Duke of Digital

030 - Customizing Your Marketing Messaging with Cory Ferrier

January 09, 2020 Brian Meert
Duke of Digital
030 - Customizing Your Marketing Messaging with Cory Ferrier
Chapters
Duke of Digital
030 - Customizing Your Marketing Messaging with Cory Ferrier
Jan 09, 2020
Brian Meert

Your customers are not the same, so marketing to them with a single message is a mistake. Raise those pinkies because in today’s episode, we’ll discuss how to customize messages for your customers.

Cory Ferrier

IG: @coryferrari

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/cory-ferrier-b89a8746



Brian Meert

https://www.linkedin.com/in/brianmeert

Duke of Digital
https://www.dukeofdigital.com/
https://www.instagram.com/dukeofdigital/

AdvertiseMint
https://www.advertisemint.com
https://business.facebook.com/advertisemint/
https://www.facebook.com/groups/advertisemint/
https://www.instagram.com/advertisemint

Show Notes Transcript

Your customers are not the same, so marketing to them with a single message is a mistake. Raise those pinkies because in today’s episode, we’ll discuss how to customize messages for your customers.

Cory Ferrier

IG: @coryferrari

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/cory-ferrier-b89a8746



Brian Meert

https://www.linkedin.com/in/brianmeert

Duke of Digital
https://www.dukeofdigital.com/
https://www.instagram.com/dukeofdigital/

AdvertiseMint
https://www.advertisemint.com
https://business.facebook.com/advertisemint/
https://www.facebook.com/groups/advertisemint/
https://www.instagram.com/advertisemint

Speaker 1:

Your customers are not the same, so treating them the same way and your marketing is a huge mistake. Raise your pinkies because in today's episode we're going to show you how to market to your customers correctly

Speaker 2:

presented by advertisement. The juke of digital will guide you through the rapidly changing landscape of digital marketing, social media, and how to grow your business online. To submit a question for the show, text (323) 821-2044 or visit Duke of digital.com if you need an expert to fix your ads, the friendly team at advertisement is ready to help visit advertisement. That's M I N t.com or call (844) 236-4686

Speaker 1:

grow your business. Here's your host, Brian [inaudible]. All right, I have got in the studio today, Corey farrier. Hello. Hello. Oh, I mean I'm, I'm excited today because man, this is a long time in, in the, in the works, I guess that I would say to be able to get you on the show. Just your schedule, my schedule. It's how it, how it works when we're all divas. Um, to give a little background, we met back in college. Um, and since then you've gone on and done incredible, incredible things. Uh, you've worked in sports, you've worked, you're now, uh, executive in a, at a hospital in the healthcare industry, uh, just bawling every step of the way, which was crazy cause that's how you were back in college as well. So it's, it's great to have you on this show. Um, give me just, if you want to fill in the listeners a little bit more background on kind of what you're doing,

Speaker 3:

man, since since college and I was so happy to see you this morning. It's been way too long and, and something, and some of our listeners won't know, um, that we need to share is we were both president of our dorm at Walla Walla college or university. So, um, [inaudible] Sigma,

Speaker 1:

I don't even remember what that means. Something beat friendship.

Speaker 3:

You get rid of your tattoo. This is kidding. Um, worst mistake ever. Uh, but since then, uh, really, I, I S I have been in healthcare for most of those years. Um, uh, worked with Adventist health, uh, worked at a couple of our different hospitals. Started out actually on the, uh, used to be called human resources, I think it's now called human performance. Um, they changed the names for everything, I guess cooler, but, uh, started out in that and then someone, Hawaii's mentor told me, he's like, do you want to be in the C suite someday? He's like, you're going to have to, uh, learn a different segment of the business and hospitals typically serve three groups, your patients, your employees and your physicians. And having served our employees for a number of years and learn some of the basics, I switched over to the physician side and business development and basically never looked back. It's definitely been my calling. Um, so in between the last, uh, 12 years, uh, in that realm, uh, dabbled a little bit in sports, um, did a little traveling. Um, but I've been back in the hospital business development side for the last

Speaker 1:

eight years at least. Now, if people wanted to find or connect with you on social media, on the internet, is there an optimal route that they should go?

