat with Frank Newbold the runner up of the smash hit BBC/Netflix show 'Interior Design Masters'
We talk about his experience on the show and what life has been like since the show aired.
Guest: www.franknewbold.com


Sponsor: To take advantage of the generous 15% discount from my sponsor Thorndown, please visit http://bit.ly/TVCarpenter. Discount code: TVCarpenter

Contact me: Wayne Perrey on Twitter and Instagram.

Music: "What's the Angle" by Shane Ivers

Show Notes Transcript

Welcome back to season 2 of the TV Carpenter

For this episode I chat with Frank Newbold the runner up of the smash hit BBC/Netflix show 'Interior Design Masters'
We talk about his experience on the show and what life has been like since the show aired.
Guest: www.franknewbold.com


Sponsor: To take advantage of the generous 15% discount from my sponsor Thorndown, please visit http://bit.ly/TVCarpenter. Discount code: TVCarpenter

Contact me: Wayne Perrey on Twitter and Instagram.

Music: "What's the Angle" by Shane Ivers

Speaker 1:

On today's show of the TV carpenter. I'll be chatting with Frank, the runner up from the BBC and Netflix, hit show interior design masters. Hello and welcome to the TV carpenter. My name is Wayne Perry. Now, if you have a passion for creating a beautiful home and garden, this is the podcast for you. The aim of this podcast is I interview all my friends from the world of interior design and garden make-over shows all the people I've worked with, the people behind the scenes. So I'll introduce you to all these different guests who can hopefully inspire you to create your dream home. On this week's episode, I'd be talking with Frank, who I worked with on interior design masters. He was actually one of the runners up. He was their finalist runner up from the show. But before we chat with Frank, I'm going to share with you a mini interview I did with Ben and Caroline from thorn down.co. Dot. UK. Now, thorn down are my sponsors of the TV carpenter podcast. As I probably mentioned on lots of my episodes, I actually love this pain company. They're amazing. They're very, uh, careful with the environment. They're brilliant. Eco brand, eco paint brand. And I asked lots of questions and one of them was about the awards that the company have won. So have a little listen to what Ben and Caroline had to say. So thorn Dan's been going to officially for over a year and you've already wants more, some awards.

Speaker 2:

So what were they? Well, we were very lucky to work with an amazing brand and agency and um, they, and we work together to create something that was going to really sort of show thorn down as being a sort of a special high quality, um, forward thinking brand. So we won the silver pen Pentacles and also the F design award and therefore branding, but also they do to go into the realms of packaging as well. So not only was the brand and recognize as being so very much a breakthrough brand in a very oversaturated kind of payments industry, um, but also the fact that all the teams have been designed, um, as a different shape. So they're not your bookstand a 10 shapes, but what, what, what was the thinking behind that? The shape of your teams? So it's pretty much twofold. It was, um, firstly the fact that when you quite often use paintings that the opening is so small that you struggled to get your brush into it.

Speaker 2:

They're quite fiddly and they're unstable. So the whole thing was about making them shorter and fatter so that you have a greater center of gravity, you have a wider opening. So even on our one 50 mill tens, you can still get a decent sized paintbrush into them. But also we leave a larger gap at the top as well. So it's one of the other frustrations that you opened this brand new tenor paint, you have to stir it properly, as with all pet Inns. So you're stirring away and you're losing half the paint over the side of the Tims. So we're like, well, we'll just leave a cut by a centimeter or something on top of the paint before the lit. So when you stay on it, it

Speaker 1:

stays within the tin. So you're not losing any pain. You're still getting the right amount of pain, but you've just designed the teens just to be a little bit higher and a little bit taller. Yeah, and just more user friendly. It's probably, it's just little things like that people think about that people don't think about it but actually makes the the end usage so much more, you know, easy to use. It really is the little things like the design of the tin that make using thorn down a real special experience and also the X so cool that they've offered my listeners 15% discount on any of their online products. So if you go to [inaudible] dot co dot. UK and type in the code, the TV carpenter, you can receive that discount.

