Duke of Digital

037 - How to Build a Digital Marketing Funnel Using the Right Strategy with Rob Roach

January 20, 2020 Brian Meert
Duke of Digital
037 - How to Build a Digital Marketing Funnel Using the Right Strategy with Rob Roach
Chapters
Duke of Digital
037 - How to Build a Digital Marketing Funnel Using the Right Strategy with Rob Roach
Jan 20, 2020
Brian Meert
Show Notes Transcript
Speaker 1:

If you want to make money on the internet, then you need to know how funnels work. Stick around and raise those piggies because in today's episode we're talking all about funnels

Speaker 2:

presented by advertisement. The juke of digital will guide you through the rapidly changing landscape of digital marketing, social media and how to grow your business online. To submit a question for the show, text (323) 821-2044 or visit Duke of digital.com if you need an expert to fix your ads, the friendly team at advertisement is ready to help visit advertisement. That's M I N t.com or call (844) 236-4686 to grow you up.

Speaker 3:

Here's your host Brian [inaudible].

Speaker 1:

All right. In the studio today we have Rob Roach. Thank you for being here. Thank you. Thank you so much. Nice. I'm excited today because we're going to be talking about funnels, uh, and everything that people need to know about funnels, which is something near and dear to my heart. So, um, I'm really excited about that. Now you are, uh, the owner and the co founder of studio eight, 10 marketing. Yes. You're uh, uh, you're an agency, a brother, agency owner. I love it. I'm a peeps, uh, out there hustling, making the world a better place through the game. Yeah, that's right. Um, so there's a couple of things that I love. Is, is you started your first business at 12 years old. Yes, I did. Is that right? Well, what's the story behind that?

Speaker 3:

Well, so my, I come from an entrepreneurial family. My, my parents actually run a full service agency as well out in the Midwest. And um, when I was 12 years old, I was given a lawn mower. Um, and my dad bought the lawnmower and he said, all right, you have to pay for the gas. I bought you the lawnmower but we'll pay you to mow our grass. So it started off like as a chore, but he taught me how to monetize that. Um, and I took it a step further cause I was like, you know, I really don't, I have a huge fear of snakes. So I was not about actually mowing any type of lawn. So I actually recruited a lot of my friends in the neighborhood and said, Hey, I could get you jobs if you guys let me take a percentage off the top and you guys, I have a lawn mower, I have a gas scan if you need it.

Speaker 3:

And so I just started doing that and I ended up taking flyers to everyone's door and just saying, okay, um, I named it R and R services for Rob Roach. And yeah, so it started off like that and it just kind of spiraled and I did it again with the newspaper route. I was always just as a kid, always hustling and you know, trying to figure out how to, how to turn over a dime or something like that. Did you tell your friends that there may or may not be snakes involved in the grass? You know, it was not one of the topics we talked about and it was never written any contracts. So I hate snakes. Snakes scare me no matter what. If I see someone holding, I'm like, yeah, I want to go. The other, no, exactly.

Speaker 1:

They're the same boat. There we go. Go. Now you are a first generation immigrant from Palau. The Republican plow, the Island of plow. Right. The number one spot in the world for scuba diving. Absolutely. Do you dive at all? No, I don't actually,

Speaker 3:

I'm a little bit scared of water. Um, I can swim. But, uh, the Republican pullouts located like it's, it, it's by the Australia. It's Micronesian. Yeah, it's in Micronesia. And um, I am a first generation immigrant. Um, my mom actually immigrated here in the 80s with her family. Um, so just for education purposes and things like that,

Speaker 1:

I've seen photos from plow. It looks amazing. I took a year off of college and lived in Fiji. Oh nine. I had a friend of mine that I had went to elementary school at the same time was like, I'm going to go to Pulau. Wow. So I was trying to get there from Fiji and there was like one flight a week that would go between these two islands, cause it's not really, they're not close together at all. Um, and the, the plane company that, uh, that flew between them went on strike as I was trying to get there. So I stuck around for like two weeks trying to see if I could get on the next flight. And I missed both of them. And they're like, there's, there's no pilots cause they're on strike. And that was it. So I could never get there. But man, I was really excited because everyone's like, this is it number one in the world for diving. It's beautiful. Yes.

