Thread Bible Podcast with Chuck Quinley

Thread Season 4 Episode 15: The Fall

June 18, 2020 Thread with Dr. Chuck Quinley Season 4 Episode 15
Thread Bible Podcast with Chuck Quinley
Thread Season 4 Episode 15: The Fall
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Thread Bible Podcast with Chuck Quinley
Thread Season 4 Episode 15: The Fall
Jun 18, 2020 Season 4 Episode 15
Thread with Dr. Chuck Quinley

In this episode of Thread, we see the moment darkness entered the world and changed the course of the human race, driving us away from the tranquility of God's perfect garden and into exile in a world turned against us.







Music by Ryan Andersen and Ross Schmidt

Ryan Andersen is licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial License.


Thread Bible Podcast is produced and edited by Ross Schmidt and is brought to you by Medialightasia.com

Support the show (https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=RL4F28KKJPKWQ)

Show Notes Transcript

In this episode of Thread, we see the moment darkness entered the world and changed the course of the human race, driving us away from the tranquility of God's perfect garden and into exile in a world turned against us.







Music by Ryan Andersen and Ross Schmidt

Ryan Andersen is licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial License.


Thread Bible Podcast is produced and edited by Ross Schmidt and is brought to you by Medialightasia.com

Support the show (https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=RL4F28KKJPKWQ)

Hi, I'm Chuck Quinley, from the Thread Bible Podcast. You know, the world around us is violent; people are divided. And succeeding in life, even surviving in life, takes focused energy. Today's Thread takes us to the moment where darkness entered the world and change the course of the human race, driving us away from the tranquility of God's perfect garden into exile in a world turned against us. What's wrong with us? And how can we fix it? We're going there today. So stay tuned.

Welcome to Thread, God's word tying together all the pieces of your life through verse by verse study of the Bible. In Season Four, we're exploring the bedrock of the entire Bible Genesis 1-12. Season Four of the Thread Bible Podcast is brought to you by MediaLightOnline.com. MediaLight is offering its most popular course for free, deepen your ability to communicate, learn to unlock the creative potential buried within your mobile device. We'll teach you how to plan and produce short video devotionals, even if you don't see yourself as a Bible scholar, and it's all available now for free at MediaLightOnline.com.

Well, this is the lesson I've been dreading. I love Genesis chapter 1 and the unspoiled vision of the Creator for our planet. And then there's chapter 2, and the focus on the potential of humanity in its male and female forms. And the big dream God has for the depth of unity these two can discover in their relationship. And then comes chapter 3, and the tragic use of free will by God's imagers, the man of earth and the mother of all living. But we can't avoid it. It's the reality of our world now. And this story tells us how we got here, and hopefully gives us a hint at what we can do to move away from it. We open this story back in chapter 2 verse 23, as it closes out the picture of the joyful first union between Adam and the newly created Eve, soulmate of his dreams. He says, "This one, this time, is bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh. This one shall be called..." -- in Hebrew, "isha", woman, counterpart of man is what it means. "Because from 'ish' (man) was this one taken. Hence, 'ish' leaves his father and mother and adheres (connects, clings) to his wife, and they become one flesh." Wow, the one-flesh union. We'll talk about that in the next episode. And then we get down to verse 25 of chapter 2. And verse 25 is actually the hinge between the two stories, the story of creation, wonderful, glorious story, and the story of the fall in the Garden of Eden. Verse 25, says this, "And the two of them were naked", in Hebrew, "harumen". "The two of them were 'harumen', Adam, and 'ishto', (the man and the woman) and they were not ashamed." Naked, the two of them were naked, and that word "naked", is the key. It's the hinge. It's the connector that ties the two humans and it will tie them in their innocence and the perfection of their created state. And they'll be tied to another smooth being who is in rebellion against YHWH the Creator, and then it will tie them to their final state of naked shamefulness at the end of this said story. So let's go to chapter 3, and dive in. 

