Duke of Digital

039 - How to Manage Your Brand Online with Thibaud Clement

January 24, 2020 Brian Meert
Duke of Digital
039 - How to Manage Your Brand Online with Thibaud Clement
Chapters
Duke of Digital
039 - How to Manage Your Brand Online with Thibaud Clement
Jan 24, 2020
Brian Meert

If you operate in social media and have an online business, you need to protect your brand. Raise those pinkies because in today’s episode, we’re talking all about brand protection.

Brian Meert
https://www.linkedin.com/in/brianmeert

Duke of Digital
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Show Notes Transcript

If you operate in social media and have an online business, you need to protect your brand. Raise those pinkies because in today’s episode, we’re talking all about brand protection.

Brian Meert
https://www.linkedin.com/in/brianmeert

Duke of Digital
https://www.dukeofdigital.com/
https://www.instagram.com/dukeofdigital/

AdvertiseMint
https://www.advertisemint.com
https://business.facebook.com/advertisemint/
https://www.facebook.com/groups/advertisemint/
https://www.instagram.com/advertisemint

Speaker 1:

It's not enough to build your brand, but you also need to protect it as well. Raise those pinkies because in today's episode we're talking all about how to protect your brand online

Speaker 2:

presented by advertisement. The juke of digital will guide you through the rapidly changing landscape of digital marketing, social media and how to grow your business online. To submit a question for the show, text (323) 821-2044 or visit Duke of digital.com if you need an expert to fix your ads, the friendly team at advertisement is ready to help visit advertisement. That's M I N t.com or call (844) 236-4686 to grow your business. Here's your host Brian Mitt .

Speaker 1:

All right , we have in the studio today Tebow commend the CEO and cofounder of loom . Lee , nice to meet you . Thank you so much for being here today. Um , I'm a , this is a topic that I think is incredibly important today , uh , which is we're talking about how to protect your brand online and you come with a fantastic bracket background because you are the CEO and cofounder of loom li , uh , which is a platform where social media teams can collaborate, collaborate, publish and measure all in one platform. That's correct. Oh, awesome. I'm doing good. Huh. Um, you know what I, what I thought was fascinating is you built the framework for loom Lee while working with your own clients and you were like, there isn't anything that does exactly what we need to have done. And so you just built it for yourself and eventually decided to launch it and let other people use it. Is that, is that,

Speaker 3:

yeah. You got your facts where straight ? Yes. Um, yeah, it's, it's actually, you know, if a friend's story, so my wife knowing me and I, we've been working together for eight years now and Lumina is actually the fourth company that we are building together. And so fewer years ago , you know, the previous company that we had was actually, I think pretty similar to what you guys do. Uh , we had an advertising agency, we were working in France with big clients like L'Oreal, but also here in the U S with more startups. Uh, in all of these clients. They had one thing in common, which was, or one process that we had for them, you know , uh , in common it was that we had to prepare what you call it, editorial plannings or just real calendar was for them. And I'm pretty sure your family, I was daddy's basically we are talking here about a spreadsheet with at least our Facebook post or ads or these kind of things. And you would present them like, you know , uh, the emails and the copy and you would ask them for their approval and you would have to go through a lot of back and forth over email. So , uh, we figured that was probably some kind of , uh , under optimized process. And so we, we look for a way to basically, you know, improve that process and we didn't find anything. So back in 2015, eight , just a , you know, I'm not an engineer, I just don't ever sing on my own. And so basically we started building that product just for us and we started using it with our clients. We did not tell them it was our own product because we wanted some honest feedback and not, you know, like just a bath in the bag and they actually loved it. Um , and so, you know, a couple of months later, we just open it up in a big bed out to see if other agencies would like it. And, and today it's, it's, it's pretty crazy because we , we basically serve , uh , over 4,000 clients around the world. Uh, agencies are about 20% of our clients and brands , uh , makeup deals are 80%. So it's, it's pretty incredible story. And , and from these very simple utility, you know, that started as like just a simple collaboration tool to replace spreadsheets. It has evolved into a , um , what we call it , a full fledged , uh , brand success platform where you can manage your entire content publishing process , um, from, you know, managing your assets to creating content , uh , reviewing and approving every single Louise your clients or your team, which is probably into the core of what we do. And then scheduling and responding to comments that you receive on social media and then measuring everything.

