Duke of Digital

042 - How to Create Converting Videos for People with Short Attention Spans with Michele Moreno

February 10, 2020 Brian Meert
Duke of Digital
042 - How to Create Converting Videos for People with Short Attention Spans with Michele Moreno
Chapters
Duke of Digital
042 - How to Create Converting Videos for People with Short Attention Spans with Michele Moreno
Feb 10, 2020
Brian Meert
Show Notes Transcript
Speaker 1:

What if I told you that in today's episode there was a single tip that other people are using to become millionaires. Now that I have your attention, stick around and raise those keys because in today's episode we're talking all about capturing the attention of your audience

Speaker 2:

presented by advertisement. The Duke of digital will guide you through the rapidly changing landscape of digital marketing, social media, and how to grow your business online. To submit a question for the show, text (323) 821-2044 or visit Duke of digital.com if you need an expert to fix your ads, the friendly team at advertisement is ready to help visit advertisement. That's M I N t.com or call (844) 236-4686.

Speaker 1:

Grow your business. Here's your host Brian [inaudible] in the studio today. We have Michelle Moreno. Thank you so much for being here. It's exciting to have you here. Oh, awesome. Now you are a camera charisma coach. You have credits on TV shows like ABC, NBC, Fox, and FX. You've appeared on Boston legal with William Shatner. Um, and I think you've, you've even appeared on dozens of online shows as a camera charisma expert. Is that correct? That's true. Now how did you like give us some background into how you got into that and what kind of led you into this field? My husband was like, Mareno I'm tired of you making $12,000 a year. And I was like, well that's what a singer, actress makes like a work unless I'm a star and he's like, figure it out. So I was like, okay, what can I do? And I, you know, I hired coaches, I went to all these kumbaya, you know, new age coaching seminars and finally I was trying to do sales.

Speaker 1:

I was trying all these different things and then somebody was putting out videos on a Facebook group and I was like writing comments to them. Like, you might want to try looking into the lens when you do your video. You might want to try speaking to your friend because you're not talking to anybody here, you know? And my friend was like, those are amazing tips. Where are you getting all those tips? I was like, I used to be an actress and she was like, you need to teach a class. And that's how it started. I did my first on-camera competence class, um, in 2016 was fantastic. Well, congratulations on that. You know, I, I did hear a story and I'd love to know if this is true, that the first time you were on television or that you were on live, the first time that you went live, you freaked out on camera and there was, it was like a big ordeal.

Speaker 1:

Is that true? Okay. It's so true. It was 2001 and I got on the game show Hollywood squares and it had been my dream my whole life to be a TV actress. So I was so excited and I got there and I look out on the audience and there's like celebrities, nine celebrities and [inaudible] in all these squares above me. And the camera went on and I wreaked out in panic and fear. I froze. And all I could say was one answer. I agree. Like you could only say two answers. You had a 50, 50 chance of getting the answer right. You either said, I agree or I disagree, and I got every single one of them wrong. And I couldn't hear the questions because my body felt like it was wrapped in cotton. And I was like asking Tom Bergeron, you know, the guy who hosts dancing with the stars, he was the host.

Speaker 1:

I was like, can you repeat the question? And he was like, what the like looking at me like, what are you talking about? Like nobody ever asks that. And even what be Goldberg and big bird were looking down at me. Like, this girl is really hashtags that I could imagine. It's incredibly, uh, your, the stress of being there as big word. It's looking down and you're like, Oh, witness. He saw it. I was, I was, I was a big bird fan since like age two. So it was, it was tra. Hashtag tragic, you know, we were talking a little bit before the show started, uh, about the process of going on when you're on television and there's lights and there's a whole bunch of people running around and they're like ready go. And you, I was sharing a couple of examples when I've been on TV and it is extremely nerve wracking when you know, when you do it every day, maybe it becomes more common, but the first time that you do it, it's like a weird sort of like butterflies in the stomach.

Speaker 1:

You're standing in front of people. Um, it's just an element to where you realize, man, this is a whole lot harder than it looks. But do you know why we fear the camera? Like I don't know why, but it's, I can tell you, Oh, I want to know back in the day when we traveled as pack animals, if we got separated from our pack, it meant death either by starvation because you can't grow your food or get it or being eaten by a predator. And so when we go on camera, we think we're going to die because we are suddenly alone. All eyes are on us. We think, okay now the saber tooth tiger can see me clearly because I'm alone without protection and so darn visible. And that is why our bodies go into the fight or flight panic mode. And that's why people who have this when they get up to give a speech because they're separated from the pack.