Chapter 3 verse 1. "Now the 'nakash' was 'harum'" -- Did you notice already the pun? Because the two of them were "harumen", and "nakash", the serpent, was "harum". He is also smooth, but the word smooth for him and, the word naked chosen for Adam and Eve, they skipped over other words for "naked" because they want to use the word that rhymes with this word. So Adam and Eve are naked. And serpent is also smooth. And the two words rhyme. But he's smooth, in that shrewd, "smooth operator" kind of word, of use of that concept. And that's where our story turns. Because this is a brand new character, the smooth, shrewd one. This one is subtle, troublemaking, devious. But we need to be careful to understand that this is not the story of the supernatural power of evil. This is not the story about the serpent. This is the story of Adam and Eve, and of their use of their God-given authority. As the lords of this world, they are equal to each other, they are co-rulers under YHWH the Creator, they are authorized to rule all the creatures and the plant life on Earth. But their mandate is they must rule it in line with YHWH's value system. And so now into our story, we just had, you know, limited characters before, but now we're going to add one new one in chapter 3. This hybrid serpentine being, the "nakash". And the presence of the serpent/dragon/human serves to make the choice more outward, and thus more physical and easier to see and talk about. But the real battle in this story is not going to be a wrestling match between a snake and a human. It takes place in the hearts and the minds of Adam and Eve. Because they have never had their obedience tested before. They've never had their relational commitment to God or to each other -- t's never been tested before. The Bible portrays Adam and Eve as moral children. They don't have much experience. They're, you know, they're newly made and there's an innocence about them. Now, they both clearly understand the word of God. And chapter 2 verse 17, the mandate of God was given of all the trees in the garden, "Eat eat, but from the tree of participating in good and evil, 'tov' and 'rah', you shall not eat of it. For on the day you eat of it, your death will become a necessity." They both know this word. They're both very clear on this word. And now they step into their testing at the hands of the "nakash". Eve is targeted. The serpent does not make the initial approach to Adam. He makes his approach to Eve; she's unique. She's God's final creation. Everything in the garden, all the creatures on the earth, they're all made from the earth. She is made from Adam's own bones. She's made from his innermost structure. She has a kind of leadership in her and a great influence over Adam, who is smitten by her and who loves her presence in his life. You see that in chapter 2 and his response to her, his excitement at being with her. Now, the "nakash" is presented not as a god, but as a creature. A created one, however, as a creature in rebellion against its Creator. In Genesis 1:28, this moment of spiritual warfare is foreshadowed because Genesis 1 which simply says, "God created humans as male and female, and blessed them, and said to them...", and here is the blessing over the human race, "'Be fruitful, and multiply and fill the earth and subdue it have dominion over all the fish of the sea, over the flying things of the heavens and over every beast.'" And now, they face a beast, who does not want to be dominated. One who will not submit to God or man. Now the power of the "nakash" -- who is much more than just a snake -- the power of the "nakash" is not in a frontal assault of force, but by the subtle weaving of deception, positioning you like in a chess game to have to make a move, and your move is going to put you in danger, but you're the one that makes it. And he's influencing your move to cause you ultimately to destroy yourself. The "nakash" has no love for your way, no love for Adam, or for Eve. Now, the "nakash" is not identified as Satan in the Hebrew text, Christians do that later. And then we read it back into this story as we tend to do the Old Testament. But we miss a lot through this habit. So let's take a little rabbit trail on the idea of Satan, and perhaps also a little bit on serpents and dragons in the Bible, stay tuned.

