Serve No Master : Escape the 9-5, Fire Your Boss, Achieve Financial Freedom

SNM173: How to make your book stand out in the Amazon search jungle with John Tighe

May 15, 2020 Jonathan Green : Bestselling Author, Tropical Island Entrepreneur, 7-Figure Blogger
Serve No Master : Escape the 9-5, Fire Your Boss, Achieve Financial Freedom
SNM173: How to make your book stand out in the Amazon search jungle with John Tighe
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Serve No Master : Escape the 9-5, Fire Your Boss, Achieve Financial Freedom
SNM173: How to make your book stand out in the Amazon search jungle with John Tighe
May 15, 2020
Jonathan Green : Bestselling Author, Tropical Island Entrepreneur, 7-Figure Blogger

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to make your childhood dream come true? Do you want to know how you can become a published author with independent, online publishing? If you are struggling to sell your book online, you might be doing something wrong. Do you know how to market your book online? Let's see what John Tighe,  a bestselling author has to say about how to make your book stand out on Amazon.

John had a rough start. Unable to find the right publisher, he found himself in 2012 with four books and a soul-crushing job. This is when he took matters into his own hands and give self-publishing a shot. After this, he never looked back. But what was it that made John so successful?

Learn how to make your book stand out in Amazon's search engine in today's episode.

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The post SNM173: How to make your book stand out in the Amazon search jungle with John Tighe appeared first on Serve No Master: Be Your Own Boss - Live Free 

Show Notes Transcript

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to make your childhood dream come true? Do you want to know how you can become a published author with independent, online publishing? If you are struggling to sell your book online, you might be doing something wrong. Do you know how to market your book online? Let's see what John Tighe,  a bestselling author has to say about how to make your book stand out on Amazon.

John had a rough start. Unable to find the right publisher, he found himself in 2012 with four books and a soul-crushing job. This is when he took matters into his own hands and give self-publishing a shot. After this, he never looked back. But what was it that made John so successful?

Learn how to make your book stand out in Amazon's search engine in today's episode.

▶️▶️▶️▶️
 
 Resources mentioned:

Leave some feedback. We would love to hear from you!
 
Connect with Jonathan Green and Serve No Master:

The post SNM173: How to make your book stand out in the Amazon search jungle with John Tighe appeared first on Serve No Master: Be Your Own Boss - Live Free 

