Thread Bible Podcast with Chuck Quinley

Thread Season 4 Episode 16: Consequences of Sin

July 01, 2020 Thread with Dr. Chuck Quinley Season 4 Episode 16
Thread Bible Podcast with Chuck Quinley
Thread Season 4 Episode 16: Consequences of Sin
Chapters
Thread Bible Podcast with Chuck Quinley
Thread Season 4 Episode 16: Consequences of Sin
Jul 01, 2020 Season 4 Episode 16
Thread with Dr. Chuck Quinley

In this episode of Thread we examine the consequences of Adam and Eve's failure in the great test of their loyalty to the Creator, and also look at the legacy of pain those actions have unleashed upon the earth. Why is there so much division among humans, and is there anything we can do to heal it?


Music by Ryan Andersen

Ryan Andersen is licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial License.


Thread Bible Podcast is produced and edited by Ross Schmidt and is brought to you by Medialightasia.com

Support the show (https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=RL4F28KKJPKWQ)

Show Notes Transcript

In this episode of Thread we examine the consequences of Adam and Eve's failure in the great test of their loyalty to the Creator, and also look at the legacy of pain those actions have unleashed upon the earth. Why is there so much division among humans, and is there anything we can do to heal it?


Music by Ryan Andersen

Ryan Andersen is licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial License.


Thread Bible Podcast is produced and edited by Ross Schmidt and is brought to you by Medialightasia.com

Support the show (https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=RL4F28KKJPKWQ)

Hi, I'm Chuck Quinley from the Thread Bible Podcast. In the last episode, we watched our ancestors, the first humans fail miserably in the great test of their loyalty to the Creator. In this episode, we examine the consequences of their actions and the legacy of pain they've unleashed upon the earth. Why is there so much division among humans? And is there anything we can do to heal it? Stay tuned.

Welcome to Thread, God's word, tying together all the pieces of your life through verse by verse study of the Bible. In Season Four, we're exploring the bedrock of the entire Bible Genesis 1-12. Season Four of the Thread Bible Podcast is brought to you by MediaLightOnline.com. MediaLight is offering its most popular course for free right now. So deepen your ability to communicate hope to others and learn to unlock the creative potential that's buried within your mobile device. And we're going to teach you how to plan and produce short video devotionals even if you don't see yourself as a Bible scholar. All of that is available right now for free, at MediaLightOnline.com.

Well, at this point, Episode 16, I'd like to reset our thinking regarding why we study the Genesis narrative. In our last episode, we saw Adam and Eve standing in front of a tree, and they were making a moral choice, the choice of obedience to the Creator, to receive by grace from him everything that they needed, including wisdom, or grabbing wisdom for themselves, grabbing authority and establishing themselves as independent authorities, little gods, over their own life, and standing apart from him. Now, we study this not to help them, because our study can't save Adam and Eve, they were dead over a thousand years before this story even came together in a written form. The point is: we are Adam and Eve. We rule a world that God has given to us. And he has put us in charge of this world. And each of us have to face the "nakash". Our inner reasonings will finally lead us to take some kind of action in life over and over again. That's why Jesus talks so much more about inner heart matters than following outward religious rules. Because our thought-life is huge. You put garbage in, you get garbage out. And today, it's about the digital space that we enter into, and allow to enter into our mind. I mean, it is so important to the condition of our soul. Are you being discipled by Netflix? Is Amazon your spiritual guide?

Well, I mean, I'm already seeing such an attempt in all the platforms to move our minds to different places, in how we view sexuality, about helping us become more left-leaning in our politics, about stirring up race related anger and division. Well, your mindset rules your narrative. That narrative is the story you carry around in your head, you know, are you a victim? Or are you the lord of your life? Is life unfair? Is God unfair? The "nakash" is always out there whispering subtly, and he'll let you put the pieces together. And you will design a little inner narrative and it will either echo with the voice of God, or that narrative will be absent God's voice; you'll follow the voice of the "nakash", the voice of the world, the voice of the darkness. So the "nakash" -- whether he is Satan, or whether he's just our own inner voice of temptation, because the New Testament does say every man is tempted when he's drawn away by his own lust and enticed -- our own "nakash" is always whispering out of our tree. And we will make choices based on the story we believe about the world and our place in it. These outward choices are then going to have immediate and long term consequences, not only in our lives, but also we're going to set into action the first falling dominoes of impact on those who are living in the world around us, our children, in our friends, our co-workers, our employees, our people in our neighborhood. We're going to make waves -- our life makes waves -- and we bring new forces into the lives of others. And it happens even if you're passive. I mean, you can't walk through the kiddie pool without making ripples. Even if you really hope no one even notices you there, you're still making an impact. Now, on the other hand, you and I can decide to make waves intentionally, waves that will influence the lives of others and push them toward the Father. And that's what it means to be the image of God on earth. But that all comes from your mindset, from the narrative that you believe, and that's why we study Genesis. So with that said, let's turn our attention to a discussion of the curse that was released to the rebellion of Adam and Eve, and the gospel that begins to be declared out of the ashes of their moral decay. Stay tuned.

