EQUUS Film and Arts Fest

2020 "Meet the Team" Panel Discussion

December 18, 2020 With Lisa Diersen, Festival Founder and Director, Hosted by Julianne Neal
EQUUS Film and Arts Fest
2020 "Meet the Team" Panel Discussion
Chapters
EQUUS Film and Arts Fest
2020 "Meet the Team" Panel Discussion
Dec 18, 2020
With Lisa Diersen, Festival Founder and Director, Hosted by Julianne Neal

Hosted by AHP Media Professional Milt Toby, this episode of the EQUUS Film and Arts Fest Podcast features a panel discussion with the Festival Team. With Founder and Director Lisa Diersen and Co-Organizer Diana De Rosa, along with Spotlight Rescue Series and Camden, SC Tour Stop Organizer Julianne Neal and new Team Member Author Lisa Mae DeMasi, this conversation gives listeners a "behind the scenes" peek at what it takes to run the festival. From its origins in Chicago, to moves to NYC and the Kentucky Horse Park, to finally a new 2020 virtual edition, the festival has added a wealth of new content so that viewers can access even more information about the content creators who contribute their films, artwork and literature.

To learn more about podcast host Julianne and her partner Bruce Anderson, tune in to "Whinny Tales: Horse Stories, Pony Legends and Unicorn Yarns," the official podcast of Nature's View and The Marley Project, their equine and arts-based 501 (c)(3). You can also visit www.naturesview.us to schedule an appointment. A documentary about their work and films in the Natural Humanship Training Series, are available on The EQUUS Channel at https://filmfestivalflix.com/festival/equus/film/the-edge/. Julianne is the organizer of the Camden Tour Stop for the fest, so visit www.equusfilmfestivalcamden.com for a complete listing of activities and updates on a possible rescheduling of the spring event for the fall of 2020.

For more information about the festival or for links to the films and literature mentioned in the podcast, visit equusfilmfestival.net. To see the EQUUS films, visit https://horsenetwork.com/equus/

Show Notes Transcript

Hosted by AHP Media Professional Milt Toby, this episode of the EQUUS Film and Arts Fest Podcast features a panel discussion with the Festival Team. With Founder and Director Lisa Diersen and Co-Organizer Diana De Rosa, along with Spotlight Rescue Series and Camden, SC Tour Stop Organizer Julianne Neal and new Team Member Author Lisa Mae DeMasi, this conversation gives listeners a "behind the scenes" peek at what it takes to run the festival. From its origins in Chicago, to moves to NYC and the Kentucky Horse Park, to finally a new 2020 virtual edition, the festival has added a wealth of new content so that viewers can access even more information about the content creators who contribute their films, artwork and literature.

To learn more about podcast host Julianne and her partner Bruce Anderson, tune in to "Whinny Tales: Horse Stories, Pony Legends and Unicorn Yarns," the official podcast of Nature's View and The Marley Project, their equine and arts-based 501 (c)(3). You can also visit www.naturesview.us to schedule an appointment. A documentary about their work and films in the Natural Humanship Training Series, are available on The EQUUS Channel at https://filmfestivalflix.com/festival/equus/film/the-edge/. Julianne is the organizer of the Camden Tour Stop for the fest, so visit www.equusfilmfestivalcamden.com for a complete listing of activities and updates on a possible rescheduling of the spring event for the fall of 2020.

For more information about the festival or for links to the films and literature mentioned in the podcast, visit equusfilmfestival.net. To see the EQUUS films, visit https://horsenetwork.com/equus/

Ron :

Hello, and welcome to the EQUUS Film and Arts Fest podcast. The only program for horse lovers who have a fondness for horses in film, art and literature each week, we will have interesting conversations with a question, filmmakers, artists and authors from around the world, discussing the nature and challenges as well as the triumphs of creating their work. Ready to talk horses and film in the arts? Here's your host, Julianne Neal along with Lisa Diersen festival, founder, and director.