Speaker 1:

And it might even be worse on video because you can't see the eyes that are on you. Yeah, yeah. I do a great T-Rex impersonation. It's gone over. It's gone over really well at parties before I was just like, can you just do it real quick? It involves tucking my hands into the shirt and running around the room cause I'll do it afterwards. It is good. Um, I've gotten a lot of, uh, a lot of fun comments from that one. Uh, w I wanted to dive into the, the topic of today, which is how to create, I mean there's some extent, attention spans are getting shorter and so when it comes to videos, it's critical to do things right or else all the work that you do can be wasted. I mean it, one, you need to grab their attention at the beginning to, you need to be able to hold their attention. Three, you need to be able to have

Speaker 3:

kind of a call to action at the end or to be able to move people towards wherever it is that you want them to go. That's the purpose of the video. Um, and so I wanted to dive into that. You know, how, how do you create videos like that or what are some of your tips?

Speaker 1:

The first thing to know about a video is that within the first seven seconds of that video, you have to hook people in by giving them a reason to stay. You have to answer the viewer's question. What's in it for me if I stay okay. So if that means you have a graphic overlay with an, with a juicy title, like, you know, find the man of your dreams or you know, you know your target audience so you know what they need. You know what thereafter you have got to let them know either with a title or the, the first thing that you say, the first thing that comes out of your mouth, that opening hook has to be there.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I would agree that it's so critical in the marketing world. We call that with them, which is what's in it for me. So w I have him and it's so critical, you know, as you start creating anything, you need to think of who is the person that will be watching this and what do they get out of it? Why would they care? How is this going to be valuable for them? How would you do the intro that we did in today's episode? I wrote that maybe 10 minutes before you came in today. How would you rank that from a scale one to 10? What's the first thing that you said again, like years. Uh, what if I told you that today's episode is a single tip that could help other people, other people have used to help them become millionaires?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's good. That's good. If your audience wants to become millionaires, okay. If, you know, that's a big importance to them. I think that's a great hook. Okay. Uh, you know, are they you getting, um, you could even be more specific like millionaires, you know, with their business. Is it, is it mostly business owners, mostly business owners here, they're trying to grow sales, trying to grow their business because it could, they don't really want to know million dollars in the stock. Now, of course they do. If they're money hungry, the people who start businesses, what do they really want? They want to be able to say, I did it. You know, I came and I conquered and I birthed and I won. You know? And so by adding a little bit more juice to it with that intention of what, you know, your audience, you knew what the meant, you know, motion Lee, what do they really want? What's really going to give them the meaning in their life. Then you could say something like people who birth their baby and made over a million or their business or you know, something to that effect because that draws upon more than just the money.

Speaker 3:

Now why do you think, you know, especially now versus you know, in the past, why is it that attention is so hard to come by that people are tuning things out that maybe aren't relevant

Speaker 1:

to them? Because back in the day there was such a limited amount of information. When I was growing up, we had like 20 channels today. It's crazy the amount of information that's hitting us and it's only getting worse because video is now ubiquitous. 80% of online content is now video-based. And so what's happening is people are stopping reading, they're getting lazy and they are looking at most all of their information now in the video realm or in the screen realm and they're tuning out whatever isn't valuable. And I found these hilarious apps that help people focus because people are becoming add to the point where they're having to actually force themselves away from the dopamine hits that is the internet or our screens. Okay, so here's four apps. The first one I found is an, these are all apps to help you focus and block distractions that I found in a blog post on zapier.com the first one is rescue time and that will block distracting sites.

Speaker 1:

The second one is for those of you who get triggered when you're told what to do, the second one's called mindful browsing. It gently nudges you away from time-wasting sites. The third one is Hocus focus for viewing one window at a time. And this is my favorite cold Turkey blocker. Lock yourself out of your computer. So just call target, like just lock yourself out. And it's because our, we're now in a survival mode. The the currency of today is attention and time. There is nothing more valuable because if we can't focus, we can't move forward in our businesses. Right? And if you can't create and before you consume your toast, so now people have to guard their attention and the brain is evolving to ignore anything that isn't a value.