Let's go to Genesis, and look into verse 8. We left off last time, in chapter 3. Chapter 3 of Genesis, verse 8, they've already failed. They've now run and hidden themselves, they have tried to create a covering so God won't see their nakedness. And they have sewn together, the scripture says, they have sewn together leaves from a fig tree to try and create garments for themselves. Verse 8, "And they heard the sound of the Elohim YHWH walking in the garden at the time of the wind of the day, and the man and his wife hid themselves from the face of the Elohim YHWH in the middle of the trees of the garden. And the Elohim YHWH called to the man and said to him, 'Where are you?' And he said, 'Your sound I heard in the garden, and I was afraid because I was naked (harum), and I hid myself.' And he said, 'Who told you that you are 'harum'? Of the tree, of which I commanded you not to eat, have you eaten?' Said the man, 'The woman whom you gave to be with me, she is the one who gave to me from the tree and ate.' And the Elohim YHWH said to the woman, 'What is this that you have done?' Said the woman, 'The 'nakash'. He beguiled me, he tricked me and I ate.' And the Elohim YHWH said to the serpent, 'Because you did this, cursed are you beyond all cattle, and beyond all the beasts of the field.'"

Let's walk slowly through starting at verse 8, and we're going to go down to verse 21. Okay, verse 8, it says, "in the wind of the day", the time of day in the evening when the winds start to be churned up by the setting of the sun, and it was the sound of the Elohim YHWH walking. Well, this tells us that he manifested for them in a physical presence, they could hear his feet crunching on the leaves and the sticks below him. They heard his sound as his feet walked, that tells us a lot about their relationship with him. We're in a physical world, they are physical beings, and they related to the Great Creator in the form of a physical being. "The wind of the day". Verse 9, it said, "they hid themselves from the face of YHWH, and they hid themselves in the middle of the trees of the garden". It makes me wonder if their daily walk and talk time with him, would always circuit these trees, you know? Did they just walk around that section of the garden every evening, so he could talk to them about the trees, and about what they represented, about what they meant in their lives? You know, this -- because these two trees, they represent the central moral issue in their lives. And so making this decision every day about the tree, this would, you know, build their moral core. Because as we said, the Bible portrays Adam and Eve as moral infants. So here is the Lord's chance to talk to them about the central issue in their life. Will you submit to me and let me lead you and guide you to be my image on the earth? Will you submit your life to my life? Or will you pull away from me? Verse 10, "The Elohim YHWH called to the man, 'Where are you?'" And then the man's answer is, "your sound I heard". It's not the expected word order. You would expect him to say, "I heard your sound", and a lot of translations, once again, they'll go "Oh, it sounds nicer: 'I heard your sound'." Well, The Hebrews knew that. They reversed the order on purpose. This is called fronting. And you ought to leave it alone. And that's a problem with modernizing translations of ancient documents, is you mess up their intended work. So the first thing in this sentence says, "your sound, your sound I heard". "I heard your sound". Either Adam is just processing his first experience of fear, he said "your sound I heard and I was afraid", or he's blaming someone other than himself for the fact of his hiding. "Your sound made me hide." "She made me sin." "You gave her to me." That seems to be more what Adam is doing, because he continues in his dialogue, he continues to do this, to blame others for his actions. He hid. He says, "your sound made me afraid". "Your sound", "your woman". "This woman, she made me sin". Adam doesn't answer -- notice already -- he doesn't answer "we". He doesn't say "we heard your sound", "we were afraid". His focus is already centered on himself. "I heard". "I was afraid". "I was 'harumen'". "I hid myself". And God asked him in verse 11, "Who told you?" The thing that we see -- it's very, kind of interesting to me about how God does moral development in people's lives all through the Bible, is he asks really good questions. He's not said anything yet. He just keeps asking questions. "Who told you of the tree?" Again, that word order strange in the sentence. God has, The Creator is fronting, he has pulled that focused part of the sentence, and put it at the beginning, "Of the tree...". He didn't say, "have you...", in English we'd say, "have you eaten of the tree?" But that's not what he wants you to look at. "Of the tree", spotlight. "Stare at the tree, the choice of the tree, the one I commanded you not to eat. Have you eaten? Stare at the tree Adam." "Said the man, 'The woman you gave to be with me...'", And again, fronting the woman. He's putting her in the spotlight. Notice Adam says, I think he's, I think his word choice is really interesting here. He says, "The woman you gave to be with me." He does not say, "the woman you gave to me". You see the difference? He doesn't see her -- and he shouldn't see her -- he does not see her as his possession. He doesn't say, "the woman you gave to me", like, "I own this woman". He says, "the woman you gave to be with me. She's my companion, not my possession. 'isha'. She is the one." The one who is the counterpart.

