The HR Fix

008 Having an Entrepreneurial Mindset in HR with Enrique Rubio from Hacking HR

November 20, 2019 Ann Lustig and Enrique Rubio
The HR Fix
008 Having an Entrepreneurial Mindset in HR with Enrique Rubio from Hacking HR
Show Notes Transcript

In this episode of the HR Fix, Enrique Rubio, PMP, CSM, founder of Hacking HR joins me to discuss his perspective on having an entrepreneurial mindset to help HR evolve. We discuss what drives people to pursue an entrepreneurial way forward, challenges along the way, sacrifices, dealing with doubters and much more.

Having an entrepreneurial mindset is not limited to people going out to develop their own product or service. It can also happen within a company or as a side-hustle.

HR is in a unique position to recreate itself and adopting an entrepreneurial mindset can help to accelerate the evolution of HR.

Internally, encouraging an entrepreneurial mindset (both in HR and within the greater company) promotes creativity and helps to make employees feel like valuable contributors. This ultimately makes happier employees and helps increase retention.

If you have questions or comments about this episode, feel free to comment below or send me a message.

If you want to hear more information about improving HR, building communities and retention - subscribe to The HR Fix podcast on spotify or itunes or subscribe to annlustig.com.

And remember - Focus on the Future, Take Action Today!


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Ann Lustig:

Hi and welcome to the HR Fix podcast. I am Ann Lustig and in this episode we will talk about having an entrepreneurial mindset in HR. I think this is a really important topic because just because you work in or with HR, does not mean you have to do the same exact things day in and day out. This is a great opportunity to both change and improve the way we work with HR. So today I've invited in Enrique Rubio , the founder of Hacking HR to talk about how to have an entrepreneurial mindset within HR. Hacking HR is a global community of business leaders and practitioners working in discussing all things at the intersection of the future of work, technology, organizations and people. And the goal of hacking HR is to create the best HR that has ever existed. Welcome Enrique. I'm so glad that you're here today t o talk about having an entrepreneurial mindset in HR.

Enrique Rubio:

Thank you, Ann. Thank you for inviting me.

Ann Lustig:

Yeah, It's great that you're here. And when I thought about doing the episode of having the entrepreneurial mindset in HR, I thought of you for a couple of reasons, actually for three reasons. The first reason is an entrepreneur can happen in three different ways. You can be an intrepreneur, which is somebody who is very creative and creating things within the company. You can be somebody who has a side hustle and you can also leave it all behind and go out and do your own thing. And I've known you for almost two years now and I think I've seen you in every single one of these scenarios. T hat's one of the reasons why I thought you'd be great for this. The second reason is that with hacking HR, I've seen it grow from when I first met you. I think you had done two previous forums when I first met you, one in Washington, DC and one in New York. And I met you with the second one in New York and now I've seen it grow into this huge worldwide community in less than two years or you know, close to two years. It's been an amazing thing to watch it grow. So I definitely think that that's a big part of it. And then the third thing is that hacking HR itself is an entrepreneurial spirit. It is all about making the changes to HR, improving HR, going out, taking the risks , learning new things, all those pieces. So for those three reasons, when I thought about doing this episode, I thought you're the one I want to talk about .

Enrique Rubio:

Well thank you.

Ann Lustig:

And I really want to just start it off with where did this idea come from? You know, all great ideas come from like a little thought or a little spark or you know, or a frustration or something you wanted to fix. So where did the idea of hacking HR come from? And talk to me a little bit about that and how it's evolved over the last couple of years.

