Duke of Digital

014 - The Secrets Behind Going Viral with Tony Adkins

December 02, 2019 Brian Meert
Duke of Digital
014 - The Secrets Behind Going Viral with Tony Adkins
Chapters
Duke of Digital
014 - The Secrets Behind Going Viral with Tony Adkins
Dec 02, 2019
Brian Meert
Show Notes Transcript
Speaker 1:

Everyone wants to go viral, but what does it take to actually make it happen? Raise those pinkies because today we're talking with Tony Atkins, AKA the dancing doctor where we're literally going to break it down,

Speaker 2:

presented by advertisement. The Duke of digital will guide you through the rapidly changing landscape of digital marketing, social media and how to grow your business online. To submit a question for the show, text (323) 821-2044 or visit Duke of digital.com if you need an expert to fix your ads, the friendly team at advertisement is ready to help visit advertisement. That's M I N t.com or call (844) 236-4686

Speaker 1:

she is your host Brian Mitt . All right , well I am very excited today because we have a special guest, Tony Adkins, who's known as a dancing doctor . [inaudible] . Is that right? Thank you so much for being here today. It's a pleasure for being here. Thank you for inviting me. Yeah, yeah. I'm really excited. Um , because you have such a fascinating story and I wanted to, to share that with our listeners. You know, some of the background behind your journey and how you've come to be where you are today. Uh , you know, a celebrity status. Now at this point, like you're, you're a pretty well known. Um, but let me, I want you to do a, a couple of background points that I know about you . You're a neuro sir . You work in the neurosurgery department , um , and you're a physician assistant at the children's hospital of orange County. Is that correct? Okay, good. Um, and so you began sharing videos of you dancing with the patients and these videos began to pick up steam and one of them generated over 150 million views, two plus million shares . Like everyone started talking about this and one of I went through last night, I was watching some of your videos and my , my all time favorite one was you had a lady's baby and they were playing the lion King music and you held it up like Simba. And it just, the mom starts laughing cause I don't think she knew that you were going to do it. And Oh , it was just great. Like she's smiling as big as can be. Uh, and just that little symbol moment, it made me laugh. I was like, that baby was a few hours old. Yeah , it was great. You could just see how she's like , she's there, you know, exhausted. And she's like, that's it. It's now, it is a little King. I love that. Um, so since that point you have appeared on good morning America, the dr Oz show, ABC world news access Hollywood, the Australia morning news and their today show, like you all of a sudden went mainstream on all these big , uh , network shows , um, that they'll tell me. Did I miss anything? I want to make sure that I get cover all the bases I got on.

Speaker 3:

Um, I was interviewed in Mark , uh , TV with Evo , um, probably about two weeks ago and it just aired last week while I was in Israel and Palestine. Um, it was , uh , one of the amazing shows that I did as well as far as different print ads , um , in orange County register, orange coast magazine as one of the top doctors in orange County as well as , uh , parenting OSI magazine. It's been pretty awesome. You know, I just love it.

Speaker 1:

So for anyone listening, you need to know who , uh , who Tony is. So how can people find you or follow you if they're listening right now?

Speaker 3:

So Facebook is pretty simple. Tony Atkins page. Uh , so look for the one with the blue check Mark, cause there's a lot of Tony Atkins out there and it's Adkins with a D K I N is not act ATK . So it's got a D like David K I N S. got it . Um, as well as , um, on Instagram T underscore Malone a three. So a reason why I did, I'm alone, it was a back then. You remember when anchorman came out? Uh , um, what was his name? John burgundy. So I was like, I want to anchor man named the team alone. So , and after you get a certain amount of followers, you can't change it indoors. I was stuck , locked in.

Speaker 1:

Um, well w the topic that I wanted to run through today was the , the topic and you know, a lot of people in business, and I hear this a lot is they're like, we need to make something that goes viral. It's just make a video and make it go viral. So we get millions and millions of views. Um, and it's, I think when you have already said that you , I feel like you've already kind of lost the battle because things that go viral generally don't go viral because there were produced. Um, unless there is a lot of thought and you do it really, really well. Um, so I mean from the outside view, this is what it looked like happened. There was three steps. One, you start dancing with patients , uh, step two , the internet, you know , Chris goes crazy. Step three, you appear on good morning America. So what I wanted to do today was kind of walk through that journey because I know there's a lot more that happens during that process. So walk me through kind of the beginning of where, let's go all the way back either when, you know, where did dancing come from as being a part of your life? Is it something that you did as a kid? Is this something that you only started when you saw a patient was going through a tough time in a hospital?

