What the Kids Were Watching

"The Golden Child": The Chosen One Just Wants to Have Fun

January 15, 2020 Sarah A. Ruiz and Rafael A. Ruiz Season 1 Episode 4
What the Kids Were Watching
"The Golden Child": The Chosen One Just Wants to Have Fun
Chapters
What the Kids Were Watching
"The Golden Child": The Chosen One Just Wants to Have Fun
Jan 15, 2020 Season 1 Episode 4
Sarah A. Ruiz and Rafael A. Ruiz

It takes a very special movie to get someone to start a podcast. For Sarah, that movie — the movie that launched the idea of What the Kids Were Watching — is the 1986 Eddie Murphy comedy "The Golden Child." Like many people their age, Sarah and Raf saw "The Golden Child" multiple times before the age of 11. HBO had it on constant rotation, Eddie Murphy was hilarious, and the film had fart jokes. What's not to love?



Well...quite a lot, actually. Revisiting "The Golden Child" over three decades later reveals a ton of problems in the film, including the obvious and awful Asian stereotypes, many less-than-stellar punchlines, a romantic relationship that doesn't make sense, and bizarre style choices for the set (an Elvis poster in Eddie Murphy's living room? Really?). But after everything's said and done and we've all desecrated a prayer wheel reenacting the "I-I-I want the knife, please" scene, the hosts must decide if the movie is worth their time or if they should leave it in the recycle bin.

Show Notes

It takes a very special movie to get someone to start a podcast. For Sarah, that movie — the movie that launched the idea of What the Kids Were Watching — is the 1986 Eddie Murphy comedy "The Golden Child." Like many people their age, Sarah and Raf saw "The Golden Child" multiple times before the age of 11. HBO had it on constant rotation, Eddie Murphy was hilarious, and the film had fart jokes. What's not to love?



Well...quite a lot, actually. Revisiting "The Golden Child" over three decades later reveals a ton of problems in the film, including the obvious and awful Asian stereotypes, many less-than-stellar punchlines, a romantic relationship that doesn't make sense, and bizarre style choices for the set (an Elvis poster in Eddie Murphy's living room? Really?). But after everything's said and done and we've all desecrated a prayer wheel reenacting the "I-I-I want the knife, please" scene, the hosts must decide if the movie is worth their time or if they should leave it in the recycle bin.