Speaker 1:

I am so pleased I got to chat with Frank. Not just once but twice. Frank is a good friend of mine now. I worked with him quite a lot on interior design masters and I made a point of interviewing lots of the contestants from the show before the show went out on air. And it was quite nice because I've got a perspective of their, their views of the show and how they thought he went before it went out. And then what I've done, I've now the shows out and the dust has settled a little bit and I've then contacted them again and had another conversation with them about what, what that life's like now. The show has gone out. So the first part of this podcast, you hear the interview with Frank where we did it I think about two weeks before the show went out. And, uh, it was, uh, it was really lovely and he was really positive and really excited about it all. And he's equally as positive afterwards. So, and the first part is before the show and out. And the second part is after the show and the dust has settled and what he's up, what is going on in his life now. So that listening to the conversation, both conversations that had with Frank from interior design masters.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Frank, thank you. Thank you for coming on my podcast. Obviously we're prerecording this before the show goes out, but we know how well you did. You got all the way to the final. Congratulations.

Speaker 4:

Thank you very much. I'd like to think that I helped you get there. You did indeed. I mean I think we definitely still got quite rapport with each other and we were definitely struggled together. You work unfortunately pushing my team fo your sense and came and helped me along the way. I'm doing your top tips and that probably saved me on quite a few occasions as well, which it's your inner wisdom of how should we say, TV. Carpentry.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it was, I had switched from working with you and he's, and for people who don't know, when they, um, when they and the carpenters get and decorators get matched up with the contestants, they literally pull the names out of a hat. So, um, they, you know, it worked out well. Yeah, we worked together quite a lot, but it's just the way it worked. We ended up being put together so you could, I know even though a lot of the percent contestants would would requests people, but it just didn't work like that, but it just worked out. But I think I worked on the job. Majority of yours.

Speaker 4:

Yeah know every time it was like the day before you got turn location and we'd always be like, Oh he's, he's the carpenter and he's the decorator. Every time I've got you. It was always a big sigh of relief cause sometimes you work with other tradesman better than others. We certainly work very, very well. So yeah. Thanks for everything you did on the show.

Speaker 1:

No, you're welcome. You're welcome. Just also how you ended up being on the show. What I love, and this happened with quite a few of the clients, same for ju. Same for Nikki. Just through connections and knowing each of them. We worked with each other. Um, the idol home show, we were styling a show house at the idle home show and we were chatting about their, their past series of like the great interior design challenge. And then I told you about, cause I knew I was booked for the, um, into the new show. So I remember telling you about it and I actually sent you the application form for you to do the show. I think I sent you the link

Speaker 4:

he did. But I think there was a slight change in communication because I think you were saying did you want to work on it? Production team kind of help cause we, we had the design team behind us and I think you were kind of suggesting that way, but it was, I was very much like go, if I'm going to do this I'm going to be definitely in front of the camera.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, you got to be center front and by George where you sent it from. What's your background then? What's your background?

Speaker 4:

So, um, my background, basically I started off as visual merchandise probably about eight or nine years ago. And, um, after a trip to India where, um, I kind of fell in love with somebody like a, uh, a relationship blossom and not only with someone but also the country itself, which is probably one of my biggest influences for my design today is my love of India. And, uh, after I came home, um, well women very months led me down to it where I got a job, kind of how, how should we say it in a good way. Uh, bluff my way, slightly a fairly good job with a furniture company, a high end retailer. Um, and it was regional visual visual merchandiser for them, but it was definitely my first step into interiors where it wasn't so much just the main product. It was totally just dining room sets and schemes throughout the eight strippers that I had at the time.

Speaker 4:

Um, and that was, that was really my first proper job within interiors. Then after that I moved to violence rightly, um, did a bit freelance for on my own until I was headhunted for a job. Um, that company that was based down in Ascot. Um, but they were very much the preferred supplier for our few key States in London, including the Grosvenor estate. And really my job role was to be the go between, between the client and the designers back in the office. And I'd go in and spec for the properties, whether they'd be Filat or for sale and then pass it back to the team, which would choose furniture. And I would then have ultimate sign off on what was going into the property and then style it. So I was always very much the cusp of interior design, but fairly much an interior stylist. And I think that definitely comes across to that shape.