How to self-publish your passion into a business with a special guest. John T on today's episode. Today's episode is brought to you by Novo, the no fee business bank that refunds fees charged by other HTMS, even internationally get $25 when you sign up today at servicemaster.com/lenovo that's N O. V. O. Are you tired of dealing with your boss? Do you feel underpaid and underappreciated? If you want to make it online, fire your boss, and start living your retirement dreams. Now. Then you've come to the right place. Welcome to serve no master podcast where you learn how to open new revenue streams and make money while you sleep. Presented live from a tropical Island in the South Pacific by bestselling author, Jonathan Green. Now here's your host. Hey guys. Welcome to the first episode in a new series where we're going to be interviewing experts from around the world trying to take the podcast to the next level, and I hope you're excited. We're going to start putting out two episodes a week. We're trying to get a lot of these interviews in places because we want to give you amazing content. And the beauty is that our record, these five videos, so if you're watching this on YouTube, you're gonna get to see some live action in just a moment. Today's episode, very exciting. John is going to talk about how to build a successful business, doing something you love. How he helps experts and entrepreneurs learn how to share their messages and everything you need to do about the self-publishing process and building a business around your writing. I'm very, very excited to share this with you guys and you're going to get to see my interview starting right now. So hi everyone. I'm so excited to have John There. He's the best selling author, crush it with Kindle. He's an online marketing expert, author, speaker, and business coach. Now before striking out his out, he had a career as a corporate lawyer, but I know we're not going to hold that against him because he decided he wanted more from life. His mission today is to help experts to entrepreneurs share their message with the world so they can build a successful business doing something they absolutely love, live life on their terms. And. Inspire others. So, John, I'd love to know what inspired you to start writing, what started this journey for you.
Okay, Jonathan. Well, thank you for having me here. And yeah, so it goes way back to even before I became a lawyer, and I always loved to read, and I wrote my first book back in 1998 so that was a long time ago. More than 20 years now. Uh, this was back in the day, kind of old school where you have double gatekeeper systems, so you have to get an agent. Before we had any chance of getting a publisher and then publish, you had to sign off as well. So you kind of a double system to get through. Um, and I couldn't get an agent and a publisher and I, that was 1998. I put a lot of time into that but obviously didn't go anywhere. And, uh, then I had another go at writing back in 2004 and same situation, but e is late to Katie P arrived. That's Kindle direct publishing, which is Amazon's platform. I didn't hear about it, but for a number of years it launched a sort of to end of 2007, but I discovered it in 2012 and uh, that was the point where I thought, well, you know, maybe I can do something with maybe a lot of time and effort and energy wasn't wasted. And so I got into it then. And my fourth book is the book crushing the candle that you mentioned. And, uh, because I, I started doing it for me just because I had these books that I've written and published, and I had other stuff that I wrote. Um, yeah. So that was the, the whole thing. And it was, it didn't hit me straight away. I've been writing and I put a city, basically, I put a system together for myself, so marketing, publishing my own books, and then it kind of hit me that I could actually teach this and combine. So I've got, by this stage, I'd left Laura anyway and I become an entrepreneur doing some stuff in the online space. So I fall in love with the marketing side of it. I love books and, uh, writing. Uh, and I love teaching. So I suddenly had this kind of a Tiffany moment when I realized I could combine all three of these things. And that was when it began. So it was sort of late 2012 so, which sounds like a long time ago now. So, you built an entire business around your writing out, and it's amazing you went on that journey. I know that so many people try the digital publishing route. I know it certainly didn't work for me. It's even, I couldn't even get an agent. They wouldn't even show up when they did make a meeting with me. So I know that experience, but maybe you could tell us about, um, that process in 2012 and how you started to develop your marketing process. Cause most authors, I know, we think it ends when we hit upload. We think once we hit and the pro, the work is done. But I've learned over the last decade. I know, you know, it, that's when the work begins. So how should someone approach writing? Who wants to get into this process? What should they start looking at first? Yeah. Well, let me, things have evolved. Well, some things have evolved in something time. So some of the things that were truly 2012 or before, uh, equally true, that movie probably true in 10 years. Some of the tips and tactics change as the platforms evolve and as