The one who is sort of like, you're the, it's not the word "opposite", because "opposite" means, like, "opposition". It isn't that, it's, everywhere I'm strong, she's weak. Everywhere I'm weak, she's strong. We fit. We're completely made to be perfect in our unity, because we've got the negative space where the other one has positive space. And we just fit together. And then, really shockingly, ironically, "isha", the one who fits into me and I fit into her. She is the one who gave to me of the tree, and I ate. He owns it. "I did eat." But he points it at her, "she" and "you gave her to be with me". "And the Elohim YHWH said to the woman, 'what is this that you have done?'" Again, he's asking questions. He wants her to think about what she's done. And again, I want to point out, Eve is completely answerable before YHWH. She is equal before YHWH, and she is culpable, she can be found guilty before YHWH. it's not, "Oh, well, you know, the little lady, I'll just talk to Adam about this situation." He deals with Eve about what Eve has done. Half the weight of this world is on her shoulders. He deals with Adam for what Adam has done. He sees them as co-equal, perfect partners for each other, but both with authority and both answerable for the decisions they make in this life. He has a very high view of woman. "Said the woman, 'The 'nakash' beguiled me'". See, now she can see it. She sees right through his deception. Because now she participates in evil. She can spot evil. "'The 'nakash' beguiled me and I ate'. And Elohim YHWH said to the 'nakash', 'Because you did this...' -- the word means, laid under the weight of a curse --  'because you did this one, laid under the weight of a curse are you...'". And then the word, this is a really important, he says, "'you are cursed beyond all cattle, and beyond all the beast of the field.'" Do you remember the last time "beyond" came in? He was beyond the other beasts, he was smooth and shrewd beyond the other beasts. Well, this is another way of looking into that concept. This one means "from", and sometimes it's translated that way. "'You are cursed from the other beasts'", as in, "far beyond the other beasts". "Away from". This is actually the first instance of a concept that is a central, if you're going to understand the Old Testament, you need to understand it. And that is the idea of exile. Because most of the Old Testament was written in exile. It comes in final form in exile as we hold it today, and is written to a people in exile. So you're gonna see, first of all, here. The serpent is banished into exile in the animal kingdom. "You are cursed, to live apart beyond from all the beasts. None of the beasts want you." You know, "none of the beasts are going to want you in their midst. When they see you they will all react, you will be shunned by all, you will be untrusted." And in most societies this is true of the serpent until this day. He is "beyond". It was the way the 'nakash' was introduced. He was said to be subtle and smooth beyond the other beasts. Now God says, "and you will also be cursed beyond all the beasts."

Now YHWH doesn't necessarily say "I hereby curse you". He doesn't say that to the snake or to anyone else involved. It's more of a revealing of the -- I'm not saying he isn't cursing them. I'm just saying he doesn't say it in an active voice. He's using passive voice, as, "something is now going to happen to you", versus, "I am doing something to you". It seems to me more of a revealing of consequences of their actions. They have all been brought out of the serpent, and Adam, and ultimately Eve through Adam. They've been brought about because of the good earth. They have sprung up out of the good earth. And now they have done actions on the face of the good earth, and that good earth is the source of all their existence. And there is something of justice built into the fabric of the universe. What we sow, we reap, whether it is good or bad, "tov" or "rah". God is the ultimate Judge of all, and he is justice. So this world that he has made, and the world that he inhabits, pulses with his character throughout the physical and spiritual dimensions. And so when you sow, you reap, and when you rebel, you come under curse. The Earth is the source of the curse, and we will see the blessed Earth becoming a cursed Earth, and curses coming from the Earth, the Earth crying out about injustice done on it.

