Duke of Digital

025 - The Secrets Behind a Website that Generated $25M with Mehrab Reza

December 17, 2019
Duke of Digital
025 - The Secrets Behind a Website that Generated $25M with Mehrab Reza
Chapters
Duke of Digital
025 - The Secrets Behind a Website that Generated $25M with Mehrab Reza
Dec 17, 2019
Brian Meert

Want to generate $25 Million in sales? Raise those pinkies because today we’re breaking down the secrets behind building a winning website. 


Brian Meert
https://www.linkedin.com/in/brianmeert

Duke of Digital
https://www.dukeofdigital.com/
https://www.instagram.com/dukeofdigital/

AdvertiseMint
https://www.advertisemint.com
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https://www.facebook.com/groups/advertisemint/
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Show Notes Transcript

Want to generate $25 Million in sales? Raise those pinkies because today we’re breaking down the secrets behind building a winning website. 


Brian Meert
https://www.linkedin.com/in/brianmeert

Duke of Digital
https://www.dukeofdigital.com/
https://www.instagram.com/dukeofdigital/

AdvertiseMint
https://www.advertisemint.com
https://business.facebook.com/advertisemint/
https://www.facebook.com/groups/advertisemint/
https://www.instagram.com/advertisemint


Speaker 1:
0:01
How would you like to build a website that generated $25 million in sales? Raise those peaks because today we're going to break down some of the secrets behind the best selling websites on the internet
Speaker 2:
0:12
presented by advertisement. The juke of digital will guide you through the rapidly changing landscape of digital marketing, social media, and how to grow your business online. To submit a question for the show, text (323) 821-2044 or visit [inaudible] digital.com if you need an expert to fix your ads, the friendly team at advertisement is ready to help visit advertisement. That's M I N t.com or call (844) 236-4686 to grow your business. Here's your host, Brian Mitt.
Speaker 1:
0:51
All right, I'm excited today because we're joined in the studio by may have reds. Ah, um, you're the founder of Atlantica. Is that right? Okay, perfect. Oh man, I, I'm so excited to have you here. Um, for a couple of reasons. You know, we've collaborated on a couple of projects, um, that have been fascinating. Uh, as I was able to work on them or, and was seeing what you guys were doing, um, which I was like, I've got to have you on this show to explain some of your methodologies behind what you guys are doing out when it comes to, you know, building fantastic website. So let me do a little bit of introduction and then you can correct me if these are all wrong. Um, you know, you're, you're a marketing expert, a business consultant, you're the founder of Atlantica. Um, you are, you've worked with Sony, Hulu, cannon, um, you specialize a lot in creative marketing strategies, website consultation, um, and a lot of digital advertising.
Speaker 1:
1:51
And most importantly, and one of the accomplishments that, you know, I look at and I'm like, man, that's awesome. Is you were awarded the two comma club, uh, X award by click funnels by creating a website to generate over 25 million in sales. Is that correct? Yeah, I've seen your, your big award. They give you a thing you can hang on the wall. If I click funnels, I mean, so that's, I, I wanted most people dream about that. And when you actually have done it and generated that in sales, I mean, that's an incredible accomplishment. Um, that most people will never get to. There's a lot of people that talk about being able to do it. You actually did it.
Speaker 3:
2:31
Yeah. Thank you. Marty. Uh, I mean, um, uh, you know, um, first of all, thank you for having me and I'm really excited to be here. Um, I, and you were saying that not a lot of people will get to that point, uh, especially with, uh, uh, building a website that can generate 25 million, but I hope they do, but the, the honest fact is that most websites don't make a profit. Most of them actually, and over the last 13 or 14 years, I have been creating businesses, working with businesses and consulting for businesses on so many different capacity, whether it's website marketing, Facebook ads, um, copywriting, et cetera, et cetera, email campaigns. But over those years and with, you know, hundreds of thousands of dollars in ad spend and testing and split testing. What I found was that the common factor that led to the success of all of those businesses was having a centralized website or landing page that was really optimized to speak to that audience. Uh, you know, help them be heard, you know, show them that they're understood. And those are the websites that are really powerful and convert.