Now, on Satan, I don't want to say too much except that Satan isn't a name. It's a job. Just like God isn't a name. It just means a supernatural being. It's a label. So I don't know why so many Christians use that label to talk about YHWH the Creator, who Jesus said to call "Father". Satan should be "the satan", "hassatan", or "a satan". And being a "satan" was an important, though unpleasant, role in the court of an ancient King. Because the king's greatest threat was not being attacked by an outside army, but by being assassinated by his own trusted inner circle, even his own son. And so a king would have a "satan", who is a detective, who is a prosecutor. And the main job of the "satan" was to find out the truth about the loyalty, the true loyalty of those who surround the king. And so this is the thought behind the "satan'. And the first actual book of the Bible to be written, which isn't Genesis, its Job. Job was -- there's an argument -- but Job was probably written 400 years before Moses. And in this book, there is a figure known as "the satan". And Satan first appears as a heavenly prosecutor. He's a member of the sons of God, He is also a supernatural being created with them, he is subordinated, he is subordinate to YHWH. And his job is to prosecute the family of Abraham, and the heavenly court, and to test the loyalty of YHWH's followers. And he does this by forcing them to suffer. And we have the whole story of Job where the "satan" walks into the presence of YHWH, he is with the divine counsel, the government of God, the heavenly created sons of God, and the Father says to him, "What have you been doing?" He says, "Roaming around the Earth researching." and YHWH says, "What about Job? Isn't he amazing?" And the "satan" says, "Of course, he's amazing. Of course, he's loyal. Because you defend everything about him. He has never been allowed to suffer. So he's the richest man in the world. He's got a huge family, everybody's happy, who wouldn't follow you? But allow me to take away his happiness; allow me to make him suffer and you will see he is disloyal to you." And so the long sad story of Job, and God allows Job's prosperity to be stripped from him later. The "satan" says "He's not suffering enough, he will break.", And YHWH says "he will not, he is loyal to me." And so the "satan" is allowed to take his investigation of Job, the examination of Job's heart, to a deeper level, and Job loses his relationships with his children because they're all killed. His relationship with his wife gets strained, he gets sick in his own body, a terrible suffering comes over him, pain in his body, it breaks his emotions down. He is going through horrible fire. But in the end, the "satan" is shamed in defeat, not by God but by Job. Job proves loyal. And God rewards the loyalty of Job because Job has used his free will. He is not a perfect man. He has stumbled in many ways. But Job has used his free will to choose faithfulness, even when God doesn't seem to be fair in protecting him. And we see a similar situation to the Gospels, where the "satan" is sent to tempt Jesus in the desert. He's testing his loyalty to the Father. And he is identified as the cause of this temptation of Jesus.

So that being a "satan" meant testing a human about loyalty to God, the Great King YHWH, you can see this also in Numbers 22, which is actually the first time the word Satan occurs in the Bible as we have it now. And it's the story of Balem the prophet. And Balem is a prophet of YHWH, and he was once loyal. And he still has a kind of surface loyalty, but... I mean, he still prays, he still does not... But he has started to love money, and love gifts, and he's receiving these gifts from the enemies of Israel. And they want to turn him into a traitor of his own nation, and they want him to show them how they can defeat the people of God, how they can destroy the family of Abraham. And this offends YHWH, of course. And so he sends, and in Numbers 22, you'll see these words, he sends the "angel of the LORD". This is the highest representative of YHWH in the divine Council. And it says he sent the "angel of the LORD" to be a "satan" to him. So he has come to challenge Balem on the subject of his loyalty.

So what does God want from us? Moral perfection? Well, we'll see through scripture that nobody's going to reach this. "No, not one." And that this actually isn't the basis of our relationship with God, our own personal, moral purity -- as important as that is, and how, how clear it is to all of us that if you walk with God, you've got to live in a way that is righteous -- and yet your own personal righteousness is not the basis of your relationship with God, it is not the thing for which we will be tested in our life. What is it that God wants? Does he want lots of praying? Does he want lots of church attendance? Does he want lots of Bible reading? How about a lot of fasting? And actually, the answer is: no. In places God sends a prophet, just to tell the people, how nauseated he is with their prayers, and worship and fasting, because what they don't have is the one thing he desires, it's the thing he demands. And that is: covenant loyalty. That you will be loyal to the Great King in the ups and downs of life, you will be loyal in your testing, you will be loyal, you will have no gods but him, your loyalty will be to him and only to him. And Jesus described it as the space between my loyalty to God, and any other human and the closest humans, that we would think of the need to be loyal would be our clan. So our father and our mother, our brother and our sister. And Jesus said, it's got to be, you know, the difference between number one and number two. Like, God versus any other. Loyalty has to be as far as love is from hate. He says, if you don't hate your mother, hate your father -- well, he's obviously not preaching hate, he never preached hate and yet, that distinction of loyalty to YHWH above all else, it is the core ingredient of our walk with God, and it is required by the Great King of anyone who will walk with Him, and fairly so.