Speaker 3:

So it all started when I was a little kid, so I was the youngest of two older brothers. I mean we stayed in South central Los Angeles. Um, so they were involved in gangs out there , um, and I couldn't go outside, so I would grab their boombox and that's when K day was out. Um, so I would turn on the radio as well as watch VH1 when VH1 first came out. Um, and I'll just look at videos to music and I would just dance and emulate everything that I saw. Um, and from there kind of took me away from the environment because you , all you hear is , uh , gunshots, please , sirens, helicopters. Um, and that's all you hear. So I was, you know, I tried to do something that would kind of take me away cause it was very tough down there. Um, and that's what I did and I, I use music and dance to kind of uplift me. And once I kind of went there, I felt that that was my savior because I never really got into watching TV always. Every time when I'm down, I listen to music, I'll go to the gym, listen to music, and it kind of takes me away.

Speaker 1:

Oh , got it. Got it. I mean, so when was the moment that you first started to there made the decision to dance with patients? Like was there a single patient or like a patient that you're like, man, I really need to brighten their day. Always . It's something like day one in the hospital, you're dancing as you walk in the door. Like how did that kind of come to be?

Speaker 3:

Sure. So , um, it all started with one patient, but when I was in school, my, my instructor, when I was doing my , um, you know, trained physical exam, she said, Tony , you're very lively. You're, you're happy. You should always be yourself whenever you go and see a patient. I was like, okay . So , um, but then there was one patient that I remember , um, he had childhood leukemia. Um, he beat that and then he started having a lot of different neurological issues that caused neurosurgery get involved. So it caused him to be in the hospital for a long time, just like when he was a lot younger and he had childhood leukemia. Um, so when I would see him in the morning, I will see the gloss of childhood kind of leaving throughout his eyes. And you know, when a kid has started going into depression route , um , and I was like, you know, this is not right. You know, I've been there before when I was a little kid. So I was like, you know , um, let me do something that's gonna bring him up. So I turned on some music one morning and I started dancing, kind of playing around and his mom filmed it and then she put it on social media and then just kind of went from there.

Speaker 1:

So it was the mom. And that was kind of my question was who started filming these dances? So from the first one you started doing your focus wasn't, I want to become famous, your focus was there is a person in pain and I want to try to help get them through that moment. And let's put on some music. Do you remember what the song was that you danced to in that first video ? Oh, can't touch this. Ah, that's such a good one. It's a great one. You have another video where you have the full costume on . I saw the favorite thing is when you do like the little [inaudible] goes across the room. It's such a great dad. Um, okay. So the mom was the one that first took the first video. She uploads it. So did you, I mean did what happened at that point? Did that one pick up or were you just like man this is a good thing? I walk us that kind of first step. Yeah. So she filmed this , she put it online and all of a sudden I started getting a lot of followers on Facebook. Cause you know regular Facebook, you only can get up to 5,000. And like overnight I hit 5,000 and I was getting more friend requests and I was trying to request them and it was like, Oh, you've reached your max 5,000 no more. I was like, Whoa, what am I doing now? So then I started, I started a Facebook page , um, and it just kept going and from there the hospital contacted me , um, and they were like, you know, we see something good. Um, do you mind us teaming up with you? Um, we have patient consents, you know, we'll go around on Fridays and we'll, we'll um, consent some of the patients that want to do it and then we'll do a little dance video and then we put it on our website and I was like, all right, cool. Sounds good. Nice. I kind of went, so it started with, you know, one blowing up organically, which is people saw an authentic person dancing with someone to make their day and brighten it up. Yeah. That just got shared a bunch and the hospital came in . That's interesting to be like because it is a situation where you just can't necessarily walk around and film whatever you want in those settings. So they came from the very beginning and said, we support this now. Was it, walk me through this. Was it like the social media department at the hospital? Was it the marketing department or was it like the CEO or the president there was like, we need to get behind this. Who was it that made the decision to? So the CEO , uh , contacted the marketing department , uh , because at that time one of our , uh , top , uh, intensivist passed away and the, one of the videos was shared on , um, in orange County. There's different , uh, community Facebook pages, like Anaheim, buzz , orange County buzz. And it got shared on one of those and the CEO saw it and she contacted the marketing departments that this is so great for us. I think we should team up with him. Wow. So this is awesome. So she saw it like it had already gone full scale in the internet and is now being out there and she's like, Oh, you work at my hospital? Yeah , we need to take this and make it really good. Oh that's fantastic. Um, what I mean was this was the F so they all did it all start from the first video because this is the one that starts to kind of grow, but then all of a sudden you start getting calls from dr Oz and good morning America when, what was kind of the tipping point? I mean did it , cause then you start doing videos, you're working with a hospital and you start doing them consistently, right? So at what point do these other things start to fall into place and snowball? So , um, doctor or the good morning America is like in the mid September cause they just started a good morning day ,