Speaker 1:
3:41
See, and this is why I wanted to have you on this show and you know, a little peek into our world. You know, I get contacted all the time by people that are like, Hey, I made a website last night on Shopify. I spent 10, 10 minutes, I put some images up, I'm ready to go. You go make me millions of dollars with Facebook ads. Um, and it's just, it's rough when I see that. And I'm like, man, you've got a lot of work ahead of you. You know, they think that they've done the, you know, the hard part's over and someone's gonna go and make them a lot of money. And I'm like, man, it couldn't be further from the truth. Meaning Facebook ads or advertising in general will only amplify what you have in place. And I've seen people waste millions of dollars by not spending a couple thousand on building a better website.
Speaker 1:
4:31
They're like, Oh, it's good enough. Let's just hit the gas and go for it. And it from my time in my eyes, sometimes it seems so inefficient. And I'm like, guys, no, no, no, don't you, we want to redo this. And they're like, no, no, no. Don't worry about that. Um, we'll figure it out later. That's not important. Um, and it's just crazy to watch the, you know, sometimes what I look at is a big mistake who everyone gets to run their business their own way. But I wanted to have you on, because I know that some of your thoughts and strategies behind the companies that you work with and the companies you're building, um, are very built around the core of build that amazing website first, that that is built to speak to the person who you're trying to bring in. Um, first. And so I, that's what I wanted to run through today. Yeah, yeah,
Speaker 3:
5:18
absolutely. You know, um, unfortunately, just echoing what you said a little bit, a lot of people, most people treat websites as a necessary evil and um, they really struggle when they treat their websites as a necessary evil. And, um, one of the other biggest mistakes that many even large companies make is that they think that great design or a beautiful design is the answer. However, when you pull people who visit websites and don't purchase well, what was the number one reason you didn't purchase? The most frequent answer they get is that I was confused either. You said something that brought up a question in my mind that you weren't able to answer or I didn't understand your message. And if the number one reason why people aren't buying on a website is that they were confused, well, you can't fix that problem with design. I'm nothing against designers.
Speaker 3:
6:13
I have great designers that have a lot of respect for, but confusion is not a problem that happens in the eye. You know, confusion is a problem that happens in the brain. So you can't fix confusion with just a pretty website. It's the messaging that's really has to be dialogue. This is so good and I'm just so excited about this. Um, so what I've seen a lot of times is people will come and they have a design that they've worked on or they're like, yeah, this is it. Here's my product, it's my baby. I'm excited. They know all the answers and they'll run through it. How do you work through the process of finding now? What are the confusing elements, not that the founders have, but did the visitors are having as they come through this site? Well, you know, there are some major pet peeves that all visitors have when they look at a website.
Speaker 3:
7:04
And this is going to resonate with everyone because we have visited bad or terrible websites before ourselves. It happens all the time. And although I'm not a design expert, I have worked on websites so much. I understand how a website needs to be designed in order to convert, uh, the audience. And one of the number one, uh, one of the biggest problems that websites have is that they are just overly extraordinarily verbose to the point where their audience gets, feels like they get hit with a wall of words. You know, when they get hit with a wall of words, you're communicating to your audiences that, Hey, this is going to take awhile. So come back later. And that's what we're telling our audience. They're thinking, okay, I'm going to come back later. And unfortunately they never do because, you know, we, our attention is so divided, it's so split and it's short.
Speaker 3:
7:55
So if we can't communicate a message on our website that immediately hooks our audience, you know, sways people who are undecided, crushes their objections, um, gives them the confidence and the conviction that they need to buy our product. If we can't do that quickly with the fewest number of words possible, we're going to have a very hard time, not just in marketing, but with everything, with advertising, with growing the business, with profits, with revenue, all of that stuff. You know, what I think is fascinating is, you know, a lot of times it network networking events. You know, when you go to meet someone you'd be like, Oh Hey, you know, you know, what's your name and what do you do? And there's some people that will have, you know, very creative answers where they're like, you know, they'll come up with some, I'm a doctor and I work with, you know, this certain type of disease or whatever.