Enrique Rubio:

I think it comes from a couple of places. One place out of passion and the other out of frustration, out of passion. Is this idea that I, that I wanted to connect the worlds of technology and HR and the reason I wanted to connect those two wo rlds i s because I myself, my background is both in HR an d t echnology. I am an electronic engineer. My ma ster's, was in public administration with a focus on HR and then I worked in as a HR practitioner as well. But I know that in the real world, these two worlds of technology and HR are pretty disconnected from each other. And I wanted to bring them together because I am very passionate about both. So that is the one perhaps one of the reasons why I cr eated H acking H R. And then the other reason is because I, I think that all entrepreneurs, and I think I am one of them, you know, we have always this creative spark in ourselves and not always do we find a voice for that creativity in our workplaces. And in the place that I was working for before I learned a lot of things. I created, you know , many things for my job in HR. I made a lot of friendships and you know, my colleagues are fantastic, but there was that huge creativity spark in me that they didn't find an outlet in that organization. And I was really frustrated about that because I am not the kind of guy who can go to a company to do the same thing day in and day out for a long period of time. We were talking offline before about you know, the span of attention of people today, which is probably like 10 seconds and, but you also have the span of attention of how long can people focus on one project or one task or one thing at work without getting bored at doing that one thing or without getting frustrated at that pain. And I feel that span is very short right now because people learn pretty fast today how to do things. And once you learn how to do it, you start doing it and then you want to get up to the next thing. I know it's not that you don't want to do the first project that you were working on. You want to continue working on that day, but because you already know how to do it, you want to get the newest skills to do the new thing. And for me in the place that I was working out before, it was the same thing day in and day out. And I was extremely frustrated about that. And I said, you know what? I need to find a creative outlet because otherwise I don't know what's going to happen with my, you know, my mind, my spirit, my intellect and my emotions. So I said, well, I am passionate about technology. I am passionate about HR. I have this creative spark that I want to find a voice and an outlet for. And that's how I created Hacking HR. You know, that's how the community came to exist. And you're right, it started us off an event in Washington DC then we took it on the road a couple of months later to New York. This was at the end of 2017 and ever since we've grown, you know, we are all over the world and we have inspired a lot of people to be here and so that's , that's that , that's how Hacking HR started.

Ann Lustig:

Wow, that's amazing. And thinking about what you're saying about people not having the attention span and not wanting to do the same thing every day, day in and day out, do you think that technology has changed that over the years because people are less patient now because they're used to getting things quicker?

Enrique Rubio:

Absolutely. Oh my goodness. The fact that we can stand in a corner in any major city in the world and you know, get our smart phones and get a taxi, a rideshare in five minutes when sometimes in New York and you know that sometimes you don't have to wait hours in the rain to get a taxi. I know you can do it in seconds from your phone. What happens with the technology that has enabled for that to happen is that it also changed the way we see the world and now we expect the same thing for everything. Right? And we also expect the same things from our employers. So when you come to work, not only do you expect to have real time things going on, like super quick in terms of the services that you're providing your own company, but also in terms of the work that you're doing in your company. Because your, your thought is wait a second, if Uber, Lyft, Airbnb can do these things , why can't my company do it? You know, why can't we do it? You can buy basically whatever you want from Amazon in the one, I don't know how they call it, the one button click or a buy or it has a name, you know, you click one button and you don't even have to go through the process of anything. You just click the bottom and the thing says in two days it's going to be your home. Sometimes it's the one day, you know, that's whatever you want. So the expectations that that has created in people is that we want the same things to happen at work and in life as well. You know, it's just made us pretty inpatient in every kind of area or department in life. You know, you come to work and you're doing the same thing. Day in and day out for six months and then you reach the point where you are like, all right , I'm done with this. You know, like I'll readily learn how to do it. I'm going to continue doing it because that's what they're paying me for. I want to get into the next thing. Unfortunately, most workplaces are designed to do exactly the opposite. They are designed to make you do the same thing day in and day out until you hone how to do that one thing in the most efficient way in the world. That's how workplaces were designed 150 years ago and we continue to drag that on today and that model does not work anymore because people learn extremely fast. And by the way, they also learn very often on their own by watching a YouTube video by , you know, it's funny because people become designers, programmers and many other things just by watching YouTube videos. That's, that's crazy . So , they learn to do that, basically in 20, 25, 30 hours of video watching. So how can you expect that person to sit still in an office to do the same thing, you know, for six months. I mean, let's not fool ourselves anymore.