Speaker 3:

Yes. They actually have a, um, jellyfish Lake, right. And it's like this hole and it's in the middle of like one of the islands. What's it called? [inaudible], I can't remember what it's called. Yeah, they Americans call it jellyfish. Pick it up and go there and say, I want to go to the jellyfish. Don't know, cause these jellyfish do not sting you. So based on just the, I don't know if it's evolution or what, they don't sting and so you can dive in, like be with the jellyfish.

Speaker 1:

Never heard of that. But now I want to go even more crazy. That's good jellies. Um, cool. Well, tell me, um, a little bit about studio eight, 10 marketing, um, how you started it and, and the type of clients that you guys work with.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. Well, like I said, I grew up in the agency world and my, both of my parents work and operate full service agencies, um, through the nineties. So, uh, we've kinda, I've kinda been born in the digital age and I've just stayed that way. Um, and so I met my partner Brandon in, um, at, at the agency we worked at prior to this. And, uh, in 2016, we decided to like diversify a little bit more. Um, we wanted to go deep within accounts instead of wide, um, honestly, because we wanted to learn more. I had done so much training on the sales side, client service and making sure business owners were educated on what they were investing their dollars in. But then when it came down to the actual strategy of like ad words and, and Facebook, um, I felt like I just didn't know enough.

Speaker 3:

Uh, I wanted to know more. So in 2016, we decided to work on founding studio eight, 10 marketing. It was another name prior to that, but we went through our iterations. And, um, our main focus is going to be eCommerce strategy. Uh, we saw that data is really something that we can measure and it's a lot easier to, um, justify for business owners, uh, for them to invest their dollars in just because they know. And so, um, e-commerce is usually what we specialize in and we do things full funnel. So we'll manage our full funnel from Facebook advertisements all the way down to um, Google shopping if you have products. Um, and our main goal is to convert whether you're looking for leads as a BDB business and you just need someone to qualify themselves on your website a lot of form so that you can start turning those, um, or you actually sell a product direct to consumer. We do both.

Speaker 1:

Nice. Oh, I love it. I love it. Well, let's do this real quick. How can people find you or connect with you, uh, on the internet or social media? I just want to make sure that the listeners are able to, uh, to connect with you after this.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, absolutely. Um, our website is, can be found@www.studio eight, 10 marketing.com and um, our Instagram is at studio eight 10 marketing.

Speaker 1:

Okay. Wonderful. Wonderful. Well, thank you so much for being here. Um, I'm excited because the process of a funnel is critical and um, it still surprises me how many people in, in the business world don't necessarily understand the funnel or what that actually entails. Or maybe they're like, Oh, I've seen, I've seen a graph of it. Yay. No big deal. But how much that breaks down into the world of marketing. And when you do it right, you can make a lot of money when you do it wrong, you can waste a lot of money. So I want, can you give a quick rundown of the definition of a funnel, how it works, uh, for people that maybe aren't familiar with it? Yeah. Um, there's going to be like textbook funnel and then there's going to be reality.

Speaker 3:

I lean towards the reality funnel just because I've been in, I've been in situations where I'm working a lot of funnels for different customers and clients. And, um, what it says in the textbook is not necessarily always what actually happens and pans out. And so, um, what I like to tell all of our, our clients is a digital marketing funnel is basically following your buyer through engaging your brand. Whether that is filling out a contact form or purchasing a product, if you're just, if you're selling an actual physical product, but we derive a consumer or an ideal buyer persona from the top of your funnel all the way down to the bottom, um, where they convert. And so that's how we set up our funnels. We look at the top as a wide net, right? And that is likely going to be social media. You're going to be connecting with, uh, most of our customers either through a network, LinkedIn, Facebook, all that, or maybe there they need you.