social media changes. So, um, I mean, I can sort of tackle this in a couple of ways. I can talk about some of the things that are kind of fundamental. Um, and then we can go from there. And really, you know, usually there's a lot of stuff that begins before you publish your book, which is just good cause, um, that allows you to kind of get those boxes ticked, uh, ahead of time. If you like the big ones, really from a marketing point of view, uh, things like having a good cover and we can get guidance and detail on that if you want a good title. Again, you know, people do judge books by their covers and by their titles or subtitle, which is kind of more for keywords, particularly on Amazon, where probably 80% of eBooks are still sold. Uh, you need to get your book in like categories again, so it can be found on Amazon. Need a good description. So these are all things that can be sort of set up ahead of time and you can tweak them. But you know, you want to get these girls broadly, right? Also, you want to have a professional book, but one of the better expressions. So really when you self publish on Amazon, the system is such that there's no reason why anybody should look at your bookings and notice any difference between your book and a traditionally published book. Um, you can get the full medic can be all the same. The structure can be the same. You know, the front matter, the back matter, there are certain conventions that you can follow. So, doing all of those different things so that, uh, eight people can find your book V, they'll notice it. B, they'll be sort of intrigued enough to check it out and have a look at the description. Um, they won't be put off cause they won't think it's, it's, you know, it doesn't look amateur. It looks professionally done. Uh, and obviously I'm kind of taking this, given that the actual, the content is solid. It's, it's a good book. But the key thing to remember as an author, as a writer, is you can have the best book in the world. It could be absolutely superb, Pulitzer prize-winning stuff. But if nobody can find it, nobody knows about it. You're not gonna sell any copies. That's why this kind of stuff is fundamental. And it's particularly important because there's a ton of things you can do to market the book once it's published and this and also stuff in the lead up to publication that you want to get in place as well. But if you don't have these fundamentals right, I call it like foundations, how I usually refer to them. So you're tired of your coverage key, what're attackers and so on. If you don't have those right, you're kind of throwing money away because everything you do will be less successful. Flip that around. If you get those things right, you don't have to be perfect. Don't get hung up on being perfect if you're doing this particularly the first time. Um, but if you've got them broadly, right, then everything you do after that to market will be much more successful. Uh, so, so that's kind of the way to think of it as this sort of almost like a two-stage process. Get the fundamentals done before you publish the book, and then you can worry about the actual marketing process. A hop to that.I think you've got into something really critical there. You know, I've been doing this for a decade, almost as long as you've been teaching this for five or six years, and yet still, I consistently see people who put out terrible covers and there's no other way to say it. And that was interesting. You mentioned bad titles as well. I haven't noticed that as much because usually I'm so thrown off by the cover. My trench with bad titles is, I can't tell what genre the book is. I don't know what it's going to be about. With bad covers, there are so many big issues, they can't figure out what causes it. So maybe you have a perspective there. Cause that's something that really interests me cause it's such a critical, cause I have seen people with amazing books. It doesn't matter. The cover kills every single sale.
And you're right. And I think if you can't get past the cover, the titles are Mr. Irrelevant. Um, and so yeah, I'll give you personally just some tips on covers. But, perhaps, again, just before I do that, just to stress that it's a useful way to think of this is from the perspective of your prospective book buyer. Uh, and it's a linear process. So they've got to find the book either through search or through keywords, or it's got to be showing up as an offset board. Something like that. I'm talking about Amazon. Um, but then that covers got to catch the arts. Got to pop off the page. Cause remember if he comes up in search, this is going to be potentially 50 other. Uh, well categories. For example, it shows 50 at once, currently. So this 50 thumbnails is people scrolling through so it feels it doesn't stand out. You're not gonna get any less of. That leads me to the first thing, which is you want to have a cover that pops up the page as a thumbnail, not as a full size company. Cause that's not how people have to see it until after they book a, it's got to be eye-catching visual as a thumbnail. Sitting amongst all that noise on the Amazon page. So that's the first thing. The second thing is hopefully you've got to be crafted a great title, uh, and the title, it should be easily readable whilst the book is still a thumb that subtitles are not, uh, important