Speaking Influence

Holistic Voice Coaching with guest Ambika Devi

May 14, 2021 John Ball & Ambika Devi Season 2 Episode 55
Speaking Influence
Holistic Voice Coaching with guest Ambika Devi
Show Notes Transcript

Have you ever listened to yourself on a recording? Did you like what you heard?

I think most of us know that we sound quite different to others than we do to ourselves and at first it is usually a little jarring. Your voice can be smoother, more resonant and open up qualities you don't even know you have. How? With some vocal exercises and expert guidance.

My guest is the incredible Ambika Devi. This episode was so much fun to record. Ambika is such a good speaker and so I knew right away we were in good hands. Find at least one action to take away from the show to sound better when speaking or singing,  professional or not. I hope you will have as much fun listening as we had recording it.

Find out more about Ambika: Visit her YouTube channel for a wealth of great information https://bit.ly/2SY8BIP and/or go to https://ambikascoaching.com/

Next show, professional voice coach  Dielle Hannah. We take a slightly different approach to voice coaching which was also great fun and incredibly helpful.

Please consider supporting the show by buying me a coffee, joining my VIP gang or sponsoring the show, all available here: https://speakinginfluence.supercast.tech/ Your support means the world to me and means I can keep making the show and making it better. Much love, Johnny

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Johnny:

Welcome to Speaking of Influence the podcast about public speaking, presentation skills and tools of influence and persuasion with presentation skills, expert, Johnny Ball, most online content creators seem to agree that live streaming is the future. And definitely the way to go. If you have thought about live streaming and you'd like to give it a try. My recommendation is restream.io is the service I use. And if you use the link in the description, you will get a $10 credit after you complete your first live stream. Welcome to Speaking of Influence, I am joined today. Well, I think we're very privileged, really to be joined by somebody who has a lot of expertise in a number of areas. Not only is she as an expert in holistic health and meditations, she knows a fair bit about yoga and all sorts of things, but also she is a public speaking expert and she's going to share with us some public speaking magics today. Please. Welcome to the show. Ambika Devi.

Ambika Devi:

Thank you so much, Johnny. It is so amazing to make it here and be here with you today and thank you everybody who's tuned in and watching and listening.

Johnny:

But it's a real pleasure to have you here and it's taken some organizing and those come from your persistence when I've been a bit overwhelmed with that with so many things to do, but I really appreciate it. And I'm delighted to finally have you on the show.

Ambika Devi:

I am so delighted to be here. Let's let's go for it. Let's share some magic.

Johnny:

Let's get into it. Let's start talking first. I think it'd be great to hear a little bit about your background, especially as it relates to public speaking.

Ambika Devi:

I was super shy as a child, super shy, the kind that held onto their mother's skirt and peeked around sometimes. So to become a speaker thinking at that beginning is. It's a disconnect. It doesn't even make sense, but I did go to a small school where I was in a really lovely nurtured group. And we started reading out loud and first grade. So when I was six years old, I think that was my first step into it and becoming more comfortable with my voice. I've always loved singing. And I did work as a professional musician for many years. And so singing on stage is part of it. But then in between songs, somebody has to take care of the banter, you know, to keep the audience engaged. And that became my job. Quite often, not in every band, but especially in bands where I was the leader. And then I was a professor. I was a teacher of holistic health for 21 years. And so walking into a classroom, a room of cold people, but they paid to be there. Yeah. I had to engage them for four hours at a time. Wow. Yeah. And I have to say a lot of public speaking teachers do talk about. The fact that longer stories or longer passages are easier than the short ones, but what is popular right now? 30 seconds, you know, TikTok, Instagram 59 seconds. And I realized that. I wanted to leverage what I was teaching about and what I've got all this knowledge stored up in my brain about. To a wider audience. And I decided that really honing more skills would make sense. Now as a musician and as a vocalist, I learned a lot of techniques in some I'll definitely share with everybody today because these are so powerful for warming up the voice, but then also learning how to make a three minute video. And then a one minute video then. 30 second video. This is really, really important for all of us as speakers, because those are the little snippets that people actually have enough attention span to pay attention to. And then hopefully we can get their curiosity to want to know more from us.

