All Things Telesales

EP 06 - Liston Witherill - Building Trust on the Phone

January 19, 2020 Jake Lynn / Liston Witherill Season 1 Episode 6
All Things Telesales
EP 06 - Liston Witherill - Building Trust on the Phone
Chapters
All Things Telesales
EP 06 - Liston Witherill - Building Trust on the Phone
Jan 19, 2020 Season 1 Episode 6
Jake Lynn / Liston Witherill

Liston Witherill is a sales trainer and consultant with a top-shelf podcast, "Modern Sales," on this episode, Jake & Liston discuss, "Building Trust on the Phone," 

With Liston's tips:

  • Be disarming right off the bat 
  • Get their attention, pique their interest 
  • Empathize, be honest, compassionate 
  • Use video when you can 
  • Tell the truth even when it doesn’t directly benefit you

Put your prospect in control:

  • Don’t just talk at your prospect but engage with your prospect 
  • Rapport Building 
  • Find a common ground 
  • Talk about the Agenda 
  • Contents of the meeting
  • Summarize what I learned 
  • And the next steps 

RESOURCE MENTIONED
CRYSTAL KNOWS ► https://crys.io/s/wzVAG5


SHOW NOTES
SUBSCRIBE TO ALL THINGS TELESALES PODCAST
WWW.ALLTHINGSTELESALES.COM

SHOW DESCRIPTION

Twice a week, Jake Lynn interviews the world’s top sales experts like Scott Leese, Kevin Dorsey, John Barrows, Jake Dunlap, Brian Burns, and many more -- to reveal tips and insights you can use to generate more revenue and close more business online and over the phone. If you want to learn the most powerful sales secrets from the top sales experts in the world, subscribe to the podcast.

ALL THINGS TELESALES
WEBSITE ► AllThingsTelesales.com
LINKEDIN ► https://www.linkedin.com/company/64255888/
FACEBOOK ►https://www.facebook.com/allthingstelesales/
YOUTUBE ►https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRQ98JUE1Mm3K9ez2DOxVhw/


ABOUT JAKE
Jake Lynn coaches sales leaders to accelerate phone-based conversions by providing end-to-end engagement solutions. As a Phone-Based Sales Leader, Jake focuses on sales engineering cloud-based tech for contact centers. 

ABOUT LISTON WITHERILL
Liston is sales trainer and consultant who helps client services professionals sell more services to big companies. He does it by providing remote and onsite training to teams who want to serve their clients more effectively while selling more, and doing it ethically. 

- Trained 50+ consultants at a $7B+ public company
- Sold a $1M+ contract to a government buyer
- Built marketing and selling strategies for 40+ private clients
- Interviewed top thought leaders and professionals on my podcast
- Worked with hundreds of independent consultants to help improve their selling


FOLLOW JAKE LYNN
LINKEDIN ► https://www.linkedin.com/in/jakelynndotcom/

FOLLOW  LISTON WITHERILL
LINKEDIN ► https://www.linkedin.com/in/listonwitherill/
SERVE DON'T SELL ► servedontsell.co
MODERN SALES PODCAST ► https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/modern-sales-b2b-sales-podcast/id1405330367



Show Notes Transcript

Liston Witherill is a sales trainer and consultant with a top-shelf podcast, "Modern Sales," on this episode, Jake & Liston discuss, "Building Trust on the Phone," 

With Liston's tips:

  • Be disarming right off the bat 
  • Get their attention, pique their interest 
  • Empathize, be honest, compassionate 
  • Use video when you can 
  • Tell the truth even when it doesn’t directly benefit you

Put your prospect in control:

  • Don’t just talk at your prospect but engage with your prospect 
  • Rapport Building 
  • Find a common ground 
  • Talk about the Agenda 
  • Contents of the meeting
  • Summarize what I learned 
  • And the next steps 

RESOURCE MENTIONED
CRYSTAL KNOWS ► https://crys.io/s/wzVAG5


SHOW NOTES
SUBSCRIBE TO ALL THINGS TELESALES PODCAST
WWW.ALLTHINGSTELESALES.COM

SHOW DESCRIPTION

Twice a week, Jake Lynn interviews the world’s top sales experts like Scott Leese, Kevin Dorsey, John Barrows, Jake Dunlap, Brian Burns, and many more -- to reveal tips and insights you can use to generate more revenue and close more business online and over the phone. If you want to learn the most powerful sales secrets from the top sales experts in the world, subscribe to the podcast.