Speaker 1:

Oh yeah. I would say, you know, looking back in my life, the number of different uh , sizes and shapes of the spreadsheets or the ways that people teams are trying to collaborate , uh , is out of control. When I think back to be like, man, some of those were really rough , uh, in different processes. And so anytime that you can streamline a and get a , a simpler process is going to help you be more efficient. Cause really what you want to be doing is the work to be done efficiently, not all the work to be done on trying to figure out how spreadsheets are working and what's, what's going on from there. Now, can you , uh, you know, I think a lot of our listeners may be familiar with, you know, some of the social media tools like, you know, HootSweet or social spider later, you know, what kind of sets Luma apart from some of those?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, it's an excellent question. So actually when we were an agency and when we decided to build [inaudible] , we were actually using all those tools that you are mentioning because those tools are in a way where we can call the schedulers. So you would come to this platform with your content already ready, prepared, approved. And what you would do is, let's say you go to, it's a hoot suite and you just, you know, paste in the copy into the copy field. You will upload your creative and then they will schedule it for you. And that's great. I mean that's great. That's why they are one of the biggest companies out there. Um, but the problem is how do you come up with that ? Like, you know, this is the hard part . This is what the spreadsheet is here for or was here for. It's basically we have to put together like a nice asset. We have to draft a copy , we have to put all of that together and give away for the person who is going to prove it to basically see what is going to look like. And then you know, only then when it's approved then you can schedule it. And so that's how we started our product was essentially just that bought the first version was just basically what we call a simple credit application where you could just upload content, someone in school could see it and then say, yes it's a go for me. And that was it. And then of course we, you know, it made sense to kind of, you know, cover the entire publishing process. Meaning once the content is approved, why don't you publish it and then you know, why don't you respond to comments and then why don't you basically measure a was analytics. So that's how we started. And that's what is very specific about alumina is that we are not a scheduler with you know , collaboration features. We are a marketing collaboration platform that happened to have scheduling feature

Speaker 1:

added on down the road. I love it. Okay. So that's the core of, of what Lumi does. Um, before we jump in today's topic, I heard an internet rumor that you traveled the world for a full year. Is that correct?

Speaker 3:

Yes, it is . You really have. You're right, right. Yeah, no, yeah, it was a, it was a crazy project. Uh , I did bike in 2011 and 12 with my spoons and await me . So, you know , we go way back and we basically do everything together. And so yeah, we traveled around the world for one year. Um, we spend basically one month in each city that we visited. So we were four , five months in Asia. Then we went two months in Australia and then two months here in the U S and three months in , in South America. And where we were doing was basically , um, we're not trying to really back back or you know, just what we wanted to do is basically leave the life that you would have if you were actually setting in that city. And so we were , uh , you know, renting Airbnbs and we were just basically going, you know, grocery shoppings , um, and , and we met like tons of entrepreneurs because I was , um, basically, you know, doing some interviews for a very famous French magazine called LA express. Um, and so I was interviewing them and trying to understand what's going on in their ecosystem and, you know, what's specific about, you know, yeah, what's going on in their city and their country and what can we learn as outsiders. And I mean for a guy from friends who had studied in Canada, I mean, learning about, you know, what's going on in China was pretty amazing, or in South Korea and in Australia and even in Brazil. So , um , that was, you know, a terrific experience. And it actually led to basically everything we do now because , uh, w one of the things that we did is we actually built, our first business was Naomi . Uh, it was a very funky business, if you think about it, because it was basically a candy subscription business. So what we would do was we would buy candy where we were and then, you know, ship them all over the world , uh, to people who basically couldn't buy candy from Japan or from Australia. And so it was a completely bootstrap business because we like to say that we actually started it with minus $200 on our bank account . Uh, and we're basically buying the candy over, you know, in , in wisdom money of the preorder.

Speaker 1:

It's like a, the black market for kids. Like they're like, yeah, I always think it's fascinating when I travel to see how, how different, you know, candy or sodas are, or that you're like, man, I've never heard of any of these or things that are completely different. What am I, I , uh , went to school in Australia and down there, everyone loves Tim Tams, which are like these little chocolate things, but they would bite off the top and the bottom and drink milk through them. And it kind of goes through it and it goes through the , the chocolate Audi and like a straw. But you know, you get back to the States and there was no Tim Tams everywhere, anywhere. So , um, what a fantastic idea

Speaker 3:

that that's correct. What you say, like there are so many other things that, you know, because you take everything you have for granted, right? But you can't figure out that there are different things going on on the other side of the world. And I think he's just super eyeopening. And, and you know, when I said that this is kind of, you know, this experience led to what we're doing today is very true because, so we ended up selling the candy subscription business because it basically got some traction in friends in the media. And then what happened is because of that, like, you know, many people around, they're starting to come to us and say, Hey, can you help us do the same thing? And so that's how we ended up building the agencies. And so from the agencies, we had this problem where we had to use bread sheets. And so this is how we ended up building [inaudible] . So all of that is kind of interconnected. It's pretty funny.