Okay, so the "satan", we got that one covered. Now let's talk a little bit about the serpent, the "nakash". Who is the serpent in the story? Well, Bible readers have many ideas, depending on your religion, and depending on what group in your religion. Because this Bible is shared by Christian, Jews, and Muslims. Bible readers have different ideas. Modern Judaism does not see Satan as a literal person, not as a being. They see him more as a metaphor for the war within the human heart. So the serpent, in that case, would be viewed as a literary device that's here just to represent the way our heart and mind battles to follow God and walk in his ways. Some rabbis say it represents, the "nakash" represents the way sexual desire clouds our judgment. So Adam would represent sort of like pure logic, and Eve represent sentiment, feelings, subjective experiences of Earth life, and you add the two of them together and you have humanity, it's the whole human experience, but then enters the serpent, and then the confusion that sexuality brings, that will now cloud our thinking and caused the downfall of the righteous. So for some rabbis, that's what the "nakash" is, it's a symbol for sexual desire. Others say the "nakash", the serpent, represents the experience of temptation. That he's not, it's not about a literal person. It is the voice of temptation inside of us. It is what sin sounds like when it talks to us. It's a power. It's our own experience of being tempted. But it's not a real person. And a fourth possibility is what most, I think, evangelical Christians would hold to, and that is, Who is the serpent? The answer would be: well, though he's not named as such in this passage, that the serpent figure is actually Lucifer, the enemy angel of YHWH, who led a heavenly rebellion against the Creator. And there's different stories in the minds about why did he lead the rebellion. But one of the more compelling, especially, and the one connected to this tree, is that he led the rebellion after refusing to kneel before the newly created Adam. Because YHWH had installed him and not the angels, as his imager over Earth, as his authority over Earth. And this is not only a story in many forms of Christianity, this is the story as told in Islam. Some versions of the Lucifer story are even better developed. That he is a "seraphim". He is one of the flaming serpent dragons that Isaiah saw guarding the closest area around the Creator in Isaiah's vision.

Well, if you want to know more about serpents in the Bible, you can just go to Wikipedia. Because it, you know, it's... Wikipedia is not what it used to be. And it's got such a political bent to it now that they slide every story to the left, but it actually has a pretty good article under the title "serpents in the Bible". And it'll walk you through the way that the image of serpents and dragons, because those two are kind of connected, the way those images are used in the Bible. And here's some of the high points: you've got the serpent in the garden. You've got Moses' rod, which becomes a serpent. You've got Israel, that's disciplined by God in the wilderness for their lack of loyalty to him, and he sends fiery serpents, and the word in Hebrew is "seraphim", not "nakash", not one of a number of words for different kinds of snakes and vipers but "seraphim", the same word that's used in Isaiah's vision, that they are stung by fiery serpents. And then you have the serpent of brass that Moses is told by God to raise up, make a bronze serpent of brass and put it on a hill. And after being bitten, people can turn and look at the serpent of brass and they will be healed. If they refuse to look at God's savior up on the pole, if they won't look -- it's a very important story in the Old Testament for Christians. If people refuse to look up on the pole at the serpent of God, the brass one that is their source of healing, then they just die. But if they will look to that, it's the -- it actually launches the idea of an intermediary between YHWH and his healing and humans. And we're told in the Old Testament that this figure, that, you know, the serpent of brass was actually placed in the temple of YHWH after Solomon built it, and it was there until people began to make sacrifices to the statute itself, which caused King Hezekiah to destroy it in his reformation. Then you got Isaiah talking about serpent/dragon/humans, they're all kind of in a mix, because they've got faces and they've got feet, but they're serpents, and they're on fire guarding God's throne. John the baptist called his pious religious enemies "a brood of vipers", and Jesus used that same imagery. He called them "the generation of serpents", the "children of serpents". But in a more positive light, Jesus also told his followers to be as wise as serpents, just don't be harmful. In the New Testament, we come to see the serpent as the devil. And that is connected in New Testament writers. And finally, the last book of the Christian Bible, the book of Revelation, the revelation of John. We see the dragon/snake and his army and they make war on YHWH, and on Michael. And Michael and his angelic army defeat them, and the snake is bound with a chain and thrown into a pit for 1000 years, is briefly released, and then judged finally, and forever and thrown into the lake of fire, and the world is rid of him for ever, praise the Lord. But we're not there in this story at the very beginning.