in that respect. Not nearly as important. Uh, but the talking should be readable. So that means you need whatever your background predominant, the fatal color of the background is your, uh, type. It should be highly from a trustee, probably up a case, but not necessarily. You've got to make sure it fits with their show hombre. Well, the niche that you're able to catch that second. Um, but it's gotta be readable. Cause yes, it's true that you've got your coverage and you've got the Amazon puts the wording x-ray of what it is. But the eyes are drawn to the cover first and foremost, and they may or may not read what's written next to it. So you want that to be read in public. The patient has a highly readable title, which you've named because of the size constraints you permanently want to. Shorter, rather than longer title. It doesn't have to be super short, but you know, if it's 10 words, you might start struggling. Uh, so that's something else. Um, and then here's are, obviously, you want it to be professional and attractive, but, uh, a really key thing for both you and your book designer, whoever you're working with. It's got to fit with that nature genre. And so going back to the point you made about type is not being able to tell what niche something's in. The same goes for covers. So you'll, you'll typically, certain types of covers fit with certain niches. And so part of your job as the author is to spend time, whether it's in a book shop or, uh, whether it's browsing Amazon and looking at the different categories that your book is going to be in ultimately. I'm getting really familiar with one of the books in that, that, uh, at the top of the charts, what are they, and particularly have a look at one's not just kind of flash in the pan, one that might be dead for a couple of days, but I look at the books that are at the top of that charts and have lots and lots of reviews and clearly have a lot of traction and a lot of staying power, and try and pick out common themes. I mean, you know, you can imagine a thrill, for example, with the sort of the iconic lone silhouetted figure, um, uh, on the, on the sort of hazy lighting and that kind of backlit. Contrast that to the romance cover, um, which is probably the completely different color palette. Completely different. Probably got a chest font rather than a, a phone font. Uh, the, the, uh, um, sensory font. And if you spend time studying that, you'll, you'll, you can pick out the kind of stuff that will, uh, sort from visual cues that will tell your prospect that they're in the right place. Because if they're buying that book, and this is equally the same part for self help books or how to books as well through this exactly the same, whether it's fiction or nonfiction. Um, and hope to get, uh, uh. Again, if you design it, you want to, you want to pick out three or four or five covers that you like, that fit with your niche or genre to give them a sense of what you want them to produce and sort of follow the, think of it as a style guide. So if you follow those rules, um, so you've got, you've got a couple of pops off the page. Your title is a contrast. Well, so it's readable, it has a thumbnail, uh, and now you've got a book which is professional and attractive, but fits very much with that nature of your own. Bruh. Uh, and now you're well on the way to almost instantly and almost subconsciously communicating to your prospect that your book is for them. And it's, it's this step that so many books, uh, kind of pullover on. It's really, really hard to recover if you don't get that, that stuff right in the first place. Again, however good the book itself might be on the inside. I think that's really interesting. I, so many people that I talked to, they approached the book cover emotionally and they say, Oh, I just want to cover that I like. And they start from that place. And the problem is, like for me, I don't read nonfiction. All I do is write nonfiction books, but all I read is pulp science fiction. And so if I just put what I like, every one of my book covers would either have a sword, a dragon, or a robot, as one of my ex-girlfriends used to say, if there's a sword on the cover, you're going to read it. And that's what we, we sometimes forget. I love that you speak so analytically and realize that it's really switching that mindset going, it's not about me. It's about what the customer wants or their expectation. Because sometimes, uh, this happened to me. I always remember the stories that I never saw the movie Donnie Darko for a really long time cause on the cover had that scary rabbit head. And they go, Oh, that's a horror movie. I don't like horror movies. And then one day my friend fired it up and I was like, why is the cover so scary? It's not a horror movie. It's totally different genre. And I always wondered if that's why that movie became a cult classic, but it wasn't an instant hit. I wondered if the cover right out the gate really hurt them. Yeah, it was a cool cover, but it looked like a horror movie. And so I think about that all the time, and you're exactly right that we have to switch to that analytical mindset, which makes me think of how many people say, Oh, I'm a writer, but I don't really think of myself as a writer. I say that too, but I'm an author because they understand that target really. What I do is I sell