Julianne Neal:

Hello and welcome to the EQUUS Film and Arts Fest podcast. I'm your host, Julianne Neal. In today's episode, you'll hear all about the Equus Film and Arts Fest , 2020 festival with a move to a virtual online event. This year's festival will feature even more films, literature, and art. Let's take a few minutes to check in with Lisa about the online event.

Milt Toby:

My name's Milt Toby. I'm an attorney and an award-winning author who's been writing about Thoroughbred racing since 1972. I live in central Kentucky, which is Horse Capitol of the world we like to think, and I'm going to be your moderator this evening. It's going to be an unusual panel. We don't have artists or filmmakers or authors talking about their work. We have the people who were behind the Equus Film and Arts Fest, the people who actually make it work. And we have joining me tonight, Lisa Diersen, who is the director and co and founder of the film festival. We have Diana De Rosa, who is an equestrian photo journalist. She's been to the past eight Olympic games. She's a writer, she's an actor. She is the co-founder or co-organizer I suppose, of the festival. And she is handling press and media things. We have Julianne Neal. She has a number of tasks. She's organizing the , uh, the EQUUS tour stop in Camden, South Carolina for the last five years. She hosts and producers the EQUUS Film and Arts Fest podcast. She produces content for the festival and she is interviewing authors for the Authors WebChats. And finally, we have Lisa Mae DiMasi. She has been interviewing 13 artists on zoom about the , their contest artists. So ladies, welcome to the podcast. It's going to be fun talking with you. And , um, I'm going to start with Lisa, Lisa. Diersen not Lisa DiMasi. Um , I won't manage the two Lisas very well, so I apologize for that in advance, but , Lisa, for years there wasn't a film festival. And then now there is, why did you start and how did you start? What made you think this was a good idea?

Lisa Diersen:

Well, there wasn't one . So that's why I thought it might be a good idea. Um , a friend of mine, Rupert Issacson, had a documentary called The Horse Boy, which was about his son and it's about autism and horses and how they help. And I kind of wanted everyone to see that film. And we were at the time doing a horse fair in our, in St. Charles, Illinois, where I live. And I have a friend who owns a theater there. So I asked him if we could show the film while we were doing the horse there . And he said, okay. And I said, well, what if I got a few more, we're still in census , the horse festival. And he said, okay, I'll give you a projectionist. And we had almost 30 films. The first year. We didn't have books, then a few artists at the festival, but we didn't have it. Wasn't about in the film festival part . And it went over well and we moved to New York the next year. And that's when I met Diana sitting at this wonderful theater called the Mist Harlem at the bar . We were sitting in there talking about why this was a good idea. And we were in New York first six of the years. And last year we moved to the Kentucky Horse Park, which in non COVID years is our home. But now we're in your living room, your own home with all, we hope everybody enjoyed this this year. It looks like the virtual part of this will stay as part of the festival from now on. Cause it's , we're getting so much positive feedback from around the world. With some of our filmmakers. We have some filmmakers this year from 16 different countries that are very happy that their fans and people that have been part of their films are able to watch them now and be part of the festival. So it's kind of exciting being pushed into going virtual, but now it's been a good thing to go turning out to be a really good thing

Milt Toby:

I was lucky enough to attend one of the New York version of the film festival and was lucky enough to win an award there. But how difficult has it been to pivot to a virtual format?

Lisa Diersen:

Um, I'm not getting a lot of sleep. I told Julianne, I think, I think I'm busier now, or all of us are busier with doing the interviews ahead of time, getting everything put together and up these platforms before hand so that the , the 10 days now, because that festival used to be only three days now it's 10 days. So everything has to be ready ahead of time. We'll have the , we'll have the Winnie awards, which will take place on the 21st Saturday night. Those will go offline or go off on, I think it's going to be five o'clock on the 21st and those will run then, but everything else is had to be done ahead of time so that we can get it into the channel. And our pop-up gallery this year will be part of the , um, Equus Film Festival website. So we'll have a whole Pop Up Gallery page where all of the interviews that Diane is doing and Juliane is doing, and Lisa Mae is doing in your doing, will be there free to the public, and they'll be able to click on and watch interviews with filmmakers. And when they want to see the film , they can go to our , um , film festival platform on film festival clicks and watch the phone .