Speaker 3:
8:41
There's other people that will be like, there'll be going like this long, you know, three minute talk about, well I started bagging and you know, your history, you can just tell like out of that everyone's like, ah, is going to take over. It's going to take a while is awkward. Like I don't, I'm not a part of this conversation. You're just talking to me as opposed to let's have a fun back and forth. And I think what happens is on websites people just feel like, I need to put lots of information. I need to get in front of them and tell them everything they ever want to know. And all the, you know, big blocks of texts describing, and I've seen people spend weeks and months putting together the copy and they're like, now it's perfect. And I'm like, I don't think anything's ever perfect.
Speaker 3:
9:22
Right. You're always changing, adapting it. Yeah. Um, but I just, I feel like that glaze over, a lot of times people, they could sense it in real life, but they can't sense it on a website. Right. Meaning what are your thoughts on how to be able to determine that? So how to be the, the question is how to be able to determine what are the great things to say and what to leave. Yeah, yeah, yeah. So a website, in my opinion, is it done when there's nothing left to remove? Not when there's nothing left to add. Oh, it's so good. That's a really, really important, our audience isn't coming to us because they want to know everything. We need to understand what are their major success factors, what are their biggest challenges and obstacles that get them to move forward. And we just need to focus on that and remove everything else out of their way.
Speaker 3:
10:09
So, I mean, that in itself is a $25 million tip. Sure. In my career, the number of times I've seen that rule broken. Yeah. All the time. And I've watched people waste well beyond 25 million. What a great tip. So I mean, when you take, if you were to, if we were to bring up a website right now, what would you start removing? Like are you walk us through that process of what you and your team would do? So I would remove everything because every single website, almost all of them are missing the most important thing that a website needs to have. Okay. And that is the never talk about the problems that they solve. If you think about it, if the purpose of creating a product is to solve a problem and then you go leave that problem out of your website, your product basically has no purpose.
Speaker 3:
10:58
Now. So businesses, when they don't start with the problem they solve, they don't hook their audience's attention, number one. Number two, they haven't made themselves irrelevant to their audience, you know? And number three, they just haven't, uh, you know, it made their values clear, uh, made their, uh, worth or their, uh, you know, clear to their audience that this is how I'm going to make your life better. This is how I'm going to help you overcome the status quo. These are the short term, uh, failures I'm going to help you avoid this is a longterm success I'm going to help you achieve. Now, he's not in some of the previous podcasts that we've had, we've had individuals who've come on who've talked about a story like creating a story that resonates with people. Um, you're very, I mean, does that need to be intertwined with absolutely.
Speaker 3:
11:48
Um, you know, the value prop back to the user. So, so here's where people story is very, very important. It's probably the most important thing on the website when it comes to your messaging. The problem people have when they talk about a story is that they start to tell their story instead of their audience's story. You know, they don't tell their customer story. And this goes all the way back to a great, um, book called a hero with a thousand faces by Joseph Campbell. And then there's a, you know, a writer's journey. And then there's also nowadays is a company that's popular is, you know, uh, building a StoryBrand. They teach you how to tell a story that's about your audience and not about you. And the best way to begin telling your audience a story is start with the problems that they're facing, the problems that you're going to help them solve.
Speaker 3:
12:34
And you know, this is taken straight from the best literature that has ever been written, the best movies that have ever been created. For example, one of my favorite, uh, recent movies as Batman begins, right? And how does Batman begins? Begin the movie begins with Bruce Wayne losing his parents. You know, it begins with the problem. That's how people hold the hook and hold your attention. And then my favorite movie of all time is the godfather. If you're familiar with a godfather, yes, the movie starts in a happy, uh, during a happy occasion, a wedding, but quickly they remove themselves from the wedding. Go to the Godfather's office, a dark room where a man comes before the godfather and says, godfather, I have a daughter. She's a good girl. But she got involved with these guys and they tried to take advantage of her and then they beat her and they beat her.