Speaker 1:

No, absolutely. Well I think that's why I was kind of so blown away by you off that first meeting at the ideal home show. Well, cause we were dressing the show house that they'd got there and you know, you, you brought in last minute kind of, you know, fresh and, and w they just left you for rooms and you know, you would style beds and cushions and all these things and, and your, your attention to detail. You know, w was amazing and I think that's why I was like, Oh you, you know, you'd be great at the or greater this, you know, not you will be. You already are. And that was amazing. And then it was lovely to see you. Like we don't on the show, you know, translate that. I think the first episode we worked together with the chocolate hotel and by day one we don't know what we'd done all the building. And then day two, I think I was just iron embedded in your, you were styling for dance.

Speaker 4:

I've got you on there. I thought you mind in that. Remember I think I've got photographic evidence of you put it down all the drills and the swords and everything and you had an iron in your hand. And that was partly, I think a little bit of a, um, it was a tap for move myself cause I didn't want you to be moved onto the ethic.

Speaker 1:

But I remember saying, look, do you want me to go? He went, no, no, just I know I can't spend a whole day. I, when you just, yeah, just do that. Like I don't remember. Let's just do it. I was like, well, we were told in the show, you know, just to whatever the contestants asked, that's that's what you do. You know. I was like, okay, fair enough. But actually I'm going to ask you, because I've been asking some of the other contestants, I remember you gave me some top tips because this podcast is all about top tips as well. Is bedding like is the thread count the most thing important or you know, like what, what would you say?

Speaker 4:

Well, I have a long time. I have a long time of fabric beds in IRM. I think a bit of a master of beds. And um, I think top tips are, it's not all about your thread count because the higher the thread count, the more amount of cotton you get per square inch. And therefore, if you're a bit, they don't see D like myself. If you're iron and got higher thread count, it's going to be a lot tougher to do and get really crest if you sweat in bed or if you get very warm behind for current is for you, you need to go lower. And then there's a big difference between cotton per cow and cotton [inaudible] and per cow is a just a one over one under week, which gives you a lot crisper, cooler feeling at night when you sleep in the bed. Whereas the setting is a lot more of a kind of silkier smoother finish, but it will make you warmer.

Speaker 4:

So it's a lot more of a luxurious bed in however, my top tip, if you are kind of, I don't know, in the industry of whatever and to maybe show housing or staging or anything like that. Um, and I think, I think some of the contestants would have stole this from me throughout the show, but always put to do bays in your bed, always fold it back at the top. So shall they. Everything to the top. And then when you roll it back, like you'll see. Yeah. So two in hotels, it gives that weird clutch kind of big bed feeling and trust me, those beds that we were working with, they would know [inaudible]

Speaker 1:

no they weren't. I think you were raiding all their like laundry cupboards and things just to get that [inaudible].

Speaker 4:

Yeah. And I still not, I still never found like a white balance. I had to use that rubbish bloody Brown. I just had to kind of disguise with about 300 throws. But anyway, it works out well right in the end.

Speaker 1:

Brilliant. I love it. I love that top tip. No one's answered it as well as you. So I finally got my bed linen top tip. I'll tell the misses was, was the show everything you expected?

Speaker 4:

I think, I genuinely think, I don't know what the other contestants have told you, but I genuinely didn't get just when surpassed any expectation, the um, the stress level because people, when you watch the show, you don't quite understand what goes on behind the scenes and we would literally find out whether we were through to the next episode and then have to quickly change it. There was tears or whatever. You slapped a bit of concealer under your eyes. You changed and got on with it after lunch and you'd start filming. But the next episode and between the moment you left those studio doors, you were already thinking about what you were going to do with the next brief. And it was crazy. The fact that you were trying to prep design and then older or within about probably nine day window including weekends and then gets the location and gets the next one. It was literally, I mean I think you will see us age throughout the eight episodes or however long everybody gets. You just see us gradually get more votes, the height of broken. So it definitely made emotions kind of run wild. And I'm sure the production crew had an absolute field day with what we gave the wrong camera because the stress levels were just out, you know, over the top we say.

Speaker 1:

And what did you, what, what did you get from the show as in within your interior design, um, and scaries or you know, cause things you, you worked on so many different rooms. There's so many different places. What, what, what did you learn?