Speaker 3:

It's interesting. I've actually used rescue time. Uh, yeah. Um, I don't use it right now, but I've used it in the past. And what it does is you, you pick one program, like I'm working on a word document and it pauses or, uh, quiets any of the other programs. So the alerts don't pop up until for a set period of time. You're like, yeah, for two hours I need to write. Um, and it's actually, it was really, really helpful. But it is crazy because you know, today, so many things are going off. You get interrupted. And I think it really kind of comes in what you're saying is to the mobile, uh, the mobile element, which is people are checking their phones all the time. I think the average time that a normal person will unlock their phone in a day is like over a hundred, a hundred different times of opening in this.

Speaker 3:

And so, I mean their eyeballs are their, um, you know, content is quick and fast. And in a world of Facebook, you know, the data that we've gotten from them is we've got 1.7 seconds, uh, which is the amount of time someone will look at a video before they scroll by. Um, and it's interesting and the most, the most, the example that I like to use the most is movie trailers is that 1.7 seconds in most movie trailers is just the logo of like Walt Disney studios opening up and that's it. And they're gone. So now movie trailers have a trailer showing three to four seconds of what's in the trailer before they show on social media. And it's because they were seeing that people just paying attention. That really does speak to the problem of attention. That you would need trailers for trailers.

Speaker 1:

And that means that you have to get into some juicy content or right off the bat if you want to put your logo or if you want to do a, you know, call to act into a free gift or whatever, it's got to come later in your video or you know, your broadcast. That hook has to be the first thing. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

What do you think are some of the common distractions, um, in the world of, uh, you know, the, that are pulling people away from content just in general?

Speaker 1:

I think it's, um, the crazy feeling that people are having the anger, the anxiety and distress that's happening to us is forcing us now. I think there's a little bit of a backlash, I would say amongst young people, not so much young people are kind of lost. Like I have a 12 year old and it's, it's a fight to pull him off of those video games and the screens and I think he's kind of lost. If the, if you have that kind of addictive personality, then you're in denial about your addiction until somebody intervenes or you go cold Turkey a blocker. Right? So, um, buffer, the rest of us, we're noticing a lack of productivity where we're noticing things happening, um, with our inability to focus or the inability to relax our anxiety level, our lack of sleep. And so I think that's what's really pushing people to make a change. And really the alternative is space and nothingness and free time to stare at the wall. I think that's where we're going to go. I think that's where we're headed. And I think that's why I'm with video. Less is more with online marketing. Less is more. I've noticed opt in pages, they've gone down to just a title and a place to put your name and email, you know, because people are craving the white space and the lack of pressure and the emotion, the emotion that you want people to have online now is that of

Speaker 3:

space and freedom. I like that. What do you think are some of the common mistakes that creators make in terms of video? Um, I mean, what would you, I mean we were working with attention, but what would be some of the, the common things that you see people slip?

Speaker 1:

Well, for bows of people who are actually going on camera to promote themselves or their business, the first thing I see is that they don't know where the lenses and they don't connect their eyes to the lens. So for example, if I'm really speaking to someone, I'm going to want to talk to them like I'm in a natural conversation so you don't have to stare into the camera the whole time like a robot. But you also don't want to be watching your selfie video like this the whole time and never connecting your eyes to the lens because the person watching is going to feel like you're cold and you're not with them. So you've got to know where that lens is and you've got to connect your eyes to it for peak moments. That's the first mistake I see. The second mistake I see a lot is there is no opening hook.

Speaker 1:

They either don't know what it is or they kind of get to it. But it takes too long and the person has already stopped watching their video. Um, the third is bad lighting on the face. Like people have to understand, walk around in the space with your camera or your smartphone until you find a spot where your face is well lit. And that's usually in front of a window with natural light coming in. Unless you have, you know, studio with lights in it. Of course you know what you're doing at that point. But if you don't and you're starting out, just grab the phone and walk around until your face is well lit and put your face prominently in that frame. Don't be far away. Don't have a huge amount of space between the top of your head and the top of the video frame. Just put your face right up in there. Well lit. And I would say there's a fourth big mistake and that is the ideas that are being presented don't matter to the audience. Remember, people are tuning out information. The brain is actually tuning out information that isn't valuable. So if you don't show up with ideas that matter to your audience, they're not going to watch.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I, I would touch on that as well. I know there are some fantastic tools within YouTube and Facebook in terms of videos and video analytics will, you can actually see, you know, where people drop off in your videos and there is so much fascination or fascinating information that you can glean from that in terms of realizing you could be talking about a topic and then all of a sudden you go on a tangent and 50% of your audience drops off. And it may only be for 10 seconds, but you come right back. But you've lost half the people because you went on it. And I think if you spend time looking at the analytics for videos, you can learn a lot about the people who are watching your videos. And I think the thing that's most fascinating for me is a lot of times how many people drop off very quickly, you know, and you realize, man, the most important thing needs to be at the beginning.

