LinkedAuthority Podcast

Episode 2: Social Selling & LinkedIn Strategies

August 10, 2019 Tracey Fudge Season 1 Episode 2
LinkedAuthority Podcast
Episode 2: Social Selling & LinkedIn Strategies
Chapters
LinkedAuthority Podcast
Episode 2: Social Selling & LinkedIn Strategies
Aug 10, 2019 Season 1 Episode 2
Tracey Fudge

Discussion around Social Selling and LinkedIn strategies on the Buckhead Podcast with Tracey Fudge and Michael Moore.

#LinkedAutomation #business #content #socialselling #BuckheadPodcast

Show Notes Transcript

Discussion around Social Selling and LinkedIn strategies on the Buckhead Podcast with Tracey Fudge and Michael Moore.

#LinkedAutomation #business #content #socialselling #BuckheadPodcast

Speaker 1:

Well. Good day. This is Michael Warren . I'm here today with Tracy Fudge and Tracy is the owner of the thrive ad agency and the day we're going to learn a lot of bit, a lot about the links and process of making you a little more famous everyday . Tracy, you excited about sharing some information? Yes sir. All right, well let's get right into it. We're here for the Buckhead business show today and we're going to get some great information about linkedin and puts you right in front of your crowd.

Speaker 2:

Hello ,

Speaker 3:

it's time once again for another episode of the Buckhead business show being brought to you by the bucket business association broadcasting live from the pro business channel studios in Atlanta. And now here's your host for today's episode.

Speaker 1:

Well, well , well it's a great day in Buckhead and every day is a great day of book hit Buckhead. We say it's kind of the center of the universe here at the corner of Peachtree and Piedmont in a day. I've got Tracy fudge with me today. And if all you folks out there who have not been able to get your linkedin profile just like you want it and haven't been able to get the kind of results you're looking for out of your linkedin presence, then I believe this is going to be a very valuable day for you. We're going to be what we would call a thought leader process. Uh , today. Tracy as a Tracy is actually the owner of Bella Roman , which we're not going to talk as much about a day, but actually the thing we're gonna focus is her thrive agency. And she's got developed quite an expertise in delivering the quality of linkedin profiling and really linkedin automation, which I'm willing to share a little bit about. But you know, we always talk about what did , what did we do and how did we get here? Tracy shared a little bit of your background with us today and tell us what's important about linkedin.

Speaker 4:

Well, I left a corporate America about seven years ago and I wanted to start my own business and I did not have a lot of time, a lot of funding to grow this agency idea that I had in my head. And I knew a lot about linkedin and being from the technology space have a lot of experience in technology. And so I put this method together, the linked automation method or the linked automation method. I shortened it and uh, the, the process came out of me having to grow my business. And today the linked automation method is what we lead with and it's been completely done for you model. And we really work with our clients to figure out their target audience, how to find that target audience and then how to generate and nurture relationships.

Speaker 1:

Well, now I know that everyone probably doesn't spend as much time working on their linkedin profile as they, as they do looking at other people's . So talk to some of the things about, I guess the common things that people need to focus on when they think about late 10 before they become your [inaudible]

Speaker 4:

client . Sure. So the profile , uh , has the , the name and a headline, obviously right below the name. And most people put in their CEO, founder, things like that. Uh , and below that is what we call a summary. And then below that usually are the, the job experiences. So linkedin started out as a recruiting platform. Um, today if you're looking to , uh, grow your network of potential prospects and sort of monetize your network, you need to shift that. And instead of presenting yourself in a resume format, presented in a format to where it calls, who do you help, how do you help and examples of that. So for instance , uh , beneath your name, say something like, I help , uh, SAS businesses achieve this percent of efficiencies or I help whatever your target market is, avoid these risks. And then in your summary Area, tell a story of how you help, why you help and maybe some examples , uh, case studies, white papers, testimonials, things like that. And then , uh, we teach people how to leverage sales navigator. That's a premium version, but it's very, very critical because there's over 32 filters in there and you really can hone into who you want to go after. What most of us don't know how to kind of go down through the, you should to filter the screening process and look at how we do a , the shelf, like starting with the profile itself. How do other people begin to find you? What , what's the important part? I mean obviously you can go out and look for people, but how it's all about being found by the right folks. So what are some tips you have that you're looking at how you begin to profile folks? So it's, it's really for us finding them. Ah, so that's the , that's the just most of my clients think they found me, but I found them and I nurtured them along the way, peak their interest. And finally they're like, oh, I'm curious about what Tracy has to say. And they've come to me. That's the point that you're not blowing up somebody's phone, you're not spamming them with email or cold calling. So it's really about the secret methods behind Linkedin, not the obvious parts, right? Yes. Well it's, it's obvious to me, but she , yes. Well that's why you're the expertise . So you're actually begin to stop people that you really want to talk to. Is that it exactly that . You're like that video camera we were talking about earlier, you've turned your video camera on, you're watching them and when they begin to get prime and ripe. So in terms of identifying services that, that you , um, you want to offer to the marketplace, not you personally, but as your , is your modeling your linkedin profile for the better process? How it's not like reeling resumes, you said it's much more deeper than that. So we should really be the personality of advertising your social . Talk a little bit about how you do discovery with clients , maybe in some of the things that you present to them as to that you grow them up so they become better at linkedin. Sure. It's all about social selling and that's the Modern Day, Aka lead generation today. And it is a very personal and subjective and it has to do with the person, not the business. So it has nothing to do with the business page. It has to do with the , with the personal profile page and folks really need to have a niche that they go after. Uh , for instance , um, I've got a client on the west coast, a software development company, well in theory they could work for any business in any industry. But , uh, we found a niche and oddly enough, it's the real estate appraisal market that we go after. So we have to have a niche, we call it out in the profile and then we build lists and back of sales navigator. And then we invite those lists in and then we put together a message campaign over a period of time that culminates in a call to action. And a call to action is, would you like to get on a call? Would you like to join me at a Webinar or this event?

Speaker 1:

Well, no, it puts you on a little bit of spot here. I heard you say something about sales navigate and I heard you talk a little bit about recruiting. I've heard you talk a little bit about building a niche. Talk about some of those nitty-gritty parts and I'll let you grade people, although we're not supposed to judge, but talk about how ineffective most people aren't using linkedin. Well, people are mainly [inaudible]

Speaker 4:

afraid of putting themselves out there and they want to hide behind a whatever the platform is. So if you take the steps to really think about who you're helping and you know, obviously if you're helping someone, if you're not, then this won't work for you. And that is a paradigm shift that people have to make and write content that really is educational and paying it forward and really giving free advice. Um, most people it does that does not, unfortunately, at least in the written format come natural. They may think about it, but actually putting it down, putting it into a public forum and allowing the world to see you is very uncomfortable for most [inaudible] .

Speaker 1:

Well that's interesting when you talk about paying it forward, I know a lot of us spend a lot of time with trying to get our story out and many of us may or may not have a definable niche. So how do you begin to unpack a, a new clients need? What are some of the , what are some of the indicators, let you know quickly that you're going to be help this person be successful. Like you said, teachability , coachability, I know those are terms you're probably gonna use in your answer.

Speaker 4:

Well you have to really flush out the WHO you're helping and why. Um, and when you get to that point, if the niche is not so well defined, there is maybe a greater set that is defined. Um, you have to have some metric and something that does differentiate you either in what you do or who you serve. There's always things between those two that is different. And if we call that out and then we build the stories and the content and your network around that, that's how it works.