Ann Lustig:

And I think that's one of the biggest challenges that people progressed to this new mindset of wanting to learn and wanting to change and wanting to evolve very quickly where businesses haven't yet caught up and they're not able to roll with that kind of thinking yet. And so that's a huge challenge. It's like a big disconnect between people and the business. And that's really something to struggle with. And it's a way where we each have to become salespeople to sell our ideas internally .

Enrique Rubio:

Yeah. Yeah. You know, what's funny is that we have these processes in HR that, you know, the performance management process, which you know is so , everybody hates, hates it. Right? It's funny because everybody agrees that the traditional way to do performance management, which is annual reviews on a rating base scale. Everybody agrees that that approach doesn't work. Yet most companies still do the same thing. So imagine if you have these expectations about how work should work and how the world is working. You have the expectation of learning on the spot, on the job, super quickly. And then you come to a work environment where you are given feedback once a year and your feedback is evaluated on a one to five rating scale. You're like, Oh , this , come on, what's going on here? Right? So it's what you're saying. You know, people's mindsets are so different today. An organizational mindset has not caught up yet with that new way of working. And actually it's quite the opposite. You know, we are organized mindset is pretty far behind from the way people want to work today, so to speak.

Ann Lustig:

So, yeah, and you know, even about the performance management, I always say that, you know, how can you even train? Like let's say you're an Olympic athlete, you know, when you get feedback once a year do you think you are going to get the gold? There's like no way.

Enrique Rubio:

No way, no way. This happens like right away if you know, you'll see the , you know , you'll see the basketball, you know, matches and you see, the coach get the team together (screaming) every one minute, especially towards the end of the game. They get the team together every 10 or 15 seconds because they need to provide feedback right on the spot right away because otherwise their team will lose the game. So the same principle, applies for the workplace today, you know, we are living in such a fast paced world where chaos, volatility are kind of the rule of the game today. But if you wait one year to provide feedback, maybe by the end of that year you are already out of business.

Ann Lustig:

I think a lot of, you know, using the basketball analogy, they do get the , the team together every few minutes, but they're also screaming from the sidelines. They're providing feedback in real time. I mean, I don't have screaming works in companies, but for basketball, for football it works well.

Enrique Rubio:

Maybe sometimes it will work. Like, you know, they scream at that feedback out loud. That would be, that's, that's, I think that's better than not providing any feedback at all or providing it once a year, I don't know.

Ann Lustig:

But speaking of challenges, what's been your biggest challenge as an entrepreneur? I think my biggest challenge as an entrepreneur, has been about making sure that we understand the people that we're serving. I see myself as a server, as a servant on the folders .

Enrique Rubio:

This is very true for the Hacking HR community. Whenever I talk about the work that I'm doing, I always say, tell people I'm happy to serve you because what I see my work today as the founder and the leader of Hacking HR around the world is how can I best serve you? So sometimes it is difficult to separate sort of the noise from what you hear from what's really useful and combine that with your own thoughts, right? Because it's bringing all those ingredients together. Making sure that whatever comes out of that tastes good. So, so I think the biggest challenge is how to make sure that we listen enough , but that we keep our own principles in mind and that we keep them alive. You know, how do we bring all of those sometimes competing things into the mix to make something that really is valuable for those whom you are serving. So that to me has been a pretty big challenge. And I have already created some businesses before and I have failed. You know, and I am pretty open about that and I have to be mindful about the fact that I have failed. But I also have learned so much that I think I'm in a much better place right now. But I think before, one thing that happens was that we weren't listening to , well, you know, with the things that I was doing. And then we thought that we knew that we had all the answers, that we're putting some solutions out there and we found out that that's not what people wanted and if we have to be better at listening and if we have been better at combining what we were listening with, what we thought maybe we would have done better than just thinking that we were right about something. I mean this is something that I do this all the time of course, because I get some feedback and I may disagree with that feedback, but as long as I am open minded to what I'm getting from people, that's going to take me further down thinking that I am the one who has the right answers all the time.

