THE TV CARPENTER : Home Makeovers with Wayne Perrey

Wayne shares the best interviews from episode 1-6 of season TWO

February 28, 2020 Wayne Season 2 Episode 27
THE TV CARPENTER : Home Makeovers with Wayne Perrey
Wayne shares the best interviews from episode 1-6 of season TWO
Chapters
THE TV CARPENTER : Home Makeovers with Wayne Perrey
Wayne shares the best interviews from episode 1-6 of season TWO
Feb 28, 2020 Season 2 Episode 27
Wayne

As I prepare for season Three, this is a chance for me to look back at the best bits from the last series.

with winner and contestants from BBC/Netflix
'Interior Design Masters'
dig-haushizzle.co.uk
www.franknewbold.com
https://bloominghomesociety.com/
www.andthentheywentwild.co.uk
Design producer, presenter and TV set designer
www.edwardrobinsonid.com
And the original Luxe-cycler
www.mucknbrass.com

Sponsor: To take advantage of the generous 15% discount from my sponsor Thorndown, please visit http://bit.ly/TVCarpenter. Discount code: TVCarpenter

Contact me: Wayne Perrey on Twitter and Instagram.

Music: "What's the Angle" by Shane Ivers


Show Notes Transcript

As I prepare for season Three, this is a chance for me to look back at the best bits from the last series.

with winner and contestants from BBC/Netflix
'Interior Design Masters'
dig-haushizzle.co.uk
www.franknewbold.com
https://bloominghomesociety.com/
www.andthentheywentwild.co.uk
Design producer, presenter and TV set designer
www.edwardrobinsonid.com
And the original Luxe-cycler
www.mucknbrass.com

Sponsor: To take advantage of the generous 15% discount from my sponsor Thorndown, please visit http://bit.ly/TVCarpenter. Discount code: TVCarpenter

Contact me: Wayne Perrey on Twitter and Instagram.

Music: "What's the Angle" by Shane Ivers


Speaker 1:

On today's show, I'll be sharing the best bits from the first six episodes of the season two. I'll be going back and speaking to Cassie Franks, you and Nikki from interior design masters. I'll also be chatting with Edward Robinson, who is a design producer from that same show. And we'll be finishing off with the original look cycler, the queen mrs Zoe from makin brass.

Speaker 2:

Hello and welcome

Speaker 1:

the T V carpenter. My name is Wayne Perry. So we're in between seasons, um, and preparing for season three. So what I like to do, rather than leave you listeners with nothing to listen to every Friday, is do a little bit of a Muff pup. And I showcase some of the best bits from, from the last season. So I'm showcasing season, uh, two episodes, one to six and just some little gems, some little nuggets of, uh, of, of pieces that people have said that my guests have said, which I've loved or found really useful and really interesting. But before we dive into speaking to Cassie, who is the winner of interior design masters, I let you know last week that I was holding a competition where I will be giving away two pairs. So four tickets in total for this year's ideal home show in London and because I'd be presenting on their main stage there, but also I'll be recording the live episodes of this podcast on their new room set stage, which is really exciting.

Speaker 1:

And all you had to do was uh, um, subscribe and leave a review on iTunes, on the TV carpenter iTunes page. And um, I've had some really lovely comments. So the first winner is Sue AZA and she said Wayne's experience and knowledge shows through on this podcast. His guests are great for inspiration and help you figure out what you want to do. I often make notes, notes for it to refer to later. So thank you Sue for that. And the second pair of tickets goes to Donna Ford. Wayne is a great house and perfectly leads the conversation. Love the color psychology with Anna, which rings so true to my own work with clients. Thank you so much. Great photos to a must listen. It's really heartwarming isn't it? When people say nice things. So thank you you guys. Um, I will be in touch. I'll find you. I think you're on Instagram and I'll contact you and I will send out those tickets to you. So if you want to be with the chance to win, um, another pair, another four tickets, um, next week go onto the TV carpenter, um, website on um, on iTunes and subscribe and leave me a lovely review and hopefully you can win some tickets. But my first guest, 12 weeks ago, it was the lovely Cassie. Cassie chatted to me and told me all about the experience of winning, creating

Speaker 3:

the, the winning scheme for her final episode of interior design masters, which is why I think you know your room particularly that, that one and just seeing your journey go from, you know, you know, learning journey to creating this amazing space with all your own furniture in there was absolutely amazing. Were you proud of the fine?