Speaker 3:

There's only two social media, uh, that I have. One is my LinkedIn profile, um, which I like to put little inspirational quips and stories and things that I've learned pretty consistently on there. Um, uh, so that's uh, Corey farrier on LinkedIn and then, uh, my alter ego on Instagram, which probably has a few more followers, Corey Ferrari.

Speaker 1:

Nice. Okay. So that's what I think if anyone were to go there, they would look at your life and it is sports games, Superbowls. You're hanging out with the athletes. You're on courtside fake news. I was like, man, I was telling you before we started the show, I was like, you are like my own version of, of Jerry Maguire. Right. It got, I was like, man, you have done so well. And so that's what I wasn't w you know, we were talking before, I was like, man, do you work in sports? And you were like the hospital and so you had, you depends what social media you follow. Exactly. Well it is, it's awesome to kind of have you here, man. So many stories. I think we could go back into the, the old days. Um, me being the president of the, it's crazy because I lost and most people don't know this.

Speaker 1:

I lost every election growing up in high school to a girl because the class that I was in had like 60 to 70, 60, about 66% were girls and then it was guys was less so great for being a dude. Yeah. You're growing up to be like, Hey, I, I, there's a lot of girls, but whenever they would have a class election, boom, I would lose every time. And it was just like all girl officers again and again and again. And I was just like, I guess I suck at leadership and this is, I'm never going to be elected anything until I got to college. And they're like, Hey, there's a, there's like a men's club. Everyone on, anyone that was on a dorm, anywhere on campus was in this and there was funds and you've got this sweet, um, little [inaudible] room. Yeah, no, in the dorm there was the best room was reserved for the president. It was amazing. So that was the first election I ever won cause I was like, Oh, there's no girls that can vote. And I ended up going for that and ended up winning.

Speaker 3:

You know, it's hilarious on that. So it was really hard following you because I truthfully, honestly you set the bar so high on different things and I'll be honest, in college I was probably a little bit of a slacker and uh, I probably didn't put the full emphasis that I should have at that point. But it's funny, I actually lost the election. I don't know if you know that. Um, I actually wasn't voted. The president, the president who beat me, decided not to come back to college. So they were like, Hey, I wrote her up. Why didn't she take this? That'll teach them to take a runner up history book.

Speaker 1:

So write that part out. Doesn't matter now. It was, it was so much fun. Bench press competitions. We, you know, it was just planning cool.

Speaker 3:

Super bowl parties. [inaudible]

Speaker 1:

James Bond. Oh yeah. We put it on a big movie screen and everyone would a would go nuts about who was the best at that, at that.

Speaker 3:

What was your favorite memory? Uh, the one event, something you did.

Speaker 1:

I mean the James Bond event was cool cause I was like, if we're going to do it, let's do it as big as possible and just to see how many dudes were like, it was like nervous for them. That was like being in the Superbowl because they had told all their friends I'm the best. And we just started eliminating one ball. And there were, I remember seeing dudes like with their heads down being like, I'm so sad. And they'd go walk back to the room when they lost. And I was like, man, it really was crazy to see who was the champion in the dorm. But I had so many fun, fond memories from that. Um, cool. Well let's, let's do this. I mean you've, there was one thing that, that I saw and this was kind of an internet rumor, which is partially why I was like, man, I wanted to catch up with you, but I want to get you on the show that at the hospital where you're working at in healthcare in general, there is a general, it's well known that there's like a one to 2% growth rate at hospitals, at your hospital and your division.

Speaker 1:

You are at an 18% growth rate. Is that true?