So back in the first book of the Bible. We're in the garden, and Eve is targeted, and she's isolated, and a conversation begins between her and this "nakash". And Eve isn't startled by a talking snake, because Eden is the capital province and headquarters of YHWH and of his divine counsel, which is all around. And they are angelic beings, and they appear strange to us in many ways. What is unusual, is not that an odd hybrid being can speak to her, that was apparently not an unusual thing. What's strange is the nature of the conversation. Because it starts with a statement. In many Bibles, it starts with a question, but in Hebrew, it's not marked as a question. In the "Chuck Quinley Translation", it reads: "Bummer... The Elohim has forbidden you to enjoy even one of these trees of the garden." Now, this is a genius sentence. It sews the seed of doubt about the fairness of the Creator, about his character as a person, about his trustworthiness. It challenges his benevolence, it says "YHWH is selfish. You have to take what you want from him, you can't trust him, he's not looking out for you. He's not trying to advance you. He's trying to keep you down. We should do something about him." And it says all of that so innocently, by making a mistake on purpose. He says to her, "Ah, you can't have any of these trees in the garden." And Eve corrects him. Chapter 3, verse 2, "And 'isha'", (the counterpart of man), "And 'isha' said to the 'nakash', 'of the fruit of the trees of the garden, we may eat, but not of the fruit of the tree that is in the middle of the garden, for Elohim has said...'", in other words, "You're right on that one." "'Elohim has said, You shall not eat of it, and you shall not touch it, lest you die'" -- "Eat eat, yes, you may eat eat all the trees, but not that one, you will die die if you only touch it." Now she knows the word of God to Adam before her creation. He has told her, and she may well have heard this many times from the Great Elohim himself in their daily hangout times in the windy part of the day. She's not ignorant of who YHWH is, what his character is like, what his command has been, what the consequences for disobedience will be: her death. And she knows somehow what death is. But now she's added something to God's word, did you catch it? And adding to God's word is as dangerous as taking things away. She has made God harsher. She added this phrase, "even if you touch it." The Father never said that. He never said that to them.

The serpent's first accusation against the Creator, she's never heard him accused like this, but it's working slowly, like venom in her veins, and it's already starting to affect her. That's the malicious part of gossip. You know, words can be so evil and those who are masters at this dark craft, they can just say a little bit, and suddenly, you know, you don't see your friend the way you used to see them. And you guys see this as spiritual war. And Eve does not. She does not realize what she's gotten into. She does not realize that she's being tested. Now, if we assume that this serpent the "nakash" is not just a snake, because it can talk, and because as the translation will help us know, this "nakash" has a chest, it doesn't say "you'll crawl on your belly", it says "you'll crawl on your chest". It has a chest, it does not crawl. If we assume that the "nakash", as later Christians come to identify, is one of the elohim, one of the angel creatures, one of the sons of light, one of the members of the Divine Council, and that he's gone rogue. And if we accept that, this rebellion may have occurred because of the creation of man and honoring man, by putting him over the planet as the image of God.

Actually, we can always go back to Psalm 8, because it is the amazement of the psalmist over this decision of God. Let me just read it to you. I'll read Psalm 8, it's not all that long, I'm just going to read verses 3-9. And I'll leave out 7 and 8, because they just explain more examples. Okay, "When I consider your heavens, the work of your fingers, the moon and the stars." Now the stars are in the Old Testament, often a representation of the angelic beings. That we look up in the sky at night, we see the stars, and we see God's angels all over the planet. That's how it was understood by them. So let's go back: "When I consider your heavens, the works of your fingers, the moon and the stars which you have ordained, what is man, that you are mindful of him, and the son of man, that you visit him? For you have made him a little lower than the angels. And you've crowned him with glory and honor, you have made him to have dominion over all of the works of your hands, you have put all things under his feet." Verse 9 concludes: "Oh, our Lord, how excellent is Your Name in all the Earth." We'll be right back.