Speaker 4:

I w I was, yes. I was really proud of the sign. I knew I had to um, prove that idealism and you know, I'm, I'm quite, I think I'm quite a good people person and luckily I got to meet the clients beforehand and really chat with them and really understand what they wanted and you know, they were wonderful people and to be able to go into the home and make it for them and they'd love this much was just an amazing experience. I had to do things as well cause they wanted things that were quite neutral and they wanted, you know, maybe more trends than I would normally go for. But I wanted to show that I can, I do understand those things, these, those things as well. It's just not necessarily what I choose to do all the time. So yeah, to push myself to look, to show that I could do different things.

Speaker 4:

And yet when I look back at it and I am really cried and the fact that the clients love it so much, it's just, yeah, it just makes me very happy. Yeah. Ladies, we made so much for those rooms and find really good pieces and you know, things that you can't just buy off the shelf. They've got a lot of things that never even got shown. And they got like all new car pets and you know, so many different things that you didn't realize. Wow. The viewer probably doesn't realize was done entirely. Like I didn't move dopes loads this time.

Speaker 3:

It's true. Yeah. Cause they only got so much edits. So I always used to bother me that it's been a whole day building something and then they'll leave or it won't even be in shot. You're like, damn, I build that. But one of the questions we had was, uh, from an amazing designer called Anna Jacobs is actually featured on my podcast. But one of our questions was, and have you ever had to design a space that fast before?

Speaker 4:

Never. Never had to design anything that fast before. It's, it's just, you know, I'm, I'm kind of a bit of an advocate of this idea of like slow growing deco, especially for your home. Like, I don't think designing your home has to be done in a week and yeah, I'm not really in, I've got to finding everything for your home in one week. I just don't think it really works like that. You're never going to love something if you just go into one shop and just buy a whole look in one go and you're going to want to change it in a few years. I think you kind of have to, you know, put a lot of love and respect into each item you buy. So the idea is that you hang onto it, we love it and you know, we're not going to be just going through furniture and home once every three years and checking out, you know, the world can't sustain that. We've got to try and make me like for a long time. That's of what I'm

Speaker 5:

about guy.

Speaker 1:

I love the idea of not creating an instant room in a weekend but actually letting your house evolve and grow. And if you look on her Instagram, you'll see her house is, is light that is full of character and very rich in texture. But obviously a Cassie was the winner and uh, that meant there was a runner up and that was the controversial Frank. And I hope that way if you listen to the episodes 11 weeks ago you will heard Frank and the kind of person he is. And actually he is lovely. He's adorable. And I chatted with him and we had a laugh and reminisced a little bit, but also he gave us some top tips about how to choose your bedding.

Speaker 6:

Yeah.

Speaker 5:

I think cock-up photographic evidence of you put it down all the drills and the swords and everything and you had iron in your hand. And that was partly, I think in little bit of a, it was a tap for move myself cause I didn't want you to be moved onto the ethic.

Speaker 3:

But I remember saying, look, do you want me to go to it? No, no, just I know it. I can't spend a whole day I in when you have just, yeah, just do that. Like I don't remember, they just do it. I was like, well, we were told in the show, you know, just to whatever the contestants asked, that's that's what you do. You know, I was like, okay, fair enough. But actually I'm going to ask you, because I've been asking some of the other contestants, I remember you gave me some top tips because this podcast is all about top tips as well. Is bedding like is the thread count the most thing important or you know, like what, what would you say? Well,

Speaker 5:

I have a long time. I have a long time not fabric beds in IRM, I think a bit of a master of beds and um, I think top tips are, it's not all about your thread count because the higher the thread count, the more amount of cotton you get per square inch. And therefore if you're a bit, they don't see D like myself. If you're iron and got higher thread count, it's going to be a lot tougher to do and get really crest if you sweat in bed or if you get very warm behind for current is for you, you need to go lower. And then there's a big difference between cotton per cow and cotton [inaudible] and per cow is a just a one over one under underweight, which gives you a lot crisper, cooler feeling at night when you sleep in the bed. Whereas the setting is a lot more of a kind of silkier smoother finish, but it will make you warmer.

Speaker 5:

So it's a lot more of a luxurious bed learning. However, my top tip, if you are kind of, I don't know, in the industry of whatever and to maybe show housing or staging or anything like that. Um, and I think, I think some of the contestants would have stole this from me throughout the show, but always put to do bays in your bed and always fold it back at the top. So shall they, everything to the top. And then when you roll it back like you'll see. So to, in hotels, um, it gives that weird plush kind of big bed feeling. And trust me, those beds that we were working with, they would know fashion.