Speaker 3:

That is a fact. That is a fact. Um, I started, uh, I've been with adminis health the majority of my career, but I dabbled, uh, I came down to another small community hospital named Cedar Sinai and um, was recruited back to Adventist health. They may have heard, you may have heard of that. And part of it was I wanted to experience outside our own system to see how another hospital does things, et cetera. And it was a great learning experience. Um, but I knew I always wanted to be back in Adventist health and I have a, uh, my president and CEO, uh, gives me the autonomy to do my job and trust me fully. Um, and it, you know what it's like when you work in an organization where it's like, just go do what your expertise is and ask for forgiveness later if you make a mistake. And, uh, because of that support has allowed me to try a few things that may be traditionally in healthcare, we've been a little afraid to step outside the box and, and, and, and take a risk. And because of that, our organization has seen, um, not just a huge financial impact. It's been on the inpatient side and 18%, which again is, you stated out average growth rate for hospitals is between one and 2%, if at all.

Speaker 1:

That's remarkable. And so I think, you know, we were talking a little bit before this, before the show started, so I want to get into this, which is, you know, the, the core topic that I wanted to run through is the process of every customer is not the same. Um, and this is an element that I see a lot of companies make the mistake, which is I have a company or business and I'm going to put one message out there and that's for everyone. Like my, I have one commercial, our job is done, Pat ourselves on the back. Um, we're finished, we're done. Or one social media post or that's it. We're just, we're saying one thing to, to everyone. And it's just crazy because everyone, your customers are not all the same.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. And that's an interesting point and I think that goes back to, um, a company's focus. Is it your focus on your product or is it on your customer? And it theoretically should be on your customer. If you can define and understand who your customer is and what drives them to use your product or service, uh, you're going to increase exponentially. And one of the examples I like to use is a hire is a, uh, electronics, a home, uh, electronics, uh, like washers and dryers. Um, they built a washer that sold pretty well, but they notice in China they were getting a high return on warranties for these, uh, washers. They could have taken the traditional approach, what a lot of organizations, including, uh, healthcare does, which is we blame the customer, they're using it wrong. And they found out that in China they were using it to wash their vegetables. And so the durability of the washer, uh, couldn't sustain the, the, the pounding the vegetables. And so instead of blaming the customer, what they did is they went back, made their washers a little bit more durable, and I think it was, they sold five times as many the next year. Um, and to me it's just like, here's a company that took, not a product focus, but at customer focus, understood what their customers wanted and deliver to that.

Speaker 1:

Oh, that's crazy. Yeah, I know. It's, it's really, I mean, you need to be able to listen to your customers. I mean, I think, you know, you were mentioning, um, the kind of the day to day in your job and as you're, as you're doing that, you know, you have a couple of, I would think customers in your job role, right? You have people that are coming to the hospital and then you also oversee and work with the physicians, right? So you help make sure, you know, they have what they need. You, you help make sure, I mean, how does that come into play? Maybe we can tackle one at a time, which one's the bigger?

Speaker 3:

So like I said in the beginning, there's three groups that you serve, your patients, your employees, and your physicians. For us, uh, the patient is always the focus and we want to deliver a, uh, an offer quality outcomes. We want them to choose us because they know they're going to get the right treatment from the beginning. Um, but there's a lot of other different philosophies. Uh, employee engagement is a huge aspect. We're 24, seven organization. So if you treat your employees right, um, eh, they're going to treat, uh, it's, it's scientifically proven that there's actually higher outcomes within healthcare organizations that have higher employee engagement. So that's a huge component of it. And then the part truly where I'm selfish and I focus, cause I believe that physicians are the ones that help drive the volume, that growth. And most people still listen their physician if they recommend to you, I want you to go to this hospital because they have the best service.

Speaker 3:

Most people still aren't going to change from what their physician is, although it's starting to change a little bit, um, with all the information that's available online. Uh, but most people still trust their physician. So for me, I focus 100% on the physician. And the examples I like to use is I don't go into the physician office and say like, Hey, I'm so excited I have X or O R space. Why don't you come over and do your surgeries over here? Okay, great. Thanks. Uh, I haven't understood a single thing of why that physician chooses where they currently go. So instead, my approach is I go in to try to better understand my customer and say, what could I do to earn your trust so that your patients can experience the care that I offer my hospital? And then I shut up, just listen and you will find so many different things.