Speaker 3:
13:24
It. Great. The best stories ever told, always start with a problem. And that's where websites need to start. You need to start with talking about the problem your audience is facing. The problem that you're going to help your audience overcome. That's where every website needs to so fast. I've heard that before by several other people that they're like any, if you're a business or a service and you're trying to tell your story, they hero in that story. Should always be the customer and your business is something that comes along. Yeah. It helps them on their journey, get to where they want to go and they're like, if you're not framing the story in that way, you know, I've worked with several, um, you know, CEOs or presidents of companies where they're like, let me tell you about the story and on the hero, I'm the founder.
Speaker 3:
14:11
I went through a tough time. I'm going to be very engaged. Yeah, no, and that's exactly what happens is the results are generally very lackluster. That kind of brings me to like the second thing I wanted to mention is the most important thing on our website is building trusts. After you talk about your audience's problem, you need to build trust and people have a lot of wrong ways that they try to build trust. They try to build trust with talking about how much money they've made, how many awards they've won, but none of those things are really effective at building trust because from research, from science and data, we understand that humans, as humans, our brains decide to trust. When we understand the utter other person's motivation. That's the only time we decide we can trust somebody is when we know that that person's or that business is motivation.
Speaker 3:
14:59
Right? And the best way to get your audience to trust you is not to talk about how amazing you are, how much money you have, how many awards you've won, how many deals you've closed. But it's to show them that your intention and your motivation is to help them. Then they see that their interest and your interest are aligned and then they trust you. And people only do business with other businesses they trust. And we know that ourselves. Like if I, you know, ask you where did you buy your phone from? Who did you buy your car from? The, if you think about it, the core factor that comes down to how you decide who you're going to do business with is that you trust that company. You trust that they're not going to disappear. You trust that they're going to give you good service, you trust that they're going to back up their product.
Speaker 3:
15:44
So the best way to get somebody to trust you is to review your motivation to them. And that better be for their own good and not for something that's self-serving. Oh man. It just, that's just another powerful tip. Um, and I guess I see this a lot where because of the speed of the internet, you know, if you look back 25 years, uh, maybe before the internet, you know, when people were like, I want to create a store, they would have to, you know, get a location and buy inventory or you know, set up a restaurant or whatever it was they were doing. And then they had to get people and come in and build that trust little by little. Yeah. Customer by customer. A lot of times people are now are like, let me try to just put up some fake five star reviews and I'll create my own award.
Speaker 3:
16:27
That doesn't really exist in the world, but people think it does and they're trying for a lot of these shortcuts. And it's just so funny because I see a lot of times in people a lot of times just can't tell what is true and what's not, which I think ultimately leads to more trust where people are now skeptical of that, which is why trust is that much more important. And you know, as a Facebook ad ads expert Brian, that um, uh, because of what Facebook calls a couple of bad actors, a lot of people have to pay for that. They get there, they get their accounts shut down, they get their, you know, ads turned off. So there are bad actors out there and unfortunately everybody kind of has to end up paying because of them. But if you can show your audience in a genuine way that your intention and your motivation is to look out for their best interests and not yours, they're going to trust you.
Speaker 3:
17:18
And you can do that with testimonials. If you use testimonials that show you're tested by the way, testimonials work when, um, your website audience can kind of somehow associate with the person that's leaving the testimonial. And again, how do you create that connection? Use a testimonial that talks about a problem that your client had, what the experience of working with you was like, and what success they achieved, right? Most people ask for testimonials to talk how great their business is. You know, when you have a website full of 30 testimonials that just talk about how amazing you are. Those testimonials never increase your conversion rate at all. So when you hear things like, Oh, low stock alerts, uh, you know, testimonials, account downtime is all these things increase conversions. Actually they don't unless you know how to use it. So, I mean, I've always viewed those as almost kind of gimmicks sometimes.
