The Ink Pods. Literary Podcast for The Blue Nib.

Deborah Cook reads Roadkill.

March 25, 2020 Various
The Ink Pods. Literary Podcast for The Blue Nib.
Deborah Cook reads Roadkill.
Chapters
The Ink Pods. Literary Podcast for The Blue Nib.
Deborah Cook reads Roadkill.
Mar 25, 2020
Various


Deborah Cook spent a thirty-year career as a scriptwriter for radio and television, writing for The Archers, Eastenders, Emmerdale, Casualty, House of Elliott, The Royal, Berkley Square, and adapting Walter Scott’s Ivanhoe for the small screen. Bored rigid by retirement from television, she has now ventured into prose writing, and is currently working on a collection of short stories on the theme of food. 

Deborah writes for four or five hours a day, depending on the weather and how much gardening needs to be done. ‘Roadkill’, specially written for the Faversham Literary Festival, is the first piece of writing she has ever entered into any kind of competition. It is told in the first person, which is a very natural and familiar storytelling mode for an ex-scriptwriter. Deborah says of ‘Roadkill’: ‘I was thinking about how casual violence affects people,and whether or not it could ever just be shrugged off, and I suddenly just heard a young girl gasp in shock. After that, the story wrote itself, really.’ 





Support the show (https://thebluenib.com/donation/)

Show Notes


Deborah Cook spent a thirty-year career as a scriptwriter for radio and television, writing for The Archers, Eastenders, Emmerdale, Casualty, House of Elliott, The Royal, Berkley Square, and adapting Walter Scott’s Ivanhoe for the small screen. Bored rigid by retirement from television, she has now ventured into prose writing, and is currently working on a collection of short stories on the theme of food. 

Deborah writes for four or five hours a day, depending on the weather and how much gardening needs to be done. ‘Roadkill’, specially written for the Faversham Literary Festival, is the first piece of writing she has ever entered into any kind of competition. It is told in the first person, which is a very natural and familiar storytelling mode for an ex-scriptwriter. Deborah says of ‘Roadkill’: ‘I was thinking about how casual violence affects people,and whether or not it could ever just be shrugged off, and I suddenly just heard a young girl gasp in shock. After that, the story wrote itself, really.’ 





Support the show (https://thebluenib.com/donation/)