Speaker 3:

And so they're searching. And so that's why our next tier is that paid social, um, and, and paid social, whether it's a PPC, uh, model where you're just, you're know, pay per click or a search intent, Google search where people are putting in their search queries and then your, uh, your website and information is coming up on that first page. Those are the two like parts of the top of our funnel that we really work on. Um, but then we drive you down the actual funnel where you end up converting on a website. And that's why I'm at the bottom of our funnel. We have, um, a website and that's because once we can drive someone to your site, it's your storefront. It's your story then. And once we can actually do that, whether we drive them from Facebook over to your website, um, you're able to tell your story and you're able to educate them and hopefully be able to find, there'll be able to find a solution you offer to a challenge that they have.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. It's, it's so fascinating because you're the process of finding customers and, and you know, the, you have the whole world and what you're trying to do is any business is find people who've find your product or service valuable. Um, and you've got to be able to reach new people, um, or find people that have the specific problem that you're looking for. Um, get them into a place. And to some extent, a lot of times you don't have a lot of time with these individuals. It's, you may have seconds, uh, as they're on a website before they leave or before the phone rings. Or they may be on a mobile device and you built a website for, it's not responsive or it is responsive, but maybe the information that they care about isn't real. They don't see it and they leave. And so there's so many things that go into really knowing how to drive your, your customers and what's going on in their head from like social media. As you start here with, with the funnel that you've got. You know, social media is, is an introduction. You're trying to stop someone that's walking by you on the other side of the sidewalk and be like, Oh, I've got to tell you something cool. And that if you do it awkwardly or if you do it in a way that's not relevant or interesting to them, they'll walk right by you and you've wasted your money. If you do it in a, in a creative way

Speaker 3:

to them. I mean, Facebook, social media is going to be all about interruption, right? Yeah. There's different ways people find your brand. And so with social media, what we have found is that, um, the way that the ads need to be written is less intrusive but still kind of on that line of educating them and engaging them about a product or service you offer. Cause in the end you want them to come to your site, you want them to learn more and you want them to convert in some way. Um, but then when you look at that paid search, that's a different type because they start with the inquiry, they start with the user intent. And so then at that point it's really more about what can we put in front of you that you're actually looking for that we actually do. Yeah. I love it.

Speaker 3:

And, and you know, from there we, you know, once, um, once people do come through on the social media and the reason why I think, at least on my end, I would always recommend starting with social media as a, as the introduction is it's just generally less expensive than most other platforms. Yeah. Um, and so that's a way you've get you, it's a numbers game and you're looking how can I reach the most amount of people at the lowest possible price. Now the next one that you've got is paid search, which is incredible. And that's where these are people that are raising their hands that say, I have this problem or I have this need. Yup. And if your company solves that problem, you 100% want to be there. Yup. And these are more high valued customers because they're, they're closer to wanting to use your product or service.

Speaker 3:

They have expressed an interest and though that is further down the funnel, whereas social media you're going to be, you may serve an impression of like 500,000 impressions and reach 54,000 people, but not every 54,000 of those people were actually looking for a product you, you are looking for. That's correct. They may, right. So search is the opposite. Um, they already have something in their head. They already are looking for something and it's really more of a service based tactic at that point. What can we put on our website that makes sure that we communicate to you when you're searching that we can handle whatever problem that you have? Oh, it's so sure. And a good example of this would be like, you know, there's people on Facebook that maybe have like Disneyland, but someone's searching for Disneyland tickets today or Disneyland price of tickets for today or exactly how many tickets are available.

Speaker 3:

If I want to go to Disneyland today, like those are keywords that you want to be in front of. Yup. You want to bid very heavily because it's very close to the conversion. Yes. Um, wonderful. Okay, so next up you have a SEO. Yup. Ah, let's run through that. How does that work in terms of your, uh, your marketing strategy funnel? Yeah, so SEO one for one, I always tell our clients that it's a longterm game. It's a, it's, it's not something that you're gonna turn and burn and then when tomorrow it's something that you build over time and um, you almost want to start early and make sure that your site has all of the content that it needs in order to educate and engage and compel your audience to convert. But then also all the images and all the technical SEO components, like for example, Google it, they don't see images. So to get your image, I don't know your image on your site onto a Google. So when someone searches and then they click images, that starts to come up. If you've ever wondered, how do I get that? Well, you have to start tagging the back of your images on all of your sites. And so those types of things are just kind of like housekeeping that you have to do because you have to change out content on the site as well. So SCO

Speaker 1:

plays that like eat your green beans and broccoli type of thing for website we'll send for websites. You've got a good analogy. Yeah. You got to keep that health going on that site so that people can actually find you and they can connect a problem they have. Again, with the solution that you offer. And this is one that I find a lot of people either are all in on SEO or a lot of times they struggle to really see the value and it's a, it's a long game. Like it's nothing that is, you know, you're going to start doing it and tomorrow it's going to go. It could be months, it could be years. Yep. It most likely will be years before you start to see things pick up. But if you don't do it, the amount of free business that you can get or some extent free exposure through Google rankings is incredible.