So if we accept that this rebellion has something to do with the event of placing mankind over the earth, and that the "nakash" is not just a metaphor or a literary device, but is actually a being whose identity is going to get unwrapped gradually, and it's going to develop more clearly through history. But if we accept those things, and I think I do, then we are looking at a scene where a member of the former angelic elite refuses to bow on earth before dirt man and his kind and acknowledge that they are the rulers of earth. And this former member of the angelic elite now has a plan to get the whole race killed. The human race, get it wiped out, but cruelly, by the Creator, who empowered them in the first place. Make the one who loves them kill them for treason; wipe out his darlings. Make him do it. Leave it on YHWH as a moral necessity, that he must, as the judge of the earth, judge these two guilty and wipe them out because you've already announced the penalty of death if they disobey you. So the "nakash" acts in subtlety. He must not use coercion, this must be their choice. It must be their action, they must be guilty, they must be truly guilty. And so he speaks to Eve. And she answers "Oh, we can eat them all, eat eat, but not the one at the center. The one about participating, the one about knowing 'tov' and 'rah', good and evil. Touch it and we die." Hebrew: "we die die". But it's, verse 4 is an unusual sentence structure because the very next scripture the "nakash" drops all subtlety. "No!" It's called "fronting", where you can take a word -- some languages, especially if they have case endings, some languages you can take a word and pretty much put it wherever you want in a sentence. And you'll still know by its structure, if that's the subject of the sentence, or the direct object, or however the sentence is structured. So you can, those are great languages for emphasis, because you can stick it the front or the end of the sentence. Usually the front, anything you want to shine a spotlight on. So in this sentence, which follows an unusual structure, it fronts the word "no", so you could almost do it with an exclamation point. So she says, "touch that tree, touch that fruit and we die." And he erupts, "No!, Die die not." Then he speaks the truth, and he does it for his purpose. He says, "Elohim perceives that on the day you eat of it, your eyes will be opened. And you will be like Elohim, knowing and participating in 'tov' and 'rah'." That part of what he says is true. YHWH does know what will happen. That's why he forbade it. They don't understand his motive for saying that. But he is actually quoting, when people say the devil can quote Scriptures for his purposes, and this is one of those. He challenges the character of God, and He quotes the word of God. Well, and this brings us to another thing: knowing and participating in good and evil. And we already went over that a lot. It's about participating. In Hebrew, you don't just know a thing, like in your mind, I memorized those words, that isn't what knowing is. Knowing is if you know your wife, she gets pregnant. You know, you participate, you're, you've thrown yourself into it. So that's how you know a thing is you just throw yourself into it. And so this is the tree of throwing yourself into participating in "tov" and "rah". "Tov", building up, strengthening, planting. "Rah", destroying, ripping down. It's all part of wisdom. Wisdom is vital. "Hokma", It is, Proverbs 3:19, "The Lord, by 'hokma', by wisdom, founded the earth. By understanding, he established the heavens", and we are taught in Scripture to seek wisdom, to want to know wisdom. The whole, you know, all the wisdom books in the Bible, they're about this quest, because we have to know, you have to know what to do. You have to know what it will accomplish. This is how you run life. You have to know what to burn down, chop down, destroy, when to go to war. And you have to know when to ask for peace. You have to know when to surrender and when to fight. You have to know these things. When do I tear down and when do I build up? It is something to be sought, and God understands it. It is the wisdom on which, by which God founded the earth. And so one of the underlying issues in Genesis 1-3 is the quest for wisdom. We must have wisdom we need to seek wisdom. The Bible encourages us to chase wisdom. And when you have wisdom, you will run your little world and any other worlds that God gives you authority over, you will run them rightly, they will prosper, the people will do well. And you will do well. The question is: where do I get this wisdom? Where do I get "hokma"? And the problem is all human sources are tainted with self-interest. "You will be like gods" and that is the appeal, the desire to be a little god. But YHWH has wisdom he has "hokma", he wants to give it to those who walk with him. They are the sons of God. They are the daughters of God. They are the image of God in the world, because he put us there. We didn't climb there. We didn't rip it out of his hand. He gave it to us because it is essential to us fulfilling the purpose for which he created all of us. He wants us to rule in life and to rule well, to take dominion over your world. And to do it as his image, do it the way he would do it. So we've got to have "hokma", but where to get it? Humans just want to be like little gods, but YHWH will give you wisdom, if you will walk with Him.