Speaker 1:

They weren't, I think you were raiding all their like laundry cupboards and things just to get,

Speaker 5:

yeah. Of course. And that's still not, I still never found like a white balance. I had to use that rubbish bloody Brown. I just had to kind of disguise with about 300 throws.

Speaker 1:

My next guest was the hugely informative Edward Robinson. Now I would, Robinson is a interior designer. He works a lot in the world of TV. He gave me my first TV job. He's a design producer on the great interior design challenge, interior design masters. So his job is to organize the contestants. He pretty much, you know, Scouts locations. He, he builds, sets. He, he does everything. This guy and uh, he was one of the first people I always knew I wanted to get on my podcast and he gave us some top tips about how to shop. So if you want to make over your house on a budget, um, because obviously when he's building sets, he has a limited budget to create these amazing rooms and things on, you know, on location. So he has a little black book of places to, to go and get the best furniture and the best rugs, um, at a fraction of the high street cost. So, uh, this was ed sharing his little black book of interior design,

Speaker 7:

I think because again, TV, no timescale whatsoever. I mean, when we need it, I need it tomorrow. So you just have to find those sort of shops. My favorite ones for me obviously on eBay, um, eBay, Amazon is brilliant. I mean, I use Amazon every single day. I mean, I literally have to stuff arriving every single day. It's crazy the stuff. But furniture shops, excuse me, I'm a big favorite. Mine was, um, cult furniture. Um, and they, they're really good because they do design a rent off space. A CLI. Yeah. So if you've seen an amazing lamp or chair, but the original one costs, you know, maybe four or 500 pounds, you can fell, do like a really like 99% closer match replica, you know, like a hundred quid. So you can get that design and look, but obviously not have to spend, you know the designer price to be like, so cult furniture is really good.

Speaker 7:

Their range is massive and mainly quite retro mid-century. But they do kind of really cool pieces and they drove thing, furniture, artwork, you know bookshelves bad. They would say anything you kind of need to kind of create a look that's really good on a budget. There's an F com I use recently on the show which just showed in Manchester was furniture one, two, three and there are men or to company and again they're a bit like, they do amazing styles of furniture. But again the chips, chips and that delivery is really quick. They normally in a couple of days, so I've used those a lot. Lots of times that bottle, some beds and velvet sofas obviously available. So from someone like John Lewis is going to be couple of grand and you can buy almost identical, same sofa flight, 400 quit. So, you know, and lastly, you know, longterm, it might not last for years and years and years because obviously you know, you pay for what you get, but for a TV Satch if you'll want to create that amazing look, those sorts of shops, um, work ideal. And then probably my most favorite shop, which I'm sure everybody knows about is HomeSense sense.

Speaker 3:

Oh, so the HomeSense is a bit like TK max, isn't it? It's the same kind of group kind of thing.

Speaker 7:

Yes. It's owned by GE, came back to the TK max group and home centers almost like it's the interior furnishings arm of the fashion side of it, if you like. And they're brilliant. It's obviously they're not, they're more so on the outskirts of town. You've seen London, they're out in the sticks, but obviously they are kind of nationwide these days and they're brilliant and they are just the most amazing, you know, relatively cheap arsenic. Darn expensive pieces. But, um, generally everything's cheapest chips and you just get a really good designer look if that's the kind of vibe you're going for. But why quite like about it in a way? There's that, you can turn up one day and they'll have loads of really cool stuff and you'll go back another day and there'll be nothing. I'll be a load of crap. But it's just really good for accessories as well. So if you're looking for things to fill shelves with like, um, you know, like, um, what's the word? Something. Fillers, spaces,

Speaker 3:

space fillers

Speaker 7:

first. And I don't want to get to work here cause all the advisers and everything. Everyone's saying everyone's the same.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. We, we, we worked together on a, my helped you style, the great British menu. We had like the sh the house like [inaudible] where they all lived and, and I think you, I remember you getting loads from like Wayfair and Danelle mill, but you, you, there was, I don't remember the producers coming in to look at it and it was like the big cheeses that arrive and they had to sign it off and that you've got, you've got channel. Yeah. And you've got the, um, the rugs. Where did, you said you got, where was the rugs from? Everyone was going on about, in the lounge

Speaker 7:

again, John. Just, I've just bought one. I've just moved house and I've just bought into this rugs from my living room. And that's a company called Benita and they are brilliant. And again, you know they do these really, really great looking designer rugs but they just don't cost the earth. And I think the high streets brilliance that now because there's so many different shops that actually you can access the designer look without having to spend, you know stacks of cash cause we all got stacks of cash anymore. Have way. Yeah there's no need to, that's the thing. There's no need to be spending thousands of parents and stuff. Generally if you can create that look for a cheaper than why not? I mean it's, it's a no brainer.