Johnny:

Yeah, you're absolutely right. The moment that these short form things, these snippets bite sized chunks of information are where it's at right now and that YouTube has launched YouTube short. So again, there's a competition with TikTok, but TikTok also is very much concentrating on bringing in content creators who are educating as well. And they're really pushing and promoting that. So if you are a content creator, like now is really the time to be getting into Tik TOK and YouTube shorts and all this, because this is where the opportunity is at right now. But it's so important to not just get your content going there, but to make sure you're as vocally prepared as you possibly can be. So, so let's hear some more about how we can do that.

Ambika Devi:

Okay. I think the worst thing that can happen is if you start speaking and all of a sudden you realize there's some mucus in the way. So the number one thing to make sure you do before you get on camera, especially if it's live or on stage is clear out your sinuses. So there are many, many ways you can do this. Uh, but. Nettie doing Nettie the night before, not the morning of, because you might end up with a waterfall water, if you lean a certain way, that could be, that could be a little of it alarming and a live broadcast. And and then, you know, blow your nose. Get up in there. They're your fingers. It's your nose. Get it cleared out. And tongue scraping. This is incredibly. Powerful and good to do. I use a copper tongue scraper, not wow. That's a tongue twister there. There's a warm-up with some tongue twisters, copper tongue scraper. There's a brand new one. I use one and on the back, the side, the side, and then straight back again. That's the technique. If copper does not agree with you, you can get. Surgical steel, stainless steel, but getting back in there because a lot of clients ask me, well, I brush my tongue. No, no, no. That's, that's cleaning. What's called the Moss on your top. Right. I'm talking about getting around that curve and the back of your tongue and. Scraping that stuff off because it sits back there and it affects our ability to speak. It affects the motion of the tongue. So that's that's number one, but then there's tons of warmups we can do and breathing exercises as well.

Johnny:

Yeah. And one thing I do notice is that. I mean, having done a number of speaking events and also from my public speaking clubs and the lights, very few people ever do it, any kind of vocal warmup whatsoever. Now actually bringing a voice coach on next week. So this is great. Uh, great. Yeah. Warm up for that. But what, what are the sort of things you would do? I recommend people doing this out, preparing their voice to speak.

Ambika Devi:

Okay. Even before you do tongue twisters, there's a few warm-ups. I can show you and lead you through. If you want to do it along with me, the first, the first is just what we call making raspberries, you know, just, or, or motorboating your lips, I guess that's also called, but take your fingers. Your index and middle finger, you can use your whole hand and just find where your jaw is. Go in front of your jaw joint, and just push up a little on the skin. So what you're doing is you're taking some stress off of some of the muscles in your face, and you're going to breathe in your nose. So exhale first and really squeeze your tummy in so you can get a full, deep breath breathe in. Okay. And so if you're not getting, if it's kind of coming up like that, you're not getting enough pressure up to release the muscles. So what you want to do is really the cheek muscle. You want to take the stress off of the cheek muscle, so you might need to come a little closer to your lips. And let, let your teeth be apart. If you're squeezing your cheeks in it won't work. So let's do this first. Let's find the jaw joint and loosen that up. I didn't realize I was so much more loose than you right now, Johnny.

Johnny:

I've heard that many times.

Ambika Devi:

And then let's, let's even do this, taking a deep breath and exhale and open your jaw down towards your chest. Breathe in through your nose and see if you can leave your mouth open. And what will happen is you'll induce a yawn. Yeah, isn't that amazing. And that will get the stale air out of your lungs. Now let's go back and let's try this. Okay. Breathing in through the nose and you'll have to play with it so that you can get a really loose feeling and your lips. Then what we'll do is a slide. So we all have a natural pitch. Or a note, a musical note that we speak at and we speak in a range. It's just like a vocal singing range. You know, maybe I go up to here and maybe I go down to here, that's a natural speaking voice. But then when we get into higher pitches and lower pitches, we can really start to relax the muscles around. The vocal chords, the vocal chords are more like ligaments. So the way sound happens is the vocal chords actually separate apart or come together. And there's these places called bridging points and that's where the voice cracking happens. Now, I know as a guy, Johnny, when you were younger, you went through a period of that, but we, women can also experience a voice crack just in regular speech, especially when we're nervous. Because of these bridging points. So what we're going to do is imagine a slide. Hopefully you're not afraid of sliding boards. It doesn't have to be like a rollercoaster, but just imagine from a higher place to our lower place, it doesn't matter if you're matching my pitch or what it sounds like. But what we're going to use is this, this kind of raspberry. Version with the fingers, taking the pressure off and go from a high pitch to a low pitch. Let me just demonstrate it. I want to give it a try. Okay. Let's try it. Take a deep breath in

Johnny:

I didn't do my cheeks. Well enough.