Speaker 3:

It's a, you know, it's convenient cause this is close to my office, um, which that may be harder for me to do if I'm further out. Um, I have this particular server, uh, type of equipment, um, that I must have. Um, and a recent example of that is I had an orthopedic surgeon that was at my competitor hospital and, uh, was trying to grow business in our area and he needed a, what's called a Maaco robot, which is a robot assisted, um, um, surgical procedure that does a total hip and total knee. And I didn't have that robot. So I worked with him and I said, if you had that robot, what are the chances you would work with me? He's like, pretty high. Uh, so we put together a business performing, we worked through it and sure enough now he's my number one orthopedic surgeon in my hospital in a period of six months.

Speaker 1:

That's great. That's great. Now you also worked and RET, um, some sports figures, is that correct? Um, how does that relate, you know, how, you know, from working with in the sports industry to working with physicians, is it the same thing? Like just listening to them with what they want and helping connect things completely.

Speaker 3:

I mean, that's all you have to do is that you have to have just a few basic questions and understand what is it that they're looking for. Um, and, and, and to me, it's just, it sounds so simple. I don't understand why more people don't do it. A lot of people, and I've seen a lot of these sales pitch, especially in healthcare. I walked into the physician office. They say, I want you to use my MRI because I'm the highest quality of the best radiologist. It's the latest technology. It's the best price. Oh, okay. Um, what if none of those things are important to it? What if it's access to the image so the physician can actually see the image of review at himself versus trusting someone else? You just missed the whole part and pitched your whole thing. You're probably not going to get invited back. And to me, I'd rather understand that upfront because it is 10 times harder to convince a physician if something goes wrong to come back and try your service if you messed up the first.

Speaker 1:

Oh man, that's such a good point. Um, in that when someone, once that bridge has been burned, people were like, that's it. Like you had your shot, I'm out. And all it would've taken was someone were listening. I mean does that play into like customer service being a par part of that or is that just you being like I just, as part of my job, which has nothing to do with customer service, it's just important for me to go and listen as people are talking and saying what do you want? And then figuring out how to be able to make that happen.

Speaker 3:

I actually think it is part of my job. I feel like the higher up you get, the more I'm here to serve everybody. And so for me, it's just like a, just because I'm an executive at a hospital, it doesn't mean I'm telling people what to do. We have so many smart people that work in our organization that have good ideas, that if someone's constantly telling them what to do, they're going to stop contributing those to me, and I'm not going to learn very much. Uh, to me it's just like, uh, I would rather see, um, uh, give you an example, the other day I was in the, our ER, um, it was very busy. Um, we were on diversion, which means we weren't accepting ambulances at the time because we were too busy and saturated. Um, and we were understaffed. And there was, it was, it was a really tough time and everybody was a little cranky obviously, and trying to make sure that no patients get hurt.

Speaker 3:

Um, I actually physically came in, I think it was like midnight. I physically came in and say, what can I do to help? And they're like, we're out of food for our patients up here. Well, my dietary department's closed at that point, so, but I have a master key for the hospital. Don't tell anyone. So I went down and dietary got sandwiches, super simple. Then I started answering phones. Super simple. Um, that's seen the executive work side by side, seeing the executive that cares. Um, that's what sets our hospital apart and they know that they can come to us for anything, uh, versus complaining about, we don't see administration. Now, guess what? They see the kid working next to him at midnight, answering phone calls for a transfer for a helicopter. Uh, to me it's really exciting

Speaker 1:

is I always refer to that as being in the trenches. Yeah. Um, and I've, it's been like a little nugget of, of something that's helped me throughout my entire career is no matter what role I'm in, I'm never too big company to be like, dude, the trash cans aren't taken out here and it smells bad in the office. That's it. I'll grab it or help the janitors get it done quicker. And it's, it's for me, I'm like, dude, it's the team. Everything moves forward. But man, when people will see that it's just reduced bosses and people I've worked for are like, that's the guy who's going to be moving his way up. Or it just, it builds morale. People like this guy's on my side, he's here to help me.