Speaker 1:

If you keep using that nice called niche, you

Speaker 4:

know, how hard is it and how or how easy is it or how beneficial is it to narrow down that to find, as you said, commercial real estate appraisal. That sounds like a pretty common answer in the commercial real estate business. But how did you get there with that particular client? Well, not from a software development standpoint. He just builds out these , uh, field , uh, apps for these appraisers. Ah, so it's the, it's the app that goes on these devices that saves the appraisers time to where they don't have to drive all the way back to the office, put the data in, they can do it live in the field. It's saved , uh, probably 45% of the time used , uh , in data entry. So he became a hero in the, in the country countryside that , right? Correct. And everybody wanted him to now become a speaker and come to their , and to come to your seminars or come to their annual meetings and poorest companies, you want them to come in and do the lunch and learns. And so , uh , volume of business grew out of that. Yes. And now he can teach , uh, appraisers what to do, how to do it , um, and why , uh , what now they can do with that time that they, that they now have that's free. The 45 , uh , percent savings and time can be applied to more homes or more jobs. He became a multiplier of their effectiveness. So he actually benefited the entire marketplace. Correct. But he hadn't thought of it that way. So we just sat down and I was talking through some metrics and clients that he had had and it really sounded a unique to me. And that's the key to, you know , listen for something that is unique. And again, for people that are starting out, maybe they don't have a unique , uh , client, they, but they probably have a unique offering, something that they are doing. So it goes back to that common question of tell me what your best next customer is going to look like. Because if you're not doing that very well, you're going to want it with a not so good next customer. So talk about some of the exploratory stuff that you , you get to do and it's fun, I'm sure. Yes, it is. And it takes more time than you would imagine a , at least on the front end. So I do a lot of interviewing and I not only look for personalities that can trans cried themselves onto linkedin, but I really do ask a lot of questions on who you help and why. And it's, it's uh, it's by what metric and we really do dig down into the metrics. Uh, our niche is been in technology companies because I feel like they have a, a harder time and finding , um, business potential and building a consistent sales pipeline, which really this is all this is becoming a thought leader and then monetizing that and what network on Linkedin you've come back to where you, what your sweet spot is, technology. You've had the benefit of growing up in a technology business and watching a lot of change in your mere 19 years of , of, of, of, of time. But you know, why is technology, so I'm gonna use the term ignorant. It seems like the technology people will be smarter and get through this faster, but you're really helping those kinds of folks out. Talk about some of those things. Most of the leaders inside of don't think of sales and marketing. They're more of the, the creators and the engineers, so it doesn't come naturally for them. And we do focus on the leaders and the owners and inside of these businesses , uh , that's one thing. The other is they're so focused on disruption being the first, that they're not really focused on , uh , the market and who can buy. The other thing is, is they leverage their websites so much and I think that is a fallacy, a great deal because people are not using linkedin and realizing that linkedin is actually the landing page for all your content and can be the place where all of your blog posts and so forth go. You want to keep people on your profile when you go out and invite them in, they want to be able to skim the page and say, oh, he helps my, my niche. He has done this and no , here's some things that can prove that he did a , he can do what he says he does.

Speaker 1:

Wow. So it seems like these technology folks have really need to take a deep breath and slow down a little bit. Correct. And that's where you're good at helping them out with. So we're going to go to a break right now. Talk a little bit about to book a business association and what's going on in Buckhead and we'll be right back with Tracy in a moment. But first we want to thank our sponsors. Serendipity lab is a mate makes this program possible along with the pro-business channel who is our primary host. Then of course the bucket business association, which has been for many years, the business voice of Buckhead . For those of you not aware of, just go to Buckhead business.org and take a look at their events and your activities. Of course, most of us here in the city know . But if you're around the country and around the world, you need to know that we meet three times a month in the mornings for breakfast and he comes early seven 30 but then I also for the benefit of others, we have lunch and learns. And then lastly we have an after hours event, which is the third Wednesday of each month only at one of the great bucket watering spots. So we hope you'll be joining there. And we've got one of those fabulous events coming up soon called a taste of buck kit in the fall. And then of course we have our annual luncheon each year in our signature lunch in which brings a real neat speaker and our public service awards, which have become a hallmark every year for the bucket business association. So now we've been talking for the last few minutes here with Tracy about how she administers this business. I'm somebody ask her to take a deep dive in a moment. And of course before we do that, I'm going to ask Tracy that question. If you're just dialing in, Tracy fudge is the owner of thrive agency. The thrive agency provides linked automation, which is a tool, which if you're not aware of it, the next few minutes we're going to just unpack it a little bit and see how it could benefit your business. Cause I bet there's at least half of us out there who probably don't do a great job with our linkedin profile . So Tracy may put you on the spot. Well, how do they find you? Wow. Well , uh , on Linkedin, oh eight , 10 well we wrote lay it right. And that was so Tracy flush that you, you, you mentioned something about company pages and personal pages and I'm going to ask you to kind of unpack that. This thrive agency , you have a company page. We do