ALL THINGS TELESALES
WEBSITE ► AllThingsTelesales.com
LINKEDIN ► https://www.linkedin.com/company/64255888/
FACEBOOK ►https://www.facebook.com/allthingstelesales/
YOUTUBE ►https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRQ98JUE1Mm3K9ez2DOxVhw/


ABOUT JAKE
Jake Lynn coaches sales leaders to accelerate phone-based conversions by providing end-to-end engagement solutions. As a Phone-Based Sales Leader, Jake focuses on sales engineering cloud-based tech for contact centers. 

ABOUT LISTON WITHERILL
Liston is sales trainer and consultant who helps client services professionals sell more services to big companies. He does it by providing remote and onsite training to teams who want to serve their clients more effectively while selling more, and doing it ethically. 

- Trained 50+ consultants at a $7B+ public company
- Sold a $1M+ contract to a government buyer
- Built marketing and selling strategies for 40+ private clients
- Interviewed top thought leaders and professionals on my podcast
- Worked with hundreds of independent consultants to help improve their selling


FOLLOW JAKE LYNN
LINKEDIN ► https://www.linkedin.com/in/jakelynndotcom/

FOLLOW  LISTON WITHERILL
LINKEDIN ► https://www.linkedin.com/in/listonwitherill/
SERVE DON'T SELL ► servedontsell.co
MODERN SALES PODCAST ► https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/modern-sales-b2b-sales-podcast/id1405330367



Support the show (http://www.allthingstelesales.com)

Jake Lynn:   0:01
Youre now tuned in to the all things Telesales podcast. I'm your host, Jake Lynn. if the phone is your weapon. This is your podcast. Every week, I'll interview leaders across all verticals. A teller sells this week. I got a special guest by the name of listing weather. Oh, he's the host of the modern sells podcast. And this week, he's here with us to talk about building trust on the phones. This did my man. Thanks for joining me on all things Stella sells podcasts. Really? Been looking forward to spending some time with you, man, we've been talking a lot here lately, and, uh, I really look forward to talking today. We're gonna talk about building trust on the phone and listen, I know you've got a really awesome podcasts out there called the martyr and sells. I just really appreciate you taking time to join me on this podcast today.

Liston WItherill:   0:49
Thanks for having me. It's my pleasure.

Jake Lynn:   0:51
Awesome. And so we hear about it all the time. You know where it sells and people don't buy unless they bike nowhere. Trust us, right? You know, build interests over the phone, especially nowadays people have their guards up with PCP, a regulations and all kinds of different things that people just robo calls. This that. I mean, it's one of the top three biggest complaints at the White House or robo calls. God,

Liston WItherill:   1:20
it seems like we have bigger things to complain

Jake Lynn:   1:22
about. I know, you know. You know, President's gotta go. We'll work to dig your these.

Liston WItherill:   1:29
Well, yes, yes, indeed. That's the understatement of the century.

Jake Lynn:   1:33
So So, with that in mind, man, I mean people, they have their guard up. So how do we build trust over the phone?