Ambika Devi:

Try come in a little bit more forward like that. Yeah. now you might've felt some bumps. You might've felt those things up. So after doing it a few times, what happens is you can smoothly go. Through those bumps. Those are the crack points. They're called bridge points. As a vocalist, they're called bridge points in your, in your vocal range. And when we listen to a vocalist who can hang out in that bridge. Cool.

Johnny:

You blipped, we lost you for a moment.

Ambika Devi:

I know. So what I was saying is when, when we're, when we listen to a vocalist who can sing in a bridge spot, for some reason, we're really drawn in, and it's not that we know that that's their bridge spot, but it's, it's a place on a quality in the voice. So when we're speaking. We are more engaging when we have a broader range of pitches. And when we have. Interesting pitches that match the quality of what we're talking about. And so to relax, these bridge points is important and you can also slide up and down so you could go down and then up again, let's give that try. Go for it.

Johnny:

I don't think I've ever felt quite so silly on my show but I understand how important this is. I think maybe that's one of the reasons why people don't do this so much is because it feels a bit silly doing it, but really important.

Ambika Devi:

If you're in the same room as your audience, it may not be a great idea. You definitely need out of a backstage green room off site. Place to do it now, w so much is happening on zoom. There's no, excuse. You know, there's no excuse with live streaming or whatever you're doing with video. Take some time. Another one to try is just making the sound mum like mummy, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, try that.

Johnny:

Mum. Mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum.

Ambika Devi:

And again. Now this time, instead of just squeezing up, make it more squeezing forward. mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum, mum.

Johnny:

Okay, here we go. mum, mum, mum, mum, mum....

Ambika Devi:

Yeah, because it relaxed your throat. Every lax, your vocal chords. Now try a few different pitches and do it. So try going low. And if you notice your logo lower and then go higher, see how high you can go and see if you can smooth pass the bridge points, using the mum's sound. Now you should feel really relaxed in the vocal area.

Johnny:

I'm starting to.

Ambika Devi:

Now see it. See if that's looser.

Johnny:

I was just wondering if anyone's watching this with the sound off, wondering what the hell are they doing? Okay. Yeah, that feels looser. Okay. So,

Ambika Devi:

So for you, mum is really important before you try doing the raspberries and here look, when you get good at this. And when you're, when your cheeks get more relaxed, because you should be able to feel Johnny that the tissue is more relaxed and more pliable now in your cheeks. Right. Don't be afraid to touch her your face.

Johnny:

I am. And I can, I can feel it. I've always had, I've always had an incredibly red cheeks and they're probably looking a little bit ready right now, manipulation.

Ambika Devi:

Yes. But there are many, many muscles in the face. It takes so many muscles to smile and more and muscles to frown as well. And so we've got. And we use this to speak. So a little massage, everybody, you know, and, and doing little exercises like this will make it a whole lot easier. I challenge you to try a tongue twister. Stop try these, just the mom and raspberries, and then try the tongue twister again. I bet you that it's going to be so much smoother, faster, easier. And look, if you're driving to a gig you can you can do it. You can learn to get it one handed. Or at traffic lights, these are, these are my tricks. And then once you get the, mum's smooth to really check to see if your voice is smoothing through those bridge points, because this will make you feel more confident too. When you get the muscles relaxed and get through the bridge points, you can just do a, a slide just vocally. So taking a breath in like this. There was a little bit of a bump. So I could go back to that bump area and play around with mom and smoothing. And I used sound and that one for me works the best. You might find a different continent works better. Like you, like, you might like to work with something like TA you know, depending. It all depends on how we use our tongues and how we create sound with our mouths.

Johnny:

Okay. Well, this is interesting. How, how long should we spend warming our voices up?

Ambika Devi:

That's up to you until you feel comfortable and confident. I mean, I think one of the coolest things that occurred while you were trying this along with me, is it made you laugh and, and laughing is a really good thing to do before you have to speak, because it will take the edge and the, the nervousness and turn it into excitement and happiness. And so anything that will make like you laugh, let yourself laugh. I would do at least three to five minutes. I mean, once you get good at it and you know, the feeling, once you get the sensation and you start to identify, okay, now I feel relaxed. Now my voice. Feels ready to go, you know, could just be a few, a few mums, couple of slides, a little bit, a little bit. And you're ready to go.