Speaker 1:

Um, and I think a lot of people don't understand. So I mean if someone were to ever want to know what their potential potentially missing out on, if you were to talk to an SEO expert, they could tell you, Hey, this keyword, you know, you're 20, the person who's number one is getting $50,000 of free ads basically free exposure every month by being in that one one spot at the next time. Yeah, exactly. Yeah, that type of stuff happens all the time. We, um, we have a couple of clients, but one of them specifically is spent about 10 years working on an SEO strategy. That thing looked amazing when we saw it though because he had spent so long meticulously making sure links were lining up, directories were updated and all of that technical SEO stuff was done. Plus looking at content refreshes that most of his business on the eCommerce site was coming organically.

Speaker 1:

He had spent next to nothing on ads, which is really great for marketers because we can place ads that will for sure get conversions if you've never placed an ad just because of our targeting mechanisms. So it's crazy that SEO, if you work on it longterm and consistently work on it, the website becomes a lot more relevant, um, across the board. So true. And you know with SEO it's always funny cause I'll tell people like you need kind of two elements. You need one that Kim Kardashians, the popularity like that are going out there that everyone wants to talk about and you need to have other websites on the internet talking about you in. The second one would be kind of like Marie Kondo, the one that's like, you know, does it, does it bring joy or does it spark joy? Are you need someone that is good at organizational and tidying up? And that's where the image all tags, you know, the back end, the metadata, all of the word optimization, all of that really changes. That's the thing. I think a lot of business owners now as, as, as digital marketing has progressed, we all have now switched to this mindset that there needs to be something I'm a business owner actually knows nowadays that they have to spend money in digital marketing versus even six

Speaker 3:

years ago businesses were like, and you want me to pay you to put posts on my social media? Like what? And those types of things they are, they've boughten in now with SEO, they pay and get it done. Like a, like a one time thing. I'm setting up your meta and all of those things. It's a constant like journey almost. You've got to do that and con consistently be looking at keywords that are trending because people search differently. Um,

Speaker 1:

so true. So true. I mean if you think about it like 20 years ago, maybe before the mainstream internet and things picked up, if you had a store, it was all about location, location, location. Like that was the key to your business is, are you in the right place where customers can find you? And in today's day and age, it's, it's the SEO that is determining your location, your location, location. And that to some extent is on a global scale, which is, I mean that this is how people find information on the internet. So you want, want to make sure you're investing money in, in establishing that location. You're allowing your customers to find you. Yes, absolutely. All right, so next up in the, at the bottom of your funnel you've got the web or website. So run me through your thoughts on that and why this is important, why it's at the bottom of your, your digital marketing strategy funnel.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. Um, so just background websites back in the 90s were technical based and people were laughing at the fact that you would use it as a marketing tool. Fast forward 28, 30 years, you, we every single, you're not considered a business unless you have a website, right? And so with websites, it's the part of the buyer journey where you're going to actually get information from your, from your customer, right? So we meet them on Facebook or we meet them on a social network. We establish rapport by sending them value, 70% value, 30% Hey, this is what I offer on their social platforms, right? And we drive them down all the way through to, they hit that website. Once they hit the website, it's there in our domain. They're they, they're walking into your store front where now you don't have other brands sticking out at them and they are giving you the time of day to pitch yourself.