Ann Lustig:

Yeah, collaboration. It's like a two edge sword. You know? On one hand you want to hear everybody's opinions because there might be something you haven't even thought of before. So it's important to hear other ideas, other opinions. It's important to involve everybody in the process, make everybody feel like they're part of the process, you know , genuinely and sincerely. But at the same time, there needs to be decisions and there's priorities or objectives that you need to accomplish as well. So it's a balance. Yeah. When we do the online events that we do, I always send an email after the events and I tell people, I want your feedback.

Enrique Rubio:

I don't want you to fill out a feedback survey. I mean, not that I don't believe in feedback surveys. I just think that if you really want to provide feedback, just do a writeup . You know, send me one paragraph and say what you feel we could do differently. And I don't get 100% of people do that. Maybe I get 5% of the people doing that, or 10% of the people doing that. But the feedback that we get is so thorough, but it's way more powerful than having 99% of the people filling out a survey. Because to me it's better to hear a couple of lines from somebody than having numbers that maybe say, Oh yeah, you know, 98% of the people were happy with your events. Okay, well that doesn't tell me anything. Right. Because you know, they're happy and I'm happy about them being happy, but I want to know how to serve them better. And I know that a lot of them have great ideas on how to be better served and that's what I want to get out of people when I ask for this feedback.

Ann Lustig:

That's a great point. Um, but also thinking about all of this Hacking HR has grown so big. You started with those few small forums and then we started seeing these chapters pop up and then the forums grew worldwide. The chapters are growing worldwide and now we're seeing these online conferences happening all over the place. It takes so much of your time and energy. I'm sure . I mean, I know you're somebody that has bounds of energy, but it takes so much of your time and energy. Have you had to sacrifice anything? Is there anything you had to say? You know what, I wish I could pay more attention to this, but I just can't now. And because the reason I'm asking this is I think people think when a person's an entrepreneur, it's so easy. They just go and they create something and they're successful. They don't see that there is a harder side to this. And I think it's important to acknowledge that as well. So that's where that question is coming from.

Enrique Rubio:

Well, I left my job for this. I left a six figure paying salary with the most amazing benefits at a company where even though identify my creative outlet in there, for a lot of people, that company is their ultimate goal to work for. And I left that job for no salary, so to speak. You know, I left that job because I believe that Hacking HR has an amazing potential to grow and become what I hope is the largest community of collaboration and connection among HR folks. That's my vision. It's what I want to build and you have to make sometimes short-term sacrifices to make sure that that vision remains, you know, achievable so to speak. And the road to get there. Sometimes it's painful, you know? Yes, you have to sacrifice. Sacrifice my job that took away basically my entire stability, all my income . You know, I don't have any income right now, but you know, I'm hopeful, not only hopeful, I'm working towards making sure that we can make the financial side of these things work, but there are many sacrifices that happen and I think it's , it's a journey of a lot of emotions because when I put together an event that takes me, you know, hours and hours of work to put together and they get 2000 people when I wanted to give 5,000 people, that is frustrating. You know, that, that annoys me because, you know, I'm putting all these events online together because I want everybody to have the opportunity to get in touch with the most progressive global thinkers in the world and for people to be able to watch them and hear them for free. Online sitting whatever they are seating and to me, my mind is like, Oh my goodness, I would love to have that in everything in life, but we don't get that in everything in life. I'm putting that together and I wish we had thousands of people joining our events. I remember this guy, his name is Grant Cardone. He puts together this massive sales events and what not , and he was speaking out what I was not at event I was watching the video and there he , he puts together these events for like, you know , 20 30,000 people in a stadium. And he was speaking from the stage and like, I don't know, maybe like 25% of the seats were empty and he was so upset. He was so upset that those seats were empty. Or he will say like, the seats should be full of people right now because we're putting an event that is not only great quality, the pricing is fantastic and I am frustrated and I'm upset that people are not here. I feel the same thing. And that's sometimes it makes me question, you know, am I doing the right thing? Right . Uh , you know, so it's, it's a roller coaster of emotion as I know I'm doing the right thing. I just have to get out of that kind of the down in the roller coaster and go up again. And I do that by when I start getting feedback, you know, when I start having conversation with people that tell me, you know, your event changed my life. Somebody told me recently I had to stop believing in HR and because of your events I'm inspired to do better work in HR again. So those are stories really, you know, bring me up to the place where I am kind of energized again to make this happen.