Speaker 3:
18:17
Then your little kind of add on things that you can be like, Hey, let me see if that works. It's like a widget. You need, timer is running down, this is going to, you know, increase sales. Um, and it's always saying, you know, I've, I've seen a couple of instances where it's worked. I've seen several where it hasn't worked, so it can kind of go back and forth. Um, you know, so are there any other common mistakes that you see may absolutely. [inaudible] I mean, I can imagine you could just write down a list. Yeah, I have a lot man. And uh, um, you know, actually, uh, while I was on my way here, I wasn't driving, but I said, uh, you know, I have a, I have a PA, I have a document on my phone and it's like 12 or 15 pages of just bullet points of mistakes people make.
Speaker 3:
19:00
And I think there's probably over a hundred, you know, common mistakes that everybody makes on their website when they go to build it. I will say, you know, the third thing I'll mentioned that one of the most common things is people don't have clear calls to action on their website, you know, um, instead of, uh, sometimes people hide their call to action button and sometimes they have confusing calls to action button. Um, so calls to action button that says, want to get started, question Mark or learn more. But if you're selling something, you need to be very clear with your calls to action button. Buy now, schedule an appointment. Um, you know, book a reservation. You need to have clear calls to action buttons and need to place them frequently throughout your website. That kind of goes into the second point I made earlier. Like people hide their calls to action button on their website.
Speaker 3:
19:52
And if you think about it on a website, a call to action button is the cash register. Yeah. Imagine you go to Macy's or Nordstrom or something like that and you've got your shirt picked out and your jeans picked out and you can't find the cash register anywhere, right? And you ask an associate and you know, where do I go to check out? They're like, okay, you got to go down to the other end of the mall. You got to take the escalator, you got to walk down the hall, you know, turn by the hall and you know, pass the water fountains, go through the door. And when you hide the call to action button on your website, that's what you're doing for your audience and for your website visitors is you're just putting up another barrier. So what I like to say is after you talk about the problem you're going to solve, put a call to action button right there.
Speaker 3:
20:33
Have a paragraph, have some bullet points that talk about, um, how you're going to help your audience to build that trust, to build that authority. Put a call to action button, have a call to action button at the top right hand of your website that's sticky. That always follows you no matter where you are on the website and you're scrolling. Okay? And um, what I really think is also Poe is powerful, is dedicating a section of your website to break down your costs. Call to action into three or four steps. For example, if you are a financial advisor, step one, book a risk risk-free call. Step two, answer a couple questions. And step three, um, you'll get a plan. Download a plan, a customized step-by-step plan to invest for the future. So you've taken your call to action and broken it down into just a couple of simple steps to show people that, look, this is not difficult.
Speaker 3:
21:26
This is not going to be challenging. It's actually going to be easy now. I mean, so go back to call to actions, you know, you know, there's, you know, different types of websites and different types of objectives. Some people may be wanting to generate leads for our business. Other people may be wanting to generate sales. Absolutely. So I mean in terms of that, I mean one of the upsides, especially if you're sending a lot of paid media towards it, is if I'm going for sales, someone may come look around, they might leave. Um, is there, do you put any sort of strategies in place to be like step one is get them to come and maybe get their email and then I work them through email marketing or their chances or, absolutely. You just, you know, always go for the sale. No, no. Absolutely. Some, some websites, some landing pages are just for lead acquisition.
Speaker 3:
22:11
Some is to just provide value. Some are gated, some are not gated, meaning that they don't need any kind of commitment from the um, visitor, like a name or email address. Nothing at all. Sometimes. Well, hopefully they're going through something like that before they get to a sales page where you're asking them to add something to the cart. Yup. Now, one thing that I've seen a lot with lead ads or with generating leads is a lot of times there's a an offer or some sort of informational product or some value. Can I add something? I'll Google everything that we've talked about so far in this, in this meeting, [inaudible] applies to all types of pages. So just because you have a page where you're just asking for a name and email address, people think that all I need to do is create an ad and send people to a form with some fields for the name and a email address and hit submit.