Milt Toby:

Okay. That's great. And then a lot of people are saying that having to switch to virtual has some benefits, and it sounds like that that you're making it work and it's not always easy to do.

Lisa Diersen:

It's really good to , easy to do with a good team.

Milt Toby:

Good deal. Uh , Diana Lisa mentioned meeting you when she moved to New York. Tell us a little bit more about how you got involved and what your role is in the, in the process.

Diana De Rosa:

Well, I decided that I , uh , a film festival, a horse film festival was going to come to New York. And that sounded pretty fascinating to me, especially since I live on long Island, not far from New York City. And so I decided to check it out. So I went to the film festival, I covered things. I, I did my job and then Lisa and I networked afterwards and we just never stopped talking. So from that time on, we just kind of hold our energy together to, to keep going into the future. And we've been doing that ever since.

Milt Toby:

So, so what's your role in the process? I know you're involved in media relations and press. What does that mean?

Diana De Rosa:

You know, really, it's a lot of networking. Um, it's not, I mean, I think that Lisa and I, we kind of talk a lot and we talk about the different things that are going to be done. And , and I assume in this case this year, for instance, my focus has been virtual doing the virtual interviews and really focusing in on that when we've been online on I've done your moderating, the opening gala night and the , the along with Lisa, the award ceremony and interviewed people on site and, you know, done whatever to try to make sure that we've got, we've got the event organized and we're ready to roll. So Lisa and I usually just have a constant communication going to make sure that the event is everything it should be.

Milt Toby:

So in dealing with the press, how re re responsive, I guess, has the press been when you're trying to advertise the film festival? My impression is that it gets more popular every year.

Diana De Rosa:

In, in general, I've usually had a, it's a different issue because we're being we're online. So because of that, but in general, I usually have people reaching out to me. I usually send out a press release, letting them know about the film festival, and I have had a large response and had all different types of media come and watch it. Um , and of course they should, they can do it online. Right. Um, but th those that could make it came to New York City or to , um, the, you know, to Kentucky, which was kind of cool. Um, and , uh, it's sort of helped make the , the change because it allowed different people that are located. Cause we all know the Kentucky horse park , uh , attracts a lot of media. So , um, that sort of allowed it to expand out to a different audience. Whereas when we're in New York, we got an audience that could actually come from there. So, so it's, it's, so one of those things that people kind of love to do, and if they can get to it and cover it and write about it, they do.

Milt Toby:

That's great. And in the spirit of full transparency, I was very excited when , uh, the festival moved to the horse park last year. I'm just seven minutes from the horse bar . So that I'm glad you're coming back.

Diana De Rosa:

Yes . And you want to know something, it's the best move we ever made. And I think Lisa and I both chatted about it afterwards and it's the, it's the right place. It's like having a permanent home. And , uh , the films can be seen during the year because they have loops going on every month and stuff. And so it's just the right place, you know, with virtual. Now we've got this extension, but in general, I mean, when we get back to our norm and we can't really say everything's normal right now, but in general it really was the best thing that we could have done with the EQUUS festival.

Milt Toby:

Yeah, absolutely. Um , Lisa Mae, tell me how you got involved in this and what your role is.

Lisa Mae DeMasi:

Yes. So , um, I had read Bernice Ende's memoir last year and I found out she was going to be at the festival at the Kentucky Horse Park. And I said to myself, I am getting there to meet her because I was just so inspired by her. Um, and of course the first person I met was Lisa Diersen. And I said, Lisa, where's Bernice Ende I have to meet her. And we just became friendly. And I met Diana and I met Julianne and it was , uh , a nice group of people. And Lisa asked me if I wanted to be involved this year and interviewing the artists and I jumped at the opportunity. And that's how I got involved this year.