Speaker 4:

I think Paul is to never work with such ridiculous budgets again. I think that that's implant trying to make over spaces. I sat on with 3000 pounds. I mean it was just crazy. It really tested kind of your resource for nurse and how, how much you could do with such leftovers. So I think that was number one. I think for me, myself as a context and I very much went into the, the competition as a buyer and a stylist and I can't get an asset all the time. It was like, Oh Frankie, just you've put in a board chair, you're not upholstering things you're not doing. But I very much came from a background where it wasn't a DIY thing. I was very much you buy in and it looks finished and it's Chris, but it's done. Um, but you'll see how gradually throughout the episodes, how much I had to kind improvise more and really start thinking outside the box. And I can honestly say, I think I went into the competition as a stylist, but I think I came out of it as a designer, which was for me something, you know, it's broadened my, um, my skills. Yeah,

Speaker 1:

absolutely. Because I remember chatting with Nikki and we were saying that she's like, well after the, after doing the show, nothing's going to be as bad as the show. So it's as in the stress level. So like I'm never going to have to be shopping for one whilst building another show about buys, building one in the data and going home and doing your mood board for the next one just in case you get to go through and you have to present it the next day when you find out whether you're staying or not. But also just that, that turnaround time. Yeah. And it makes you make decisions quickly. She says, cause you haven't got time to, you know, tiny about.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, I think that was one thing that I didn't strike. I'm very calm. I'm rational blood personality, full stop. I'm very kind of off the cast. So it was every much like that. We'll do it like sling it up, let's get that in there. Slim get ups and gas and get, I was very much like that, but I know that some of the other contestants, especially people like Nikki and ju, they love to go into the deep tail as the whole design process, which I wasn't as familiar with. So they would really stress over the decisions they were make it where it was. To be quite honest. I was literally like, you've got what you've got furniture on location, so you've just got to use it and make the best of what you can do. But it was, um, I think it pushed all of us to our absolute limit.

Speaker 1:

Oh, absolutely. And um, not just the final, but um, out of all the episodes firstly, which was your favorite episode?

Speaker 4:

Oh God, this is so hard. Um, I think it was probably episode seven. [inaudible] I was just walking them. Yeah. Because I remember walking away from it, like it's not finished and I was stressing about it. But actually when I look back, I was so proud about over what we actually did in that I, the three of us that were left, my biggest florid, basically a whole tote rewiring. Uh, I think it did tick, um, the guys briefing. It was [inaudible] client please. Yeah. And definitely his expectations kept chopping and changing. So it was really hard to get [inaudible]. But I think I'm weirdly most proud of that. Yeah. I think

Speaker 1:

I like, obviously I worked on that one with you and it did look amazing by the end and that, that was the most stressful thing ever. It was, I think, I think it was, that was a hard one because we had electricians, we had plumbers, you know, he wasn't just, yeah.

Speaker 4:

Of our debt. And literally that electrician, I love the trades that I work with, but I've got to say the, uh, the 50 electrician on episode seven, God, he loved the camera as much as I, it's, and so it was a constant battle to actually just get the bloody job done.

Speaker 1:

Okay. I'm of that. If you could change anything or do anything different on any of the episodes, which one would that be?

Speaker 4:

I think, do you know what way? I'm just going to be totally honest with you. There'd be a lot of our change. I mean when look at also a little point I want to say is obviously when they added on the camera for when they air the shapes, the colors come up very, very differently. So um, how you see it on the TV screen isn't how it looks in like our own photos and things. Um, it's very much kind of over contrast. So the whole time we, for example, literally looks like you've took a bad trip in there. Like it's very bright. But in real life the green was a lot more muted and that kind of tumor colored headboard was a lot more muted as well. I love that very because I love elephants. I think we got caught bloodshot that, um, however, I think just throughout the competition the thing got changes. I think I'd be a bit more considered on every walk really. I think I'm naturally more is more with me. I think certain aspects it would have made it look better if I just ranked it Insightly.

Speaker 1:

But no, I'm going to totally disagree and I know I can say I'm saying this now, I'm saying this now in not even in hindsight cause we haven't watched any of the episodes. But you got to the final did, I mean, so you must've done something right?

Speaker 4:

Yeah. Oh I don't know. We'll just have to see. Oh well I went in like such a cocky little bugger and literally by the end I've been between all of the guest judges and Michelle, they definitely not be down to Peggy Otay. So I think just the whole thing was just at such a huge learning curve.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. But the thing is you've got to the final mate, you know you're in from from day one. You, you, you're always great. And you've got, you've got all the way to the final. The one running commentary I think that we had was there. Wayne, can you just, can you just let, literally we'd have five minutes to go and you'd be like, can you just put up this, well that takes an hour or the final when. Yeah. Can you just cook a curve to put this curtain track up?