Anyway, this is a theme that we'll see through the Scriptures, he turns to the 'nakash', and he says, "'On your chest you shall go, eating dust'' -- the humiliation -- "'eating dust all the days of your life." And then in verse 15, we see the first line of the gospel. It's gonna come out in sparkles, just like, one at a time. Like, is there something in the dirt? Is there something in the ashes of this total defeat of the human race? And then you catch a glint in the ashes, and you say, "Wait a minute, there's a jewel or something shiny in there." And it's, it starts here, it's the first line of the gospel. A promise that one day, a child of Eve will arise who will be the Snake Crusher. And, at the cost of his life, he will crush the head of the 'nakash'. And this idea of the 'nakash' is going to grow through Scripture. And already, I mean, this is one verse later after the fall, and already the person of the 'nakash' has grown from being a snake in a tree, to being the one who will personify evil and the relentless attack of evil against the descendants of Adam and Eve throughout all the ages. Because that's the language God starts to use about the 'nakash'. And thus shall the personality of the satan emerge as the devil, and become slowly revealed and develop throughout the rest of the Bible until we get to the last book of the Bible, and it shows him bound and defeated by the second Adam, the son of Adam, the Son of God. And YHWH says to the 'nakash', "Enmity." -- this is the first time he speaks of something he will actively do. He says, "Enmity". That means hatred, it means war, relentless war. "Enmity will I set between you and the woman". Notice he's dealing with Eve, and with 'nakash's work against Eve. Because what happened between Eve and the serpent is not what happened to Adam. Adam has an entirely different sin. His situation was different, and it really doesn't get much attention in Scripture. Eve is the one who is the focus now. She is God's last creation. She is the one that, when Adam saw her, he said, "wow". And now she is the one, of all, who has betrayed the Lord, because of the words of the 'nakash' that slandered him. And YHWH says, "Enmity (hatred) will I set between you and the woman, between your seed..." -- so that means there's going to be more 'nakash'. There are going to be human 'nakash's -- "and her seed.". There are going to be, now we started to see this division among humanity, of the seed of the serpent versus the seed of the woman, in the battle that goes on through the ages between good and evil, and it just never stops.

Eve was deceived by the serpent, not Adam. What he dealt with was something totally different. And God will get to that in a minute, but he says, "the seed of the woman shall bruise, shall crush your head, and you shall bruise and strike his heel." If you haven't seen the Bible Project's "Snake Crusher" video, look it up. It is so artfully done, and the heel that slams down on the serpent, it's got two fang marks in it, and... Anyway, it's just a beautiful video, and I think it unwraps this initial concept of the Snake Crusher, who will come, and the promise that good will triumph over evil. But the knowledge that it's not a painless victory, that the Snake Crusher will have to give his life in order to crush the head of the serpent. He will have to take the striking of his own heel and praise the Lord. He bought that for us. Verse 16, "to the woman", and now we turn to God's words to Eve, who has rebelled against him, and has opened Pandora's Box. She has released a force in the world. He says, first of all, "I will surely". Now every time in the Old Testament, you see the word "surely", it means two different things. Number one, it is grabbing the spotlight, and it's putting it on the thing about to be mentioned. Surely. So he's saying, first of all, "focus. I want your total attention. When I say the word "surely", I want your eyes to go to the next word in this sentence." Secondly, it means, "surely the thing I'm saying is a fact". Jesus used to say this constantly. Old English it says, "Verily, verily, I say unto you". He's using this same concept from old Hebrew. "Surely, I'm about to tell you a fact, it is truth. And I want you to focus on this one thing. Surely, I will... Surely...". And God says, "I will surely multiply". Now remember, the initial creation of humans, God blesses them, he calls them good. And the word he speaks over them is "multiply". He says, "Be fruitful, and multiply". And now he looks at the rebel Eve, and he says, "I will multiply. I've already said I'm going to... I'm speaking 'multiply' over you. But I will now multiply two things on you. Number one, your sorrow" -- we're going to come back to that word, it's a repeated word in this passage, and throughout the Genesis narrative -- "I will multiply your sorrow, and I will multiply your conceiving." See, being the mother of all living humans is the glory of Eve. Until her creation as Adam's counterpart, humans had no way to reproduce. The abundance of humans on the earth, all the humans that will ever live on the earth will flow from within her. And this is still her calling. But now, it's going to be much harder, she will have to have more children, "I will multiply your conceiving". She has to bear more children, because now death will begin to claim humans, and we'll need more births to multiply against the power of death to wipe us out. He says, "I will multiply your conceiving, and I will multiply your sorrow".