Speaker 3:

um, and or GMA day , uh, with Michael Strahan. Um, and that was a third day, which was a Wednesday. That of it starting in it had dancing with the stars there. So, but before that I was doing my videos and just kept putting them out and um, uh , daily mail contacted me. Okay. And , um, I did something with them and what they did was , uh , did a quick interview and then they put a bunch of my videos together and then a made like one of those now, this little video clip . Um, and then from there that kind of exploded. Um, but go back a little bit before that, my wife was like, you should did a dance, you should do a dance challenge. I was like, all right . So I did an in my feelings challenge and Oh my goodness, that thing exploded. That was a one that went, yeah, that like took off. Now did you do it, cause generally art , don't you do that where you jump out of the car and do it while driving or did you do it in the hospital? I did it in the hospital side , finish rounding on a Saturday morning and then I had one in a nurses film it. Okay . And while I was doing it, and then I had to run to the ER, but in the meantime, I posted it while I was running to the ER and then it just went like wildfire. You upload that, you get back to work. Yeah. And then you check your phone later and you're like, Oh man. Yeah, I have, it was like 600,000 views. Wow. Wow. Like in a matter of minutes. Oh yeah. Wow. That was crazy. So at this point you're like, man, this is nuts. Yeah. Um , and I , I imagine, you know, comments, usually what I hear is know comments, get out of control and you're like, Aw man , it's overwhelming. And you're like, what do I do? Like I'm ignoring these people. Right , right . It's just like, it's become this massive snowball. Yeah . Um , you know, why , why do you think people are so drawn to dancing in videos? Um, so the difference of, you know, there's a lot of people out there with dance studios and they dance in a video . So then you have a lot of dancers just look at those. It's , it's a community of dancer to kind of look at and new things. The difference between my dancing , um, and dancing studios where there's professional dancers. I'm not really professional dancer. I may pretend like it, but no, not at all. This is VH one train . So , um, but it's a difference between me connecting with a patient and their family and their small patients or big patients. Um, it's a medical provider that is seen in a different light , um, is not us. Um, that you see us in a white coat and that's it. Yeah. And we step away. This is something different from a regular thing that you see on TV. Is this somebody just hopping around and having a good time and people are laughing and smiling in these videos? It's like no other.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. You know, it's crazy because you know, we work in the advertising industry and you know, you could put up the best commercial with everything, you know, here's all the reasons why you should buy or whatever. And a lot of times you just put up someone dancing next to it and try to go head to head. And the dancing video, a lot of times we'll , you know, when they, people I think are drawn to dancing. It's no matter if they're good or if they're bad or if it's even just as so , so dance people seeing other people dancing, a lot of times we'll just stop and watch it. Um , and I just think that's so fascinating. It's something that's probably happened throughout the history of time that, you know, when people are dancing, it's all right , let's , let's stop for a bit and ,

Speaker 3:

right. And it's a, it's a time to get loose and enjoy yourself. You know , there's a lot of , a lot of research based off of, you know, people having fun, laughter and dancing.

Speaker 1:

Now after, you know , this is all happened. How has this affected your career? Like has it opened doors or is it just kind of this big, you know , does it keep, I mean, yeah, it does. The viral stuff keep going. Um , does it open doors? Did it, did it go and then kind of have a lifeline and then it kind of slows back down? Yeah.

Speaker 3:

So , eh , we have a , so I have a lot of peaks and valleys , um , but in , uh , in my career has just went in so many different directions. Um, as far as going on TV shows, talk radio, podcasts, print ads , um, it's, it goes in different timeframes. So when I first started , um, the first TV appearance was a channel for nightly news. And then after that was ABC world news tonight. And then the next week was , um, uh , good morning day. Got it. And then that was on a Wednesday and then I came back and then on that Sunday I did the Australia morning news, which was three o'clock here, 3:00 PM here and seven o'clock over there. Um , and I did it on sunset , um , right in , uh , right by the waffle house. So , um , but , um, the, the advertisement portion has slowly start to go down a little bit. Uh , but it picks up every time one of my videos gets a lot of views.