Ann Lustig:

Yeah. And you know, I think those kinds of doubts are so common. Um , in the entrepreneurial world, especially when you're first starting out, because you're going to second guess yourself, it takes time to get up and running. Typically people don't hit the ground running it, you know, $40 million a year. Typically it takes a long time to build something new. And it's not just about the money for everybody, obviously. Sometimes it's about the passion and and that's where you get the satisfaction. But on the way there is a lot of doubts and there is a lot of second guessing and there is a lot of, maybe I should try it this way. Maybe I should try it that way. You know, and things like that.

Enrique Rubio:

I don't know if you remember this but, you told me something a few months ago. Uh, and I always quote that when I talk to people and I said, you told me Enrique, you are just like my husband. You have a love hate relationship with money.

Ann Lustig:

Oh, that was me? I saw you post that the other day, I didn't realize you got that from me.

Enrique Rubio:

Yeah, I got enough for you from you. And I always think about that because it's true. You know what I'm doing is not for money because if it was for money , I would not be doing it the way that I'm doing it right now. My strategy would be different, right? I would not be doing all in the way that I'm doing it. If all that I was thinking about was morning . I do want to have an income of course because well, you know, eventually I want to run out of my savings. Well, you know it will get a little messy for me to continue doing this in the long term. I know these things will happen but for me is the passion and this is a true differentiator in whether entrepreneurs keep pushing along or not. If you're doing it for money and you fail, then you will stop what you're doing and you will find the next idea that will bring you morning . But if you're doing it for passion, then what's going to happen is that no matter how many times to fail, you will continue pushing along and you know or you feel you have the hope. Of course that morning we come, but you are driven by passion at this is important. A lot of people say this, they say, a lot of entrepreneurs, they say find a problem to solve and work on that and then Money will come. Don't do it the other way around. Don't just try to showcase yourself as somebody trying to make money because people will notice that. They will notice that you're not authentic, that your initiative is not genuine and the moment you fail, the moment you will quit. To me, I am passionate about bringing people together. I am passionate about advancing the HR profession. I am passionate about building community and no matter how many times I fail , I will continue to push it along and I'm hoping of course, that is also reverts back in some, you know, financial incentives to keep this going and sustainable, so to speak.

Ann Lustig:

Yeah, definitely. I mean, you deal with so many different things. That's just one of them, but another thing I wanted to mention that you have to deal with as an entrepreneur is the naysayers or the competitors or the people that are going to say, Oh, this is never going to work. The people that doubt you, the people that say this is a terrible thing that he's doing, this is bad. For whatever reason. I don't know . There's always people out there that you're going to have to deal with the trolls on your LinkedIn posts. I mean there's, they're everywhere. People are those naysayers everywhere and haters everywhere and like how do you deal with that? How do you do that?

Enrique Rubio:

Well, you know, I recently sent an email to somebody, this person, you know, is well connected and what not , and I sent her an email saying like, Hey, you know, I'm putting this event together for March next year . It's going to be our signature event. I would love to partner with you to see if we can make it happen. Her response was, I have been trying to reach out to you and you seem to be very disorganized and all over the place. This is the way I deal with those kinds of things. My response was like, wow, that's not a great conversation starter. Thank you so much. I'm not interested in working with you anymore. Very respectful. Even though she was very disrespectful to me and not always do I get that kind of reaction. Of course, you know, like, you know, a few people have provided negative feedback and it happens and I think I have grown to a place in my own maturity curve, so to speak, where I am open to all that. You know, when people come to me and sometimes I get frustrated but I don't, you know, I don't vent that out in front of people. I, you know, I'm always extremely mindful of how I treat all others because I want to be treated with respect, so I have to make sure that I treat others with respect as well. And it's part of the process, right. I think the most important thing here is to be open minded to that criticism. Do not take it personally and to make sure that even when it's coming in the form of negative feedback, criticism, judgment, your response to that is a polite response. You don't have to fall into the same hole where those people are trying to get down to them. Right. Because some people, unfortunately they thrive in negativity. I don't know if you find , if you've had people like that in your life, you know they are happy when people are unhappy. I don't know how people can be that way. I don't know how can they be that way. But some people are, they thrive in negativity. They thrive in an environment of, you know , a toxicity of pessimism. And what happens with them is that they try to bring you to that environment and if you fall into that environment, you are letting them win because they are happy doing that. But you won't be happy doing that and they will be happy that they brought you to that place. So to me is , how do I deal with that is I'm not going to get into that place. I'm going to be polite I'm going to be genuine. I'm going to be a good human being. I'm not going to judge them, but I won't go to the place where they live, which is the place of toxicity is the place of negativity, is the place of, you know, a pessimism and whatnot . So that's the way I deal with it. You know, like some people we have people who think they are competing with us. What people ask me about other HR communities, I always say both publicly and privately. I always say I celebrate what everybody is doing to advance the HR profession. We don't do co-branding , we don't do events together, but I celebrate what they're doing because they are putting their efforts also to advance the HR profession and it's okay . You know like we don't have to all like he told her as long as we treat each other with respect, I think that's the bottom line of everything.