books and that's the business mindset. I think switching that mindset is so critical. So you were talking earlier, and maybe we can build on this, or what are the key steps that one must follow when they're building an author or a book business when they're switching from the writer mindset to the business mindset? I think the first thing is to go back to what I already said, which is to think of it as a, broadly speaking, you could break it up further, but broadly speaking, it's a two-step process. So you've got getting the foundations right, pass the covers. Kind of my back. Um, and then, and then doing the marketing and think of it that way. And, and also sort of embraced the marketing, you know, uh, if you, and you can always get help with this. Um, but if you think to yourself, I'm a writer, I'm not a marketer, so that's going to kind of, that, that's gonna hamstring you a little bit and make it harder to succeed. Uh, so the more you can, uh, and embrace the marketing side of it and understand that it's a means to an end. You know you have, if you have great content, you want to get it out into the world. So you do need to understand at least some of that stuff, uh, so that you can direct your Kevin designers and if you work with people to help you on the marketing side, you kind of know-how to steer them and make sure that, that they're doing the right types of things. Um, and, uh, I mean, there's a, I guess there's a ton of stuff that we can talk about in terms of how to, uh, I, I suppose, let me take a step back. So the next question, if someone was coming to me, I would say to me, what, what is it you actually want from this? Is this a royalty play? Are you just planning to write a lot of books and you want to generate royalties? Or, uh, do you want to build a, some sort of backend business office? You're trying to collect leads to upsell people to a cause or coaching or, you know, positioning yourself as an expert through your book. So I guess the answer to the question depends a lot on who the, uh, who the audience is and what it is they want to achieve for it. I think that's really good. So, well, a lot of times, like whenever I take a client, which is very rare, but sometimes they do, I always say, what do you want to achieve from this book? Do you want to sell a lot of copies? Do you want to get as many copies of people's hands as possible? Do you want people to actually read the book? Are you trying to make money from book sales? And that's, that's a really great question because most people don't have an answer to that. So even asking that first question is so critical because they go, Oh, if I just sell one copy, I'll be happy. And then you sell one copy and you're not happy. Cause it's not really a goal we give ourselves these small on the way goals. So I think that's really, really great. We're talking about the mindset in order to be ready to build a business is to actually think of it like a business - start to approach it like a business. Um, and what are the components of an authorship business? We, you know, a lot of people have talked about, we had some other great seminars about the process of writing a book. You've talked a little bit about Amazon ad, but in a broader structure, what's the difference between an author and an author business. Okay. So I mean, if I, if I just kind of do a high level overview of both the royalty play and the building back business, think that there's an overlap, but they're not the same. And then if you will, we can dive deeper into with them over them if you want to up that. So if you're going down the, the, the royalty right now, look, I know a lot of people, but for me it's more about. So I don't really care so much about the royalties. It's more about getting the books. They've got positioned myself, getting my books and people. I can build an email list and go from there, but I know plenty of people who make it. Some crazy bunny from, uh, from the, from royalties, you know, four figures a month, five figures a month, six figures a month. Some people, and I think part of it, it's whichever way you go down, is you need to be committed and build it up over time. And you might not be fully committed. You might have a job and it might be a side project, but over time you can, you can build it up.  So obviously it's going to sound like a, it is a truism, but the more books you have, the more you can sell. Uh, now, particularly if you're a fiction writer, it's easy to put together a series. Um, but if you're a nonfiction writer, again, I'm guessing, chances are your books sort of going to be broadly on similar themes. So related to there's going to be lots of opportunities for cross selling. Uh, so that's something that you can do through your books themselves. You can have links to your other books. Amazon will put those in automatically. It's a Kindle version anyway, but you want to make it as easy for people to be aware of your other books as you can. Again, uh, you know, for Kindle books particularly, it's the ultimate impulse purchase. Somebody gets to the end of the book, they're not ready to get asleep if they're reading that and they can literally one click and get the next, uh, next installment in the trilogy or whatever it may be. So, you know, that it's a fantastic opportunity from that respect, uh, for us as writers. So writing