Speaker 3:

I learned that early on and I want to say it was almost an accident. Um, I was on the, uh, human resources, human performance side and I got a promotion within our system to be the head recruiter for a certain hospital. So I was recruiting, um, all of our pharmacists, nurses, rad techs, clinical lab scientists, et cetera. Um, and you know, my background, I'm not in clinical, it was the first time in our company that we hired someone to oversee nurse recruitment and pharmacy and all of that who is nonclinical. So imagine when this 24 year old kid walks into the hospital, how all these directors who are used to having that service has someone who knows nothing about the hospital. So I said, man, I have to change their minds. And so when I'm in an interview and the ER nurse is asking me, it's like, so what is it like here at 2:00 AM great, I'm glad you asked. Let me tell you exactly what happens at 2:00 AM because I've been there side by side with our staff. Um, after a year it was, we'd come around and most of the tractors, like, man, I wrote you off at the beginning, but it was just like, I'm so glad you're here. And I, that's something I took with me through the rest of my career. Um, which I think is really differentiated and helped me.

Speaker 1:

Oh, I love it. Now when it comes to the consumer, right, it's a hospitals, you know, there's patients, um, and there's a lot of different reasons why in anything, I mean they call it the five P's of marketing, which are, you know, product, price, placement, promotion, and then people. Right. Um, and that's a lot of times what a person will make their decision on, on choosing one option or another. Uh, when it comes to a hospital, you know, is it, how, how does that kind of way, like, is it product that they're like, we want to go to the best hospital? Is it price? They're, they're concerned about money. Um, what have you kind of found in working with people and, and what works?

Speaker 3:

Yeah. Uh, this one's probably a little bit more controversial than you think. Um, and I'll tell you, most hospitals like to promote, um, their mission and I would say the quality product, but in actuality, most people choose a hospital for three reasons. Location, place. Uh, insurance drives me there or my physician told me, so everything else is, is small and a minority. Yet what do you see all the advertisements towards advertisements, highest quality, best awards, best service, et cetera. Um, and so that's something that I've tried to push a little bit and, and focus on again, understanding our customer. Why is it that they choose what we do and how do I double down on that? Um, and it's hilarious to me. You're asking to our healthcare industry for, uh, uh, further advice on that because let's just be up front. My industry is one of the worst and probably 10 years behind every other industry, but there's things we can learn from it to hopefully make a change.

Speaker 3:

And so one of the examples I like to use is, uh, we hire a new primary care doc who's new to our community. And I want, uh, I want patients to sign up with them because a hospital subsidizes the cost of a primary care doc in the community. And the quicker I can get them up seeing the number of patients they need to that, the quicker he will stand on his own two feet. He or she will stand on their own two feet. Um, so traditionally what we've done in the past is we will put an advertisement in the newspaper in Simi Valley, it's called the acorn, and we'll put an advertisement out and say, uh, we'd like to welcome dr X, uh, sign up, uh, call this number to make an appointment. And, you know, we'll get a few from that. No problem. And there's still a lot of people that read the paper, especially in my community.

Speaker 3:

Uh, what I wanted to do is say, why don't we take a step back and say how many different types of people are looking for a primary care physician and using, uh, using some of the techniques that other industries do, especially now that we have social media. And Facebook was, you know, way more than I ever will. Um, eh, it's like, why do we have one message try to reach the entire audience? And to me it's just like, is the cost of creating an advertisement and placing it on the creation side? No. I can put three different stock photos and I can change the words for a fraction of the cost of what it takes to actually, uh, place, uh, uh, online. So why don't we have something that reaches multiple different, uh, groups. So why don't I target the busy mom who's so busy taking care, everyone in her family, she doesn't make time for herself. Um, and appeal to that side of things where it's like time is important to her. So guaranteed to be seen within five minutes of your appointment time, we'll get you in and out. Um, that's going to reach another segment of the population that I think we're missing with our traditional [inaudible].