Speaker 3:

After Edward Robinson's full episode ed, I had so many people tell me that they literally were there with pen and paper in hand writing down the list of all of these, these amazing shops

Speaker 1:

cause you know he is the fountain of all knowledge for, for this kind of stuff. Now moving swiftly on to the colorful as you did, you was a semifinalist on interior design. Masters. And she was known for color and bold print and flowers and she chatted with me and told me the whole idea behind color psychology.

Speaker 4:

So easy. He's like, you know, we think about this like three types of colors or color schemes. So he got them completely complimentary scheme that you call it the opposite, the wheel. You've got their miners color, they call it the next two children a wheel. And then they got them on a chromatic colors days, just like one color in different tones and shades. So if you just get the color wheel and understand that it's going to be so easy to, this came together.

Speaker 1:

Ah, okay. So just what worked from the color color wheel. So, so at least if you get some basic rules then from that you can, you can.

Speaker 4:

So for example, if you want to work with, um, like if you like, um, color for rooms like me for example, where you can start like started picking two colors to work with. So let's say two colors opposite the color we, so we get like what a warm color, what cold color to get one, get pink, the one color, right? And then get blue. The coat color, they will balance each other out, right? Yeah. So you pick one of those two colors that you want to use more in the bloom because if you pick them boys use them both in the same quantity, they're going to fight for attention and then it's not going to work. Yeah. So for example, I'm going to pick a room that speak and blue. Uh, I'm going to use more pink, less blue and there I can start, introduce all the colors in the NICU and then I can take a little bit of yellow and green and put that that will work. This is why you got to episode seven in the show.

Speaker 4:

He's amazing. I let them explain without the wheel. My listeners can then look and look that up. It's so important because if you know which colors you're using, if you know, like for example, if you know the feeling you want, like for example, you are designing a guest bedroom, right? Yeah. You want your guest if you welcoming, right? Yeah. And restful and peaceful. And so like you should pick being the very good, very good color to have because then nurturing color for makes people feel welcoming and taken care of. And will you shipping book pick blue blue is like arresting color, calming color, relaxing colors as a great color combination. So it's good to know these things because it really makes a difference.

Speaker 1:

I am so fortunate in the job that I do that I get to meet some, some talented people and some just lovely, enjoyable to be around people. And one of those, uh, is also my good good friend Nikki Banford. Boz, Nikki Bamford Bose is one of the quarter finalists from interior design masters and she, she was like the, the people's winner. Um, her designs seem to speak to so many people and everyone who I meet who talks about the show always talk about her designs. And the things that she created. And I'm just thankful that I get to call her. My friend. She lives around the corner from me and we get to work with each other. Quite a lot of designed. Um, she's designed in soya and I built a lot of her things in her house. Um, and we've got a bit of a, a, a working relationship where she's always ringing me up and asking me to create crazy things for her.

Speaker 1:

And, uh, it was lovely to chat with her over a glass of wine. But what I wanted to share with you today was a little bit about her Instagram and how she turned, uh, Instagram, um, on its head. Really. She started about six, seven months before the show went out and then before the show went out, her numbers went through the roof to the point that I think she's got 70 odd thousand followers at the moment. And it's just people are buying into her and what she's doing. So we discussed, uh, Instagram and also the pressure of being a so-called influencer in the world of Instagram.

Speaker 3:

I just want to talk about your Instagram. So instead what I love is you didn't really have an Instagram account until literally a few, like a year before we'd started. And, and you know, you're asking me about Instagram now you're like 65 and a half thousand followers. He's got insane. Um, your Instagram and then they went wild is your grid is amazing. But what I find really refreshing with you is each of your posts is pretty much a, a a blog post. It was that intentional.