Speaker 3:
23:01
But if you haven't talked about the problem, if you haven't built trust, and if you haven't called to call people to action in a meaningful way, even if it's a free video, right? Step one, watch the video. A step one. Um, you know, enter your name and email address. Step two, watch the video. Step three, email me if you have any questions. If you haven't done that, you're still going to struggle to just get leads. It doesn't mean that everything has to be a monetary transaction and when you do that, your your quality of leads will increase just not the number of leads, but your quality of leads. It's funny that you just answered my question. I know. It's great because to some extent, you know, a lot of times what we all hear conversations from is people will be like, you know, the information isn't right or people are going to a, and they're entering in a wrong name and email you.
Speaker 3:
23:48
How do you, you give them the information first and I think ultimately what you said was the answer, which is you've got to address their problem. You've got to build trust and if you can do that again, audience, people will want to be give you their information and they'll be like, I want to know more. I want to get to the next step. Yep. As you know, I mean usually 50% of more or more of the people who opt in for something never end up going through it, watching it or reading it. But if you do it this way, you know you're going to get more qualified leads, they're going to be more engaged because you have spent some time with them. You've helped them understand that you get them, so they're going to be much more likely to go through whatever you've just provided them for free.
Speaker 3:
24:36
And you know, fun for one of these large companies that we worked with, you know, they were spending almost, almost seven figures a month to send people to a lead acquisition form. But the problem was less than 50% of people were actually consuming the information. But when we changed their landing page to go acquire the lead from a form to something that tells a story about their audience, the percentage of people that started opening the emails after they opted in went from less than 40% all the way up to 70% and higher. That's incredible. That's incredible. How important when it comes to, you know, landing pages or websites is video to help you achieve your goals. You know, video is always important because there are different type of people who visit your website. Some people just like watching a video. If there's a video option, they'll give you the time.
Speaker 3:
25:34
If there's not a video option, they won't give you their time right now. Right? And creating a video is again, very simple. When you use this powerful story framework, start your video by talking about your audience's problem building trust, not just authority or you know, competency, but building trust. You know, by showing them that you are your, your motivation is their best interest and calling them to action. So the same formula that you use to create your landing page or your sales page or your website, you can use the same exact one for your video. Nice. Now do you, um, I'm just curious, do you recommend autoplay videos or do you allow people to click? Um, well, I was actually, uh, I'm interested in asking you about that. What is, how does Facebook feel about autoplay videos? I mean when they go to landing pages and it just starts auto-playing uh, I mean it can exist.
Speaker 3:
26:29
Ultimately what we always will look at is the, the numbers behind it. Um, a lot of times the autoplay features now, um, we'll begin with the audio off. So if you do auto play with like a YouTube video that's embedded, here's kind of what I think about auto videos, um, until people read a really attractive offer and understand how this business is going to help me, they're not very interested in watching a video. So if you look at heat maps of a website, right? If a video doesn't have a really interesting headline, by the way, this is another problem that websites have is they'll stick a video on their website, but it has no interesting headline to entice people to watch that video. They think just because I build it, people will come. Well, if you think about YouTube, you can't just upload a video to YouTube and not put a thumbnail and engaging thumbnail, an interesting headline that opens a story loop that you know, builds curiosity.
Speaker 3:
27:23
Without that, no video is ever going to get clicked or watched. When you have a autoplay video, you know, you haven't done those things. Uh, it could work. I'm not saying it's not going to work, but it's a lot better if you build some interest. If you hook their interest, if you deepen their, um, uh, you know, if you deepen their interest in your brand and your website, they're more likely to consume the information, uh, and have it resonate with them. Ah, it's such good advice. Um, is there anything that you would say behind creating a great value proposition? Meaning something that people are like, man, I've got to do this now versus, you know, a day from now or a week from now. Like it could be a great product. It could be a good website. I see about, you know, the, the, you know, the benefits to me are the problem.