Speaker 1:

Yeah. Yeah. You know, so much of advertising today comes from, I think there's a lot of bad habits today that come from a pre internet era of advertising when people only had the newspaper every day or like three channels on a TV. And so you could make one message and be like, I'm just going to hammer this out. And that was okay. And I think in today's day and age, there's way too many, too many options. Meaning people are getting bombarded with thousands of different companies and options and things all at once. And it, part of it is most people won't make the decision instantly. It takes chipping away the same way that it would be with like dating. Like when there was a girl that you like it, you know, was there one thing that you said where she's like, Oh, that's it. I'm now in and I'm on the team, let's go. Or was it a series of different things that led up to that where she was like, all right, I like you. Like, let's hang out. I dunno, I stocking up. Just kidding. And once the restraining order was lifted, I went back to a normal grads. Um, man, so I mean, I don't know. Do you, what, what else, um, is kinda going on? Or it would be some of your advice for people, you know, when it comes to, you know, really talking with the customers and being able to connect with them.

Speaker 3:

[inaudible] pretty, you have to define who your customer is. I think that's the first thing. If I, if I'm a marketing executive, it doesn't matter what industry you're in. I want to define who my customer is. The second thing is you want to gain insight on that customer as much data as you possibly can, um, and then translate that data into action. Um, those three simple things, uh, will help exponentially, I think increase any business and it doesn't matter the industry. Um, I was just thinking back, it was something you were saying. Uh, so my focus is in our primary service area, which is relatively close to the hospital because again, a lot of people choose the hospital cause it's where do you go in the emergency, closest place. Um, and so that's really been our focus but with some of the stuff that we've been dabbling in, which is advertising the differentiators, uh, and, and reasons that people would come and choose us.

Speaker 3:

We're actually finding that we're getting people commute to our small community hospital. And, uh, I use the orthopedic example, but literally I had a patient in the last two months who drove two hours because they researched online, saw a physician that does a particular, uh, procedure and happened to come to my hospital for it. And so the power of social media and what that's done is allowed us to reach a, a, a bigger, uh, portion other than your primary service area. And there's hospitals that have actually that's what the, that's what they've made is their niche market. And so you have small hospitals, um, and uh, in rural California who are actually destination, even though their population is 60,000, they're doing about eight times the amount of orthopedic surgery that I'm doing because they carve that out and they went out to the country to try and say we are the best. Here's why you need to come here and try to understand their customer and convince them,

Speaker 1:

Oh, it's so true. And I think that's something that is also essential is that you in any business, I think should cover the core basics, which means there are, there are people that are going to use your business because it's less expensive than another business or more expensive than another business. It's the best option. And that's what they want. There's people that, because you have a better product that will research every detail, you know, the number of times I've heard stories of someone that's like, I've got a product. It's like we read every detail all the way down. And there was one little component that was a little bit better than another one and that's why I made my decision to purchase. Um, or you know Kim Kardashians recommended this product so that's it. I'm in, I'm on board and I just think it comes back to you want to make sure that there are those, those highlights or those elements that you have.

Speaker 1:

You need to have those stated somewhere where people can find them on their terms when they want to. I'm a super common example. I see a lot of times our eCommerce companies, one of the first things that people will search for if they're looking to buy something is company name coupon or a company name discount code or promo code. And a lot of times there's these other guilty that I'm doing it right now as a print cryptography, but a lot of companies don't do that and all these other coupon sites will post them and they get all that traffic. And I was like, any company should be able to have that listed where if you're selling something on eCommerce, you should have your own coupon site where you are coupon page on your website. We were like, Hey, these are our coupons and they're all here and you can get them because there are people that will search for that and find it.