Liston WItherill:   1:40
Well, so Well, I always like to start with kind of the problem, right. So why is tres so important is the first thing that I want Oh, kind of tackle when we talk about this and my feeling is so if you're in, like, true tele sales, right? So I focus on selling. Professional service is so consulting, you know, management consultant, software developers, accountants, like people who sell really expensive, very specialized expertise. Even then, right? Even those people, when they're reaching out to someone, these air very credible, accomplished, educated people when they reach out to someone, the other person is going to have their guard up because they're thinking, Oh, no, I'm about to be sold something right? What's wrong with being sold something right? Because we we do respond to messages that are relevant to us. You know, on my podcast, I had I recently ran this Siri's called Buyer Insights, and I interviewed corporate buyers and I asked them. One of one of the questions I asked was, Hey, do you ever respond to cold calls or cold emails? And they all said the same thing, which was very rarely, yeah, but if it's relevant to me and I'm currently interested in this thing, I will respond. They all said that right? Initially they were almost dismissive about it like, No, no, no. I would never respond to a cold. The Miller cold call. Well, actually, there was this one time, right? So we know that it's OK to sell to people if it's relevant, right? But we also know that they have their guard up right, And the reason trust is so vital is because if you're especially if you're getting interrupted right, I had no expectation that this call was going to come in. We don't have any familiarity with the person or the brand in some cases, right? And so because of that, the other person doesn't know. Is this worth my time? Are you credible? Can I make sure that you're not going to just kind of screw me over? There's gonna be a giant waste of my time. So that's why people have their guard up so much, right? Because we've all encountered the kind of sleazy sales person. And who wants to you have that happened to them? And even more so, listeners of this podcast? No, none of you want to feel that way, right? And hopefully you aren't that so you shouldn't feel that way. So how does trust work? So a couple of different things, Right? 11 thing that I think and you've mentioned Josh Braun from sales DNA, and this is something he's big on. And I agree with it, particularly in the setting of tele sales. Yeah, is to be disarming right off the bat, right? Yeah. So I don't remember who said this, but I love this line. It's very me. It's not gonna be for everybody but this person. He said his opening line when he cold calls is high, It's so and so I'm calling to sell you something. And then he's just quiet, right? And the reason I think that's so interesting is because it's telling the person right away like that takes it off the table. They can't say, OK, I get it. You're really just here to sell me something? Well, he's saying it right

Jake Lynn:   5:02
off the bat. Yeah, and so the prospects like, curious at this point, you piqued their interests. What does he try to sell me? Well, it it's

Liston WItherill:   5:12
different, right? People have never heard that before, And so now all of a sudden you might have their attention and you know So hey, I'm here to sell you something, and they're probably gonna be a little taken aback and be quiet for a second. Is it okay if I take 10 seconds just to tell you what it is? And you can tell me if you wanna hang up on me, everyone's gonna say us to that, right? Right. So I think it depends on the setting of how we build trust. But I think the first thing is to be disarming and really empathize with the other person. How would you feel if you receive this call and start to honor that By making sure you are doing things that build trust, like being disarming, being honest, right? Being empathetic and really carrying about the other person in their time. And one of the problems with the phone is that so much communication happens with body language. So I don't know if you're familiar with, um I think it's Greenpeace when they're on the corner like they'll hang out by, like a mall or a thoroughfare where a lot of people walk at least. Ryan, you're in L A. So none of those places exist in a way you need by Staples Center, right?

Jake Lynn:   6:26
Okay. You guys

Liston WItherill:   6:27
know there's someone out there with a little, you know, clipboard and some things that they're gonna pass out. Yeah, And what they do is they'll wait to make eye contact, they'll go high. And if you make eye contact now, you Yes. So if you make eye contact, they go. Hi. How are you today? And they reach their hand out. Yeah, right. Why do they do that? Because there's this really weird, unwritten social rule which is if someone reaches their hand out, you have to shake it. Sure, it's not clear why, right. But you can also assess, you know, do they look trustworthy based on the way they carry themselves, based on the way they shake hands based on their cleanliness based on their clothes based on, you know, their posture, like there's all these other indicators that we're using to try to figure out. Is this person trustworthy and their subconscious over the phone? None of that exists right whenever sword of major disadvantage. And so I think, very first impression being open, making sure that you're showing that you're not going to deceive the person and tone of voice is really important to I think you have to sound confident and calm, right, because if not, it's gonna kind of freak. The other person out. If you sound like you're in a boiler room and like, it's 100 degrees and your sales manager just had a push up contest, and so everyone's trying to get their quote in right like that's probably not gonna go well, right? So you know to me really focusing on that. How are we going to start. The call is really, really important because people are so skeptical now in my line of work, what I like to do is use video, so I have a 100% remote business and I get hired over the Internet. I don't meet my clients in person. At least it's rare that I d'oh right, So I'm working remotely, and so from the outset, I want to set that kind of, um expectation immediately. But I also want my communication to be is richest possible. And so, if possible, here's what I would push you to dio if it's possible in your line of work. If you're scheduling calls, you make sure you do it over video because it is going to give you a chance to show body language. It is going to give you a chance to show who you are. Besides just a voice over the phone like What do you look like? How persuasive do you seem? You know, do you talk with your hands, which I'm doing a lot of right now, You know, no one on the podcast can see that, but of course that's who I am. So I think video is very, very important. Is that something that you ever use or talk about in your line of work, Jake?