The you know, the serpent says "You will become like the Elohim". And this can mean one of two things, it either means, because the word "elohim" is already plural, and we use this plural word to stand for the great Creator God who's too big for a singular word. So, although it's a plural word, it's used kinda like the royal "we", you know, "we shall go now" and you're just talking about yourself as the King. So, "elohim" can mean one of two things, it either means "you shall be like the creator Elohim, God Himself", that would, there'd be a logic, if that's what he, how he meant her to take it. Because then he's saying "God is jealous of his position, he's afraid you will overthrow him, he's afraid you will become like him." Or it means like the "elohim", because it is plural. It's also the word used for all the angelic beings, the lesser elohim, the created ones, the heavenly creatures that God has made that are not made of the earth and are not made for the earth. They are his sons of light. So you will become, either like the great Elohim, or like the sons of light, the created heavenly ones. And that Psalm said, "We'd been made a little less than them". So she maybe had that one in mind, that she sees that group and one of them's talking to her now. And they radiate, and they are the sons of light, and to be like them just seems like it'd be really cool. And she wants that, whatever it was, it was the bait that was necessary. And we see her now abandon her loyalty to God. And we will, in verse 6, see a pattern start that will be echoed throughout Scripture over and over again. Because virtually every character that you will meet from here till the end of this Bible, not just Genesis, just keep walking, every character is going to come to the same scene over and over again. They're going to step up and see a world, there's going to be a world there that they want. And as they reach for this world, there are going to be temptations that come at that moment. "If you do this, you can grab it." And it's this pattern of "she saw it", it says "she saw the tree, she coveted what she saw, then she took and then she ate". Like that saying "stolen waters tastes sweet". And then she's gonna suffer the consequences. So you'll see that pattern all the way through the Bible over and over again, men and women of God will step up to be tested by the "nakash", and to be tested by circumstance. And they will face the same circumstance and you will see them over and over again be loyal to God and receive it; live in submission by faith, trust the goodness of the Creator, ask him for whatever you want. Stay close to him. Trust Him, he's going to give you what you need. When you are ready. Just walk with Him by faith and submit and enjoy the abundance of life in the garden with your Father, or, do what Eve did. She saw. She coveted. She took. She took it to herself and she ate it. And she tasted the sweetness of her victory. "I did it myself" and then she suffers the consequences. And we'll just see this played out over and over and over again. Abraham, David. It won't stop. Every character, they keep stepping up, you know, another Adam, another Eve, and over and over again they fail, they fail, they fail, they fail. Until God promises to send a human who will not fail. So Eve took and she failed, and then to go a little deeper. You know, how the one who is victimized over time becomes a victimizer often. Verse 7 says "She took the fruit and she ate, and she gave also to her husband with her." See, corrupted. Now she corrupts others. She chooses, remember our study of Proverbs, she has two choices. She can be the temptress, or she can be lady wisdom. That's God's dream for her. She can be Adams "ezer" who protects him, or she can do what she does now. She destroys him. She corrupts him. And she chooses the role of temptress, and she uses her appeal. She uses the power she knows she has over her husband and she gives to him. And he is broken with her.

There's a very strong connection between Genesis 1-3, and all of the wisdom literature. Actually, in some ways, the whole Bible is wisdom literature, but there is a section of Scripture, Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Song of Solomon, Ecclesiastes, books like that, they are, they talk about wisdom and getting wisdom, but all these books are basically an extended reflection on Genesis 1-3.