Speaker 4:

and I don't pay as much attention. It, I don't, it's , I pay a lot of attention to my personal,

Speaker 1:

I've heard that story before about a shoe maker in his shoes, a cobbler and these children, you know. So talk to us about the personal page and how really important it is. You really put a lot of effort and activities at and , and these individual owners, founders, leaders in whatever space they're in, need to find their niche. So let's go back and dive down into that a little bit. Talk about what kind of things they need to be really paying attention to.

Speaker 4:

Well, you need to look at your profile, the personal page, and analyze it from the point of telling a story not only about yourself, but exploring how you can help others. You're not just the CEO of this technology company. You help people achieve something and it's important for leaders to put forward their thought leadership and their authority and really embraced social selling , uh, more so than it is just the standard sales and marketing teams.

Speaker 1:

Let's talk about some of the things that probably people don't spend as much time of . Uh , as I look at people's sites, and you mentioned earlier in the first segment, we talked about the number of filters available in a , in linkedin. Most people aren't aware how to do a good search. Let me give you one of those hypothetical. I'm looking for people who went to Northwestern university cause I'm really distracted from my school and I've never been very participatory. Any alumni, can I find that stuff out on linkedin?

Speaker 4:

Oh absolutely. You need to go into sales navigator. That's where the 32 plus filters are. Okay .

Speaker 1:

But aren't there some filters and basic linkedin that people can use to begin to hone down and get educated so they can become your good client ?

Speaker 4:

There are, but you cannot find tenure, you cannot find number of employees and you cannot find uh , schools , tags, group memberships. So the, the short answer is yes, but if you really want to move the needle and grow a potential network, you need to have the sales navigate .

Speaker 1:

So sales navigator people think of as a new tool. It's one of those premium services. Talk about what you've seen in the evolution of Linkedin and just, I'll let you be a, their, their spokesperson for moment about their premium, their sales navigator and in other services and what they dig down a little bit about what you actually offer and how you deliver services to people.

Speaker 4:

Sure. So linkedin was purchased by Microsoft as you well know. Um, and from a business stand point I think that they are really trying to um, put more into the premium version. It is a paid version. You get a month free, but I think it's $79 after that. But I think what they are doing is making it an investment to allow sales and marketing to really go after their target market, whether they're people or businesses see specific news feeds because sales navigator has its own newsfeed, sales navigator has its own messaging. So it is very distinct and different [inaudible] now you focus on the sales folks, but there's also a recruiters segment to it there in linkedin. Correct. That's a different version and it's actually how linkedin started and now that's distinct. You'd mentioned that, you know, it was actually recruiting too , which is kind of neat to know the background. Let's talk about some of the things which might not be so apparent to people. Um , I know one of the things I enjoy is what you're interested in. I think that's one of the things that people begin to fill in. If you want to be on boards , so you want to do volunteer work or so forth. And that's kind of putting some gray areas out there. So talk about how important you think those are or are not for people who use linkedin on a regular basis. I think it's very important to really describe yourself from a personal standpoint because people are going to know, like, and trust you and follow you from a social media standpoint. If they feel like they, you've exposed yourself and shown not only your interests that are not obvious but maybe some vulnerabilities and that is, you know, putting content out there that may not be the most structured, sometimes not most appropriate. I , I think , uh , if you misspell a word or two, you really don't need to worry about it. Um, it's really putting yourself out there and people see that and yes, they are looking at your, at your profile and quote unquote stalking you , um, on a daily basis. So that scary thing about posts to comment or share a comment or like, I mean, how important is it to really participate in budget your time on Linkedin? Talk a little bit about how your time investment pays dividends and or how you can get caught into that spiral. So that's a funny question. Um, and of course my answer is going to be biased. I am a linkedin certified consultant , so I spend a lot of time, but I think a good , uh , at least 10, 20 minutes a day engaging , uh, with people. If you are trying to find a market and if you're trying to find a following, yes, you definitely need to be on it every day. We'll talking about finding a following and engaging with people. Are there some guidelines other than quote time of , Gosh, 10 or 20 minutes? I thought you're going to say 10 or 20 minutes per hour. No, no, no, no, no. So how do you begin to monitor your numbers of connections and how do you begin to look at what's important? And is there any, are there any tools out there that you can use to kind of analyze your connections? Uh, no, there's not. Um, linkedin is very , um, particular about the , the third party tools and actually our service is a done for you model and it's a process of, of that's been put in place and it's a team. It's not one tool that does what we say. Um, there's a social selling index, SSI, that Linkedin , um, does put , um, put forward and publish for you and you can see what that is. But it is an index and most people have probably 60 to 70 of a grade of social selling index. So how would, how would one find that on their profile is that you just go into your profile and click on social selling index and then you can see. So there's a lot of skillsets would probably be, most people have never really clicked on the behind the scenes a little bit. Yeah . Well, you've got to engage, you know, there's algorithms on Linkedin and you've got a like people's comments, you've got to say happy birthday, congratulations on your promotion. You've got to read content. I mean it knows what you're doing on the platform. And then that way when you produce content and post it, it presents that content in the newsfeed of whoever you want it to be seen. Otherwise the algorithms don't post. If you just post once a year, no one's going to see it. So are there some , um, I guess I've really never really noticed that you, linkedin community is a , linkedin is a user group of its own in reality, but are there any local resources or do you run an organization here that it puts people together and puts knowledge in their heads and kind of stirs the pot? How does that work? You know, it is something that is on a, not now, but in Atlanta. Yes, I will be putting together a user group within the future. Pretty important. Do you have any other dreams for your linkedin business you want to share with us today? Yeah , I would love to be able to put this into a catalog of content that people can get to and entertain 24, seven. So that's, that's my goal is to really dig deeper into teaching people how to do what we do. I can see it now. The Tracy avatar comes online whenever you need it and , and nurtures you through the linkedin process. She'll talk about your, your desire to start this business and talk a little bit about the backstory now we've gotten the nitty gritty of the detail, but what in the world did you do this? I a laugh corporate America, as I said about seven years ago, really wanted to get out. I've always had this creative side. Um, I paint quite a bit . So I've, I have this, this creative and this nerdy technical side. And I had these visions about creating an agency and designing websites and doing things like that. But when I left, I didn't have any clients. So linked automation method came out of me needing to drive my, not only my name, but my awareness and finding people that could potentially use my service. And today instead of web design, this method is actually what we do and sell. And you call this method a done for you process. We'll talk about the moving pieces of your business, a little bit of how somebody would engage with you. Well, we do start out with , um, you know, a quick call because we can't help everybody. Um, and we do a quick discovery to understand the , the goals, what the lifetime client value is to someone, to really, if it's a proven sales process , um, and then trying to determine if there is a niche or if they want to have a niche. And then we do as a onboarding, there's a setup phase where we rewrite the profile, we put together content, and then there's an ongoing phase that we have where we're actually growing the network and messaging that network that the messaging that culminates with a call to actions . So, you know, we're filling the pipeline and we track everything , um, for our clients. And we have weekly meetings, we have weekly reports, you have assigned project managers. Uh , it's just a completely done for you model. Wow. So from an engagement standpoint, a person who's gotta be really dedicated, they've got to fund you, they've gotta be acceptable as a client currently , they're going to be having some success in a very short time. I take it. What's the normal engagement cycle for a client for you? Is it a 30 60 90 180 days or the rest of my lifetime now it's probably nine months average. I've got clients that have been with me longer than that, but um, you really, it's something that you need to stick with. This isn't a , uh , a quick fix. This is not only changing your paradigm, but changing the , how people view you as well. So it takes time and it is a process. Let's talk about the ripple effect in a company. You've talked several times about the quote CEO or the senior sales guy or a , I guess the sales guy or Gal. What's the profile of working down in a company through a company having more than one relationship within a company? For you as a business owner and as a service provider? So it depends on the , the , the vertical you want to go after. I've got one client, a , he is the CEO and we are going after merger and acquisition prospects for him. Another niche for them is going after data analytics, but we're going after that project with one of the other leaders within the organization. So it's, it's two initiatives, two campaigns in parallel and we're building out , um, the profiles to speak and go after those different things. So it's, it's more of a vertical uh, effort. Yeah . Well you've got done a great job of telling us the background you shared us with how you got to new organization. I'm going to go , come back to this process of, you gave one more phrase here about speaking you gave me, so your next best customer, if you had to pick the person you to engage with next, draw me that perfect profile of your next customer. Well, it would be a technology business. It would be with a leader in that space that is forward thinking, that understands the art of social selling that is ready to commit and work hard and that is willing to put in that effort with me and we explore and with the team. So it's, it's very a subjective many times because it is an ongoing relationship. We're involved daily together . So , um, you know, technology space with a niche, with a forward thinking leader. Right. Well I know there's been a lot of growing up