Speaker 8:

Not necessarily. It's funny because I feel like I don't have a lot to say, but I have a lot to say. And at that point I didn't have a blog and I was never intending to have a blog, I guess. Uh, I, you know, it's a great way to try and express your design thinking. And what I loved about it was initially people were saying, Oh, they're quite long, but people read a lot of what I write and they feed back. And I think it's really great to be able to get a bit of your voice and your personality over and you can take as much or as little of it as you want, if you only want to look at the pictures and that's fair. But if you want to actually really understand the thinking behind the design, it's all there, you know, most of the time. So it was just a great way of being able to express some of my design thoughts of why I've done something. So it wasn't initially intended to be that way, but it kind of grown in that way.

Speaker 3:

So your Instagram is, like I say, it's beautiful. And of the big

Speaker 8:

things that landed recently, was your blue room, your back, what do you call it? Y'all call it my blue room. Blue room. And I'm proud to say that I was involved in that room, NICU, NICU done this. I made the cupboard doors and the sofa. Um, and it's funny because we'd made those quite like a couple of months before and you were like, don't put any posts out. I'm going to do a post when it, when we've got time to put it all out. How did you know the response from that has been insane? Like just tell, talk me through what you've received on Instagram from that one post alone. Oh wow. I mean I think it's funny because when you do a room in your own home and you live in it and you breathe it and sometimes I don't always post things immediately cause I actually really enjoy having them to myself for a little while first.

Speaker 8:

But when I put it out there, I was blown away by the response. Um, a great thing I think about that room was we made a lot of stuff to go in it. So the sofa, I'd always wanted a Cain sofa, but they was just so out of my price bracket. And so I was just like, you know what? Let's just design and make one ourselves. I know Wayne, he can help me. I'd never don't came before. I'd never made a sofa before. But yeah, love, I go there. It was really about getting the look at an affordable price and that was, you know, a real achievement to be able to create that. And then I'd already had some shelves built in and I just wanted to cover all of that up with some cool doors. I really wanted to pick up the cane idea that was going on with the circles.

Speaker 8:

And so we, you know, I have, I wanted some lights in the area so we just, so I designed some cupboard doors to cover it all. So what was sort of like, where did you get the inspiration for that from Jeremy? Me, like I know everyone now and I do it myself. I look on your, on your Instagram a goal. She's using that blue collar like, Oh, I like that color. So jump me in. And now the color of the year is blue, while it's a different blue, albeit, but like, where do you get your inspiration from? Where do I get my inspiration from? I mean, obviously we look at Pinterest and Instagram is incredible for inspiration. Uh, but my biggest thing is really going out and looking around, not eyes on stalks the whole time. It can be anything from a shop window to an art installation to something that's um, I mean, for example, the niche shop I love because the circles and the tubes that came from that came from actually from the building sites.

Speaker 8:

There was lots of long great big, yeah, the piping. Yeah. Yeah. And I was just like, I love that kind of the graphic shapes and the fact that they're moveable. So it's just constantly looking around and I think you just need to get out there and look at things and keep your eyes and ears open the whole time. So I'm just like a great big sponge. Basically what I love is every time you come, you come back and ask to speak to Matt. You know, I've had this idea for this room. It's like he balks now and he's like, I just rolled his eyes, but he doesn't let me get on with it. In fairness, he loved you too. It's like when I turn up, he's like, Oh, are you coming out for a drink or is it going to cost me money?

Speaker 8:

But like with Instagram, you're now, you are an influencer now whether you like that term or not, you know, 65,000 followers, you can't, is there a pressure to that or is it become a job? Are you still enjoying Instagram? I mean, gosh, Instagram has been a whole new world for me. I put it off for a long time just because I was so busy with life. And then once you start it you have to feed it. But I just, I love it. You know, it's incredible. It's been incredible in so many ways. I mean, it's not my main job. My main job is working on interior design. So it is an extra full time job in itself, which I'm having to learn to juggle, particularly family life as well. So it's pretty full on. And obviously there is that pressure of what next one

Speaker 1:

big things. Like, you know, um, Halloween, you know, Christmas, your, your wreath. There's, uh, if anyone seen on your Insta insert, if you haven't go check it out when this goes out the new year. So the weeds will be coming down. But it is amazing, you know? So did you feel a pressure to create something amazing or would you always have done that?