Speaker 4:

Well I did it here. It was, yeah, it got busy. But I could've killed you in that lap last episode when you drill the front of those bloods on that naked kitchen. But I managed to keep it very much carb just caught on with there. But it was, I think we were just all by the eighth episode by the side or it was done. Personnel cost. Cost and crew.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. Oh no, absolutely. So your, so going forward now, obviously when this goes out, the show will be aired, but I'm speaking to you to before it's been in, I think he's going to go out and about two, three weeks time. What's your, what's your hope from the show, what you're hoping to get from the show?

Speaker 4:

I mean, I think I'm a bit of a Maverick in more ways than one and I just want to kind of have that and grow it so it's not, it's not done yet. I'm hoping it will grow over a few years. We want people to see kind of my rooms and places that I'll do in the future as that's Frank style. And I suppose whether it be egotistical or not, I want it to be kind of very identifiable and something different. The running trend, I mean we can see a lot of different design styles. We're all on Instagram and Pinterest nowadays. However, there is just this theme of what is at the moment and what's in trend. And I have to admit, I think I do go against the grain with a lot of that. So I hope people, if they want to employ me to design their homes or their spaces or commercial spaces, whatever it might be, um, I hope that they all want something different. And I hope that when they think of me, they identify me with something that is just completely different to the norm.

Speaker 1:

Okay. So at the moment then, like you said, this is an evolving thing, like you know, free. And I always think that's, I think what you said is bang on. If you think someone like Sophie Robinson, you know, it was one of the judges on the interior design show, which is one of the judges on the show. She's known for color. You know, her house isn't bland by any state, you know, where's Kelly Hopkins known for, you know, off whites and very muted. So, you know, and I think it's good to have your, your, your kind of standard. A lot of the people on the show had their own, you was colorful, Jerome was quite dark and his, you know, choices and stuff. So at the moment, if someone was going to employ you as an interior designer, what do you think your style is, is at the moment?

Speaker 4:

I think it's always used in bold color. I think it's always got an ethnic influence. Always. I'm obsessed with living abroad. Uh, just that kind of inside, outside space that lot of countries like Morocco, India, those kinds of places have. Um, there's always abundant greenery and it's always a little bit camp. I'm not going to lie.

Speaker 1:

Now Frank, when I spoke to you, I think it's about two months ago now, before the show went out, I asked you if there's anything you would change, but that was all of Risley, mainly about styling and, and things you were doing in the, in the builds. But now you've watched the show. Is there anything you would do different?

Speaker 5:

Oh, this is such a hard question to answer, but I, I don't think that race really, I think I had, um, I hate the word, but I think I had quite a journey. Um, I think I went in and I was kind of made out to be this certain character, but I think by the end of it, I think people kind of like me for that. So you know, me being maybe a little bit boots at times, I think a lot of people kind of were like, well kind of needed saying and things. I probably would have totally done slightly in the start, but I don't know, you can always look back on your work and be critical about it. So there's obviously going to be like major tweaks I would have made to all of the projects, but I was quite happy with how it turned out. And do you know what I'm, I'm really relieved. I've got second place. I don't think I could have done as good a job that Cassie did on the hotel.

Speaker 1:

I think it was like a poison chalice, wasn't it? I think they, the uh, the prize came was revealed quite late on and then the price came out and everybody was like, Oh, I don't want that. It's a bit scary that one. [inaudible]

Speaker 5:

it's quite funny actually because I don't know whether we can do too much behind the scenes, but we all got films in Whitstable. That's when it was all kind of revealed to us. And we all went off one by one with fun, probably had a good hours tat on camera. And um, I think, I think she was literally like, I think cut face were dead pan and she was literally like, I'd either one this and then Cassie with like Cassie was like, yeah, we'll go on there. And then I was just a blubbering mess and I think I was crying that much. I don't think they could have it. And then I remember coming back to the salon and I'd let you all tasks and um, yeah, you'd be like, so what is it? And I was like, Ooh. So I think that's why it didn't make the episode.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I think that that, it didn't make the episode that one. But it's interesting, like you were saying, you know, you, at the beginning you knew you were quite outspoken. And I've said this on my podcast already, but what I loved about you is you, you just said what you thought. But also then you'd go and say to the contestants, look, I've just said this about you. I mean, because look, you know, so wasn't, so when anyone would say to me, well what's Frank really like? I was like, he's lovely. He's actually really, really lovely. But actually he's, he's the film crews dream the director's dream. Cause he's just saying what you think, what everybody's thinking and the no, and everyone else was being reserved and going second guessing. You were just like, nah, just say as it is, that's not going to work. Or