Speaker 3:

And I know like your marketers out there who are network marketing, you're going to whole bunch of events and you're, you're having to get up and say your 32nd commercial, the website serves as your 24 hours a day commercial where you, where you're not even, you're trying to bring value, right? And so we put that at the bottom of this funnel because that's the last component typically that a customer or an ideal buyer is going to engage you. Because at the very end they're either purchasing the product on the website or they are filling out a form on the website. Yup. And so that's one problem. The second thing that, the second reason why we put this down at the bottom is because if I cannot get a prospect or a customer perspective customer to convert, whether it's form submission or, um, like buying something, then the next thing that I can do for my client is be able to extract data from it. Be able to measure out of all the 10,000 people that we shuttled to this specific page on your site, here's what happened and here's all the information we have. So, um, that's another thing why digital marketing has just super gone through so much growth and is explosive. It's just because the data we can get about our customer or our potential customers, um, can help us strengthen our efforts and our strategies moving forward.

Speaker 1:

I love it. Yeah. 100%. There's way more data with, uh, with digital than, than other platforms. Um, when it comes to web, I mean, there's, there's different types of flowers. I mean, people can, you know, go to a Shopify side to be able to do e-commerce. They can build a click funnels page. They might be selling on Amazon. Um, you know, is that when it comes to that, is there like a full gamut approach or is it always everything goes into a single web, uh, to be able to get the best results? I'm just curious what your thoughts are on

Speaker 3:

well, okay, so Amazon is its own platform, um, just like ad-words. So we would count that more as like a paid strategy type of thing. Anytime you're actually having to pay a website is you could prop up in your own website easily. Um, but it's not connected to anything where you're paying because you're paying over time. And so with that, the website becomes more of a library of information that brings value. So if you're driving them on from Amazon, they usually have a search intent at that point. So they're not really, they're almost past getting to your site, right? So they're, they want to purchase the product or they don't. And then the website is in the end, if I need more information, I'm always going to be able to go back to that site. Landing pages can serve kind of the same thing, but at the same time you, with landing pages, you're wanting them to go to one call to action. I want you to download my ebook, I want you to purchase this new product. But when you're talking about a website, this is where they need to be able to search and shop your information to qualify themselves.

Speaker 1:

Oh, I love it. Okay, so now this point, they're on the website. You're going to have some people that will purchase or complete the actions that you want them to. Um, and then you'll have a majority that may look, browse, and then eventually kind of move on from there. And I know you have strategies as you get down further in the funnel. Do you want to talk about that in terms of, you know, what's your advice once a person gets to the web to make sure that, I mean, ultimately what I think most businesses would want is I want a hundred people to come to the website. I want all a hundred to buy [inaudible] all the, you know, uh, pick up what I have. So, you know, what's your thought on once people have gotten down to the web? Um, what, what's your process at that point?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, um, that's a really good question. Uh, once they get, when you get a consumer or your ideal buyer, we like to call it your perfect customer. If you get your perfect customer to come to your website, you need to tell them a story and you've gotta be able to tell them a story in which they can qualify themselves in a need. Right? And so the only way we can do that is by making sure we can explain our value, value propositions of the company, the services. And, and then at the same time, because content marketing is consistent, you've got to refresh your content for your SEO purposes. And, and just because market moves, you want to start to actually give your consumer value for free. And I know a ton of people say no, that's a lot of it. You know, I've got to pay a lot or I have to.

Speaker 3:

Um, it's a lot of work to have to create content for your perfect customer and give it to them totally for free. And that to me has really helped our clients because of the fact that it establishes credibility, but it also creates that rapport with people. There's so many blogs out there in, in digital marketing and agencies, for example, that we, that they're trusted blogs, they're trusted sources and a lot of times they're connected to another agency or another company that offers services. But that's the type of, um, movement. We, we try to, we try to drive people, especially on the BDB side, direct to consumer. It's a, it's a whole different ball game there.

Speaker 1:

What would you say is generally a good free, something that could be given away as free because some people may be like, here's a free blog. Like I wrote blogs that's free. Um, other people would be like, here's a free car. Like, it's definitely different levels of value, but what have you seen works best in terms of the type of things that are given away for free that people find valuable?