Speaker 3:

Uh, you need to provide value or what's in it for them? Uh, right off the bat. I mean, hooks are really important because you will lose everyone if you don't necessarily everyone. But if you don't have a hook, people really want to know like, what will I get out of this? Um, the other thing that I think is important that let people look at is the time. Um, so the actual length of the video, if it's 30 seconds, ah, stick around, right? If it's two hours and 20 minutes, they're like, ah, I'm not gonna do it. Or if it's 30 minutes, you know, they ha, they look at that amount of time to realize what's the commitment that I'm going to need to make to go through this and get to the end based on the value that I think I will get out of it.

Speaker 1:

And when you look at your analytics and it's so important to do that, don't be discouraged. Like, I've been doing this for almost four years now and I have videos that go the the reverse hockey stick that just, they just plumb it after, you know, 30 seconds and it happens and don't be disheartened. Look at the information. You must look at those analytics, look to see where people drop off and just make changes and adjustments and do it all over again. And I promise that if you'll start to understand your audience better and you'll, you'll become a better video maker if you look at those analytics. Like I definitely had to make changes. I wasn't looking at my analytics at first and I was wondering like, how come nobody's opting in here? And then I started looking. I thought, Oh, and I would try things like I'd throw an ugly picture of myself and tell some like goofy story and the spike would go up again. People's engagement will go up if I did some kind of like, what do you call it when you break people's attention and do something crazy? It's called a pattern disrupt. Yeah. It's called a pattern disrupt because they, they, they hear things like this need

Speaker 4:

your new knee or near, near, near, near, near, near [inaudible]. We are near, near, near, near, near near right. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

So it's like a, your brain starts to tune stuff out if it's the same, same, same. And then if you break that pattern, like if I started like rapping right now, which I could lay a wrap on you if you want. Okay. This is for people who are scared to do video. It's time. It's time to make a video. Put your inner critic in the backseat behind plexiglass so you can't make a peach. She can come along for the ride but she can't try and you cannot listen to her. Well she can come out when the shoot is over cause there is a time when you need her by your side and that's the time to watch the replay because she's a master. She'll tell you faster how to improve. Just ask her. Right. Okay. So put that inner critic in the backseat when you make your video, but then she can come out after to tell you how to improve and she'll tell you. I love it. That was, that was good that you, that you are beatboxing.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. Did you like that? I was going to come up with, I was like, Oh, I don't, I don't want to, I could've gotten the whole time, but we needed you to be in a little more in the pocket. I'll work on that. Yeah. I love it. I love it. I don't, I've never beat boxed ever in my life. Maybe. Maybe in the shower and that's about it. Never in public is my first going. Yep.

Speaker 1:

Because Brian is like, so just get in there and do it. Like you notice that like it may not be perfect, but just go and do something like that. Don't be afraid to take that risk. Do it. You'll feel better. It might be horrible. You might have horrible analytics in the beginning. Honestly. You might, you might hit it out of the park too. You never know. But just take art that you can improve for next time. And if you don't take that first step, and if you don't go for it, you'll never know.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, yeah. I, I, I agree with that 100%. I think it's always important for people to, to give it a shot. Like the worst thing that happens is you fail. What do you do? Like, yeah, all the time. But you'll never know if you don't try. Uh, and then just try again and try again. And as you do things more, you, you get better at them

Speaker 1:

really, because I've been doing this for years and I went and moved to Hungary, to Budapest because my husband was doing a job on a film out and I came back and I was like kind of doing the same old videos that I was doing a year ago and they are not working like no bueno. Like I'm not getting engagement, I'm not getting views. So don't even be discouraged if you, you know, do well for a while and then things get rough. It's all about what am I going to do now? Like, well, I'm going to have to make some changes. Aren't I going to have to put my big girl panties on and I'm going to have to try something new?