Milt Toby:

What's been the reaction of the artists that you've talked with? Are they excited? Are they looking forward to the festival?

Lisa Mae DeMasi:

Uh , actually the whole virtual part of the, of this festival this year, just, they were not affected by it at all. They were, they were just so pleased to be part of the festival that it just didn't impact them in any way.

Milt Toby:

Wow . That's neat. Neat. And it finally Julianne, I was putting together a little information for this. You seem to be wearing a lot of different hats. Tell me how you got involved and what you're doing to make all this work.

Julianne Neal:

Well, I , I came in , um, into 2016, I think with my , my partner, Bruce Anderson, we had a film called The Edge , about his life and his work. And it was done by a Canadian Trinidadi and filmmaker , James O'Connor and I was the producer. And so we had the trailer that year and I was talking to Lisa, just, she goes around and meets everybody. And so it was exciting to get to talk to her. I talked to her on the phone and finally meeting in person and she asked, well, how are you going to finish? Or are you going to finish your film? What are you going to do? And I said, well, we have to raise some money. And she said, well, a smart nonprofit would bring us in and do a tour stop. And I said , well, I don't know how smart we are, but we're a nonprofit . And so come a round, we'll come to Camden, South Carolina. And so we sort of started the relationship with that. We organized a tour stop and we started traveling that year to all the different tour stops. So we went to Ocala, Florida and Sedona, Arizona, and Marfa, Texas with some of the other, other filmmakers w ere hosting and other groups hosting. And so I got to know Lisa with that, and then just everything that happened from there, we would collaborate i n something come along and she'd say, well, you should do a film about this for the spotlight rescue series. And we were doing a podcast, u m, already called Whinny Tales for, for our work. And so just decided it was a natural fit to start podcasting for the EQUUS Film a nd Arts Fest t oo. And so that's sort of how I got involved and i t's, I've just loved every minute of it. So it was a no brainer when she asked if we would do some WebChats, I got the opportunity to speak with a bunch of authors and have had a really, really great time doing that, meet new people. So

Milt Toby:

That's great. Lisa, it sounds like you've put together a very good thing.

Lisa Diersen:

And, you know, Julianne has 60 over 60 authors this year and Diana had over 40 with the filmmakers, with our Encore films and, and the new films that Lisa Mae did a great job with her artists. We had a 13 artists that we've highlighted, but I've been blown away this year by the literary component because the books that have come in, I have been just the quality of the authors. It just keeps getting better and better and better.

Milt Toby:

It's amazing how much it's grown and in really a very short time.

Lisa Diersen:

Well, it's been 8 years I don't know if I feel like that's short, but we did . We have grown, we have a film channel now where , um, where the films can be seen all year long. We do a lot of tour stops. We do the Winnies , um , with now a little short, two hour festivals that have been going virtual as fundraisers, since the pandemic where a lot of nonprofits are able to do virtual fundraising and a couple of the different groups we've had Brooke USA do it. We've had a group out of well , Oh gosh, New Mexico cloud, the cloud therapeutic riding. I think they raised $5,500 with a little w you know, weekend one festival . So virtually. So it was a good , really good for them. So we've been working with a bunch of different groups.

Milt Toby:

That's really neat. It sounds like a full-time job now, but let me ask you a different question. Shift gears a little, I know everybody has horses in the background here. So Lisa, tell us about your horse involvement at , you know , outside of the festival.

Lisa Diersen:

Well, my, my breed of horse, my favorite horse is the Lusitano , which that is our artwork . This year is Karen Psillas who is our official artist, her, she does a bunch of different types of panels , beautiful photography in Portugal. And so this was one of her images that we selected for this year's poster. Last year, she had a beautiful Marin full, the color was just breathtaking on it, but , um, I have Lusitano horses . I love , love the breed. It's um , interesting breed , uh , the history. I love the history of the breed. I love the simple hiding . So I have a , I have a lot of fun with the horses.

Milt Toby:

Yeah . And for people who aren't familiar with Lusitanos you need to check out Lisa's website. They're beautiful animals.