This word "sorrow" means, your grief. And it ties to Genesis 6, which is a story that sets up the flood, and the flood is set up by Genesis 6:6-7. And it describes the emotional burden that YHWH feels over what happens to his perfect peaceful world. And here's the quote, "And YHWH saw that the evil of man was great on the earth, and every imagining of the thoughts of his heart was only evil all day long. And the Lord was agrieved that he had made man on the earth, and in his heart he sorrowed." This sorrow is what YHWH already feels, it's what he will feel as he watches the world, the humans of the world, spiral out of control instead of being his imagers. They will become the force of evil, and they will bring, directly bring, darkness into the world. And Eve, the one who brought this chaos to the earth, because she envied to have the experience of "tov" and "rah", will now feel the effects of "rah", what it does on the earth, what it does on her life, and she will join God in carrying this emotional load, this grieving in her heart, this sorrow in her life. "I will multiply your grieving, your sorrow, and your conceptions. In pain you shall bear children."

Now this expression "bear children", according to the translators Samuel Bray and John Hobbins, stands for everything in the process of birthing and raising children. It's not just, "it will hurt to push out babies". It's way past that. It's everything about bearing and raising children. Eve has now introduced competition into the world. And with it, shortage. There's going to be turf to fight over, there are going to be food and treasures to hoard, in what had been a world of total provision and abundance, and everything about human relational life will now be harder. Even with your own children, you're going to have competition now, with your children, there's going to be a wrestling, there's going to be pain. The most beautiful thing in life is burying kids, and raising kids, and we celebrate every birth. And God says, "with that celebration is going to come a measure of pain, it's going to hurt to raise kids." And every parent knows parenting is not fair. It's not an equal love between parent and child. You give and give and give and give, and sometimes you don't get a whole lot of credit for all the sacrifices of your life. And he tells Eve, "You're going to bear and raise children, it's going to be a painful experience, because everything in human relational life will now be harder." And not just in her relationship with her own children, but this is going to affect her relationship with her equal life partner. He says, "and toward your 'ishek', your husband, shall be your hunger." And that word "hunger" also means, craving. It also means, longings. Kind of an odd sentence. "Toward (aimed at) your 'ishek', aimed at your husband, shall be your hunger, your craving, your longing. And it is he who shall have charge, dominion, authority over you."

There had never been a government between the two of them, you know, in an army of only two people, there's no need for a general. Now, patriarchy gets a lot of hits today, along with government, policing, and host of all things related to the need to establish some kind of authority in human societies, so you can provide for the common good, because it's a fallen world now. And we can't live anymore like we're still in the garden, because people are twisted. And that's what's wrong with every utopian plan, whether it's communism, or the commune systems that have been tried so many times. We just keep trying to build a utopia, and God built one, and our heart craves it, we want to get it back. But it's a fallen world until Christ is here, and he is ruling. We just can't live like we're still in the garden, people are the problem. And the rest of the Bible is a series of stories that illustrate just how deep our value system has been perverted. Because, you know, we all want to be gods now, and we hate to be ruled. And this starts in us before we're two years old, and it really never ends.