Speaker 3:

Yeah. Um, I think it's going to range depending on what industry and what, what your perfect customer looks like. But if you're looking at business to business for example, if you can give them something that they can instantly get, they can put my information in here and I'm going to get an email or the, or you can actually give them a consultation of value where they can personalize their issues in front of you so that you can PR, you can position your services, but also just straight value of teaching them how you do your business. You know, I was always taught from a young age, like it's not a secret on what to do on social media or Facebook or website. Amy, anybody can look this up and try to do it themselves. It's about the execution. So being able to just give my knowledge base of this is what I would do and then you can try to do it if you want or I can try to do it if I want. I know at the end of the day, execution becomes really what differentiates it. So being, knowing that I'm able to say, okay, here's this data that I found and here's a free audit because I love what I do and I can just show you this is how I do it. That helps establish rapport. And typically with those types of magnets online, you're going to get that perfect customer to continue to lead, continually lean in so you can actually have that conversation with him.

Speaker 1:

Love it. Now, what would happen, um, if someone were to do a strategy that wasn't in this order, like what is the downside of not having a marketing strategy funnel?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, yeah. Wow. There's a lot of downsides to that actually. Um, I think the number one for business owners is going to be your resources. Um, are you actually effectively spending your digital marketing dollars, uh, responsibly? And you want to make sure that even though tactics can work for short terms, a strategy that's scalable is timeless, right? So you're going to have someone, you're going to be able to look at a strategy that you integrate all of these tactics together and say, okay, this is how we're going to approach things. For, let's say the year and you're able to follow that through and at the end you may have low losses, you may have wins, but you're going to be able to look back at that data to see how to strengthen it for the, the, for the next, for the next campaign.

Speaker 1:

Now, when, when everything is done on this, right. Um, you, you set up the funnel, uh, your, your, you have your strategy in place. Is there any other steps beyond web, uh, that you have the, you know, once they're coming through, I mean, ultimately once people become customers, is there more that you do at that point in time, uh, with, you know, retaining customers or building advocates?

Speaker 3:

Absolutely. Um, that's a really good question and the answer is yes. We definitely, we bring in email marketing and automation and that's because, um, once they get to the website, one of the main things that we're going to try to collect, um, so that we can understand you more and what you want is your email. And if we can have your email, then what we do is we can take you through drip campaigns, um, from the very beginning of establishing rapport and connecting all the way down to here, our services qualify yourself. And so, um, if you are already in a position, right, that you have all of these four main tactics, social media, paid social SEO and website already going for your business, you have them integrated, you're looking at the analytics in all tactics, but then also looking at the big picture. Yup. If you're doing all of that, it's time to add even more umph to your strategy by looking at your email marketing and your automation. It's a lot of people like do it simultaneously, which is totally great too. Um, I go by the principle of let me master something and understand how to scale it first and then I'm going to explore another option. That way you don't feel like you're spreading your marketing dollars so thin and you don't really know what you're spending on.

Speaker 1:

Oh, that's great. That's great. Now there was, and I want to see if I can pull it up here. Um, a quote, uh, that you had at that time. I gotta look through my notes. They're all all messy here that I highlighted that you guys had on Instagram that says social media is the single most undeniable effective way you can reach your audience and engage with them with your original content. Um, man, I as is powerful, you know, walk me through it to jump back to kind of, I guess it would be the top, but why do you believe that is? Why are you, you know, all in on social?

Speaker 3:

Yeah. Um, I was just talking to my partner about this earlier this morning and the biggest thing that I can see is that social media nowadays is the voice of your brand. If you read around times like 30 years ago, there are still companies out there that don't have any social media that do well, but nobody knows about them. And so that tweet or that, that post was really to speak to business owners who don't see the value of organic based strategies on social media. If you are asking someone, for example, real estate agents, I can't tell you how many times I see realtors only post your open houses come on like the open. If you only post an open house, right? I'm only posting what I offer. That's like me saying, I only am posting websites costs X, Y, Z. People don't want to see that. People want to see who you are. Why are you so special in real estate? Why are you so special in digital media, whatever have you. Whatever industry you're in. So social media is that maneuverable, flexible way to be able to educate your audience and engage them in and honestly delight them. Um, and you're not putting it in a blog or you're not, it's not enough officiated type of like, I dunno, piece of work. It's something that's, it moves, it's constant and, and I think that is the easiest way just to connect with a customer.