Speaker 5:

I think it's important. And I think the main thing to always remember in an industry like interior design is just, cause I say it doesn't mean it's right or it's wrong. It's an opinion, isn't it? Listen, kiss down to opinion. It's all, it's all what personal likes and dislikes, you know? So, um, yeah, I was just putting it out there.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. What was really lovely and I messaged you, obviously we kept in touch since the show's ad I worked with the most of the time on the show. So we became good friends. But I remember just sending you a picture, I was driving in London with the messes and was passing liberties of London. And I shot, I sent a picture of their window display and their window display had your line. I know from the skate shop on the wall in the window. And I was like, he's ahead of the trend.

Speaker 5:

[inaudible] and then what was really hilarious that my good friend Leanne, she does all the videography for Liberty and she went down once a month or once every six weeks. She goes down and she films the window and she texts me and she was like, you won't believe it. You lie nose on the wall in the windows. So I don't know where the Liberty we were ahead of me or I was, it had to do with the tape. Let's think it was the latter.

Speaker 1:

Well that leads well cause we had quite a few questions. Um, questions about the liner. Where did the idea come from?

Speaker 5:

Well another little bit of behind the scenes is up until episode four where I was kind of working full time as well. So my desires, I can't exactly say that I like spend hours and hours, like considering every little element. It was a little bit like, do you know what? We're going to go through that with them and go through that. We're going to go through that. We're going to go to that. And even though it was me and Jerome on the shop project, which was um, the first time that I used the line, no. Um, it was, it was really just like a great cost effective solution and I was like, do you know what? I can trust that way and we'll find a way to get it on the wall. So I'm going to water it. And that's kind of how it started. There was a huge rip in there, but we managed to Moscow over that. It was all just a bit, do you know what the Whitehead design, sometimes it's all just a little bit like to know what love that we're going to go for it. It's just kind of grabbing the bull by its horns, not thinking too much and just going with what you love. And I think that's how the whole fly, no movement twist book. I love it. I have to keep plugging flying. Oh, hopefully someone's going to pick up blowing out there. She had to call me.

Speaker 1:

[inaudible] it was looking for partnerships, looking for partnerships. I've got a question from um, Claire Delaney. I think it is. Well she asked, um, has your opinion of any of the other contestants changed since you've watched the show?

Speaker 5:

Um, no. Uh, absolutely not. So, um, we, regardless of what you see on camera and how much tension there was, we, we really are, we're really good friends. Um, we're on a WhatsApp group that I've actually had to mute because there's so many, it just pings off constantly, but we're all really in close contact. We all really, I think there's just mutual respect for all our different design styles. Like even, you know, me and Cassidy was the huge big, we are really good friends, but there's just, there's just a mutual kind of respect there. Um, and I think everybody's opinions of each other, but from the start, we've all kind of, it's all carried on to not, I mean, it's, are, they're the queen of vintage, they're the queen of modular graphics. She's the queen of floor will Jerome's the queen that did, do you know what I mean? It's all just, there's just a respect there. And we all do. We do love it.

Speaker 1:

And what's, what's really interesting, you know, is making a show and like it, and it was, it's kind of, I'm aware of how it's edited and how it's looked. So, you know, there'll be moments where one personal, you know, you'll go off for VTS, you go off and do little bits to camera as in, throughout the whole thing. And you're being pulled away to chap. Everybody's being pulled away and every, they're asking you questions for you, for you to give comment, you know what I mean? So, and you know, and [inaudible] from day one you talk to, you know, say the question in the answer, you know, and, and, and, and then it's just how they edit it for the narrative. And the storyline that goes through it. So like you said at the beginning, you know they use quite a lot of like your negative stuff, but everyone will have said negative stuff. It just happens that they're the ones of you that they showed. But like you said, your journey was amazing.