Lisa Diersen:

We're from port Portuguese, both fighting horses.

Milt Toby:

Neat, neat. Julianne, What do you do with horses?

Julianne Neal:

I used to event and decided about 20 years ago that hitting the fences that hard. When I came off, it was probably not a wise move. So I moved more into dressage, which I love anyway. And so I have a horse named Winston. He is half Dutch warmblood half Shire. And I trained with Mary Werning through the Karl Mikolka system and just absolutely loved dressage . And so Whinny Tales comes from my horse, Winston

Milt Toby:

Lisa Mae , how about you? Yeah ,

Lisa Mae DeMasi:

I'm a recreational rider. I do a lot of trail riding and every once in a while I kind of have to go wild and I just get up and jockey position and I gallop across the cross-country fields. I just love being around horses. I love being around horse people. Um, I I've always loved it.

Milt Toby:

Great. That's fun . Yeah. You're right though. Going fast on the horse , something special. Diana, I know you've, you've ridden, you've trained, you've done all sorts of things. Tell us about your horses.

Diana De Rosa:

Well, my , I remember when I was six years old , uh, blowing out the candles on a cake and wishing I could have a horse. And then when I came home from the 11th grade, many years later, I said to my dad, you know, I think I got a hundred on the regions. And he said to me, well, if you've got a hundred I'm buying you a horse, that was my horse. That was my experience with my horse. And there was just kind of recreational for awhile . But then after I got out of college, I had the opportunity to run my mom's horseback riding stable. So I ran the stable for, I think, 13 years. It was and did, went to all kinds of shows. Did the Florida circuit had students, did international competitions, national competitions. And so really, really had the gamut. And then , um, life kind of moved on and I got into the journalism part of it. Instead of riding. Now, a days I cover , like you said, I covered eight Olympic games. I'm supposed to do my ninth this year in Tokyo and that got canceled. So my world is surrounded with horses in just about everything I do. It's just not necessarily as much riding anymore.

Milt Toby:

And I'm sure this keeps everybody busy.

Diana De Rosa:

Yep . We did the World Equestrian Games and we did the World Cup. But Lisa and I together, we , you know, we sort of pulled through getting to the world cup in the world. Of course World Equestrian Games and a lot of pretty big events where , the EQUUS Film and Arts Fest really got noticed.

Milt Toby:

That's great. And , and everybody's love of horses, I think is obvious in the work you put into the film festival and in the results, you know , the it's obvious that you care about the animals, you care about the horses and that shows that shows in the organizing that you guys do, and everybody appreciates it. Trust me. So let's talk a little bit then shift we'll shift back to the film festival. What's the most rewarding things you Julianne that has come out of the film festival for you in working with Lisa and the rest of the team.

Julianne Neal:

I have to say, first of all, our film, The Edge would have never been shown all over the world. If we had not been involved with the festival, it would have , we would've been really proud of it. It would have been on a shelf here in the living room and my grandmother would have seen it and that's probably about it. And so because of Lisa, first of all, we had, you know, it's been shown in France, it's been at the World Cup, it's been at the World Equestrian Games. How, how in the world would that have ever happened any other way? And so that's first and foremost, but also meeting this group of people right here has been life-changing for me. Um, these are my friends. And so I, you know, it's been, these, these guys have supported Bruce and I through so many. And so it's every new person that comes into the festival. All the authors I've talked to this year, it's the connections that we make and things that happen because of these connections are bigger. They grow exponentially. So it's been the most rewarding thing we've ever done.

Milt Toby:

That's great. And Lisa Mae have asked you, what's the most rewarding experience you had so far?

Lisa Mae DeMasi:

Uh , just talking to each of the artists. I mean, the artists work is just, they're all very different, but their work and their inspiration and their journeys are just to talk to them about their work and how they see the world is just incredible. I would never have this experience otherwise then being involved with the festival.