Speaker 1:

You know, we had another guest on the show and he was saying, we were talking about how he got on shark tank and it came from doing a very small interview with a local small newspaper. And he was like, because of that, a producer saw it and gave us a call. Um, and he, you know, to some extent, it sounds like you almost had the same experience, which is you did the first opportunity that came through for press and then right behind it was another one and another one and another one and all of a sudden the phone is ringing where everyone wants. Is that kind of how it happened?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, that's how it happened. And I didn't have anybody to help me. I was doing as well as working at the same time. So it's been pretty tough. So now it's, this year has been a lot of speaking engagements. I've been going different areas in Florida. Just came from Savannah and that's long ago. Um, and just doing a lot of speaking things based off of things that I do. Just connecting with patients.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. Yeah. Um, now there was a moment as things were going crazy right in the viral moment where there were some individuals, I was, you know , looking back last night and reading some of the comments, you know , you're referred to by the press as the dancing doctor. Uh, your , uh , your actual title at work is a physician's assistant. Um, which would be someone that I think generally works with doctors but isn't necessarily doctor . Right? Sure. Okay, cool. Yep . Um, so what happens was there was a bunch of people that were in there being like, wait , he's not really a doctor and we're throwing out these comments. Just somebody saying, you know, like, this podcast is called the Duke of digital, and I'll let everyone in on a little secret. I'm not a Duke, it's just right. It's just for fun and we have a name that goes with it. So I think that's kind of what happened in this scenario. But there was a lot of people that were like, Oh no, this is controversial or whatever. What are your thoughts on that, on, you know, did having some haters [inaudible] ultimately helped us even more? Because then there's people arguing back and forth. Was it something that you responded to them to be like, no, I didn't know this. Aware, you know, this is something I'm aware of. Or were you, did you just like, Oh , I'm going to ignore them and keep doing my thing?

Speaker 3:

So I did a little bit all of the above. Um , because once I think the , uh , the dancing dog started , um, after I was on or when I was on good morning America. Okay . Cause , uh , Michael stray had just kept on saying, Hey doc, Hey doc. And then the, the , um, the trainers of , um, dancing with the stars that they're dancing. It was like, Hey, dr Tony, how you feel about that? You think you can do better? I was like, ah , they look okay but I can do better. So that was when clips and he just kept on saying, doc. And then people got upset , um , was like, why? He didn't say , um, I'm not a doc, I'm a physician assistant. And every time I went on shows, I would tell them, I'd say , I'm not a doctor. Don't say doctor, because you're going to make a lot of people upset. I'm a physician assistant , so just say mr or just say Tony. Um, and every time as soon as the show starts running, they just go back to doc barbaric . So it wasn't even your fault. Right, right.

Speaker 1:

You're even saying, I'm claiming this and you were up front about it. It was just, I would probably imagine it's the casual thing to say. And the dancing doctor just kind of rolls off the tongue and they're like, let's go. We're off and running with that. So I mean it's so you, right , it wasn't something that you set up or did. It happens from this and out of it. There's a lot there . Not a lot, but there's some people that are like, Hey, we're grumpy about this. What did you do at that point? Were you just like, ah , ignore them and keep moving on? Um ,

Speaker 3:

yeah. Uh, like I, I was on a lot of PA forms and they were like, well, he had an opportunity to say, I'm not a doctor, I'm a PA. So I was like, you know what? And TV is so scripted that you got a time limit. I'm not about this been a minute and a half to say, you know, I'm not a doctor, I'm actually a PA and a PA is. So I was like, you know, I'm just gonna let it go. Um, and everybody who knew me or knows me know that I don't claim to be anybody other than what I am. And I love being what I am. Um, and it's in the folks that are online, you know, I would, there was points where there's millions and millions of comments and people from other countries, they don't know doctor , they don't know anything other than doctor or nurse. So if you weren't a white coat, you're a doctor. If you're not wearing a white coat, you're a nurse. So they don't know the difference of physician assistant . So I wasn't going to sit around and just try to educate every comment. Yeah . So, but yeah, but at the end , um , now that has gone so high and now I can continue. Now I start to continue to put out there. Then I'm a physician assistant. I was doing in the beginning, but nobody was catching it.