Speaker 5:

I think also one of the big points as well, it's like TV producers that they reach other people and if they want you to say something, they will get you out of here. They'll ask the question 300 times you to just only say it. If they think it's on your mind, they will manage to get it out of you. And a couple of times they'll say, well we know you're not being honest right now. So then you end up kind of just going, do you know what? What the heck? I hate that design, you know? But I think they definitely got what they wanted.

Speaker 1:

They did. They did. We had lots of questions about the elephant wallpaper, which is our first one we did together in the whole chocolate hotel. And where was that from?

Speaker 5:

Let me stop bro. So it's phone call with sons, which is probably my all time favorite. All paper buttons. They are. Um, but anybody that's like not totally familiar. Um, they have been around a very, very long time and they've got huge archives. They've got now even got books which are remastered from the archives. So that always bringing out new collections like twice a year. And they have a dishonorable paper brand, so a little bit pricey, however, they're not ridiculously priced. That's why I use them a couple of times throughout the show. The Palm print or paper in the student holds was also from colon son and I just love how they, they always go all out with the colors, like all of their colorways. It's always kind of, that'd be much maximalist which I'd say I'm probably, they read more towards,

Speaker 1:

yeah. What's interesting Cullison also do a big, I'm like bargain clear out every year as well. So I know a lot of people will go and you get like the end roles. So if you, you know, if you, if you only want three, two, yeah, two, three rolls of a batch, then you can go and you can get from a fraction of the cost. I know a lot of people have gone and then designed the whole room around the wallpaper from Colin's and that they've, they've managed to get a bargain price cause it's, they say it's not cheap and [inaudible]

Speaker 5:

there's kind of that alone. She's like, if you were taught, you need some times to be really careful because if even if you're getting them at really good prices, you need to make sure that the batch numbers try and correspond with each other. Because if you try and match them all up highly colorized wallpapers and they can have a slight color difference. So I would never recommend trying to kind of hodgepodge and walk pay program. We have different bachelor ms even if they are from the same, same type of paper. Um, but what's quite a good way of doing it is if he fought enough and the dissolvable paper or even if you're paying full price and can only afford one bottle and doing something with like paneling. So if you measure to the width of the wallpaper and do say three drops and then very much like my sidewalk might be [inaudible] or an edge round it, you can get away with only using what run and that way you can fill a wall, make it a feat that sits right and you've got your design a piece of bald paper, but you're not having to go into hundreds and hundreds of pounds in order to just finish the ball.

Speaker 5:

Do you know what I mean?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, absolutely. So just using one batch within one frame kind of thing. So it's all in is capture them. Oh, it was brilliant. Brilliant. Top tip. Now this question is from my wife, who's just done it to pee me off. So she asked where did you get the kitchen from in the final, because we hinted about what happened in the final when I, when I listened to the thing before. So firstly, okay, answer the question Frank. Where did we get the kitchen from in the finals?

Speaker 5:

So the kitchen was fun. I'm actually doing a blog post about it in the next two weeks, but, and it's an amazing kitchen company called naked doors. They also own naked kitchens and they've got a nother one, which I can't remember. They've got like a three companies. They're based in Norfolk, a family run and they are bloody amazing. And they were MTF doors and it's from their Ladbroke range, I think, which was Walnut backed. So through those little cut out circles, that was that under it. And it was Walnut that however I had the world's worst tradesmen, taps them to the kitchen doors in the wrong way. So that's why too much come without wanting to do you know who did that?

Speaker 1:

Let me just think it might be right. Okay. So I'll fill everybody in. So I told Mike that the whole of the, I did all like seven episodes of the AA. I didn't do the first one, did all of them. And throughout the whole of the time I was dreading the final because I thought they're going to show this. And to your credit, which is why I love you very much is these, these panel doors didn't have the hinge holes put in so we have to screw them in and they look the same front and back apart from the finger hole was slightly different. So you only knew it wasn't obvious cause they looked exactly the same. So we had to screw in these holes to put the hinges on and we were in the room. We are bought just enough for all of it.