more stuff, making sure people are aware of it. I can, there's a couple of things you can do to sort of really turbocharge that. Let's see, you have a series of 40 books. You might discount the price of the first one. It kind of looks very pricey, so if you dropped the price, sales will go up. Um, so you might discount the price of the first book to get more than you read, as in, and assuming, you know, you can test this, but if enough of those readers go on to read books two and three and four, and how many. It's worth losing royalties on the first book to bring all those new readers in and get them onto your author platform and get them buying the rest of the series. And, uh, and uh, there's a wellness strategy in the industry studying Permafree book, which is where you give away, you can give away around us and it's through other channels. I probably should, but it might be in a better, it might get a quick five foot tips if it's a how to book, something like that, something which is going to be. Ideal for your target market. Introduce them to your work. Be a logical sort of, your series is going to be a very logical following from that. You can give that away for free. And then from there you can get of people discover you and, um, you can use that as a platform for building your own platform, getting people into your email list. I handle social media, uh, but also say, introducing people to the rest of your series. So giving away something for free with Sanford is actually a really powerful way of building up your readership quickly. Works very, very well for fiction and nonfiction. Um, so that's, those are a couple of tips that are on the, on the royalty side, but, and of course the great thing about the roads is, is that you know, you, you can start making roads is from book one, even if it's just a side hustle type thing. As you build up your portfolio, those worlds is increased. And if you've got foundations right then that's what we were talking about at the beginning. You should be able to sell quite a lot of books just, just sort of organically through Alison because the algorithm will pick it up, uh, that you books being successful, particularly I've stuck to just launch them and get them going kind of. Give them a little bit of momentum, then Amazon will sort of take over. Now flipping across to, uh, a, think about it back in business, obviously critical is, is building up your email list. But I would say you, you want to be doing that equally, whether you're a fiction or nonfiction writer. So having something that you give away at the beginning of the book, which incentivize you to get their email address in exchange for some kind of bonus, having more than one call to action, but certainly having a reminder at the end, but if it makes sense and it fits with the flow of the book, some people do it off every single chapter or sort of sprinkle it in where it makes sense to do so. Um, don't be afraid to test, you know, if something's working. Um. It doesn't seem to be working well. Maybe we're only getting five or 10% off, right. Test something else and save that, that what's better or change the coffee and it's very good. Excuse me. One of the great things about Allison is that you can upload a new version of your manuscript within an, it can be live typically within about 12 hours now. It used to be 24 it's even quicker, so you can test very easily. And there's a so great presentation by Pell Ellroy. He's the author of the miracle morning. It's a couple of years ago now, but he was getting, instead of getting 18% which is almost unheard of. I mean it's obviously he's doing it. That's what it was like a cheap, cause it's five things you do every single morning. So it was like a little checklist that people could follow and some other stuff. And it was such a perfect fit with the book. He was getting this absolutely insane. Alton right. And building this absolutely enormous email is to literally thousands and thousands of people coming on every month just through the book. So, unlike most people going out and paying money to build an email list, uh, he's getting paid royalties to Wiley while building. So that's, which is one of the nice perks of being an author. You actually get paid to build the list. Um, and so then you've got that email list. Uh, you can also encourage them to get, you know, they'll build a page or a group curfew build on that as well. So there is a synergy if you can be communicating with people through email, through social, uh, and then offer them your. What have you back in product or service or course or whatever it may be, but you're, it's your area of expertise, so it's, yeah, getting it out there and building the list and not being afraid to test different stuff to see what resonates with your target market. Wow. That's such a good overview on how to approach books as a business, and I know that you're actually passionate about helping other people succeed. And what I was wondering, what mindset do you think people need in order to be ready to start building a business? What's the key mindset? That first piece? Yeah. I think one of the first things, uh, let's assume the book's written. Um, and that people would take it on board. The idea that yes, you've got to be a, if you're building a business, that you're going to want to be marketing anyway. So, uh, that