Ann Lustig:

I think it's a really good point. That's it. It's all about respect. You don't have to like each other. I agree with with that.

Enrique Rubio:

You don't have to like each other . I mean if you respect all the people you have , you can disagree with them and you know like there was this guy, he sent me an email a couple of days ago about the one conference that we were having and he provided negative feedback. And I said, thank you so much for that because I agree with you - all the things that you're saying. I saw the same thing and I was like, am I crazy? And he was like, Oh, I'm sorry if you feel like this is too negative. And I'm like, no, I totally appreciate it because you're coming from a place of respect. You're not insulting me. You're not insulting our speakers, not insulting our event. You're coming from a place of respect. You're helping us grow. And I was extremely thankful with that person and the feedback was negative. So it's all how these things come from. And if they come from a place of respect, I think we are good to go regardless of whether the feedback's negative or critical or what not.

Ann Lustig:

Well, the negative feedbacks essential. That's the only way you can evolve. That's the only way you could grow as long as it's constructive. Absolutely agree with you. Okay. I have one last question for you. There's different types of ways to create things. It's like a combination of planning and being flexible, being reactive and responding to the feedback and the needs of the community and being proactive and planning and being strategic. So how do you juggle those two things? Because you really need to do both. You need to be responsive as well as proactive.

Enrique Rubio:

Yeah. Yeah. I have a vision for 2024 how can HR and have a vision for 2021 maybe . So for 2028 that I want to build up to 200 communities all over the world and I want to connect all those communities together and I want to provide the most top notch online events for free for the HR community global . So that's what I want to do in 2020. What I want to do in 2021 is that I want Hacking HR to become the largest community of connection and collaboration among HR folks. That's the vision. Now, how are we going to make that happen? I have no idea. We're going to find out, you know, but there's some pieces in the puzzle on how to make that happen, but there are many pieces that are missing. There are many pieces that are pieces that are misplaced. There are many pieces that are not in the, you know, are not part of this puzzle. They belong to other. Then we bring them back to this one puzzle here. So to me it is what do you envision? And you start with that vision in mind and then you figured out how you're going to make it happen because today, as opposed to 100 years ago or 50 years ago, it's very difficult to plan at a level of detail that tells you that those things may happen the way you're planning them. Right? Today, everything changes so fast. Like for example, when I started doing online events, my first online events were on Facebook live . Then I switched to LinkedIn life , which is way better at to do this professional events. So LinkedIn life changed the way I was planning events and this happened only like, you know , five or six months ago. So maybe in two months from now, LinkedIn or any other tool released something else that maybe would make me think, Oh, now this is going to make it way easier for me to create this communities. So I leave a lot of wiggle room to decide how to do things and how to make them happen. But the vision is what keeps me going. And so that's the combination, you know , the vision with the flexibility to make that vision happen and be building basically day by day, how to get there.