So Eve turns now and Adam's temptation is not from the serpent. Adam's temptation is from his counterpart, it's a different kind of temptation. And he eats, and it says "The eyes of the two of them were opened. And they knew that they were naked, and they sewed fig leaves together. And they made themselves belts for coverings." Now in Hebrew, the pun on the concept of nakedness is now complete. Did you notice it? And it ties the passage together, it goes something like this: when we started our podcast today, and we talked about chapter 2 verse 25, where these two are living in a blissful innocence. They are naked, they are united physically and emotionally, they are clinging to each other, and they are completely unashamed. They have never known a moment of self consciousness, of comparison to others, they've never been embarrassed, they've never known shame. They are "harumen". They are naked, but they're not ashamed. And then they meet another creature who's also "harum", he's smooth too, but in a different way. And he promises not to just make them smooth, but shrewd. But in the end, they're only nude, and in public, and they now feel vulnerable and frightened and covered in shame. And so you can see this same word for "naked" is being played with behind the scenes to tie it all together. They have joined the "nakash" in his rebellion, or in some art, in her rebellion, because again, the "nakash" is at this stage kind of an unfocused personality. There's no his/her, like, mentioned.

They join the "nakash" in the rebellion they eat the forbidden fruit. So they might take wisdom, "hokma", knowing when to do "tov" and when do "rah" when to plant when to root what is planted, so they can rule over their life and rule over all the other lives. And they can have the wisdom that the Creator has, and they will take it for themselves, independent of him, and they will become little gods in the process. And they tasted "rah" for the first time, doing the opposite of obedience, the opposite of trust. And what they came to know was not a great enlightenment. But they came to know that they were now alone. They were uncovered. They were no longer under the "chikaina" cloud of God. They were outside the dome of his protection; outside of His provision. They were cut off from fellowship and communion with their Father and their friend. They were naked, and they were afraid. And they begin to feel lack for the first time in their lives. They feel vulnerable, and they feel weak and insecure. They need to cover their sexuality, which now has shame attached to it. And their efforts to provide for themselves are pathetic, flimsy leaves to make a covering apron. It's comical, and it's childishness. They're covering their genitals from view but it provides no protection overall to their body. They never needed protecting before, they've never known danger, and they know it now. And they're afraid.

Well, why are we studying all this? Why go back into this? Is it for Adam and Eve sake? Well, no, this book was written thousands of years after Adam and Eve had passed away. There's nothing in it that can help them, it isn't a real-time account, just like a transcription of the video as it played out. And again, it's also not for the sake of history, this book of beginnings makes very little effort at history. It's not here to establish some sort of historical record of things. It's here for us, dear friend. We study the pattern of the past so we can amend our present and rewrite our future. We see their failure, we see the consequences of their actions, and this can prepare us for our own days when we stand at the tree. Because in this story, we are Eve, and we are Adam. Passively watching our fellow humans defy God, seek to be their own little gods, and being called to join them, and our anemic response to temptation is to just silently follow along whatever other people are doing. But God is calling for people, he's calling for sons and daughters of Adam and Eve to rise up, to take back loyalty to him, to bow the knee, at the foot of the cross, where he has paid the price for all these mistakes. And he has made a way that we can come back to the garden, we can come back to him. And we can take back the place that we lost, we can become the image of God on Earth, we can become the rulers of our little worlds, and the rulers of the bigger world around us. And he will anoint us to have influence, and he will anointed us to bring change and transformation, that this does not have to stay a place of chaos, but it can become again the garden. That is the great spiritual war, and it is a calling on everyone who will answer his call, because God is calling. That is what the gospel means. That God is calling out to the earth to gather to himself a loyal people who will be faithful to him again. I want to be in that number. And I hope you will join that number too. It's matter of your heart and his heart. Just come to him. You don't need anybody to tell you the words. Just come to him and determine that you are going to be loyal, and you are going to live as a loyal child of God. Life is in front of all of us, life and death. Choose life.

Well, that's all for now. Don't forget about the new free online courses at MediaLight Online, and our Facebook group as well. Just go to MediaLight Asia on Facebook, and you'll find us, and find lots of ways that you can grow. Just visit that today and share the podcast with your friends. Okay? Expect God to use you today because you are the light of the world.