ASPIRE by 3P

EQ-IQ - Emotional Intelligence

November 11, 2019 3P Season 12 Episode 1
ASPIRE by 3P
EQ-IQ - Emotional Intelligence
Chapters
ASPIRE by 3P
EQ-IQ - Emotional Intelligence
Nov 11, 2019 Season 12 Episode 1
3P
Transcript
Speaker 1:

Good morning, it's time for you . And number 12, on a subject of emotional intelligence , um, HQ or E I as it's , um , affectionately know that's a term grit a long time ago by some researchers and it was popularized by Dan Goldman and 1996 and he brought a book , um, with the same title and in that, yeah, I remember buying that book for the , for the first time and really starting to think about emotional intelligence in a work setting and in management zones and in leadership. So what is a emotional intelligence? I'm just taking the basic definitions of that from Dan Goldman . It's the ability to recognize, understand and manage our own emotions. Yeah, sounds straightforward. But , um, we don't always know how to do that or recognize some of the behaviors that might not be as constricted as we want it to be. And also the ability to recognize, understand and influence the emotions of others. So a good self-management , understand your own emotions. And then how can you help to understand those and influence them as well. So easy to say, more difficult to do. And the book itself opens up lots of thought processes and ideas as to how to achieve that. So today we would like to talk about emotional intelligence and our spend on that and to give you some something to work on. Just the means to, to, to have a little think. Um, Maya Angelou. Nice, nice little a phrase. People will forget what you said. People will forget what you did. People will never forget how you made them feel. Now that can be in the moment and it can be in the long run as well as I was reading that I had recollections of working with um, others and a good example and not so good example. And the first thing that you get to is have that made you feel, I can't remember what they said or what they did. Real [inaudible] NIMS maintenance. No, no, no ma'am . It's called . No , cause you know, we're all developing, we're all growing. And Samath may as well, you know, go back many years ago , uh , maybe I didn't make people feel the right work, but you'll learn from that and you want to get better. That's and build your emotional intelligence. So people will forget what you said. People will forget what you did, but they will never forget how you made them feel. So it's important . And linking that into to business and then a marketing as well. People buying emotions . Yeah . We all think but buying a product, we all think of buying something rationally, but all we're doing is we're buying something emotionally and then instantaneously trying to rationalize that emotion. So products make us feel a particular way. Yeah . The association with those products, the marketing and advertising makes us feel a particular way. So we're driven by emotions. We know that. So it's important to understand that in as an individual and when we're trying to influence others and influence team .

Speaker 2:

And just to add Lindsey as well, you mentioned the M how people have made you feel that you will, that will be, tend to be lessened. I think very much so as well with the your manager or your leader at that particular time. I think that relationship is, we've discussed on some of the previous videos , um, 70% of the variants engaged when it's only a manager. And I think how that manager makes you feel good. Butter and different will tend to last.

Speaker 1:

And again , just to flip that around, cause if you've watched our videos, you'll have seen this be called the power of 95. So line managers, line managers, that's anybody who was looking after a team tend to be just 5% of the organization from a headcount point of view will be 5% of the organization yet they're trying to influence it and 95% of that doing that with good emotional intelligence, that'll be very positive outcomes. Yeah. They're doing that with poor emotional intelligence. You can see why we have low levels of engagements . Yeah . Another statistic to throw at you and it's just to give you the , the sense of it, yeah . That the prediction of success in life and in business can be attributable to um, [inaudible] I run about 80% of your success in business and life attributable to EEQ rather than straight IQ or intelligence. Now, but that's 80% or 70% or 50%. What it's saying is ADQ is got a big factor in your success as an individual in life and in your working environment. So [inaudible] very important. So what did we see in real terms? Um, again, we record Tony Robins quite a lot cause he'd been out there for 40 years and then his laboratory is , you know, tens of millions of people . So he knows what he's talking about, particularly practical psychology friends. And he'll say that one of the biggest constraints in our businesses is the psychology of the leader. You know , all the business owner. So the psychology of our leaders for us presents a particular challenge. Yeah, Ray Dalio , another guy we've caught it before , um, runs the biggest hedge fund on the planet and there's no stone to bring all of his and his insights into now he's managed to do that. And you find him on LinkedIn, all the social platforms. Yeah , he's giving away secrets. He said there's two moving parts in business, people and culture. Now, again, we've had previous conversations around culture and as the leaders who managed the culture yeah . Or the cultural manage the leader, the leaders go determine what culture they want. And I would hope in this day and age leaders thinking that EEQ brings about a level of success that's going to bring a better cultures . Our culture is built around emotional intelligence. Yeah . And if you see some of the clients we've worked with as well, it's great to see a lot of that. Our leadership programs now I've got a specific module on EEQ so I think people are starting to realize the importance of EEQ a lot of people anyway. Now what do you think 1996 when this term was first popularized? That's like almost three decades later and we're still talking about ACU not being prevalent and um, modern. They're working, but it will start at a time to raise its head and become important, know the name to drop in there. Anybody was saying Gary Vaynerchuk, they're on the every social platform you can imagine. And he'll say it in a very , um, New York type of where , um, he will, he will , uh, recruit based on IQ rather than IQ. Now that's an easy to sand but more difficult to do. But what he's saying is I'm putting some importance on that. Yeah . And again, skills, getting somebody to, to, to find a where to, to perform a task can be done through training EQP affairs, but more difficult to , to build in . So let's just recruit for it. Let's bring that emotional intelligence in and then we can work on the skills from that . I heard it , Tim , which is the IQ is almost, can you do the job with the AICCU is about, will you do the joke ? Yeah . Maybe fit in. Yeah. Good . Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. So Lindsay mentioned the , um, the Daniel Goldman book back in the mid nineties. Essentially emotional intelligence. Why it can matter more than EEQ . It's a good part that's , I think this is actually from more than IQ and need more than IQ. Yeah, yeah. Yeah. So it was a why it can matter more than IQ. And I remember reading this years ago for the first time and it up time , I wasn't really sure what [inaudible] was, but I just, I'd heard about this and I thought, Oh yeah, give it a shot. Um, and it looked a bit daunting in the writing . It was really small and stuff and I thought, Oh yeah, give it a shot. But the very first page, it started the book, there was a [inaudible] a little statement from Aristotle that the quarter , so I'll just read that because this gives me a good understanding of what he meant by E Q a basically just goes, anyone can become angry that is easy, but to be angry with the right person to the right degree at the right time for the right purpose and in the rate [inaudible] this is not easy. And that was just by Aristotle. So it's about how you manage those emotions. I think that just summarized it quite nicely for me at a particular team . And when I look back through this again, it still rings true with me in terms of a summary. So in terms of the book itself, when Daniel Goldman popularized the subject of EEQ , he looked at four key areas and it was self awareness, self regulation, self motivation, empathy and social skills. So there was five key areas of ECU . It's obviously changed and evolved since then and there's lots of different takes on it. But really that's the fundamental elements of [inaudible] in terms of trying to objectively measure and use it as a tool for the awareness element, but also the development side of things. We use the tools Hartson assessments, which we've spoken about a few times and particularly in the last video, video 11 where we looked at predictive analytics. And really what that's done is it's simplified the, the five elements of EEQ from Goldman and it's produced for customized behavioral competencies. So you can actually measure someone in each of the four key areas that they've come up with, four areas they've come up with or knowing oneself, relationship leadership, self motivation and self management and social awareness and service orientation. So there's four key areas that that can be objectively measured. And then it looks at the granular level of all the traits that's necessary to give you success across each one of those four elements.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. So just to , to summarize there, what we're saying is that three peak and make this easy to understand and measure those success factors for money [inaudible] perspective to, to, to help each individual and , and under an organization as well