Jake Lynn:   9:26
Yeah. Um, actually, I got a buddy that owns problem Call, Quick page and quick pages. That is absolutely thio like vidyard use vidyard. I've actually seen one of your big yard videos. Which, to your point, is how I got to know you was through a code outreach email, that he sent a marketing department and I was like, Hold up, This is great. You could make a great guests on my cats. So some a bit yard, or there's a lot of tools out there right now that would give you that ability. Saw 100% man. I get it. And then having a way to track that and get some analytics and some visibility into, you know, open rates and success rates, too. Right is this is equally important on the back in, but on the front end again, get him back to build and trust. Absolutely 100%. That's it's a great way to build trust.

Liston WItherill:   10:18
Yep. Well, so I think one of the big tips that I like to give people about building trust is. And this was also confirmed in that buyers Insight, Siri's that I just ran on my podcast that I mentioned earlier where I talked to corporate buyers. But one of the things that I recommend everybody doing sales, whether it's tele sales or any kind of sales, is too do and say things occasionally not exclusively, but occasionally that are against your own self interest. And what I mean by that is, if you're in a sale setting right, whatever you're selling, whether it's a product or a service, it's not going to be perfect for everybody in every situation. And so one really easy way to build trust. Let's take software, for example, just because it's so clear right? If I contact someone and say by my project management software, of course, some people are gonna ask. Well, does it do this one feature? And if it doesn't, I think the key thing to say is, No, it doesn't do that. Yeah, right now, if it's not on the road map, don't lie about it. Um, and also I think you can always take that moment to say, You know what? It doesn't do that. Is it okay if I take a second to explain the thought behind our product and why we include some features in some features, we don't It's intentional right now that opens up a conversation about how we're different. But I think, ah, lot of, ah, a lot of people in sales unfortunately, feel that they need to Why over represent right If they dio,

Jake Lynn:   12:01
Yeah, you're not setting proper expectations on the front,

Liston WItherill:   12:06
right? And, you know, just telling there's gonna be certain people like me, and I don't know you well enough to say what your personality is, Jake. But if I'm talking to someone and everything I ask, they answer in the affirmative. Oh, yeah, I can definitely do that. It's the best. Everything you want to condemn you. I'm gonna be sitting there being like No, it doesn't. There's no way right. There's no you didn't build the software for me, right? There's gotta be some things I wanted to do that it doesn't or some things that aren't implemented the way I'm asking, right? There's got to be something. Yeah. And so for me, one of the best ways to build trust is to show the other person. I'm going to tell you the truth, even when it doesn't directly benefit

Jake Lynn:   12:54
me, right? Yeah, for sure. It's You hear it all the time. Bad budget authority need timeline. But the biggest part of that is the need. And if I don't have what you need, then I'm gonna tell you, right. It's just being transparent. Honest,

Liston WItherill:   13:15
right? Exactly. And it's, you know, I don't know that it's a simple as like, I can meet the need. Er I can't meet the need. I mean, obviously, if I can't meet the need, then I should tell you, and you should go elsewhere. And I should sell the prospects who I can help, But usually it's kind of on a spectrum, right. I can meet 85% of your need.

Jake Lynn:   13:33
Yeah, Yeah. Narcissistic deal, right? Yeah. You

Liston WItherill:   13:36
know, I could be more of their needs than others, And those were the moments where I would really take the time to say, Let me explain to you, you know what we're good at and what we're not? Honestly. And you could make your own assessment.