Speaker 3:

Uh Oh, well how do you get people? Here's a, here's a common question is do you have any tips or advice on how to get people to watch the entire video?

Speaker 1:

You know, I'm not very good at this, but I've seen other people do it. They promise something at the end. So let's say I'm a love coach and I'm helping you find your dream man. Then I might say, and if you stick around to the end, I'm going to tell you how to find out what kind of guy you're dating and how to get rid of those toxic relationships or something like that. So like, and then at the end you offer like some kind of evaluation for them to take to find out what kind of toxic guy they're dating now and how to turn it around. So I might wait till the end or I might scroll to the end to get the evaluation. If it's really important to me to figure out why do I keep dating these toxic guys, you know, and if that really means something to me. So either promising something at the end or, or just making the content that you promised in the beginning with your opening hook. Really, really, um, concise and clear and easy to follow and short. And that could also get them to watch the whole thing because as you said, people are willing to watch 30 seconds. They're willing to watch maybe a minute if they don't know you. If you have an audience already, a fear Anthony Robbins or Tony, right. Tony, does he go by Tony? Do you call him Tony when you hang out?

Speaker 3:

Do I am like, tell me what's up. I'm actually, his birthday is, uh, in like two weeks or three weeks. He's having a big party here in LA and I'm a big, uh, like a, it's a fundraiser event, but you get invited. I got, well you buy tickets, but I picked up two tickets. Yeah. To see him again, which is great. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Oh my gosh. Shout out to Tony. Happy birthday.

Speaker 3:

He's a, he's born on a leap year, so he's only, it's his quinceanera. He's only 15 technically. Yeah, totally. Yeah, exactly. He's going to wear a big poofy dress. Well, how, um, how important is the element of charisma that goes into video? Meaning there's some people that are petrified of getting in front of other people and talking. I think, you know, a mobile phone or a camera at home a lot of times can help people kind of bridge that gap. Cause maybe they're by themselves and they're like, I can edit stuff out or do what I want. But ultimately, you know, when you're on camera you can tell the difference of someone that's highly, it has a lot of charisma or someone that's like, well, Hey, I want to talk about this topic. Like know, does it always matter that you have charisma, you know, what are some of your tips or advice for people that are trying to get more on camera or on videos and to get people to, to watch them because it's interesting.

Speaker 1:

Well, it matters if your performance is so stiff or so cold or so angry or so the wrong energy that you're actually hurting your brand. So it matters if you're hurting your brand. So the antidote to that is to elevate your brand. And the way you do that is by connecting to the person you're talking to. So when you look into that lens, you really want to imagine that person, your what, whether it's your favorite client or your best friend and really talk to that one person. Imagine they're right in there and imagine that they are in massive pain and they need your help or they're so close to their dream and they need just that step from you. They need what you're about to say on that video. They need it and you empathize with them the way you would with your best friend who's crying or the way you would with your favorite client.

Speaker 1:

And if you can connect emotionally to their needs, their pain, just imagine you're in service, right? So many of us serve clients and we're so happy when we have clients. Like I know I am, I don't get them that often. And um, and I'm so thrilled that they have trusted me that when I'm serving them it's like I'm another person. Right. So I'll have to do is imagine that I am talking to that favorite client right in that lens and it just changes my whole perspective because now the focus is off of me and it's on them and I'm not going to have that cold or nervous or stiff or you know, bad energy that's inappropriate for the moment. I'm going to have the right energy that's appropriate if I'm really connected to their needs. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

And I think you touch on something which is the ability to connect. And I think most people, if you think about who you admire or who you watch on TV or on, you know, videos online, there are things that they do that you're like, I can connect like Oprah or Ellen or some of these people have a really, really good ability to be able to, to connect with people that they don't know. Or even, I would imagine if Oprah or Ellen were walking down the street and meeting new people, you would be impressed at their ability to make friends very easily or for them to be able to feel, make the other person feel valuable or, or that they cared about them. And I think that's something that's so, so important, um, is because ultimately in business people work with other people that they like.