Speaker 2:

in very simplistic terms is you've mentioned at the very start, Lindsay , the metrics that we've produced for the four key areas, it's just about the recognition of yourself, the recognition of others, and also the influence of yourself in the influence of others.

Speaker 1:

Okay. So as a , as a man stir to give some advice here today , um, what we suggest is that you look for emotional intelligence competency and the success factors that lead to that as well. Okay. Now we know we've , we've, we've looked at, there's many tools out there and the role excellence , okay? But you have to choose something. Okay. We've done that. We've chosen a tool which will predict a level of success through particular benchmarking and Tayvon analytics that we use Harrison assessments. And we're proposing as well, that you start to build your talent management strategy on this. If you look at our talent wheel on the screen, you can see where we fit in emotional intelligence. He Q it's a wrap around to wraparound feature within talent management and the talent management strategy.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. So yeah , so in terms of looking what we recommend, etc. We don't, we're not saying you should go out there and just measure everyone in everyone's EEQ specifically as Lindsay mentioned earlier. Yeah, there was that the power of 95, the key influences. So if you can focus on the 5% improve the E Q of those 5% of the people that can then have a massive knock on effect on the whole of the business on the other 95%. So certainly is the recommendation is to start thinking of the AICCU if your key influences the power and 95. So start thinking of how you can measure , um, the ECU for those people. And certainly as part of what we're trying to do with through the aspire talent management program is , um, you'll see on the wheel, it's, it goes right the way around with the talent analytics. So it covers , um , rate across those key areas of uh , talent management. And we're looking to, you know , certainly offer some, some things that you can take away from the Deere , you know , w certainly free sample report, which goes into detail of all the behaviors that are linked to the four key areas of [inaudible] that we've mentioned. So it's a three Harrison assessment report and some of the reports will give you the details so you can get involved if you would like a copy of that. But also more importantly to see if you'd like to actually have your own E Q score and we're happy to give that away for free. It's a percentage. So just out of a hundred gives you a percentage of where you sit across those four areas of AICCU . So as I've said that certainly give that away for free. And for those people who want to dig a bit deeper and you can get access to the full suite of your own reports for the [inaudible] , which covers the no one wants self, the relationship leadership, the motivation and self management and also the social awareness and service orientation. So it's a full suite. I can run exactly how many pages, but it's a really detailed full suite of reports , um, basically to help you with you at the first element of, of the self awareness. So we're gonna um, yeah, we'll leave details of how you can actually get involved. And it really all comes from the 20 minute questionnaire as we mentioned before with the Harrison assessments. Really simple. Um , it's a preference based assessment , um, and the information that we can get certainly measure yourself against the customized emotional intelligence

Speaker 1:

competency. Okay. So just to , to to summarize for today then, so people will never forget, maybe fail bare that in mind. And I think the psychology of ourselves as leaders, managers or influences in the business is, is key. Um, we can help you to , to make this easy, to understand and to, to measure the success factors for emotional intelligence and the recommendation of really build this in your talent management strategy. And there's , Trevor says there are some links here now to, to give you access at the levels that you may or may want to , um, engage with. So thank you for listening today. See you next time. Yep . Yes .