Speaker 1:

in linkedin. I think I shared with you in a , in the pretend that we were going to talk about that question. If you could start your business over again. Linkedin has been around about 15 years. You've been working in this space about seven or so years and probably getting very good at it in the last three. I'm going to guess if you could start your business again today, what would you do differently?

Speaker 4:

I would build out my team, you know, get the art of that because , um , I grew fast in the beginning and I feel like I made a mistakes and if I could go back and recreate that time , um, I would do that.

Speaker 1:

Well that sounds like a national championship profile to me . Build a team better, but you also gotta be there . You've got to be smarter sooner. And most of us aren't able to do that. Correct . Unless we're modeling after somebody that's come along with success before us . You're certainly pioneering some new ground. Feels like you're having some tremendous successes and uh , I know after hours you do fun things, you have some pets, you play a little tennis. What else is fun about Tracy ?

Speaker 4:

Uh, I've got uh , two great kids and just busy on trying to get them , uh , through high school and into a good college. That's where a lot of my time goes. And we ride horses and play tennis, loved to cook, drank some wine. Right?

Speaker 1:

So we have with us, they Tracy virtues as business owner. Tracy Fudge has been a member of the bucket business association, and obviously Tracy Fudge is impacting businesses right here in the Atlanta metropolitan area, but throughout the world. So you don't have any borders on your business, right?

Speaker 4:

None at all. None at all. So yeah . Tracy , how did they get in touch with you? Well, they can call my cell or see my linkedin profile, (404) 285-4100 and that's Tracy fudge at (404) 285-4100

Speaker 1:

right on linkedin. So do they. We've been with it with a true business leader, with a true thought leader. Tracy has put in some interesting information. If you're not paying attention to your linkedin profile, shame on you. If you'd like to get more information, please go to her site. Look her up on linkedin. I bet she to connect with you. But I think the most important part is you want to be one of those folks who has that initial interview to find out how to make your profile, do what you need to do every day. So we're here with a Buckhead business association with a bucket, vicious show, serendipity labs right here at the corner of Peachtree and Piedmont in the world. And boy out to you what we have learned some things. I'm Michael Moore, your host. It has been great to be with you today. We will see you again next time. Thanks for being with us, Tracy. Thank you.

Speaker 3:

Thank you for joining us and our guests on the pro business channel. Fuse , the social media links here to share today's show and stay tuned for the next episode of the Buckhead business show brought to you by the Buckhead business association.