Speaker 1:

So the moral of the story is go travel the world for a year.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. Well, yeah, I think that's part of it, but it's also just, you know, like do sings because , uh, that's, that's one of the lessons that I've learned is that, you know, when you are considering a project, whatever it is around the world trip or like in your business, you can probably have a good idea of what it will look like. If it works. You can have a good idea of 40 will look like if it doesn't work. So let's say, you know, bought unities and risk , but there is one thing that is probably impossible to foresee. It's basically all of these new opportunities that is going to open for yeah. And that, I mean, that's kind of like, you know, the , the butterfly effect. You just have no idea what's going to happen. And yeah, that's, that's very cool that if you want to have, even as an example of , of what happened during this , uh , this trip, which was pretty, pretty funny. Uh, so one of the things that happened is, as I said, I was, I was writing these articles for , for an express [inaudible] and I ended up being in New York and I sought , you know , uh, it could be cool to get in touch with, said God in, okay. Yeah, sure. Cool. So I just, you know, I reached out to him, he basically says, Hey , uh, you know, why don't you get in touch with my French publisher? So I get in touch with his French publisher, we set up an interview, I go to his , uh , to his office. Um, then we do the interview, we publish the article, and then, you know, her , his publisher basically says, it's like, how come? Like, what are you doing? Like how , how, how come you're in New York writing for express? So I explained , you know, everything, I just, I just explained to you. And then she says, well, that's pretty interesting. I think we should write a book about that. And I was like, what ? What are you talking about? And then we ended up publishing a book about that, you know, kind of because no , Amy and I went around the world. Then we decided to kind of, you know, reach out to set the garden. Then he introduced us as a publisher and then we got a book deal. I mean, that's pretty insane when you think about it.

Speaker 1:

Oh yeah. You never know what hustle can, what doors hustling can open. Or I always say this is that everything can change in a moment and you just, you've got to keep pushing forward, keep pushing forward. And you never know when that tipping point will happen when a door will open or it's even something that you would never even expect. Um, would a , would open an opportunity to will come your way. They wouldn't have had you not gone down that path. So man, it's just fantastic to hear a story. Well, I want to transition into, you know, the , the topic of today, which is, you know, building and PR and ultimately protecting your brand. And I think, you know, in the days of, of digital, it's very easy for people to start companies to start to build brands. Um, and so there's an element of building them up and then there's also an element of protecting them. And I think that's something that a lot of people they know. Yeah, I know I need to go post and do things to grow. But when it comes to protecting the brands, I think the , a lot of people don't really have the tools or understand what they need to do for that. So I wanted to run through some of those topics. Can you walk us through kind of in your mindset, what is the process of kind of beginning to build a brand and what businesses should be doing in terms of that online?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, no, of course. Um, so what I'm going to share is , is probably, you know, it's basically based on the data that we , that we have from all four sides and customers. So , uh, it's , it's pretty interesting to see, you know, what successful brands are doing out there. Um, so the first thing, and it's kind of, you know, one of the things that we've noticed, and it's , it's kind of of the premise of every single sink about these days is that , uh, like you said today with the digital, anyone can start a business, can start, you know, a Shopify store and can like have an Instagram account. Um, but because of that or , or even like, you know, like make product available on, on Amazon because of that, you know, competition is pretty fierce. Um, and there are more and more [inaudible] products. I mean, it just happens. Uh , it happened to someone in my team recently who bought something on Amazon and it turned out to be a contribute product. So what is interesting is that, you know, we is more and more brands beginning or you know, launching the problem is no longer like, how do you, how do you start a business? It's really how do you actually maintain it and grow it. And we think that, you know, actually building a strong brand is probably your best element of defensiveness in these day because it's what he's going to protect you against your competition. You know, someone doing the same thing as you or even again, contribute products because people will, people will want the real thing and, and, or even substitutes, they won't go for the cheaper option. They want, you know, the real thing. They want to be part of your, of your brand or your story. So that's kind of, you know, the premise , uh , of , of where we seek and what we do at, at loony . Um, and so we think that building the brand is, is actually very important to actually build a business and protect the business. Uh, and so there are many things that we, that we see these days, but , uh, I would say that there are four best practices that we see from the most successful brands out there. Number one, we see that, you know, there is a lot of collaboration behind the scenes , uh, in the early days of social media. Um, we had a lot of, of, you know, like he was kind of the rise of social media managers. So , uh , it was kind of a new job and your responsibility and you will probably be one person in India office kind of, you know, overlooking social media. What we see now is that even in smaller companies, it's no longer the case. We have many people involved in the, you know, the social media content publishing process. Uh, we have of course the social media manager, but we have also other people from marketing people, from product, people, from sales, even people from HR because you also want to build like an employer brand, which is kind of another product of um, of building a brand. Uh , and , and even sometimes, you know, in bigger companies we have companies that are kind of, you know, biblically listed. So we even have companies where the CFO actually takes part in the process because they want to make sure that, you know , you are not putting on social media something that is going to affect stock price. And again, like this is kind of the famous example that we give very often, but you probably know the famous CEO of a famous , uh , electric car manufacturer who's really it and basically that affected the, you know, the company. And so that's kind of the thing today is that, you know, building the brand involves like having many more people in know , taking part into the process. So that's number one. There was a long part, but there was no, I love it. Yeah. Um, another thing that we, that we see is that, you know, social media is a lot about in the digital era and brand in general is all about tending your story, telling your brand story. And that's all about, you know, having content that is on brand . I mean, that's obvious, but you know, you have to be on run in terms of brand guidelines, in terms of tone of voice and all these things. Um , you also have to be consistent over time. You can say one thing one day and then the country and the next day that would , you know, that would not build your brand , uh, authority. And , and loyalty. Um, and, and you also want to publish relatively consistently over time because you can be there for like a week, then disappear for months and come back and say, Hey, like I don't understand. I don't have an audience. Well, if you want an audience then you have to be there for them. Um, so that's the thing and seeing publishing consistently and consistent content. The second thing is , uh , basically a respond , uh, to ah , to people who basically reach out to you. Uh, and that that's true, you know, on organic content. But it's also true with when you do a , I think your company does a lot of advertising. I mean, answering the comments on ads is extremely important. Uh, not only because well, you know, it's just your job, but also because you know, people may give you some actual interesting feedback and also last but not least because responding to comments actually boost your engagement even on ads. So responding to comments, to interactions and actually interacting with your audience is extremely important to be the brand because this is what is going to make the difference between, you know, like a , I would say just a brand like, like another and a brand who is , which you are making a connection and you want to , uh, spend more time with more money ways . Uh , so that would be the certainty. And the , the last thing, and again, I'm pretty sure this is, I'm seeing you are very firmly always, but it's basically you have to major , uh , that's the beauty of the digital. You have data everywhere along the entire funnel. And so you can know how many, you know, how many impressions you had, how many clicks, how many conversions, and you can see how this evolves. And you can use that, you know, as a closed loop marketing strategy to basically improve over time. So if you do those four things , uh, I mean, basically you involve more people in the process. Uh, you publish consistently, you respond to comments and you measure , uh, whatever you do, then you have like a pretty good chance of building a stronger brand.

Speaker 1:

Oh, I love it. You know, you could go back to your example about, you know, responding , uh, you know, from the ad side we see the cost that people pay for Facebook ads go down anywhere from probably 15 to 30%. If you respond to every comment that comes underneath the ad because it impacts the algorithm, there's more engagement. You , you write back to people and a lot of times we'll answer their question but then put in another question and then they write back. And what happens is all that builds underneath ads. Um , and that's something that most people have no idea about.