Jake Lynn:   13:51
Yeah, for sure. And then they can tell you whether or not, you know, how important? So it's one of the questions I've learned. Ask is through that discovery processes know how important is this Because, you know, I'm telling you that I'm not able to deliver on this. How important is that? And I said, Well, it's important. Appreciate you being honest, but, um, we keep we can keep the conversation going. Them say, you know, just and then that's that's one good way of building trust

Liston WItherill:   14:17
for sure. Yeah, for sure. So, you know, I think being honest is really important. I think also, let me ask you, when you're talking about building trust on the phone is this may mainly just like total cold calls. Um Or, you know, what are you talking about? When when you think about building trust on the phone?

Jake Lynn:   14:41
Well, building trust over the phone, of course, depends on the setting, right? It did somebody fill out of four. And so then you just simply if they have the intent to buy, then they reached out to you, and it's just asking, I think just what prompted you to reach out and just listening? You get permission to take notes, take notes and listen, and then rephrasing some of the highlights that they're looking for from inbound opportunity. Then they That's how you go trust is letting them know that you're listening to their needs and and after, like that's that's that's a lot easier than, like I say, an outbound call and out Belle call, whether it be cold call or like I'm calling on age leading and nobody from my company's talk to them, you know, within the last couple of weeks. Or, you know, legally, depending on the setting, like a bit some, it's B to C. I can't call him after nine of the 90th day, right? Right? Intent to Bob. So it's been a BBC world. We have to build some type of rapport, you know, and and always coached agents. When I when I had a call center, we do what we were doing. Life insurance sales. I would say Some also big your ears get with Noah is that transfer of enthusiasm and that's kind of where that trust building starts. So So the answer question. It really just depends on the setting on a cold call. I like your purse. Nicole call, You know? Hey, I'm trying to sell you something or you don't know my guy, right? I'm aware I'm calling right. You don't even know who I am. But right, Get five minutes of your time. And so, uh, just being honest on a cold call. 100% how you start building trust and B to C environment. It's a little bit different. Like you gotta build some report there in your tips that you might have

Liston WItherill:   16:39
for building report. Yeah. So, you know, I've worked with a lot of people who are technical experts in a field, and some of those folks have a really hard time with this with building report. And so I always think about like, Well, what is the grab bag of things you could always cover that anybody can talk about? So I think the tricky thing about building report is it has to be interesting and relevant to the person, or at least on the surface. But it also has to be something that they can engage in easily. Right? So a lot of people, I'm sure you've seen this, right? Some CR EMS have, like, sports scores built in. If you're calling someone in Chicago, you know what the Cubs score Waas, but not everybody follows the Cubs. A Man Great Cubs game last night. They're like, I don't watch baseball, right? I think. You know, For me, one of the one of the things that anybody will talk about is always the weather, right? I know I'm looking for on Looking for is not to have a deep conversation and not to show myself is vulnerable right off the bat, although I should. Eventually what I'm looking for is just to get them to respond, right? Have a little bit of a back and forth. So you know, the weather, something about their city, something I know so like in Chicago, pizza is a big thing, and they're to pizza restaurants that a lot of Chicagoans debate as being the best. And so that that's a question. I'll ask right If I'm talking to someone in Chicago, all say so. I've been curious. Lou Malnati's Orpik wads, right? And they'll be like, Oh, okay, you know something about Chicago, right? And then it will be this whole discussion about like When do you go to Lou Malnati is and why is P quads better? No P quads isn't the place you should go to this other place. Yeah, and so something like that to show some sort of commonality, right? Or even contrast. Like when we got on the phone today, you said, How's your day going? And I was like, Well, it's warmer now because it was snowing in Portland. Never snows in Calabasas is right, and you're like, Yeah, sure does. And it's pretty hot down here, right? So that's an easy thing, usedto bond, depending on how much research you can. D'oh! Where the person went to school is always an easy one, right? So if I see someone who went toe UC Santa Barbara, that's something all used because I went there for grad school, right? So I'll say, like go gauchos if I record a video to them, which was our mascot. Something that shows that you're paying attention always helps, but I think something general, like the weather there, geography, where they went to school. I think that's all fine. Yeah, and in particular, if you have something that you genuinely have in common with the person so, like for me, I love food. I love exercise. I love coffee. I love beer. I love whiskey. Like all of those things. If I can learn that about the person before I come on, Those are things I can talk somewhat intelligently about for like, two minutes, Right? So that's what I'm gonna talk about. And Rapport works best. You build the most report, I should say, when it's not just we're having a little surface level conversation like I would with someone in the line at Whole Foods, right? It works best when we actually have something in common. So the the pizza question for people in Chicago like that's a bonding moment because they're like he's been here, even understand something that you couldn't easily just find on the Internet, right? Like it's a It's a thing that we can now talk about and have in common, which will open us up to other things.