Speaker 3:

And that really a lot of times comes down to it, you know, when there's two competitors or there's two different options, um, people, lot of times as they work to be like, well, we liked, it isn't always necessarily that the product is better. It can be that they liked the, uh, that they were working with at that company. Um, veterans. So I think that that's something that is so critical to be able to put back into the videos is remember who are the people that you're talking with? How do you connect with them? And ultimately, you know, if you imagine them, for me on my end, I do usually just imagine the people that I don't know as friends I haven't met yet. And so when I approach it like that, when I go to mixers I'm like, Oh, these people are all my friends. They just don't know it yet. And I've got to go figure out what we have in common and where we're going to hang out and what good memories we're going to have down the road. And so it takes a little bit of the pressure off, at least for me, of walking into an empty room. I mean I still get nervous from time to time to time, but ultimately that's how I generally approach going into a room where I don't know anyone and be like, Oh, let's go, let's go make some friends tonight.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely. And I used the friend at a cafe. When I talk about when you go on camera, you're really just a friend at a cafe. So imagine that the person you're talking to is already a friend is the perfect way to approach going on camera because that way, especially if it's live, you have to be you. You cannot pretend to be anybody else and you have to be a friend and a cafe. Live video is just about seeing a slice of life. There is nothing about putting on errors or doing a performance is not that at all is about being real. It's about being the real you that people say authentic. I don't know why I can't stand that word, but it's about, it's about being the same as you are on camera as you are off camera and and being that friend at a cafe.

Speaker 1:

Like how would you talk to somebody if you were at a cafe would you say? And so so you know, so x.com for your opt in now, like you would never say that to a friend at a cafe. You might say, Hey, so go grab the training@x.com so that we can get started getting you clients with Pinterest. Let's go like you would. That's how you'd talk to a friend. So that's the way you need to end your video because that's how people talk when they come over for a party or be at a cafe. You've got to be the friend at a cafe as specially when you go live. And I'm guilty wilty of this. Okay. Because as an actress, I'm used to playing parts and it's very easy to meet VZ for me to snap into a character or be somebody I'm not. It's so easy for me to do that. And one of the hardest things for me to do is to be the real me. And it's something that I've had to work on, you know? And there's some people who can just be the real them, but if you are not that person, then you need to practice. Just practice. Just film yourself and watch it back and say, what am I doing? That's not real. Yeah,

Speaker 3:

yeah. Oh, it's fantastic. One of the other elements that a lot of times comes into video is ultimately the end of the video or getting people to take another step beyond the video, whether it's purchased something or learn more or watch another video. You know, do you have any advice in terms of how to weave that in in a way that is not, you know, cheesy or marketing or spammy? You know, we work in advertising, so it's amazing. A lot of times if we just took a random person off the street and we're like, okay, we need to make a commercial, immediately would they would be, it was like, well buy this by now, Sunday, Sunday, you know, like all of a sudden they think that marketing is all about yelling at a person, right. To just put the big bold letters in front of them, sale, sale, sale. And it's just that people are like, well that's kind of maybe what we see a lot of times. But I like with what you just said. I agree 100%. It is, it is the element of um, you're talking like a human talking like it, it'd

Speaker 1:

be the other way because I'm really good at that and I told you I struggle with being the real me not in situations like this, but sometimes I do or maybe even in situations like this, I do. And so for me, this is a struggle, but, but I'll tell you this in my latest, um, webinar and training, which of course people can get at my website, which I'll give at the end. Um, I teach first, you want to showcase your expertise in this following manner. You want to show your audience that you get them right by presenting ideas that are useful, meaningful, valuable, that give them hope, that give them a way forward, that really speak to where they want to go. Get them to the next step, okay? And you really want to show that you're trustworthy by delivering whatever you say you're going to deliver at the beginning of your video. If you show that you will do what you say you will do. Just like a boyfriend. Okay? That is going to be the first test. If the man says I'm a call you at eight and he doesn't go dik dik dik dik at seven 59 he's done. Okay. So same thing when you go on video.

Speaker 1:

And I had, I had one who didn't do it, he said he would not, no, he got his claws in me and it was like this horrible toxic relationship. And I couldn't get him. Like I just couldn't break up with him. It was horrible. It was like, you know the relationship that he in my twenties and it can happen, but it won't happen because people won't tolerate that on a video. So you do need to deliver, you have to show that you are trustworthy because they're not going to waste their time or ever giving you their money unless they can see that you deliver. Right? And then the third thing you want to show on video is that you're easy to follow. And that's where the likability and the relate-ability comes in. You know, are you easy to follow? You know, is it clear? Is it concise?