Speaker 3:

Exactly. And well, it's funny you mentioned that because a , it's something that we were discussing like very recently with my team where we've seen some people, actually some brands actually take advantage of that to kind of build that in the ad . Meaning, you know, that's what we call trickled down ads . So basically, you know, you would, you , you can organize a contest on an ad, you know, you can just say, Hey , uh , you can win that. If you leave that comment here, or you can say this is a Q and a ad , do you have any question about our product, about our brand ? And then, you know, we'll answer everything here. And then what you do is you basically kind of reverse engineer everything and you build that interaction right into the ad and like you said, that is going to decrease the cost per action very significantly.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. Oh , for sure. Um, okay, so now what I would , I'd love to do is to pivot to the protection. Um, and I think, you know, you mentioned the Elon Musk story, which you know, is a great example now that came from a CEO. It was tweeting that out, but I know he was going right against the sec and he was calling people out and it caused a huge uproar. And I think there a lot of fines that he had to pay for that as well. Um, you know, when it comes to protecting a brand, I mean it can take years to build one up and it can take a second for a brand to, to lose its, its voice or its meaning or for people to lose their trust in a brand. Um, you know, I walk us through some of the steps for, you know, how, what other business owners should be doing to ensure that their brand is protected , uh, that it's, you know, something that can last. Uh , and then we can talk about going through, you know, maybe crisis is or things like that.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. Um, well there are, there are a couple of things that, you know, you can do. Um, I think the very basic thing that you can do , uh , and that's not even, you know, part of our product. I'm just giving this a as a , as a piece of advice because I think it's extremely important. It's basically, you know, setting up some brand monitoring. Um, I would say solution and that can be, you know, you kind of go was like some pate solutions. Sorry, like mentioned, you know , uh, that's a , that's a fantastic solution that will kind of crawl the web and, and basically, you know , uh , tell you every single time, you know, your brand name is popping up, but you can actually even do it in a very simple way, in info free by setting up just a Google out aerate and you can even have that, you know, kind of , um , pushed to you , uh, as email or as an RSS feed that , you know, again, you are notified every single time something is being said about your brand. And that is extremely important because it allows you to, well first see when good things happen. And I mean, you know, he should take every weekend, but that's number one. But number two, you can also, you know, kind of see what people say about your brand. Uh , that's going to have your earned media. So you earned it again, so it's , uh , you should have access to it. And a search thing is, you know, sometimes sings, kind of go South. So you want to be able to jump in and say, Hey, I'm sorry this happened. Let me figure it out. Uh, because at least you know, you have a chance to fix things . It was not perfect, but at least you know , you show that you care and that, you know, shopping was a brand wasn't a mistake. Uh , and that, you know, if something goes wrong, you are here and that's part of the brand, right? The brand is basically some reassurance that if you go with that company, things are going to go well. And so doing that, he's kind of, you know, your backup plan. It , it's , it's how you, when you make, like when something happens, you see that you want to, right . You're wrong.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. Well, I think, you know, for any business it's essentially understand that conversations are now happening all the time. And if someone chooses to not use the tools to listen to those, it's a huge mistake. And I think, you know, ultimately some of the best companies are , the best brands are by default, the best listeners. Meaning, you know, the iPhone one is very, very different , uh, from the iPhone, you know, that they have now the X, X, X max. Um, and it's, it's all that is come from listening to consumers and what they want, you know, bigger phones, better battery life more. Um , it didn't start with the best product right from day one, but they were able to continually make it , uh, and generate sales and grow and build that loyalty and trust by listening to the consumers as they were talking. Um, and it's okay , I think for businesses to get feedback that is negative because ultimately that's the opportunity for what you need to improve or what you, what you could do to win them over.

Speaker 3:

Well, I mean you are preaching to the choir because , uh, again I'm , I'm getting to use loom Lee as an example here, but not the product. I mean the brand and the company. Um, one of the things that we do at alumina East that we speak with over 100 customers and users every single day through the chat over email, actually people, you know, every single person who actually signs up for an account that lonely receives an email from me. Yes, it's an automated email, but whenever you respond to it, it directly lands into my inbox and chances are you will receive an answer by , you know, maybe it was in an hour, maybe if I'm sleeping a couple of hours, but I will respond to everything or this to say that, you know, these hundred people talking to us every single day. When you kind of, you know, when you aggregate their feedback, you have a pretty clear picture of what they want. And so this is exactly what our roadmap is made of, which is, you know, every single day people will say, Hey, I need this feature. I have these bags . Can you fix this usability issue? Uh , that competitor is doing that. Can you do it too? And then we just, you know, we, we basically have a very simple , uh , dashboard and we just, you know , Mark counts of how often a feature is requested. And that is basically what has been driving our roadmap for the past three or four years. And, and I think that, you know, it's , it's also part of the brand. And if you read the reviews about our company and our brand, you will see that people say that we never , uh, seize to , uh, improve and listen to the feedback. And I think that's a very important part of building a brand.