Diana De Rosa:

You know , I think one of the biggest pluses that we can say is that we have given these people place a platform, a platform for their, their movies, for their films, for their shorts, that would not be possible. So I echo a lot of what Julianne said and Lisa and I talk about it all the time. I mean, I just, even speaking to them and that thank you, is that I get from doing the interviews just because they have a place that they create these films and inspires him to create more films. And now they have a place that horse films can go. And that's, that to me is the most precious gift we could have given them.

Milt Toby:

Yeah. And when you're talking about a platform for the artists and the filmmakers and the writers, but it also is a platform for the horses. And for me, that's the most important thing of the film festival. Yeah . I love meeting the people. I love seeing the films. I love chatting with the authors, looking at the work of the artists, but it's the horses that really matter. So , so Lisa, what about you you've been doing this longer than anybody else? What's the most rewarding thing to come out of it for you?

Lisa Diersen:

Um, well for me is , is that's it, you know , um, getting the story being able to be a part of helping people share their stories from a book that we got in this year about a little pony that goes into a party where there's a little girl, who's in a wheelchair to the artists that did the work, who is coming out of it and got inspired to do the work through the loss of a loved one that the horses brought, brought them together to last year when we had the miniature therapy horses too , with Mustang Saviors of the Wounded Warrior programs, the PTSD we've got, we're showing a film this year about using horses with the prisoners, with, with Randy Helms program out in Arizona. It it's , to me, it's just being able to share with, to the , to the world, literally to the world, because now we're off, we are all over the world. The stories of the horses, helping people get get better, or I don't want to say healed, but yeah, they're helping people heal, whether it's kids or adults or whatever, or just even recreational riders. It's just getting those stories out because people do with their heart and soul into whether it's a painting or a book, a 12 page children's book, or a two hour long documentary on the different kinds of worms that horses have. Everybody puts their heart and soul into what they do, you know , and I love the fact that we are here to be able to help these places. These people have a place to , to, to share and be rewarded and get a witty award sometimes when they're at work. So I am , I, it makes me really proud.

Diana De Rosa:

I'd actually like to add to that because, you know, we talked about press before and one of the things that you always hear equine media, and I know that you know that as well is that we never get enough exposure. And by doing this, by having a film festival, it's created an interest in the media and a place for them to go to learn so much at one location when we do the annual film festival. So it's really been a great opportunity to get promotion through the media and get some interest in the media when it was so hard to do that before the media attention.

Lisa Diersen:

Yeah. Yeah. Well , when we were, we had a New York times article written, what was it? Two years ago, Diana, The filmmaker that one of the films they highlighted the filmmaker had flown in from Germany. And he had done a documentary about their wounded warrior program called Cyrus comrade . And when he walked in to the festival, I had a copy of the New York times. And it was a very big story that they did on us with a lot of, there's not a lot of coverage and I gave him a copy. And I said, there's not a lot of times that a filmmaker, no matter what film festival, they're going to get off of a plane from Germany in New York. And he can say that they were in the New York Times. So that kind of, that's so exciting to be able to share that and, and literally make his, I think his , his day that he was there. I mean, he was so excited about that

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Lisa Diersen:

It'd be an important addition if we would have never done, we would have never had a virtual piece to this other than, you know, your Facebook Live. So this way, this is kind of nudged us out of a comfort zone a bit and got us into doing these interviews and learning how to do all the editing. And I've learned so much the past month and a half trying to get this ready to go up online. So, you know, it's been, it's been fun and it'll, it'll just every year has been fun with the successful and it gets every time I think you can't, something else can happen. It gets something else does, or Berniece Ende shows up at the festival for, you know, in Kentucky last year. And I mean, it's just, it's always a surprise.

Milt Toby:

Yeah. Diana was talking about exposure and you're right. Being virtual gives you more exposure than you could get any way, any other way. So again, this is one of the positive things, surprisingly that comes out of the pandemic. I think lots of organizations have increased the scope of their reach beyond ways you would ever expect. And finally, before we wrap up one of the things that you always learn as you, as a journalist, when you're interviewing someone is to ask them what questions didn't I ask you that I should have? So Julianne, what should I have asked you that I didn't,

Julianne Neal:

Gosh, that's tough Milt. Um , I don't know, pass and go to somebody. Let me think about that.