Speaker 3:
28:16
So how to get people to act right now. I mean, I guess, I mean I guess there's two cause the value proposition is what does it do for me? Yeah. But there also would be, you know, getting people over that final hump of, Argh, I gotta I gotta do it. This is kind of scary because, um, I mean, you can remove this part later, but I actually am launching a free course about websites, uh, in 20, 20 and beginning of 20, 20. And this part of it, like the three things we just talked about, you know, the problem trust and the calls to action are, you know, the, the chorus talks about that thing and the other two things. So five things total is exactly about this, how to get people to act now and not later. So I don't, it's like, did he watch that?
Speaker 3:
29:00
But he couldn't watch thy way into the future. Watching came back, I took notes and came back. So, you know, getting people to act right now to take action right now, not a month from now or a year from now is really important because you can get people all the way to the edge of the cliff. But if you can't convince them to jump over the gap and go to the other side, if you can't convince them to take action, well, your business is not going to grow. And most businesses struggle with, well, how do I get them to act right now? So that's why you see those things like fake count, you know, fake scarcity, countdown timers and things like that and count. It's not always fake. It's not always, um, uh, it's real. Sometimes, you know, the low stock alert, those things. However, through our testing, what we saw that there's something more powerful than all of that, and that is, uh, creating some kind of stakes where you talk to people about the short term failure that they're going to experience if they don't move right now, if they don't take action, if they don't break out of the status quo, define what the status quo is.
Speaker 3:
30:06
It's the thing that has them running in place constantly but not moving forward, right? The short term failures that they're going to experience. And then talking about the longterm successes that they're going to experience, the big picture, the promise land, right? Defining those things, talking about those things clearly on a website is what motivates people to act right now. Because they see a, you know, fast approaching, you know, negative scenario. I mean being, you know, as long as we're all being genuine and things like that, when we're uh, talking to our audience, they see that fast approaching, you know, apocalypse and that longterm success that they can achieve if they act right now. So creating these kinds of stakes, you know, helps them overcome the status quo. And that is actually more effective than saying, you know, this webinar only has 50 seats, uh, we only have 10 more, uh, toothbrushes in stock or you know, your chance to sign up goes away in five minutes.
Speaker 3:
31:11
I mean, there have been websites up for like four years that's saying like, you know, these next five minutes of your life is the last chance. So those things aren't very effective. But what's more effective is, you know, creating some steaks. So what's the short term challenge challenge you're going to, uh, experience and what's the longterm success you're going to experience if you act now. I love that. And the truth is, I think any business, if you sat down, you could quantify what would it cost someone if they didn't absolutely buy, buy my product or service for a day or for a week or for a year. Like if you waited, what would that amount to in a dollar? I was most likely the easiest way to do it would be an a dollar. But there's other, you know, values of thinking of time, lost time or frustration or headaches or other relationship relationships, you know, years of, uh, you know, professional opportunity, opportunity costs.
Speaker 3:
32:06
I mean, those, sometimes those things can get at a deeper level than just like, you know, here's the amount of money you're not going to make in the next month if you don't take action. If you can talk about those, you know, emotional hooks, if the, you know, the, the way those problems manifest inside of them, uh, around them and spill over to their coworkers, to their family, to their home, like those kinds of things. Now you're making it so much more real for your audience. So good. So the tips that you've given today are just fantastic. Um, I want to take a minute, just make sure, how do people find you if they want to connect with you? I mean, you are dropping some, some massive truths today and I want to make sure that they can connect with you if they want. I would love to connect.
Speaker 3:
32:56
Um, you can go to my website, atlantica.com that's what the D a, D, a,L , a, N, T, I, C a. It's kind of like the Atlantic ocean, but with a D because of advertising play on words there. You can just go to Atlantic a.com and there's a button to like reach out to us. Um, and uh, you know, we're redoing our website right now. I mean, at a company where we focus on websites, we're redoing our website all the time. And in the beginning of 20, 20, um, if you're listening to this in January or February, the free course is probably already out and it's going to be, you know, a lot more information about what we just talked about. It's going to go much deeper. It's going to actually pull examples from like the best ad campaigns in history, um, from the biggest brands like Apple and you know, so many others.