will kind of take that as given. But one of the things that I, that I've seen alone is it comes up over and over again is people being afraid to put their stuff out to the world. So they've written a book, but they're sort of sitting on it and they haven't got around to publishing it, or they've done the course or they create videos or they're afraid to put them out there. And so I guess the first thing I would say there is just, you know, put it out there. Don't be afraid. Not everybody's going to like it. That's okay. You know, not everybody likes the Dell alarm and not everybody likes Tony Robbins. You know, everybody is going to have some detractors, but that's okay. Um, so, so yeah, not being, it sounds so simple, but not being afraid to put your stuff out there is, it's really, really important. As soon as he put it out there, good things happen. So I can give you a couple of good stories if you like, but yeah, you know, when it's sitting on a, on a hard drive on your computer, gathering digital dust, nobody can see it. Nothing happens. It's not until you put it out to the world that you can start building that, uh, getting the royalties, building an email list, building the backend business, uh, and also getting the feedback that you can iterate. Um, again, feedback can be really, really useful. And, uh, you know, if he looks at from the beginning, that one or two people are going to be critical and it probably some of these constructive, which is great. Some of it's not constructive, and that usually says more about them than it does a value. So that's, that's, that's the frame I approach. Yeah. Okay. Give us a lot of gold today. It's like, I'm almost, my head's just spinning. It's overwhelmed. It's so wonderful. I'm curious is, where are you going next? What project you're working on now and what are we going to see. From you this year and over the coming months. Yeah. And sorry, before we get into that, I just realized, I mentioned, so do you want me to share a very quick story with you about just to illustrate the importance of getting stuff out there? Yeah, absolutely. That'll be great. Okay. So I put the first version of crushing the Kindle app back in December, 2012 and late January, early February. Uh, I've got a call from Jeff Aflac, who was the marketing manager for. Uh, like a little team of people. So it was Marcy shine, uh, Chris Atwood and John Bryant would know, uh, Chris Nazi, uh, and Janet, they're all New York times bestselling authors. Marcy, I knew I'd seen it speak to that fence and she'd sold over 15 million books. Traditionally, she, uh, she's the author of happy for no reason. Chicken, chicken, soup for the woman's soul and various other books, both of which were best sellers. Uh, what would got cancer. And I got invited through Jeff to speak to their mastermind. Now again, to back up a little bit, that that was based on the very first version, the first edition of Crawford, the candle, which had only been out for just over a month before. My check got in touch with you, but he'd got it. He'd read it, got in touch with me. Uh, I've completely rewritten that book since, uh, the first version was 23,000 worth. The current version is 66,000 words. It's got up tons and tons of new material. The point is that first version was good enough, even though, you know, if I, if I wrote it now, I wouldn't be happy with it, but it was good enough at the time to get out there, get in front of people, get noticed, and I found myself help them. Months later presenting to a high end mastermind group that, uh, Marcy, uh, Chris, John and Jeff were running and you know, people have paid thousands of dollars to be at that group. And there was a Q and a at the end. And I had this sort of pinch me moment where I've got Marcy Sharma asking me questions about Kindle publishing associates. There are various differences between Kendall and Amazon publishing and the traditional publishing world. And so. That's just an example of something which, you know, it was very, it was an imperfect first edition by many, many measures, but it was good enough to get me, uh, get me connected, uh, and have, uh, I ended up speaking with Decker, uh, three times. So that's just a little story that to publish a new book will open doors that you didn't even know were there. I had absolutely no idea what was going to get approached by Jeff. It didn't even cross my mind. But then I got this out of the blue. Um, Facebook message and he went from that. So, uh, that's, you know, good things happen when you, when you put your stuff back to the world. So that's amazing. I think that one thing you did and under that was so cool is that people forget that you can push an update it so easy to do a new edition. You know, when you do a printed book, you can't do like version two until all version one is sold. You don't want to leave a bunch of, whereas with. Yeah. Or they pulpit with digital books and with print on demand, we can put out a new edition today and every dish, not they're thrown in. If you, I know that you can actually push the new edition to everyone's Kindle device if you want as well. So you can actually change the edition that people are reading so they get the new freshest edition. That means we can do things. We don't have to worry about what we're putting out now. Cause if it's not perfect, we can keep making it better, better, better, until it is. Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. Tell me a little bit about where things are going forward for you. Okay. So yeah, so I'm still doing the, uh, sort of teaching side of it. The, um, I have, uh, various courses on Kindle publishing, so I'm still doing those and, uh, promoting those, uh, more and more what I'm doing today is working with, uh, experts and entrepreneurs to help them get a book of their own. So lots and lots of people who have tremendous expertise would like to book, but you know, don't know the process. And so working with them either individually or as part of a small group to kind of almost standalone to that, that knowledge, and then work with a team of editors, proofreaders to get that polished up. So you've got something that sounds or reads as if it's been professional written as opposed to just simply say a transcript. And, uh, and get those out to the world and get them. And again, as we touched on other days, obviously, that coming in from a physician's house in Texas before, if you wanted to find a really key thing, and this is another question to ask yourself. If you're starting out and you wanna build the backend businesses, um, who's my ideal client now, that may evolve and change over time. So the answer is probably not gonna be set in stone, but if certainly if you've been in business for awhile, you've probably got a good idea of who you really enjoy working with. Who's, uh, who's Melissa to work with, who's easy to get in as a client. Um, and so to kind of going through an exercise and kind of working out who that ideal client is, and then you craft a book that's going to attract that client as opposed to, uh, you know, a client who is suboptimal. And you know, that ties in very much with the 80, 20 principle. You know, you typically get 80% of results from 20% of output, some big, big believer in doing 80 20 analysis before you embark on a project to make sure you're doing the right. You're working smart as well as hard on the project. So, uh, that's, that's my kind of key focus now is working with. Entrepreneurs experts to help them get a Burke that attract their ideal prospects so that they can then do more with their expertise and grow the businesses. That's amazing. I'm so excited to see what's come for you in the future. I know you've done a lot of amazing things over the last eight years. I can't wait to see what you do over the next day. Is there any special message or advice you'd like to share with our audience just to close out today, because I know already they're taking crazy notes and they're like ready to take action. Uh, yeah. You know, take action. It's that you just mentioned that that's the key. That over and over again, whether it's publishing or anything else, what I noticed between the people that are very successful, the people that are not successful is that the successful people take action. So get that book written, get it published. You know, it's probably not going to be perfect first time out of the gate. That's okay because you know it, but it gives you a learning opportunity. Again, I already said this. You know, you, as soon as it's out that you get feedback, you mentioned that you know, you can have, you can republish. Uh, very, very quickly and have the new addition going out to what else is breaking sales. Uh, and it can make significant changes to your book. As you say, Amazon will actually email you, you can let them know and encourage them to do it, but they'll actually email it to anybody who's bought the book previously, which puts you top of mind. So they get the new edition for free, uh, which is also helps help build Goodwill. And, um, you know, you've got, everybody starts somewhere, however small you can send your handful of offers and a handful of email leads and a handful of people on your social channels. Uh, the Sunni start is like the old product that when's the best time to plant a tree 20 years ago? When's the second best time today? It's, it's exactly the same. So, uh, yeah, take action, get, get something out that doesn't, don't worry about it, you know, good. But it doesn't have to be perfect. And then. Get the feedback. It's right if you need to, um, and then take it from that. Wow. That's amazing. John, thank you so much for spending time with us. We really appreciate it, guys. I hope you really enjoyed everything John had to share. This was an amazing interview. I hope you can appreciate that. Even though it was recording in the middle of the night, sometimes my internet connection is not perfect, so sorry if my face or my voice got a little bit fuzzy. If you want to learn more about John and some of the amazing things he can do, you can check him out at his website. crushitwithkindle.com Thank you for listening to this week's episode of serve no master. Make sure you subscribe so you never miss another episode. We'll be back next Tuesday with more tips and tactics on how to escape that rat race. Head over to servenomaster.com forward slash podcast now for your chance to win a free copy of Jonathan's bestseller serve no master. All you have to do is leave a five-star review of this podcast. See you Tuesday. Ready to turn your book into a bestseller? Find out what other authors don't want you to know at servicemaster.com/secrets.