Speaker 1:

Is it doable? Right. And, and so I remember when I was first starting, I would do these really long videos about like networking at parties and it was like, no, that has nothing to do with video girl. Like I wasn't staying focused and so people could see that I wasn't focused and they were like, bye girl, bye. Okay. So I needed to start to focus, what is my audience really want? I need to start ask questions. I don't even do that enough now. But you know, I do surveys now and to ask, you know, what are you, what are you struggling with? But that's what you have to do. You've got to know what people want. You've got to ask them if you don't already. You can also go the route of creating your own content. Like that guy, salt Bay, have you ever seen he flicked salt off of his elbow into his steaks and he's like this star chef.

Speaker 1:

Okay. Like that. He made that up and nobody ever said in a survey, I want somebody to flick salt off their elbow. Cause I think that would be fascinating. Nobody says that, right? So you can do it with your own creativity, but if that's not working, then go and ask your audience what they need. So you've got it present the ideas that are relevant and you've got to be easy to follow with doable action steps. And then if you do that, then you transitioned to your call to action by saying, you know, you've shown them that you get them, then you offer hope, inspiration and a way forward by saying something like, so I want you to learn from my mistakes. So, or something like I went through that pain so you don't have to. And then you give them a gift that moves them forward or ask them to do something that helps them join your tribe.

Speaker 1:

But if let's say that you're giving a gift and you want to give really something inspirational at the very end with the right energy, so you're gonna ask them, for example, grab my Quickstart guide and let's get started bringing your business clients from Instagram, right? So it's a very specific way of asking, but it's also going to give a promise. It's going to be a way forward. It's going to be inspiring. It's going to be the positive thing. That's your solution. So the energy behind it has to be matching. It has to have that hope or that confidence or that I'm going to give you a way forward. Or let's just say your call to action is, I want you to join my email list. So then you might just say something like, welcome to my community. Like you're excited, you know, or, Hey, welcome to my community. If that's your brand, you know, like if your brand is young and fun and or whatever it is, but you want to give something that's inspirational at the same time as you're giving your call to action.

Speaker 3:

I love it. Now, Michelle is, we kind of bring the episode to a close. Are there any final tips or advice that you would give to other other business owners out there? Uh, as they're working to get more exposure for their, their company, trying to work to create more videos, to connect with more customers, trying to get on TV. Anything else that maybe you haven't mentioned already? Uh, the, any advice that you would want to toss their way?

Speaker 1:

You really need to just make videos and if you're scared, just start out by making them free yourself. Put a camera up, put your walk in front of a window with natural light coming in and start, just give a tip. Look into the camera, talk to your favorite client. Just give a tip or gets, tell a story. Tell stories are the best stories. Give people meaning. Like you said, people remember stories. They don't always remember content, but they remember stories. And then once that kind of gets good enough, then go ahead and show like a client. Say, Hey, is this, do you think this is good enough? Do you think so didn't think was swell. Help my brand or hurt my brand. And if they say, no, it's good, put it out there, then just start doing it. Going live. Um, like say a Facebook or Instagram is the easiest way to get started because you don't have to do a lot of production.

Speaker 1:

People are way more forgiving of your lighting and everything else. So going live is the easiest. Put some bullet points. Put an opening hook that tells them what they're going to get if they watch a video, make it short a minute or less and just start, well now for life, if it's live, it can go 10 minutes, one to 10 minutes, and really give them some value and then a call to action, whether it's, Hey, I'd love for you to comment in the comments below and let me know what you're struggling with with X, you know, so just do it is my advice. Wonderful advice. Well thank you so much for being here on the show. It was wonderful to have you here. Thank you guys for tuning in and we'll catch you on the next episode.

Speaker 2:

Thank you for listening to the Duke of digital podcast with Brian Mitt, one to network with other business owners. Join our exclusive group at facebook.com/groups/duke of digital fancy the Duke. Leave a five star review on your favorite podcast app, and you can be mentioned on the show. The Duke of digital was produced by advertisement and recorded in Hollywood, California.