Speaker 1:

It's just fascinating because it's something that, you know, wasn't necessarily anyone's fault there . TV's moving quick and it's got a catchy ring to it. Let's go and we're onto the next guest and let's keep moving on from there. But um, you know, ultimately, I mean it sounds like you did everything right in that scenario. Uh , it's just crazy. You know, I generally think a little bit of controversy is always a good thing when there's people , when people disagree on the internet, right ? They start putting up lots of comments and that usually is what rises things up higher is something in there where it's, you know , if everyone's like, yeah, we all agree with that, they just pass over it, right ? If there's something that gets them fired up or wanted to have a discussion, a lot of times that can ultimately help benefit you or anyone else trying to go viral. Um , awesome. What, what are some of the top social media platforms that you use today or that , where you spend the majority of your time to be able to connect with people?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, so in Facebook I spent a lot of my time there because they are , have a 1.9 million followers. And on Instagram it's a little bit different. I spend a lot of time there too and there have 227,000. So it was a little different. So , um, the, the population , uh, differences from Facebook to Instagram is a lot different. So the younger population is on Instagram, the older population is on Facebook. And so you get a lot of followers and likes from Facebook. Instagram is like all , they'll look at it and they'll look at your page and then keep going. So , and if they really like you, they'll follow you or like it. So it's, it's a totally different, so majority of my time is on Facebook, but I, a lot of things that just, you know, because Instagram and Facebook are kind of sharing and as soon as I posted to Instagram, it goes directly to Facebook.

Speaker 1:

Got it. Now do you have any tips for people who want to go viral, either individuals or businesses? You know, it's definitely something that I would think, you know, people that watch the internet and see these things kind of come and go or like that's, I want to do that at some point in my life. You know, what would be your advice to them? Um, can anyone do it? Uh, I know a lot of times people try hard. What are your thoughts on that?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, so you just have to be passionate of what you're doing and not try to overdo it because then once you try to overdo it, people can see it. That this is all pretty planned. Um, it shouldn't be planned. You know, if , if you want to , you know, go to side of the road and give somebody some shoes because you see them on their homeless, you know, some of that stuff, you can tell that it's way too scripted. Um, so, you know, trying to become a viral sensation is sometimes usually by mistake. But if you want to work on it to make it become, you have to, you know , be passionate about this is what you do. And don't try to steer away and say, okay, one day I'm going to a pet monkeys and that didn't go, so let me go over here and let me hold some babies. So you have to stay with a plan and from that plan you have to look at what you can do or today on that plan.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. Yeah. Know it's so, it's fascinating because I think every person has something unique about them. There's something that they care about or they would know more about a topic than me or haven't experienced in life that's completely different than me. And , or it could, can dance better than me are seeing better than me. I think those are all things that people have talents. And I would generally say, you know, do exactly what you're saying, things that you love. Um , try to be your authentic self. And I think, you know, try to have fun and be entertaining. You know, like there's a little component of that was you're like, you're having a bad moment. You're in a hospital, you're struggling. We're going to do the exact opposite of that right now. And try to break through that or not even break to it, but just make it through the day with a smile. It wasn't trying to, you know, change the world. You are trying to change. One person's frown into a smile and that moment was captured. Uh, and because of that, other people resonated with that, it resonated with them. Um, so it's, it's just, it's fascinating because I don't think there is a recipe for going viral. I think it's being yourself. I think it's doing something that other people possibly have never seen before. Um, or that evokes an emotion inside of them of either happiness or, you know, fear or pain or joy or laughter. Um, and because of that, they want to share it with other people and help them feel that same way too. Right , right. All right. Um, I wanted to switch really quick as, as into another section, which was, you know, maybe a little bit more serious questions. Um, one of my favorite movies of all times is patch Adams and they , many of the people in the press have referred to you as kind of the modern day patch Adams. And so one of my favorite quotes from that movie is the purpose of a doctor should not be to simply delay the death of a patient, but to increase the person's quality of life. Um, why do you think makes that so special in terms of what you're doing with individuals right now?

