What the Kids Were Watching

"Speed": Finding a Community on the Commute

May 12, 2021 Sarah A. Ruiz and Rafael A. Ruiz Season 2 Episode 2
What the Kids Were Watching
"Speed": Finding a Community on the Commute
Chapters
What the Kids Were Watching
"Speed": Finding a Community on the Commute
May 12, 2021 Season 2 Episode 2
Sarah A. Ruiz and Rafael A. Ruiz

Pop quiz, hot shot: What deliriously fun, fast-paced film released in the summer of 1994 made Keanu Reeves an action star? The answer, of course, is "Speed." (Or as Homer Simpson called it, "The Bus That Couldn't Slow Down.") The movie also served as the directorial debut of "Die Hard" cinematographer Jan de Bont. Plus, it made the world fall in love with Sandra Bullock, and it inspired Sarah's love of retro cat-eye glasses.

"Speed" is one of those movies that's so improbable and over-the-top, there's no point in dissecting it too much -- you'll miss all the fun. Upon rewatching it, Sarah and Raf are struck by how much they still enjoy the film, even with its ridiculous scenarios. And all these years later, Reeves' and Bullock's performances remain explosively great.

But what truly surprises the hosts is the sense of community they now see within the film. Unlike action movies with a lone wolf-type character, Reeves' police officer and the bus passengers work together to survive and thwart the villain. Camaraderie and compassion develop in the commuting micro-community, with Reeves' character using words before bullets and the passengers working together to protect one another. It's an inspiring message that still holds true today, even if the film's plausibility remains as thin as a bus pass.

Show Notes

Pop quiz, hot shot: What deliriously fun, fast-paced film released in the summer of 1994 made Keanu Reeves an action star? The answer, of course, is "Speed." (Or as Homer Simpson called it, "The Bus That Couldn't Slow Down.") The movie also served as the directorial debut of "Die Hard" cinematographer Jan de Bont. Plus, it made the world fall in love with Sandra Bullock, and it inspired Sarah's love of retro cat-eye glasses.

"Speed" is one of those movies that's so improbable and over-the-top, there's no point in dissecting it too much -- you'll miss all the fun. Upon rewatching it, Sarah and Raf are struck by how much they still enjoy the film, even with its ridiculous scenarios. And all these years later, Reeves' and Bullock's performances remain explosively great.

But what truly surprises the hosts is the sense of community they now see within the film. Unlike action movies with a lone wolf-type character, Reeves' police officer and the bus passengers work together to survive and thwart the villain. Camaraderie and compassion develop in the commuting micro-community, with Reeves' character using words before bullets and the passengers working together to protect one another. It's an inspiring message that still holds true today, even if the film's plausibility remains as thin as a bus pass.