Speaker 8:

Always. I've done that. It's just got bigger and bigger as I've gone on, you know, gives you an excuse to get me. Cause I love it. I absolutely love it. Obviously next year I'm panicking slightly with, Oh gosh, I need to top that now that I'm saying so then it becomes [inaudible]. But you know, I do love it and I love challenging myself more than anything. And it's the biggest thing that pushes me and it's just to keep pushing myself, pushing my boundaries. And so yes, there is that pressure, but I kind of thrive off that at the same time. Not a bad pressure. Still creative. Yeah. But it, you know, it's, and it's fantastic when you hear that it's inspired other people. I mean, the thing that most excites me in life is being inspired and to hear from people around the globe that you've inspired them. I mean, it's just the absolute bar. You can't beat it. And that just keeps pushing me to keep going. What next? What next?

Speaker 1:

My final guest is the crazy Zoe from and brass. Now when this episode went out, my listening figures went through the roof. She's huge on Instagram, but actually I think people were interested about her story and where she came from and how she's created this amazing look cycle brand, which is muck and brass where she, she turns furniture into beautiful resalable items and crates, lamps and kitchen wreaths and God knows what else. Um, but yeah, her, her episode was a real highlight of the season and it is only fitting that we end this Roundup with Zoe from Mac and brass. You took a lot of Jeep plan furniture, know the, uh, is

Speaker 3:

G plan, isn't it? That old I remember.

Speaker 8:

Has Mike had a love of it at the time? Do you know what, when I moved, when we moved back in together, Mike kind of G plan a table and chairs and the first thing I did was Chuck that crap away. I was like, get that out. It's Brown on it. But that's the thing with the house with Ikea. I mean can you believe it or now the G plan stuff you know is, so is it seventies [inaudible] from the city, you know, 50s old ones. I mean the total range is 15

Speaker 3:

and then you cover it in wallpapers like wacky wallpapers and stuff. So the really, I feel been telling us when I first saw your stuff, that's not for me, but now I love it.

Speaker 8:

Backlash for like ruiningG glam. But like hang on a minute first. I've just found it in a charity show and you know, if you liked it that much by yourself when it was Brown and um, and we've offered this straight from the beginning. If you buy one of ourG plans or any of our furniture, if you change your mind, I want it changed into something else later, we'll do that and come back to us or we'll buy it back. And the reason we did G plan is because Mike loved it and it is really sturdy, well-made pieces and we can get a lot of it cause he's, there's so much of it out there. Yeah. I mean even now, five years later, I can still get my hands, I've got a stack of it and that's the rate. And so, and don't forget, like I was doing this from a flat on a small shop. I needed to find furniture that I can replicate so I could use the images on websites. As soon as it's sold I can then make it so, cause I didn't have places to store it. I didn't have a big shop, I didn't have all these. So I don't have to. And even now I don't have to make everything until it's sold because I'm, I'm in London, I can't afford big premises. I have to be very savvy with the space that I use.

Speaker 3:

Turn it around. But what again, what I love, I think a couple of colleagues ago when I was working on celebrity, big brother, I remember ringing up game, they're thrown out, load loaded when you van up and I got you some tables and then I gave you these big poodle and there's like a big plastic bulldog and yeah and a say. But what I love is you were like, Oh I'll take them. Cause I knew you could do something with them. You only went and turned the pool into this amazing lamp and put an amazing lampshade on it. And then you sold it and now

Speaker 8:

no, I have to do it now. I have to find him. But that's what I love. How you be resourceful and you found a niche and made it work. That's going back to me saying I just, I'm, I can change quickly and I see a gap and I know what sells. I mean at the beginning, I think this is a downfall of a lot of people who do this type of work is they are very precious about what they make. They make either then what they like or they get a diff or offensive and defensive. When someone messaged and said, Oh, I like it, but can you change your color? Or like there's a lot of, he was like, no, you know, that's the color I chose. I'm no, I mean I will if something doesn't sell. Um, I change it. Simple as that.

Speaker 3:

So there we are episodes one to six of season two, the best bits. I have some really cool

Speaker 1:

guests have an eye. Um, and all of them are my mates, which is the whole point of the TV carpenter podcast. I interview my friends from the world of interior design and makeover shows and garden makeover shows and I'm just thankful that they want to come and play and, and talk to you. Don't forget if you want to be in with a chance to win a pair of tickets to this year's idle home show in London over the Easter holidays. Just go to iTunes, look up my page, the TV carpenter, and subscribe and leave me a comment, and I'll be picking another two pairs of tickets next week. But all that's left for me to say is, thank you for listening to the TV carpenter.

Speaker 2:

[inaudible].