Speaker 3:

So, you know, this is always hard film because I'm really passionate and sorry, I may cry. Right ? Um, but , um, I have a lot of kids that I treat , um , and I just lost a kid , uh, this past , uh, Sunday , uh, to a brain tumor. And, you know, it hurts all the time. You know, being in neurosurgery , um, we, it's like almost like a homicide detective. You know, we see some of the worst things, sorry, my eyes are leaking. So we see some of the worst things that happen to kids , um, things that we all don't want to happen. You know, especially, you know, we have a few kids that have non-accidental traumas where the parents do things is usually the male figure in the family that does things to kids. And then they come, they go in one way, they come out a different way. Um, but what that quote means to me is the quality of life. You know , um, we tend to think quality of life , um , in adults looking at kids is a quantity of years is not always that way. We have kids that are sitting in the hospital right now dying. Um, and their quality and quantity of, of life is totally different objectives. Um, so the quality of life is, are they have been a good time? Are they enjoying themselves? And every time I come in contact with any of my kids, my, my eyes won't stop leaking. Um, I, I make sure their quality is, you know, at its best because they, I connect with them so many different ways. Um, I don't, you know, not necessarily , um , care about, you know, trying to prolong their, their struggle, you know, by doing quantity of years. You know, we can, we can give radiation until , um, people are just like , um, like in of like this here.

Speaker 1:

But is that a good quality of life? It's not, you know, we, we tend to think that, you know, us as parents that we want our kids around forever , um, when they have a tumor, but sometimes we, it just is not possible. We should just make sure we step back and make sure they're enjoying themselves on their last days because that's , that's what's important. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, man, that's , you're hearing those stories and I can imagine it's incredibly difficult to be around people in those situations to be like, all I wanna do is help. All I wanna do is push a button and have everything be okay. And it doesn't always work out that way. Um, you know, having been right in those scenarios, I would imagine would change someone having seen these stories or these people, the kind of come through, you know, what have you learned about the value of happiness or the meaning of life from going through these type of experiences? I've , I've learned so much. You know, we have, you know, our parents, you know, they go through so much, you know , and I try my hardest to be the best provider I can. You know, it's not about me being a physician assistant and not about people calling me a doctor. This is about Tony being a human and connecting with these parents because I have kids too. And I would hope people would treat my kids that way. So that's why I do the things I do for these kids and their parents because I want memories of them enjoying themselves in the hospital. A police where they couldn't get out of. Yeah. Ah man, you're , I , I don't know if you know this. Um, I had a brother that passed away from childhood leukemia. Um, and he always wanted to be an astronaut, right? Like he wanted to go to space in his room. He had a space shuttle on one wall. Everything was rockets and you know , you know, how do we get to the moon and stuff like that. And the Make-A-Wish foundation sent him to space camp with my sister. And I remember, I think it was probably the happiest time I ever saw him. Cause you're going through, you know, leukemia, you've got chemo and you know, most of the time he was sick or recovering from being sick to try to build back up. And then it's, you know, the next chemo session, you've got to go right back. And so, you know, to be able to have that moment where he was like, I get to live my dream and I, everything else, needles and doctors and everything gets put on the back burner for a little bit and I get to go and be a kid. Um, and for me it was just seeing it happen was so incredible to be like, it does matter to help make happy and to help them live the life that they want to live. It's such a valuable, valuable profession. So , um , any one , I'm , I'm sorry for bringing up the deltoids jeans . Um, any final words of wisdom as we kind of wind down today that you might have for other aspiring , you know, people who are aspiring to work in the medical facility, medical industry, or to work with kids? Any advice that you would have for them?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, so you always have to, you know, be human aspect of it because in medicine , uh, we're not taught to be that much , um, human, other than, you know, treat his disease , um, diagnose a disease and kind of work with folks to give a treatment plan. I'm not necessarily saying, Oh, you need to be more human to it, you know, connect with the patients, you know, take care of yourself as an individual, cause you're going to see a lot of rough things. Uh , we're not taught those part of medicine. So you have to , um , look into yourself and to see if this is really what you want to do. Because a lot of people get into medicine for the wrong reasons. Either that money or the family pushed him in that direction. So we have to make sure this is what we want to do and kind of go from there.

Speaker 1:

Oh , that's wonderful advice. Thank you so much Tony, for being on the show. I appreciate it. Wonderful advice on your journey and it's just, it's fascinating to see how you've fo how far you've come so far and it's exciting to be like, where will you go from here? A dancing president and I , I don't know , maybe.

Speaker 2:

Thank you so much.

Speaker 1:

Uh, and yeah, we will see you guys on the next episode.

Speaker 2:

Thank you for listening to the Duke of digital podcast with Brian Mitt , one to network with other business owners. Join our exclusive group at facebook.com/groups/duke of digital fancy the Duke. Leave a five star review on your favorite podcast app. And you can be mentioned on the show. The Duke of digital was produced by advertisement and recorded in Hollywood, California. All rights reserved.