Coaching Conversations

3 Things You MUST Do to Train & Coach NEW Manager Leaders

July 29, 2021 Tim Hagen
Coaching Conversations
3 Things You MUST Do to Train & Coach NEW Manager Leaders
Show Notes Transcript

This episode teaches 3 fundamental strategies new manager leaders can use to launch their leadership careers successfully. This episode will teach those strategies and how to implement them.

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When developing future leaders. There are three fundamental rules organizations should deploy to make the transition successful. Now when you promote people from within which is a great thing for organizations to do. It comes with some responsibility and certainly some challenges as well. When you are developing new leaders, it is imperative that the transition has a foundation first before somebody becomes a leader, they should be taught core leadership principles, such as, What does it mean to be a leader, how to provide feedback, how to develop other people why talent development is important just to name a few. The three rules for new leaders in terms of their transition are so fundamentally simple yet organizations often do not provide them. 

Number one, the transition. Now this is going to come up very jaded very cynical. The transition is tough. Relationships are changing you're going from friendships and peers to AI now the boss. And often the knee jerk reaction of people is why don't want my relationships in the workplace to change all they will change. Whether you try them out in terms of just maintaining that peer relationship typically doesn't work, the relationships will change, there's no getting around that. So the transition number one has to be done openly. When we promote people to tell them. Relationships are going to change. You're going to have some people who are thrilled for you. You're going to have some people happy for you, but a little disappointed, Maybe they didn't get the promotion. And yes, you will have people who are not happy you got the job. Let me tell you a quick story. One of our clients has a new leadership program, and it's an emerging leadership program and we're coaching the new leaders. And remember this young lady at the age of 28 has a gentleman on her team, who went for the job. At the age of 57, which is my age, and she said, I've got to win this guy over I said, No, you don't. She said, What do you mean I said it's never gonna happen. Think about the circumstances if I came to you and said try these things out, and he's really gonna support you, would you believe me. She said, No, probably not. I said, what you have to do is reengineer the relationship that transition. He's upset, you might be the target of his Inkster his anger, his frustration, you're not responsible doesn't matter he's still frustrated. So if he's not showing you support now you have a job as a leader to do it isn't to win him over. It's to do your job. Now, we have to educate people on the transition. It's gonna be good. And then there are times people are going to try to pull us back a little bit, they don't want us to be that successful, they don't want to be that happy for us. 

Number two, the 5050 rule. I shared this all the time. If you're going for 100% of people buying in or liking you. You're fighting the wrong battle if 50% of your people like you and 50% of your people feel challenged by you, things are probably going to be pretty good. Every time I make that statement. I get people to raise their eyebrows and go, Oh, okay. Oh yeah, okay, because you're not going to get 100% by an interview thought you had 100% buy in. Would you really trust it.

Number three, the rule of feedback. I have given this suggestion for 26 years. Every time I do it, it seems to calm, leaders down. So I'm going to go back to step one, the transition. Then I'm going to go to step two, the 5050 rule, here's where the feedback rule is awesome. Sit down with every new employee that a new manager has, and sit down and say, What's the best way to give you feedback both positively and constructively. And this is called co authoring the relationship. Here's the funny thing, every time a new manager has done that I'll get a call and say, you know how to answer that, said right because no one's ever asked them, and it's the ultimate sign of respect in there Ben responses such as well. I would like you to email me beforehand if it's constructive so I can prepare and I don't feel put on the spot. And when a leader does that what it does is it builds trust it solidifies it strengthens the relationship. So the three steps of helping a new leader, start their careers one, be transparent about the transition, even though they're thrilled with the promotion. It comes with challenges. Number two, the 5050 rule, don't go for 100% bIown. Don't go for 100% Love it 50% Like you and 50% feel challenged by you, you're probably doing pretty well. Number three, the feedback roll, ask every one of your team members, what's the best way to give you feedback, both positively and constructively. Now here's the funny thing. Years ago I had a new leader do this. And a woman who was asked this question said, I'm so happy you asked, please do not give me compliments in public. I feel humiliated and bullied or said to me, I was shocked. I said, yet. Now you know some pretty valuable. So we dug in a little bit deeper and she said, I don't know what it is, I appreciate it. Yet when I get a compliment. I don't feel like I, I feel comfortable. She said I feel red I feel flush, I get horribly uncomfortable. I'm embarrassed to tell you that. That was two years ago till this day they still have a great relationship because of that interaction. So there are three steps, be transparent about the transition. Number two, teach the 5050 Rule number three, teach them how to provide co authored feedback.