Johnny:

Yeah. So w if you smoothing out those bridge points, that's a good sign that you've that you've warmed up.

Ambika Devi:

I think so, because what happens when we're nervous is the muscles constrict, and then that makes the bumps more obvious in the bridge points.

Johnny:

Yeah. And there's a good chance. If you're about to do a big presentation, it's going to relax you a bit as well, probably cause you feel a bit silly doing it. You have some fun though. You make yourself laugh. And also because you're focusing on something else instead of your speech for a few moments, and that's always a good thing to do as well. This is really cool. So I like this. I think everyone should be doing this before they speak. I should be doing this before I start doing my episodes. I I'm certain that my voice is a little deeper now than when we started the episode.

Ambika Devi:

And it's not just deeper and I'm sure you'll hear it when you go back. But also notice the fullness because there are overtones and undertones. To any, any vibration, any frequency, and what it gives is a more full feeling. And that's a more inviting feeling. If it's like opening your heart up to your audience, when your voice. Is more smoothed out it's it's got butter and molasses and good stuff in it.

Johnny:

I do find that there are certain times, and it is usually later in the day. And maybe that is to do with being a bit more relaxed where my voice does tend to go a bit deeper and more resonant. And I often. Much prefer the sound of my voice at those times. And, but I really had thought that it wasn't something I could have that much control over and now you're showing me I can. And I'm excited about that. I'm excited about that.

Ambika Devi:

Well, I've looked forward to everybody experimenting and give me feedback. There are tons of ways to play with your voice and these are my favorite. And then again tongue twisters. There's some classic, simple ones like red leather, yellow leather. And just repeat, repeat, repeat, and go faster, faster, faster. That's that's a really good one.

Johnny:

A yellow that's a red leather, yellow leather, red leather yellow yet. But yeah, I can cope with Peter Piper picked a Peck of pickled pepper.

Ambika Devi:

There's some, there's some funny ones I picked I've I've picked up over time and I think what was the one I said earlier, copper tongue scraper.

Johnny:

Yeah. Copper tongue scraper. Certainly one to wrap your mouth around

Ambika Devi:

You definitely because I can't, I can't stand it when I stumble or fumble. And I know it's natural. So, so be it when it happens, but if we can get a little bit warmed up, I think it'll look, does a dancer go out? Does a a core ballet dancer or a premier ballet dancer go out without warming pack? No, they'll tear something. Okay. You might not tear something, but. You'll be smoother. You'll be more inviting. It's definitely worth it.

Johnny:

You do hear of and this is maybe more so with singers than public speakers, but we do hear peoples straining their voices and ending up with vocal problems and nodules and all sorts of things that can end up being in some cases ending their ability to sing effectively. There's a famous singer here in Spain for a band called Mecano who had, has had to quit singing. Pretty much because of that. And I think Dame Julie Andrews as well. I had the effectively a big operation per voice doctors that has been, she can't sing again is is there, I mean, these are the kinds of things that can maybe at least help us protect against that can't promise, but hopefully it helps, right?

Ambika Devi:

Yes. Those nodules. Quite often form when a vocalist is pressing a lower range voice through a bridge. And it's, it's like shin splints on your vocal chords. And that's so sad. Yeah, that's actually what led me to learn this because I was singing back-up and playing drums in a band with a guy who pressed through bridges really hard. And he would scream at the backups, you know, match me, match me and rehearsals. And it, it started really hurting my voice. And I've found my way to what's called speech level singing, which was developed by Seth Riggs. And that's where I learned these exercises from one of Seth's proteges.

Johnny:

Mm. Do you think it, it helps being able to sing for public speaking work?

Ambika Devi:

Yes, absolutely karaoke it up folks.

Johnny:

In what ways?

