Keep Coming Back: AA Speaker Meetings

vol 67. Sobriety Date 2/12/2012 (Sahar)

August 19, 2021 Tara / Sahar
Keep Coming Back: AA Speaker Meetings
vol 67. Sobriety Date 2/12/2012 (Sahar)
Chapters
Keep Coming Back: AA Speaker Meetings
vol 67. Sobriety Date 2/12/2012 (Sahar)
Aug 19, 2021
Tara / Sahar

Sahar shares her Experience, Strength and Hope—as an addict and alcoholic she goes into details that we don’t often hear in the rooms of Alcoholics Anonymous. This is a true story, told with completely vulnerability.

One of five children in a Spanish-speaking home and English-speaking school, Sahar always felt “different than.” Sahar was a wild child with a bad attitude, who refused to follow directions, and for that was kicked out of kindergarten and many grades thereafter. Sahar’s first drunk was a blackout event at the age of 11. Most of her teen years were spent in psych wards, fighting back and eventually attempting suicide with an almost regular cadence.

After institution life ended, street life began—this took Sahar down quickly, which brought her to the rooms where the promises immediately started coming true. But then about 3 years into sobriety, as it does for so many, life got in the way of her program. Within 6 months of no meetings she was out using and drinking again. After a new dark bottom, one of physical, mental and spiritual anguish, Sahar joined the fellowship once more. Today she’s a happy, joyous and free gay woman, living and practicing these principles.

Quotes
 “I just wanted to die, I tried so many times to die; the number of times I tried to overdose is just ridiculous.”

“I lost the power of choice when I drank.” 

“I have a pretty amazing life today . . . I can’t imagine my life without Alcoholics Anonymous,  where before I couldn’t imagine my life without drinking and using.” 

Show Notes

Sahar shares her Experience, Strength and Hope—as an addict and alcoholic she goes into details that we don’t often hear in the rooms of Alcoholics Anonymous. This is a true story, told with completely vulnerability.

One of five children in a Spanish-speaking home and English-speaking school, Sahar always felt “different than.” Sahar was a wild child with a bad attitude, who refused to follow directions, and for that was kicked out of kindergarten and many grades thereafter. Sahar’s first drunk was a blackout event at the age of 11. Most of her teen years were spent in psych wards, fighting back and eventually attempting suicide with an almost regular cadence.

After institution life ended, street life began—this took Sahar down quickly, which brought her to the rooms where the promises immediately started coming true. But then about 3 years into sobriety, as it does for so many, life got in the way of her program. Within 6 months of no meetings she was out using and drinking again. After a new dark bottom, one of physical, mental and spiritual anguish, Sahar joined the fellowship once more. Today she’s a happy, joyous and free gay woman, living and practicing these principles.

Quotes
 “I just wanted to die, I tried so many times to die; the number of times I tried to overdose is just ridiculous.”

“I lost the power of choice when I drank.” 

“I have a pretty amazing life today . . . I can’t imagine my life without Alcoholics Anonymous,  where before I couldn’t imagine my life without drinking and using.”