Milt Toby:

Okay. And I see Lisa Mae's hand, Lisa Mae what should I have asked you?

Lisa Mae DeMasi:

Um, in what manner did I get married in January of this year and the festival? So my , my husband and I got married in January and we wanted to have a very small wedding. We didn't want any of our direct family there. So our witnesses were two horses.

Milt Toby:

Diana , what should I, should I have asked you

Diana De Rosa:

Sort of like to make the comment didn't you you've addressed the issue. That virtual is really been such a great addition and it's something like Lisa said that we probably never would have done. And now we have the whole experience of doing this. And by us being able to interview these people, one-on-one, it's a cleaner interview. It's more people being interviewed. It's more exposure for everybody. Everybody got a chance because when you're onsite , there's not always, you're rushing around. There's not always a chance to interview everybody or find them. And what have you. So I think it's been a really good gift to us to be given this opportunity to go virtual, have this experience. And then when you look to next year, we're going to have this behind us and we're going to know how we can address and expand and do even better.

Milt Toby:

Okay, great. Do you Julianne, have you saw this something I should have asked you?

Julianne Neal:

I guess, so I guess I would say you didn't ask if we have more content, new content coming from the South Carolina area. And I will say, yes, we're working on a new film about a wonderful place called Camp Cole, that's A Place to Shine and the Therapeutic Riding Program that goes on there. And so there's a little three-year-old boy that was put on a horse for the first time, about a week ago and we're documenting his year. And so, and so's journey will be a submission in the festival next year from the South Carolina camp. So I guess that's something that I can say,

Milt Toby:

Neat, good deal. And Lisa, you get the last word. Should I, who asked you, how did all of us feel about having our new little stallion addition to our herd, Milton , all the women. I'm looking forward to the rest of all, and I'm glad that you found room for me to help.

Diana De Rosa:

I was thrilled when I, you know, I mean Milt has been a part of publications and is certainly a welcome, a welcome addition.

Milt Toby:

I'll keep that in mind. I think we're going to wrap it up, but thank you, Julianne . Thank you, Diana. Thank you, Lisa Mae. And thank you Lisa, for taking part in the , in the podcast and also for all the work that you're doing for the festival. It's paying off.

Diana De Rosa:

Thank you so much.

Milt Toby:

You're welcome. Thank you. That means I'll stay around for awhile . Everyone take care and stay safe. You too pony on.

Fenwick Equestrian Commercial:

I'd like to take a few minutes from the podcast to tell you about a new product that my horse Winston and I've been trying. Winston just loves his Liquid Titanium Calming Mask from Fenwick Equestrian. We actually tried it out on the first cool morning as we were going over for a dressage lesson. And I have to say he almost fell asleep standing by the trailer. So think the calming effect was real through some extensive testing. Fenwick has discovered the use of a high performance smart fabric, and this mask has a calming effect on many horses. In fact, some folks call it a happy hat. In the racing world, thoroughbreds and Trotters, the stewards have declared it a hood if worn without cups, but I've got the one with the ears. And Winston seems to like that the best liquid titanium produces negative ions, which have been proven to make you feel better. They provide more energy in a positive mood. This fabric is specially formulated to allow continuous washing and drying without diluting the qualities. It's the first and only therapeutic mask that can help your horse relax and focus naturally. And Winston seems to love it. All of Fenwick's therapeutic head gear is approved for competition worldwide. You can search for the mask and other products at www.fenwickequestran.com. Tto obtain your 10% discount, just mention, Winnie. Visit Fenwickequestrian.com, backslash discount backslash, Winnie and that's W I N N I E .

Lisa Diersen:

Please be sure to tune in next week when Julianne and I have another interesting conversation with one of our EQUUS Film and Arts Fest filmmakers, artists, or authors.