Speaker 1:

How do you think social media can contribute to either a brand crisis or potentially rumors about a brand? Meaning anyone can say anything they want about anything. So if something does get said and it starts to get, a perfect example would be , um , one of the first guests we had , uh, on this is a guy named Zoe who , um , came on to talk about how he got a deal on shark tank. Uh, like a week ago he was out on Hollywood and he took a video of James Corden and Justin Bieber , uh, driving in the car. That was his video. And so he was there and saw him and said, Oh, you know, and they were, it was a , the carpool karaoke were being towed and they were being towed. And he was like, ah, this is why I have trust issues. Everything I feel like I've been told has been a lie. And immediately someone that followed him posted it, they had a really big account and then it started to get tons of coverage and immediately became this , this huge, everyone was posting it . I think he was saying he's got like 17 or 19 million views on his video and eventually James cordon on his show went to talk, here's what's going on. So I mean, in his world it is some extent a crisis of people don't believe that what we do is real, or I now have to stop and address this. So, you know, in that example, you know, what are some of the tips that you would give to a business if they find themselves in that scenario?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, no, I think it's , it's fantastic example. Actually. I had a, I had a lot of fun actually watching the , the CIM Scotland's response to that. And I think it was actually pretty good. Yeah, I agree. Well, what we'd like to see is that usually when something like that happen, when a crisis happens , uh, you want to use the three A's framework. You want first to uh, you know, acknowledge what happened. You didn't want to , to, you know, to, to just do like, you know, to put your hand in the sand and just say, Oh no, I didn't know , uh , you want to pull out a apologize, sorry to everyone you may have offended or you know , who feel offended and three you want to address, you want to explain how you're going to fix it. All right? So that it doesn't happen again. And I think that, you know, what James called and did was actually pretty interesting. He basically, I mean it's entertainment, it's a bit different. And so he, and he is also a funny guy, so he had to play, you know, he , he spot , uh, but basically he, he, he kind of said yes, sometimes we told the track, we told the range Rover BQ is, you know, maybe I'm drunk or maybe we have to change our costumes or maybe we are doing a choreography. So what do you want us to do? Do you want us to just like not, you know , uh, like not do that or do you want us to take a risk on , on public road ? I mean, we have to too . And I think he was basically saying, yes, we do that sometimes. Um, he also said, here's the list of, you know , the episodes where we actually did have to , to for these reasons . And there were maybe like, I don't know, like less than 10. And then he said, here's the least of the ones where we didn't. And it was like maybe, I don't know , a hundred. So he was, it was also, you know, a nice, what'd you say? We're not lying to you. But regardless of that, he basically also, he apologized. He said, I'm sorry if you felt like that he kind of introduced like in nuclear, a level of sarcasm saying that, you know , uh, he was not really going to work and the celebrities were not really helping him go to work, which I found very, you know, very funny because , um , it was pretty a pretty nice way to put it. And then here he , um, you know, he basically also addressed it. Uh, and he said he will , it will happen again. Uh, we , but you know, that's , that's,

Speaker 1:

yeah , I know . I thought it was so fascinating because I think a couple of things he did joke about was that he was like, this video has gotten more views than some of the episodes that we've created. Uh, and he did, you know, he went right through them. You know, he acknowledged, Hey, I understand there was an issue here it is. People are talking about , uh , this, he , he did apologize and you know, he went and said, I'm sorry for that. And then, you know, he addressed it and said, here's what we're going to be doing moving forward. I mean, so does that work for kind of everything? Cause it's some extent. It does feel like everyone's in this uproar . Like, yay, look, look at what we've been lied to. And he's like, no , here's, here's what's going on. And people are like, Oh , okay. And they kind of just walk away. It's not a big deal anymore.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, exactly. I mean, if you're trying to escape it , uh , whatever the problem is, you know, if you have like an equality issue , uh, if you have like, you know , um , just like a brand, just like, you know, like this trust , like the first thing is, yeah, this is what happened. This is why it happened. Uh, we are sorry that that happened to you. Here's what we can fix it. So sometimes it can be a discount, it can be a replacement for the product. Um, it can be just, you know, like a refund, whatever you know, it takes, because in a way you, you made a promise as a brand. You didn't , uh , you know , you didn't keep it. That just happened. It's just, it's just life. It's just business. Um, and so, but that's what , what you can do to protect your brand. And you can say, yes, we screwed up. We have, sorry. Uh, here is where we can do to fix it for you. And we, and we hope that, you know , that's what that works for you. Uh, and I think that , you know, this is these kind of very positive attitude. It basically build trust over time. And what it does, again, it's what I was saying earlier, is that if tomorrow you have to make a new purchase decision, you are going to say yes, sometimes go wrong. But that's the case with pretty much every brand. So I would rather go with a brand that actually owns their mistakes and fix them for me.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, all for sure. And I , I'd say an example of this, you know, I used to have a , a Toyota Prius , um, and the headlights, the light bulbs would burn out like every three months, which is way too often. But I just, I don't, I don't know a lot about cars, so I just go replace them and keep going. But every three months, and this happened for probably two, three years and I was like, man, I dunno, something must be wrong, but I just didn't want to fix it. And eventually I get a notice from Totus from Toyota that says, Hey, we have a recall. Th there's an issue causing your headlights to go out, bring it in, we'll take care of it. Um, and from that point on, you know, it didn't , it wasn't a problem anymore. And you know, while I was a little grumpy, like I had to buy lights, the fact that the brand came and said, look, Hey, there's a problem, we need to fix this to make it right. Um, and I was like, man, like I trusted them more being like, would I, if I now get to go pick which car I want, they're up a notch over the other people because they ultimately said we care about you. There was an issue, we resolved it for you and we want to move forward.

Speaker 3:

Yeah . And I , I think it's , it's a very, very interesting example because we feel like, you know, your brand is not only what you say as a company , um, or even like how you react when you, when you screw up. That's , that's the second part. That's what we just covered . But it's also what people would say. And, and you know, this is again a very interesting example because what you are saying now is you are talking about them on your show, although it's study, it was a problem. And so that says a lot because you know, you are basically contributing to the trust in their brand by doing that. And that's a very interesting example where a mistake can turn into actually some brand loyalty and trust.

Speaker 1:

I love it. I love it. As we kind of bring the, you know, the episode to a close today, are there any final takeaways or advice that you would give , uh , to other businesses about how to, how to build and how to protect our brand that they need to take away with

Speaker 3:

them today? Well, yeah, I think, you know, we've, we've, we've, we've covered a lot. Um, I think it's, it's, you know, again, like tell your story that's very important , uh, like, you know , stick to , uh , to who you are and what your brand is and , and , and , and just, you know, find your niche and , and, and speak to them a whole new state. That's lesson number one. Number two is, is basically, you know , um, listen to everything that he said and respond as much as you can. And number three is measure, which is just an as a way of listening. So I think that's, that's kind of , um, you know , uh, the basics. Um, and, but more and more things that I see today is that, you know, like, you know, pretty much everyone and their grandmother is launching a brand or a startup , orphan raising and these kinds of things. And, and I think that's kind of one of the flip sides of, you know, these, this new world where, you know , everything can happen in uni . We basically just said that it's , it's, it's incredible in thrive opportunities, but it can also be overwhelming if you're just starting and you're like, Oh yeah, and I'm just, I have a hundred followers or I have like, you know, end customers, but AC , this company, they are raising $100 million. I mean, I think that doesn't really matter. And that's probably, you know, one of the things that we've learned along the ways that Rome wasn't built in a day. Uh, so you have to take every single step one after the other. And what matters is not comparing your brand or yourself to competition or to your peers or to someone you know, is you know, the only thing that matters that you keep moving forward. And it's what do you need to measure is your progress, like who you are versus you know, yesterday , uh, who you were and rather than who you are today versus who your neighbor is today. Because what Myra is at the end of the day is, are you going to keep moving and growing? And that's, that's what Myra is the most.

Speaker 1:

I love it. It's such fantastic advice. Teebo will thank you so much for being on the show. Uh , it was a pleasure to have you here and we'll catch you guys on the next episode.

Speaker 3:

Thank you so much.

Speaker 2:

Thank you for listening to the Duke of digital podcast with Brian Mitt , one to network with other business owners. Join our exclusive group at facebook.com/groups/duke of digital fancy the Duke. Leave a five star review on your favorite podcast app. And you can be mentioned on the show. The Duke of digital was produced by advertisement and recorded in Hollywood, California.