Ambika Devi:

When you're singing a song. Okay. I can only tell you for me why or how, but when you're singing a song that you really love, it opens up your heart area, your heart and your lungs are in the same. Location and your body. And this is where your power comes from. You mentioned that I teach meditation earlier. So let me bring in a little bit of far Eastern mysticism into this. The heart chakra or heart energy center is where the lungs and the heart, the physical heart are. And this is where the element of air. Resides and air is what moves energy in the body. It's also what. Activates our voice. It's the air going across these vocal chords, creating the sound. So anything that will open up the chest area exercises stretches a bolster on the floor, rolled up towels, just a little gentle backbend to open up the heart area forward, bend to squeeze down on the belly to help get the stale air out because most people breathe in the top eighth of their lungs. Eighth, come on. There's seven eighths of capacity there for you. So we've got to focus to get a full, deep breath in. Yeah, singing is a great way to practice breathing without having to go through strenuous pranayama or the breathing exercises, but learning those exercises, even just a breath where you breathe in and hold the air, then exhale and squeeze and hold still and steady. With the air out. These are really, really helpful because we might get going in a story and we're starting to run out of air. And then we don't want to, you know, gulp in the middle of that last sentence. It always happens in the, you know, the punctuating sentence. Doesn't it. And so to get your breath moving and working more with you and for you. As important as singing is singing as a form of pranayama, it's a form of breathing exercise. So why not? And sing something that makes you happy. I don't know about you, but before I speak, there's a song that I like to listen to and it gets me going, you know, I mean, it's just like the same of listening to particular music. When you exercise. Yeah.

Johnny:

Yeah, I have, I have my Spotify playlist for when I'm speaking and there's perhaps a rather disturbing amount of Britney Spears songs on it, but it's but it's and I love putting it on before I speak. Yeah. It pumps me up.

Ambika Devi:

Yeah. I mean, and ultimately when we get back on live stages, you know, there's a theme song that you use to get on stage. There is. Yeah, it's a, it's a Britney Spears song. We should be no surprise to you after that revelation. Yeah. Wow. I never know. You never know. I mean, one of my favorite songs to use is in another language that I don't even speak, but there's just something about the music and I make up words to go with it and it just really moves me and gets me focused.

Johnny:

In all seriousness, my favorite song to walk out to is a Diana Krall song, which she wrote herself. I'm pretty sure it's called Charmed Life. And I absolutely love it. And it's great. It's a great entry song. Don't nick. It it's mine. That was for the audience. Not for you.

Ambika Devi:

Oh no. That's okay. I won't nick your, your Diana Krall song.

Johnny:

Yeah. I mean, it's, it's kind of jazz and smooth and cool. And it's like, well, that's what I aim to be. I don't know if I come anywhere close to achieving it. This has been some great insights into warming up your voice. So we've got some tongue. Twisters and some actual physical things we can do. What else do you think is important or what else do you tend to teach people to talk about when it comes to public speaking?

Ambika Devi:

Well, definitely warm up your body. Shake off the nervous energy. I like to jump up and down and especially bouncing my heels on the floor because the sciatic nerve runs up through the body and there is a connection point and the bottom of the heels and just stamping my feet. On the floor, because this helps to get me grounded. So there are practices of centering finding that location. That's just around the navel area and, and then getting myself grounded, imagine roots. I definitely do some meditation in the morning and some yoga before a situation where I have to speak or record and eating right the day before being kind to your body being well-hydrated. So that means inside and out. I think a lot of people don't realize that their skin takes in a lot of water. So bathing the night before bathing the morning of I'm a, I'm a twice a day there and sometimes even more if I'm swimming midday. So I just, it blows my mind that people just don't let their bodies get wet enough

Johnny:

I'm a big swimmer as well it's about my favorite form of exercise. And I love to swim and probably can go most days. So I hadn't really associated it with my hydration. But as you mentioned anything, yeah, I always feel pretty well hydrated. I've always got a glass of water next to my computer. And and I do like to use the neti pot you talked about as well. And for people who don't know where that is, So he's running say line through your, through your sinuses. It's very safe and it's actually really amazing. And I think it's the only reason I haven't had a cold for a number of years.

Ambika Devi:

Add the tongue scraping and it will blow your mind.

Johnny:

I'm going to do it. I'm going to do it. I think I have a plastic tongue scraper somewhere.