Speaker 3:

[inaudible] so this happened yesterday and I, you just triggered something. It's funny. So one of my employees came to me and said like, Hey, our urgent care isn't listed online. I was like, that's weird. I was just like, I've spent a lot of money doing the Google promotion. We have Facebook. All of that kind of stuff. Uh, and so I just Googled it and I was like, Oh, it was the first one. And I was like, Oh, that's weird. And so they're like, Oh, well I just typed in urgent care near me. And I looked at it and near me was the number one tag on Google for urgent care. And sure enough, we weren't even right on the first page, I don't think. Um, or we were way down at the bottom. And I was like, instead of like, Oh, you're Googling it wrong. I was like, Oh man, maybe we need to add that word since it's the number one. So that's great. Yeah,

Speaker 1:

that's a great example is, you know, a lot of times that would be the business side being like, you know, urgent care, Simi Valley. Like there we go, that's our exact term. But when someone is hurt or they've cut a finger or they're having an issue, what they're Googling or asking series, Hey, find an urgent care near me. Um, and that's such a great point is exactly right. And you could miss a lot of that. And the fact that you connected those dots is what takes you above and beyond all the other hospitals where their teams are like, our job is done and we did the main word we ever city, keyword. And there we are, we're finished. So I think that really does emphasize a great point of going back and listening to what people are actually saying out loud.

Speaker 3:

Here's somebody who actually used it and was looking for it, um, in their own context. And we could have missed that if we hadn't been paying attention. Yeah,

Speaker 1:

I love the fact that you just, you hear something like that, and this is something else I see a lot of times is people get afraid of thinking of things not being connected because they're afraid. That means like, I didn't do my job. Or someone may get mad at me. And the truth is there are some bosses maybe like, why wasn't this done? But the truth is like, there's no way you can do everything in marketing. You just, you're lining them up and being like, how do I fix that? How do I fix that? And the more you do, that's generally how you build a quality like robust. Anyway. That's how you get 18% growth rates is when you're connecting all the dots that everyone else is either too lazy or doesn't care about. Um, and go from there. So I love it.

Speaker 3:

Um, eh, Oh, what's that Michael Scott quote? He's just like, do you want your employees to love you or to be afraid of you? And he's like, I want them to be afraid of how much they love me. And it's funny cause I will say probably most of my staff or most people at the hospital feel they can approach, we talk normally, et cetera, but there's that 5% of the time or I can be super serious. I'm like, man, don't mess with Corey right now.

Speaker 1:

Well let's, uh, let's do this. Um, is there, as you kind of come to a close, is there any final words of wisdom that you would have for other business owners out there? Um, in regards to, you know, their customers or what they should be doing or any final, final words of advice?

Speaker 3:

Honestly, you have to continue evaluating. Um, uh, things change. My industry is changing. And so it's like what is important to people five, 10 years ago may not be the same today. Um, so it goes back to those three simple things, which is define your customer, know who your customer really is. So for my industry, it's not just the patient that comes in, but it's the people that, uh, work side by side with us to deliver that, uh, the care. Um, the other thing is, uh, data, understanding the data and why they're choosing us. And so, uh, again, my industry, we have surveys that talk about, uh, would you recommend this as a place? Was communication with nurses, communication with physicians? Were you treated with respect? Do you understand your medications? All of these different kinds of questions. What gives me real data to act on? Um, and then the third thing is do something with it. Don't just say, okay, check it off and that's a nice graph and move on. It's just like, how can I translate that into a revenue stream or a service or product? Uh, so that I can expand my footprint.

Speaker 1:

Oh, I love it. I love it. So just wonderful advice. Well, thank you so much for being here, man. It's good to see you again. It's been way too long. Yeah. Cool. Well, thank you guys so much for hanging out us and we'll

Speaker 2:

check you on the next episode. Thank you for listening to the Duke of digital podcast with Brian Mitt, one to network with other business owners. Join our exclusive group at facebook.com/groups/duke of digital fancy the Duke. Leave a five star review on your favorite podcast app. And you can be mentioned on the show. The Duke of digital was produced by advertisement and recorded in Hollywood, California. All rights reserved.