Jake Lynn:   20:33
Yeah, I like that. And it brings me to a really interesting point. Two is free call preparation. How much? Yes. You know, before that you placed that call. That call is made like Western. Were they located? What score do they go to? Right? And so that freak on preparation now, did you have Facebook. You have windy and you have so many different ways that you could look people up before you get a hold of them or has the means to get a hold of them. And the chances are that they probably already researched us before. We better even researched them too,

Liston WItherill:   21:09
right? I know and shame on us, right? I mean, here's what I think is linked in for all of its many faults. And you and I were talking about some of them. Or at least I was, uh, you know, reading my laundry list of things I don't like about Lincoln. It's still the best source of professional information. Write about other people. Um, and it takes I'm not exaggerating here. One minute to go to someone's linked in page and look at where they went to school. What jobs they've had in their career trajectory, Probably where they grew up. Some extracurriculars. They've done what kind of reviews people leave for them. And then some of the things that they did, they're posted or commented on recently, takes 1 to 2 minutes to do that, right? Yeah, And the amount of impact I can have in one or two sentences is now 10 times what it was before first, because they'll know I paid attention. Right? And they were important enough for me to give up a minute or two of my time to come to this call prepared. And that is pretty critical, right? Because we, you know, especially think about this. If you're talking to the type of person who does their research and you show up and you didn't do their research like, I'm not going to trust you because I like people like me. And you're not like me, right?

Jake Lynn:   22:35
Yeah. And you had mentioned it earlier into the podcast. She said you don't know me well enough right now to never know my personality, But there's a tool out there called Crystal knows.

Liston WItherill:   22:47
Mmm mmm. Mmm. Mmm. Have you seen Mark about that? Sure about that.

Jake Lynn:   22:51
Yeah. So Crystal knows, like disc assessments and all that to understand. First, understand your own personality and how it relates into, like, the personality assessments I think is important thing to learn. Like what? Sure how you can adapt toe like, let's say how I can adapt to listen and your personality so that you don't get to that common ground a tool of my linked in to help me get there. Recall preparation, Help. No. Trust is a tool that Crystal knows.

Liston WItherill:   23:21
My thing on, Krystal knows, is most people tend to communicate in shorter bursts online, shorter sentences, often in complete sentences. Because we're busy, we're distracted, right? We're not trying to write a novel, and actually, most people don't write very well. So there's that also, like, regardless of reality. Sure, um and so my experience was several years ago. I having his crystal knows in a while is that it over represents the number of deep personalities that you would see in the world population. So it over represents people who are the quote unquote classic a personality like very driven, very in your face, very direct. People like me. Um, and so you know, that's I think that's my two cents on crystal noses like it sounds good, but I don't know how useful it is. And also, if personality is fixed, it depends, you know, like how adaptable is someone really to change their personality to meet the others? Anyway, I could go on for a long time, a balance. Well, Mr Personality Tests, what I do think is important is to evaluate when you're talking to someone else. Very simple things which you can draw from disk. Right. So, like a C personality, I forget what C stands for. But this person tends to be more analytical, right there. More about the details, right? And so my wife and I get into many arguments because we both like details, and I'm very direct, which is a nasty combination, anything that she can tell you. Yeah. And so we we will get into arguments about, like, what was the exact right thing? Always right. So when you're talking to someone, you can probably sense, do they need more or less detail? Right now, I'm more inclined to disagree with me or agree with me. So if they're constantly agreeing, maybe I'm gonna need to make some space for them to tell me. Hey, what you're offering sucks right? Because, like, I want to know that, right? And I want to know if they have any objections. I don't want them to just agree with everything I'm saying, right? Yeah. So I I think you know, there are some useful things about personality says just understanding the core differences. Things like agreeableness, conscientiousness, openness. Those things were really, really important and can help you in these initial calls.