Well, two things need to be noted here, and what God says to Eve about her relationship with Adam. Number one, he says that she will now have inner drives, emotional drives, that will war against her relationship with Adam. In other words, she has messed up the unity the two of them have always had, they have had absolute unity. They've been selfless. They have been so perfectly created to unite with one another, and this is going to be affected. Now she's going to have inner drives that will arise from some kind of unmet needs, or from envy, or from the experience of being insecure. It just depends on how you want to psychologize her experience that's being portrayed in the word, the Hebrew word that we have to translate "hunger", "craving", "longing" or "desire". There's an experience she's going to have inside of her, now that it's a competitive world, and it will, these drives, will affect her in her mental state, and it will affect her relationship with her counterpart. Secondly, God does not say expressly that he's installing Adam as Eve's authority, he simply says that's what's going to happen. I guess the third thing would be, God doesn't say that what applies to Eve applies to all of her daughters. Like, this is the new rule for all the humans in the world. He's talking to Adam and Eve about their life together. We've traditionally taken it to mean this, but there's really, it's not in the text to say that God is installing patriarchy. He just says, "this is how it's going to end up. This is what's going to happen now." Stay tuned.

Now God turns his attention to Adam. He dealt with Eve first, because she did this first. And what she did was different in nature, she and the 'nakash' are tied together now, because they have conspired to bring this world to a different place. She didn't know that, but she followed the accusation against YHWH, and she believed them in part, and she joined forces. Adam is an entirely different situation. His sin is different from Eve's. And YHWH points to the fact. He says in verse 17, "Because you 'heeded did the voice'", and to heed a voice means that you listen, you focus on that voice. And it means that you obey the voice. God says, "because you heeded the voice of your wife." -- now, these days, it has become almost a doctrine that husbands should listen to their wives. Because the wife's perspective is so vital, and she sees a lot of things a husband would not see, but in Scripture, that's really not a blanket direction. There are many wise women in the Bible who speak with the voice of Lady Wisdom herself, and they advise their husbands. And, you know, that English word "husband", it means, house band. If you're, I don't know if you've ever seen an old wooden house in Europe or other countries where the house is in danger of actually falling apart, and they put steel bands around the house, like a barrel, and it holds that house together. It's strong. It's steel, it's tough. House band, the husband. So there are many wise women in the Bible, and they advise their husbands with the very wisdom of God. and they help them to see a better way. And there are many women in Scripture that are honored according to this model. That is God's design for womanhood, it is what he wants women to be. It's what Mary is highlighted as, that she is the woman who is submitted to God, and she's, like, facing again, her own choice. And she is totally working with God, versus Eve's choice. So those two are being paired up in the New Testament versus the Old Testament. But that's what God wants. That's his design for women. That's his dream for women.

But throughout the Bible, there is also a second image of women as having this ability, this power, to sway their husbands, to move their husbands to deeper corruption. To appeal to self-centeredness or sexual indulgence like the daughter of Herod in the New Testament. King Herod took his brother's wife away from him, and they started an affair, and she lived with him. John the baptist rebukes them for doing that, and she has her daughter -- this is how twisted -- has her daughter seduce the king, and he gets all worked up. And then he says, "What would you like from me? Yes, anything." And she says, "I want the head of John the baptist". So it's this kind of, it's like, there's this other thing that women can do. And it's what Eve has done. She has used this power. It's what happens with Sarah. Sarah urges Abraham to make a baby with her maid. What a perverse thing! Because she wants to remove the shame of her own childlessness. It's what happens to Solomon, because he falls in love with pagan women. And they introduce him and they induce him to build them places to worship rival elohim. And he puts pagan gods right in the city of YHWH. I mean, this is Jerusalem, the city God gave his father David. And the Scripture is very clear. It's because those women use their power and turned his heart. It's the power used by Jezabel, to pressure and influence King Ahab to become even more of a murderous tyrant, and to lead the whole nation into destruction. Now, generally In the Bible, women are portrayed as noble, desirable, even heroic. Like Esther, who saves the people at the risk of her own life. Like, like Ruth. But there is a power in a woman to move other people, especially to move a man who's in love with her, and to move those to whom she's like a mother. And when a woman goes bad in Scripture, she usually goes very bad.