Speaker 3:
33:47
And the goal of the course is not to leave you hungry for more so that you buy something. The goal of the course is after you watch this course, you should be able to create a website that is on the level of those major brands and it's completely free. Um, and my goal is to, you know, create free content that is better than paid courses. That's my goal. And I V I'm very firm on that, so if anybody wants to learn more about this, they can watch that. Um, yeah, that's great. No, that's, that's fine. I was going to say, you know, man, you have to, if that course lodges, you know, like let people know where to be able to find it. So it'll be on your website. There'll be able to go and sign up for that. Um, fantastic. Uh, I'd probably go sign up right now if I get a check that you have to let me know when it goes live.
Speaker 3:
34:36
Cause, I mean it sounds good. I mean I, I've technically already seen it in the future cause I right. Questions. Right. That's great. Well, you know, as we kind of wrap up here, uh, is there any final words that you would have for, you know, people out there that you know, have a website right now and you know, maybe they're thinking, you know, Hey, it's, it's uh, we think it's okay. Like I think that's another thing is people a lot of times don't know, they don't have a baseline for that. So yeah, feel free to, I have a couple of things. Number one, don't get bogged down by what tools you should be using. You know, all the tools are going to at the end of the day, help you deliver your message and uh, you know, spread your message and attract an audience, right? So don't get so obsessed with, well, where am I going to host this?
Speaker 3:
35:22
Where am I going to put this? It really doesn't matter if you're just starting out. If you're creating a business to put a really strong foot forward, you need to sit down and think about your audience. You need to think about what they struggle with. You need to think about what be meaningful to them and you have to deliver it to a way that is convenient for them and not get stuck in your head about what you want to say, what you think is important. And that is hard. That's not always easy. So once you've done that, go to somebody and ask them for just 10 minutes of their time. Ideally a potential customer or potential client. And don't tell them anything about what you do. Don't say anything and say, Hey, can you read this and tell me what you think? And they are going to answer all of your questions for you.
Speaker 3:
36:12
When people ask like, you know, how do I know whether I should do this or whether I should do that with our, I should say this. And whether I should say that I say, go to your audience, they have all the answers. Yeah. You know, I still do this to this day. You know, when we create a website, either for a large company or ourselves, we, you know, focus group it and I give people two and a half minutes to look at my website. I don't tell them anything about it and I ask them to answer six questions, uh, four to six questions. And if they're able to nail those four to six questions by spending, you know, 120 seconds on a website, I feel like, okay, I've done my job and now I'm confident about coming to someone like Brian and saying, Brian, this, I think this is ready for traffic. Ah, Oh good.
Speaker 1:
36:58
Your, your pieces of advice are just like, I get goosebumps hearing it because it's, it's, maybe it's just like gold after gold after gold that you've kind of shared today. So anyone that, uh, is looking to improve your website, um, definitely check out that course. Uh, you know, get recourse free course. Get on that. Um, just fantastic tips. I think every website has the ability to be improved in some way. Um, and the truth is all the big ones always are, they're always changing them. They're always Justine and try new things. So their websites never really come to an end. So there's always a way to level up. So I just wanted to thank you so much. Thank you. How many chairs? It was a pleasure and a privilege. Oh, that's great. All right guys, thank you for hanging out and we'll catch you on the next episode.
Speaker 2:
37:42
Thank you for listening to the Duke of digital podcast with Brian Mitt, one to network with other business owners. Join our exclusive group at facebook.com/groups/duke of digital fancy the Duke. Leave a five star review on your favorite podcast app. And you can be mentioned on the show. The Duke of digital was produced by advertisement and recorded in Hollywood, California. All rights reserved.
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