Speaker 1:

And as I was drilling it, Dickie the or the builder just look to me and gasped and, and then you went, what? And I went, Oh and you could see a drill, the holes in the front of the door. And at that point the camera crew spun, rounded. Like what? Until your credit, Frank. And I'll always thank you for this. You won't know nothing. I just put some water it, you know, nothing. And they, they moved way, they, the camera crew moves out of the way. And I was like, Frank, I've done this like that. And you were like, you were like, um, and then I was that, look we need to tell the camera guys cause they need to get it. So we pulled them in and showed them what had happened. But what I loved is you were like, you didn't, you, you could see the fear on me and you didn't want my lasting legacy of the show to be your kitchen. And I'll always be,

Speaker 5:

do you think that if the season gets renewed, the series gets renewed? You wouldn't be on it if they [inaudible]

Speaker 1:

yeah, like I've, I've done like all these shows and I've failed on the final task. But yeah. So to your credit, you, you didn't say anything but, and then when we were watching the final, I was sitting with my wife and she just looked at me, cause there's a moment where I go, Frank, there's a problem. And it was the, the talks about the liner floor. They didn't talk about that. The kitchen cabinets.

Speaker 5:

Do you know what, by that point I was so kind of like there was issues with loving everything that headboard and that fine or I was just completely rude at the end of it. But it was this more linear ones set. There's not fat lot you can do apart from them. If you run out of paint, this was kind of from episode one all the way through except so day. Unless she run out of like paints or something, there really is nothing you can do. So you've just got to think on your feet, make it work and get it done. And um, I think we all, I mean God, you saved my bacon so many times.

Speaker 1:

It was pay off. Thank

Speaker 5:

you. I think it was, this is for me being nice to you for all those other episodes and you return the favor at the end. Well, can I see it really well? I just want to wrap up with it and I say it to all my guests on, on, on the show. Well, eight, well, I've got a few questions actually, but the first one is if you could design or have your perfect space, your perfect room. Can you describe that to me and what you'd be drinking as well? Oh God. You'd notice that? Um, I think it would be, um, an old her valet in Jaipur, which is like a bit kind of townhouse kind of Riyadh style populate with lots of original features. It'd be the master bedroom with properly lock in a joined in sitting area and I'd be sipping on a spicy margarita.

Speaker 1:

Ooh. If you ever had a spice margarita. I've never, I don't think I've ever had one actually. I'll have to have one of those and um, just acts to finally extra extra funding. What are you doing now? What, how's life treating you now? It's all been ad and what are you up to?

Speaker 5:

So it's definitely been a bit of a crazy on, um, but I am kind of just get into it. I've got a lot of inquiries, but I think it's just working out the ones that I want to pick and choose. And at the start I really want to kind of put my name to things that are quintessentially folk and I've got a few brand collaborations that I'm working on just on one this week, which is quite exciting. Um, and I am trying to save all my money and get myself out to India in the new year.

Speaker 1:

Ooh, very jealous. I've been interviewed quite a few times

Speaker 5:

being this cause not for, not for holiday though. I'm hoping to go for a little bit of a longer period because off the back of Netflix, like to my pure joy with the show going kind of worldwide, I've had like a lot of attention from Indian clients and um, from a few magazines and, and big paper companies out there. And so that's something that I probably really want to pursue if I can, if I can do things to move me out there to send the appliance I'm all for

Speaker 1:

Oh absolutely. I've worked in India quite a few times and it's, it's absolutely stunning. Thank you so much for chatting to me and good luck with everything. And once again, thank you.

Speaker 1:

He really is a cool guy is Frank. I really, really like him and I hope you enjoy listening to my interviews to hear about what it was like to be involved in the show and to find out what he's up to. Now the show is finished. Um, you can send any questions and anything you want me to feature on the show by contacting me, Wayne Perry on Instagram or Twitter. Actually you can help me out because I'm interviewing the lovely Nikki from interior design masters, Nikki Bamford Bose Cove. And when they went wild, which is a social media handle, and we're going to have a glass of wine round at her studio and she's going to answer some questions and tell me what she's up to and fill you in on what her experience being on the interior design masters was like. So yeah, don't forget to send me some questions if you have any burning questions for her. As always, a huge, huge thank you to my sponsor thorn down. Um, and you can get 15% discount by putting in at the TV carpenter on their website, a thorn down.co. Dot. UK, and you'll get that 15% discount from them on any of their online products. Now, all that's left for me to say is thank you for listening to the TV carpenter.

Speaker 3:

Okay.