Ambika Devi:

Personally for me, copper works really well. Copper, as I said earlier, copper is not for everybody. Some people actually do have an allergy. If you're a person that's tried wearing copper jewelry and it just instantly turns. Your skin green, you may or may not want to deal with it, but it's anti-microbial. So it, it kind of gives you that boost do that after neti. I have an informal. Teaching video on my YouTube channel, Johnny, about how to do Nettie and how I tongue scrape and everything I do to my mouth and nose. So the extensive, you know, play by play, live with me in the bathroom of, of how I do this. And especially now with the. The COVID situation, keeping your sinuses clean is a really good idea, really good ideas. But after I go out and I've been breathing in a mask. I do neti that, that night, when I come home.

Johnny:

With, with so many antigens pollutants around all this kind of stuff, I think it's a really good practice to have. And it's I, I know I probably I'm like most people when they think about that, starting doing something about it feels weird. And of course, if you haven't done it before yet, but you do get surprisingly used to it. And it's important to know that, especially if you are a bit congested when you do it, you really do need to make sure you get as much of the water out afterwards. Otherwise you may have a bit of Niagra Falls on your face a bit later on. And I tend to do that. I don't know if this is the right way, but I tend to do that by bending over and turning my head side to side. And that usually gets it all coming out. And then I don't end up with you know, wet streaks or anything like that, but I find it a really valuable practice. I hadn't really considered that it was beneficial for my voice as well, so,

Ambika Devi:

Oh, well think about it. Your sinuses are a part of your breathing and there are weird little cavities all around. We yogis in an early stages of training are trained in netti and scraping and all kinds of internal cleansing. And when we do neti we. All after we get it going through just the nostril areas. We actually flip back and pull it down into the throat to clean that back sinus passage. So I do talk about that in that little video. It's that's a little bit more advanced, but Occasionally, I get people who want to one-on-one to learn how to do it. And I'm more than happy to teach them that way, because sometimes you just need a little adjustment and yes, that head tilt I've had. I've had times where I look, I have pretty clean sinuses, pretty clear passages, but I've had times where I've done Nettie and the next one. Stay I'm doing a forward bend or a downward facing dog tends to be the angle that not all the way forward bend, but that slight forward bend I've had yesterday's neti come out like, Whoa, where was that from?

Johnny:

Yeah. I've, I've experienced that, like when I've done one in the morning and then gone to bed at night and you put your head on your pillow and that night and then Oh, wow.

Ambika Devi:

Yeah, because it just hangs out there for awhile. The other, another key thing is oleation, so moisture. Yes. The water is good, but our bodies need it particular types of oil to be happy. And as a speaker, you want to be able to always hear also. And one of the greatest causes of hearing loss is lack of moisture. So getting some proper moisture into your ears and up in your sinuses, after you do something like neti I recommend. Whatever edible organic preferably oil you're using olive oils. Great. If you're a ghee user, if you got into ghee a ghee is great. Also it's great for your eyes, your ears, your nose.

Johnny:

You would run that through your sinuses?

Ambika Devi:

Well, you'd warm it up because he would be a little more solid or Sesame oil works for some people. So Sesame oil would be my top three choices to put inside, but if you're using any of them, put them in a little dropper bottle and. Put that bottle sealed up into a cup of hot water and that'll warm the oil because your body's going to your, your core temperature is warmer than the air around you. So you want to get it a little bit warmer than your core temperature. It doesn't have to be scalding my goodness now. But. Warm as warm as you can take, but in the beginning, just warm enough.

Johnny:

Do you put it through with water, with the neti pot?

Ambika Devi:

Well, after you do, because neti should be done with sea salt. So salt is very drying and is actually kind of like an acid. So after that, we need to put a base in oil and, and the, when we run that salt water through the body, through the soft tissue, that the extremely sensitive tissue of the sinuses, we then want to only oleate it afterwards. So you could take a dropper and. Flip your head back and just snort it in. And if you can pull it down your throat, because then it's that back passage that hangs us up vocally, a lot that gets stuffed up. And that also after you do that having a clean tongue scraping because some will end up on the back of the tongue and sit there. It's when you swallow that gunk that it creates stomach and viral kind of things in the upper digestive system. So that's why you haven't been getting sick because you've been taking good care and keeping that area more clean.

Johnny:

But there's more I can do. And so you would also put that oil into your ears?

Ambika Devi:

Into your eyes, do ears in the daytime when you have to hear, because the way to do the ears is just a drop or two of the warm oil or geek. Oil is probably a little better for your ears. Ghee, if it gets. Staying in there will congeal and feel almost waxy. So I would, I would go with olive oil and Sesame oil in your ears. Right. It's up to you if you want to experiment with ghee, but just realize you might need to flush out with saltwater later. And just put a couple drops and then stick a little piece of cotton in and leave it there for several hours. It's really soothing.