Speaker 1:

That's a great example. I mean, I think, you know, the real estate, the real estate example of agents, you're, there's so many things that in their world they would imagine these are just the mundane things. But for someone on the outside that doesn't work in real estate, um, there's a ton of stuff that's interesting. Like, Hey, I'm, I'm going into this house. I want to show you guys around before anyone else gets to see it. Exactly. Or, Hey, check out this bathroom. Is this not a beautiful bathroom? What do you think? Would you have done these sinks? Are these fixtures like you have so many elements, um, or the stories behind the house. You know, this house used to be owned by a celebrity. Um, and check this out. This is where he kept all his shoes and showing your personality. Uh, there's a, there's a real realtor here in LA that I follow and she does really cool.

Speaker 1:

Um, little mixed alcohol drink little segments, I guess before everyone gets to her open house, she's learning and she's teaching her audience how to make these cold drinks of why, because she likes drinks and that's what she wants to do. It gives your brand personality and if you can humanize your brand, you can drive the, you can, you can find your perfect customer a lot quicker. Oh, I do. I do think that's a great tip. You know, most people generally do business with people they like and that's, that's the real upside of social is you have the ability to just be yourself and people will relate with you and be like, Oh yeah, I get that. Or yeah, I've been in that situation or yep, I think he's funny. Or I like the shoes that she's wearing. Like I think people naturally have a need to connect.

Speaker 1:

Like that's something that's going to happen. And social allows that to happen on a business level much, much better than necessarily [inaudible] more efficiently than going to mixers or you know, more events. You have the ability to, to reach everyone on plan. And think about this. If you see somebody on [inaudible] or if you see a post on social media, right, and you're, you're in the market for a certain product, your self-expression, being able to be self-expressed and see something digitally is a lot easier to deal with versus someone who's having to go out into the market and who's having to market themselves. And so it's not, I'm not here to say that like, you don't want to have salespeople for your businesses. The salespeople are super important, but when it comes down to digital marketing, there is a, there's like a medium that you're communicating with your customers on where they're able to be more self-expressed because you're not physically in front of them or you're not asking them to buy right now. They're searching your site, they're doing investigations, they're looking at your social platforms. Yeah, yeah. Oh man. As wonderful as, as we kind of bring, you know, this podcast, um, to, and then is there any final tips or advice or strategies that you would give to other business owners or people listening in right now that are, you know, looking to take it to the next level? Yeah. Um, I think there's a ton, but I think the biggest

Speaker 3:

thing for me and for my team would be, um, give digital, try, give us, give digital marketing a chance. Because a lot of small business owners are a little bit nervous just where to spend their money. And the fact that they don't understand the technicalities. It is important to find somebody that you can trust in this industry but give this medium of advertisement a chance because it definitely can pay huge dividends.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, no, I, I see that so much that I think it because digital changes so quick and so fast, people are like, I don't know what to do. Like you were telling me my space was important and now you're telling me it's nothing. That is Facebook and then there's Instagram and now tick tock or whatever else and there's just name after name after name is people. And I think a lot of times it seems like either confusion mixed with exhaustion when it comes to what to do. And my advice is always find someone like I can't know everything about everything, but if I need to be strong in an area, I'm going to find someone who's good at that and be like, I need your help. And then from there just watch the results. And if numbers are going up and things are improving, you found a winner. If numbers aren't doing well, you know, keep moving on and find someone else that can get those numbers up.

Speaker 3:

Yup. And find somebody that can actually put your strategy in words that you understand. If you don't understand it, ask a lot of questions.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's for sure. I think that's actually really good is to ask a lot of questions. You don't understand it. Say, Hey, I need you to explain this to me like a five year old. Just real quick, give me the bullet points. Why is this important and what do I need to be doing? Um, and what do I, how do I move on from here? So, um, anyway, well thank you so much Rob for being on this show. It's great to have you here. Um, and we will catch you guys on the next episode.

Speaker 2:

Thank you for listening to the Duke of digital podcast with Brian Mitt, one to network with other business owners. Join our exclusive group at facebook.com/groups/duke of digital fancy the Duke. Leave a five star review on your favorite podcast app. And you can be mentioned on the show. The Duke of digital was produced by advertisement and recorded in Hollywood, California.