Jake Lynn:   25:49
Yeah, man, Let's lots of nuggets, man. Um, anything else that you that you might want to add to building trust some of the phone? I mean, it's such a bond re list of things that we could talk about. Oh,

Liston WItherill:   26:02
my gosh. Yeah. So I the last thing I would say that I think is really important, you know, definitely use Zoom for video

Jake Lynn:   26:11
is awesome, huh? Is the

Liston WItherill:   26:12
best by far. Don't use Skype. Don't use Google hangouts. They suck in comparison. Um, the other thing I would say this is the last kind of take away I want to leave everybody with is to put your prospect in control. And what I mean by that is there are ways that we can structure are calls to give people more or less control, right? And one of the big mistakes you've done sales training. So you know this one of the big mistakes a lot of people will do is they'll just get on the phone. And when the prospect answers. They're just talking at them until the prospect hanging out there like I give up. I can't take it anymore, right? Is that that's not a good way to put the prospect in control. Yeah, I think one of the initial things you can do is always start that. Here's my format for a sales call. No matter where you are in the sales process. Report building. You know, how's it? How's it going or something that we have in common? Um, always talk about the agenda. Here's why I'm calling. Here's what I'd like to cover. Here's what will happen at the end of the coal You know, the contents of the meeting that I'm going to summarize what I learned, and then we're gonna have next steps, right? Even if the next step is let's not talk again because this isn't a fit. But we're all gonna walk away knowing exactly what just happened and why. Right when I say put your prospect in control at each of those stages, you can ask for permission, right? So we do our little report building. That's 1 to 2 minutes. I would say, Hey, you know, here's the reason why I'm on the phone today. I'd like to cover X, Y and Z. Is there anything you'd like to cover? They say yes or no. And then you would say Cool. Is it all right if I ask you a few questions? I'm always asking for permission, right? Is it okay if I ask you a few questions? Yes. Is it OK if I summarize what you just told me? Of course. Everyone's gonna say Yeah, right. Is it okay if we talk a little bit about what might happen next? Right. I'm always asking for permission because I want the other person not just to feel like they're in control, but actually have a real stake in what happens during this conversation. And importantly, salespeople. What happens after the conversation? Because if they feel like they have nothing invested, you have no deal. It's not going anywhere. There's no reason for them to keep talking to you. So we want by giving them control and scary as it may be, actually seating that control to them, genuinely giving it to them. If we do that, they're gonna have more invested in the conversation. And what happens afterwards? That's my last very spirited Enthusiastic.

Jake Lynn:   29:00
That's good stuff, man. And yes, So So after butting up a car, I like, I like that Where you'd you know, Is it okay if I summarize what we talked about so rephrasing you know, after Because you should be. I should have been taking notes through that call to be able to rephrase to the person in and not the exact words, but in words in which they took it, that you understood the need. And so, yes, I really like that you asked for permission to then summarize. I haven't heard anybody say that. And I like that part of it as well and actively would like to wrap up calls if it's a one call close like in the life insurance BTC to do one con closes and even at the end of a demo or in the Discover card like that, finishing with how did you How do you feel about the meeting that we just said? How do you feel about the time that we just spent together that gets them? So then I can understand what their commitment level is to maybe keep the next meaning. Er, you know or what could have done better if anything, and so a sells professional could get better. Are there any other power questions that you might ask