Johnny:

I know I have done similar things like that when I've had like a buildup of ear wax that needed to be. Give them a bit of help to shift out. So yeah, it's not, it's not a super strange practice to me. Do you make sure for everyone at home, don't accidentally pick up that oil that has been infused with chilies because that is going to hurt.

Ambika Devi:

I have been known to use essential oils in with the oil, but they are very, very. Very strong, so proceed cautiously, and please use organic unfiltered of whatever, you know, the Sesame oil or the olive oil don't use just standard cooking oils. No, no, no, no, no. This has to be really high grade. You know, inside and be absorbed because your tissue will absorb it so quickly.

Johnny:

Okay. I'm definitely going to try it. I'm curious about it and I really want to try it since I live in Spain, it's going to have to be extra Virgin olive oil. Yeah. That's perfectly.

Ambika Devi:

Okay. And there's nothing stopping you from putting a little bit on your pinkie and getting up there and swabbing it. Now, you know, your, your nose has muscles and, and getting up in there after you get everything clean and doing a little inside, outside massage is good because if you can open up and stretch the nasal passages, you can take in more air while you're speaking.

Johnny:

I feel, I feel like we should have done more prep for this episode, Ambika. We could be doing this on camera for everybody now.

Ambika Devi:

Trying to be polite,

Johnny:

but maybe, maybe not such a, such a beautiful image to conjure up, but yet past that's a good idea not to do that. Definitely play with these things.

Ambika Devi:

It's a shame that people are afraid. I think we get the stigma of nose picking luck. I don't want to sit here on camera and pick my nose for you, but, but in the shower, you know, That's your place. That's you get in there, clean everything out. Exactly. You get some water, water, because that'll help melt the wax. You can. I like taking the handheld behind my ear and just getting the area warm. And, and then if you, if you're a Q-tip addict like me, um, you know, I, I haven't seen wax in a long time, although. A couple of times a year, I will use an ear syringe and, and do rounds of, of warm, almost hot. I w I guess, hot saltwater, but then only eight after, you know, with the oil in and some cotton for the night. It's really important, especially when you begin. Some of us have more oily bodies, but many do not. So really...

Johnny:

Well, I'm an oily person I have to blot my skin with this with this paper before I come on camera. Otherwise the glare of my skin is bad enough without having done that. But, uh, yeah, I, I'm definitely on the oilier side.

Ambika Devi:

Well, that's, that's great because then you, you age more slowly, you know, you, you have the power to. It's it's a good thing. Don't be afraid of your moisture.

Johnny:

I, I would see my very best not to be. Yeah. I get told I'm not looking too bad for approaching 50, so, I'll take it. I'll live with that. But yeah, I know that that is probably part of the thing that. So I don't get dry skin very often, thankfully. And so yeah, I can do more to, I have a very good skin regime as well. Now I'm going to have an even better sinuses ear, nose and throat routine as well. Thank you T so I really appreciate that this is a lot of interesting stuff. And for if anyone's watching or listening in. Try stuff out, play with it. And if you don't like the sound of it, don't do it. But do some of these things take at least one thing from this episode and give it a try is going to improve your ability to speak. You're probably going to feel healthier for doing it. I think these are some really nice and they're safe things to try out as well. You're not going to damage yourself any of this super important. Go ahead. You were about to say something?

Ambika Devi:

Oh, um, yeah, I just, I am so excited to hear how people find either doing the mums or, or loosening up their jaws. I think everybody is going to find something, if not a whole handful of incredible tools to use and yes, with neti, so many people are trying neti and not putting the oil in after this is not a good idea. People, you, you've got to put the oil in after, a little bit.

Johnny:

They don't seem to tell you about that when when you buy the packs, I'm pretty sure I've never seen or heard of that anywhere before.

Ambika Devi:

The secrets, the true secrets from yes. From I, you see, Ayur Veda is where these, where yoga is, where these practices are from. And this, this is true. I mean, Yoga is such a vast body of knowledge and people associate it with the exercise program, branded with the word yoga, but it's a lifestyle. And. It is unfortunate that many of these techniques. So, you know, we grab one and we say, okay, that one's cool. I feel good. I'll do that one. But then you miss the, the culminative step and this can ultimately damage you. You know, if if you're in saltwater, I, I live in Florida. There's surfers. If you're in the saltwater all the time, right. Well, please rinse off and fresh water and oil yourself at least once a day.