Ann Lustig:

Yeah, and I think also a big part of of your model is, is the volunteers, because it's the volunteers, you know, you set the vision, you set the strategy, you're driving it forward, but you're relying on so many people around the world and there's so many great people that are willing to give their time and their efforts to make this happen also also.

Enrique Rubio:

If it was not for them, they will not be a Hacking HR community It's only because our volunteers in all the chapters, including you in New York and Ashley and Ali and all the other people in New York, and all the other folks that we have in all the chapters, if , if it wasn't for those folks that are unconditionally selflessly putting their time, their energy, their love, their passion into advancing the HR professional , if it wasn't for them, there would not be Hacking HR community at all. So I am just one more in this community, right? My work here is to build bridges among all the communities. But if it wasn't for those volunteers working tirelessly everywhere, t here would not be a community. And I, you know, I don't have w ork to express how thankful I am that we have been able to inspire so many people to join this and to continue pushing to make great things happen. So I am thankful to you. W ell, of course for inviting me to do your show and for the work that you do in New York and with everybody else, for all the Hacking HR communities that we're creating because it's only for them and because of them that we are able to do this.

Ann Lustig:

Yeah. Well, I have to say it's been my pleasure also working on this, so thank you. And agreed. Without the volunteers, it could have never scaled at the rate that it did because it's amazing. It's really amazing. Um, is there anything else that you'd like to add? Any other thoughts or ideas you think would be beneficial to anybody that wants to have that entrepreneurial mindset, either in a company or as a side hustle or on their own? Anything at all?

Enrique Rubio:

Just make it happen. Just make it happen. There are no excuses today not to make something happen. I was speaking with somebody before. I come from Venezuela and in my home country. I didn't have a lot of things when I was growing up, you know, I come from a family that didn't have too many resources and I was always in public s chool, public universities and growing up, you know, not having much, I still needed to make t his happen. And the way to make those things happen is well. If all I have is this one tool and this other tool and it's all I have,, I have to make this happen, with those two things. So what I'm saying is that sometimes you don't have on the table everything you need to make something happen. W ell make it happen either way with whatever you have available. Because I am sure that today that are so many tools out there, a lot of them for free to make great things happen. So there are no excuses. Make it happen. If you have an entrepreneurial mindset, y ou h ave a n i dea, you have something, just make it happen. You can make it happen. There a re no excuses.

Ann Lustig:

I totally agree with that. Just start and try. If it's not working, try something else. Just gotta . Just start. Take that first step. You know that that's saying that uh , I walk up a thousand miles starts with a single step.

Enrique Rubio:

Yup . Yeah. And I , I always say on my LinkedIn and I, I've said this several times, it always starts, I'm a runner. I'm a competitive runner at all. Starts with the first mile. The first mile to me is always the most difficult one. And the reason why it is the most difficult one is because to break the inertia that he's keeping you from running that one mile. It's really hard. Once you're running, are you getting the cadence that you keep going. But you know, getting up off the couch, I'll say like I w ant to get out of that door and go for my r un. That decision that the termination is difficult. So the first mile is difficult. I don't know what the first m ile l ooks for everybody here in your, in your show b y just running, go and get it done.

Ann Lustig:

Agreed. Completely. Well, thank you so, so much for joining me today. This has been a fantastic conversation. I really appreciate you taking the time to share all of your experiences and share what's happened with hacking HR and how it's evolved and how people can learn from it. This has been great. Thank you so much.

Enrique Rubio:

Thank you so much for inviting me. Okay, I'll talk to you soon.

Ann Lustig:

Thanks again to Enrique Rubio for sharing his insights into having an entrepreneurial mindset in HR. If you'd like to reach Enrique, you can contact him by sending an email to enrique@hackinghr.io and if you'd like to stay up to date on the latest events happening with hacking HR, follow Enrique Rubio on LinkedIn. So that's it for now, but I do plan to talk about this in more detail in future podcasts . So if you're interested in learning more about this topic, please subscribe to this podcast and if you want to contact me or ask a question or invite me to speak at your company or conference, you can reach me through my website, which is annlustig.com or send a message to me through LinkedIn. Thanks so much for listening. Every member Focus on the Future, Take Action Today!