Liston WItherill:   30:19
like that? Our question is, though, on my questions. Hi, I have a six questions Siris on my podcast. One question per episode six episodes s. So anybody listening to this, you can go check that out. Awesome. But for more something a little bit more clothes oriented or what I say is the conclusion of the sale, because we could get a yes, and we can get a no on. Both are fine, but we don't want to live in. Maybe right, eso if especially if I'm selling something that's going to require more thought or more people to be involved in the decision, especially that right, here's a question that I would recommend you use. So if you're talking to someone and they have to bring it back to their team to discuss whatever you just talked about, I would always say, Let me ask you, how do you feel about what we talked about? That was your question, and if they're like this, seems great, right? But it's not just me. It's my team also. Yeah. And I would ask Tell me what we need to do to make this a home run when you take it back to them. It's good. What does this need to look like for them to say yes? And if they're invested, they're gonna tell you they're gonna tell you exactly what's right with it. What's wrong with it? What needs to change? And I want to know that, right? Because often what will happen is you'll hear some objection surface. That may just be misunderstandings. They think one thing, and actually, there's something different about your product or service. And so we have a chance to correct that now. Okay. Cool. You know, I understand why you would have thought that. Is it okay if I explain what that really is about and, you know, and everybody will you? Oh, yeah. I'm because I'm gonna need to go sell this to someone else. Please do straighten the record for me. So that is one question that I would ask, Um I think you know often at the end of these calls, what you'll hear is something to the you know, something like, I'm gonna need to think about it, or I'm gonna need some more information. And so I would always ask when I hear that, um well, cool. You said you need to think about it. What are some of the things that are on your mind right now? Like what's going through your mind that you need to chew on for a while, cause I might be able to help them make that decision, right? And I again, I would love it if I could help them get to a no. So that they don't have to spend time with me. That's unnecessary for them. Yeah, I don't have to do the same, right? And if they're asking for Well, you know, I think I'm I just need to do some more research or find some more information. I'd say Cool. You know, I actually have a mountain of information over here. There's something that I can send you. Let's discuss what that might be. What can you tell me? Some of the things that you might be looking for, right? So I'm always looking to get to that. No. Right. Like, how do we get to that? Noah's fast as possible. Um and so those are some of the questions that I like to use at the end of these calls, because the point of any call right is it's not only critical what happens on the call, but it's critical what happens after, Right? The point of the call is to move the sail forward. And so if we're not moving the sale for, we have a major problem. So I'm going to ask questions that helped do

Jake Lynn:   33:35
that. Nice theme, man with the questions. That's me. Yeah, I'm gonna current everybody this Listen to this podcast. Go check out modern sales podcast will listen with roll Check that pie cast out. He's got He's got mountains of information. Lots of Lal is there. Check him out and working people find

Liston WItherill:   33:58
so people can find me on my website served on cell dot com. Um, I send out a daily email that is right. A new e mail every day. So if you want, if you dare to sign up for that, I send out a daily sales insights newsletter. Everyone has a drawing, so you'll like to see pretty pictures in there so you can sign up for that you can connect with me on LinkedIn. And, of course, the number one thing I love for you to dio sign up for that newsletter or check out the modern sales podcast, which you confined anywhere. You listen to

Jake Lynn:   34:32
podcasts that was listening with the room building Trust on the phone. Be disarming right off the bat, Get their attention, piqued their interest. Empathize the honest, compassionate use video when you can. That's Alison on that through a bid yard video. Tell the truth, even when it doesn't directly benefit you. We talked about the importance of pre call preparation. We talked about the pros and times of crystal knows. Check the show notes for an affiliate link for a free trial. Put your prospecting control. Don't just talk at your prospect, but in Cage with your prospect Report building. Find a common ground. Talk about the agenda contents of the meeting. It summarized what you learn and, as always, next steps. If you want to secure the bag, gotta secure the next steps. I'm Jake Clear. Had a good time chatting with listening with a real chicken mountain serve. Don't sell dot com. Modern sells podcasts. Thanks for staying on the line on all things Teller sells podcasts. Did you like today's episode? If so, subscribe. So next week's episode will be available for you. If you really enjoyed today's episode, leave a five star review. It's a good way toe. Get the word out there and if not, check out another episode. Maybe then you'll be able to rape the show. Five stars. Any teller sells leaders you'd like to hear from on the show Senate? Imode up. I cast at all things Teller sells dot com.