Johnny:

And, and in Florida it probably helps keep the alligators away as well. Right?

Ambika Devi:

Which the noises or

Johnny:

Harder for them to grab you? Maybe

Ambika Devi:

I know, I don't usually encounter them a couple of live behind me. I hear them, they talk and I've learned how to speak alligator. So, they, they have kind of a vocal. Sound somewhere between a duck and a dog barking. It's like that

Johnny:

I've only encountred alligators up close one time in my life. And it was in a hotel in Entebbe and they actually keep the alligators. So it was adults, babies, all sorts in this alligator pit in the hotel, quite incredible. And that was as close as I ever want to get to them as well. But they're interesting creatures alligators though.

Ambika Devi:

We've done all over the place today.

Johnny:

We have gone around a few houses and then some, but we've covered a lot of really useful things. And, and I think like many people who might be tuning into this, a lot of this is going to be like, you heard it here. First. It has been for me today. With you, um, because I really appreciate what you've been sharing with us and for those who do try this stuff out. Yeah. Check out, you know, if you're watching this on YouTube or on any other social media platforms, leave some comments so that we can hear how you get on trying some of these things out, try the exercises out with us at the very least and do that, especially when you're about to speak. Ambika, I know people are going to want to find out how they can find out more about you. What, what is the best way for them to do that?

Ambika Devi:

I have a link tree. So if you all are familiar with link tree it's just slash my name on Ambika Devi, A M B I K A D E V I same on YouTube, my name.com and, Ambika's coaching is a great place to find more too. So my first name A M B I K A. S and then coaching.com

Johnny:

Great stuff. All of that is going to come into the show notes later on. So you're going to see it in the live stream, but you'll see it a bit later on and Ambika, I always like to ask my guests for a book recommendation and it might be something that you've just been blown away by as a book or something that you have found very powerful as a speaker or as a coach. What if I asked you for a book recommendation, would yours be?

Ambika Devi:

Ooh, can I give two? Yes. Okay. Start with the why by Simon Sinek, because this really helps us understand why we're talking about a particular subject, but also helps us to craft it into what we're speaking about and to really have a great takeoff into. Our talk, another book that I'm I'm taking in, in tiny bites is called Trend Surfing, and it is just blowing me away about behavior. So for those of you who speak about behavior and it's translated into a bunch of different languages, so Trend Surfing it's actually originally was small books, but yeah. You can find a compilation of the first five. And sometimes I read a page several times and that's enough for a week. It's just a lot of information.

Johnny:

Sounds pretty good. I'll have to check that out. I appreciate the recommendations. And I would like to ask you, if you have any closing words, you'd like to leave our audience with today.

Ambika Devi:

Sure. I want you to feel really comfortable about being playful when it comes to noticing what's going on with you before you get up to speak and to allow yourself to make yourself laugh. To give yourself time and space to go out into nature and take really deep breaths to lie down on the ground and look at the stars or the clouds. And just remember you're a human being. You're here in this incredible place. Spend some time just in quiet, taking in all the sounds and the sights of nature.

Johnny:

Highly recommended. Great advice. Ambika, it has been so much fun speaking with you today and you shared some great information. It's been a pleasure to have you on the show. Thank you for joining us. Ambika Devi. Thank you

Ambika Devi:

so much, Johnny. And thank you everybody who tuned in. Thanks for tuning in. I hope you've enjoyed the show. If you did, please make sure you subscribed. Don't miss any amazing upcoming episodes whilst you hear a pop over to present influence dot com and grab yourself a free copy of the last minute presentation checklist. It might just save your butt someday. Next episode is going to be more voice coaching, but a very different style with the incredible Dielle Hannah and coming soon after that as well, an episode on the Psychology of Buying, if you want to get into why people buy and how influence persuasion works, we're having much more focus on influence and persuasion this season. Join me and Moeed Amit as we talk about the Psychology of Buying and much more besides what gets those customers, buying your products and services, understand how trust and persuasion works in your business. Don't miss it. And if you're enjoying the show, make sure you share it with your friends as well. See you next time.