Adam's sin is heeding the voice of his wife, over the voice of the Elohim YHWH. That's what he has done. He has listened to her voice, knowing that it contradicted the voice of YHWH to him. You don't always follow your husband or your wife's voice, you listen to the voice of the Lord. And he says to Adam, "Cursed is the ground because of you." He does not say, "Adam, you are cursed." The Creator says that the curses lie on the "aduma", the ground, not the "adam", the groundling, you know. The curse is on the dirt, not the man of dirt. The curse is on the earth, not the man of the earth. Adam and Eve are the federal heads of planet Earth, and in choosing to obey the darkness as it worked first through the 'nakash', and then through Eve, and now into Adam, they've opened the good Earth to dark spiritual forces that are now going to invade the whole creation. And the ground now lies under the weight of a curse. And instead of yielding sweetly to the work of mankind, it will now resist his efforts. Man will have to compete to survive on this planet that was once a place of endless abundance. Man was created to work, work in the garden of God, but now, his work will become a heavy labor that will break his body down over time. Verses 18 and 19, "Cursed is the ground because of you. In sorrow" -- and there's that word again. Adam and will join Eve in bearing a sorrow for what has been lost in this perfect world. The life extension, pushing your life one more day, one more year, one more decade, life extension will now become a battle, and nature will work against you. And your own body's death clock is gonna start to systematically remove your immunities and your resources. We know that through science. "In sorrow", he says to Adam, "you will eat of her", (eat of the earth, Mother Earth), "you will eat of her, but eat of her in sorrow all the days of your life. Thorn and briar shall she sprout for you. And you shall eat the grain of the field. By the sweat of your brow shall you eat bread until you return to the ground, for it is from her you were taken." This last image is pretty vivid. It's an image of wheat. And in order to eat wheat, you have to grind it, and he says to Adam, "Your life and work on Earth as you grind your wheat so you can live, the effort you put into living on Earth will grind you like wheat until you blow to dust. For dust you are, and to dust you show return."

My friend, there are consequences for all of our moral choices. We are the image of God on Earth. We are the lords of this planet, federal heads of planet Earth, it belongs to us, it is under our feet. And our choices on this physical planet, our physical choices, they come back on us. They either come back in blessing or they come back in cursing, and they become a source of blessing to others, or they become the beginning of cursing on the lives of others too. We destroy, we do "rah", or we do "tov". We have that amazing power. Now, Adam steps up. Their court sentence is over, they have heard the consequences of their behavior. And hopefully we have all through watching their mistake come to understand that we must be careful as we stand before these trees. That we face the tree every day, and every time we choose to rebel against God and be a little god ourselves, we are joining the darkness, we are joining the dark side, our personal moral choices have cosmic significance, because we are joining the outside forces as a spiritual war for this planet continues to rage over thousands and thousands of years. So now Adam steps out of that, and he steps up as the leader of his 'ezer'. For the first time, he's never been the leader of Eve, but now he is. And he steps up as her leader, and he does something that he had never done before because he wasn't her leader. He named her.

Now, he had characterized her once before as 'isha', that she would be counterpart to man, but that's not really a name. It's just her characteristic. She, you know, "she flows with me, she's the exact mirror image of me". They've been through a lot together. And Adam can now choose many different names for her, and some of them would not be positive. But in love, I actually think he's doing a good job here. He steps up in love, and he names her, but he does so kindly. He chooses a name that's in line with God's prophetic vision for his partner, and Adam called his wife's name, Eve. It's the word "mother", because she was the mother of all the living, all humans will flow from her body, ultimately, to include the Snake Crusher, and he will bring justice to the 'nakash', and he will end his beguiling of the human race. The last verse now, verse 21, "And the Elohim YHWH made tunics of leather for Adam and for his wife, and he clothed them." 

Here we see the second revelation of the gospel in this one passage, because the mighty Creator and Judge of all the earth has had to find them guilty, they are guilty, and he is declared their guilt and their consequence. But then the Judge steps down from the bench, and he gets involved in trying to help the two of them recover from the consequences of their action. First of all, he sheds blood for the two of them. He kills an innocent victim from the animal kingdom to cover up their shame, and makes leather. And then he takes on the humble role of dressmaker. And he clothes the two of them with protection. Now, there are a few different versions of the Old Testament in the scrolls, and the one that we're following now is the Masoretic Text, and it ends the passage here. And it ends this, sort of like, chapter here, to show that while this has been a disaster, and it will affect every human who will ever live, the earth that God has blessed, he called it good, but now it's cursed. But as we will see, God has a plan to restore all things. So the the Masoretic Text, it ends with this passage because it wants to end on hope. What we're going to see as we go through these first 12 chapters, and especially as we hit the 12th chapter, we'll see this good Earth is now cursed, but God has a plan to restore all things. And this plan begins with Abraham in chapter 12. And Abraham is told to walk the cursed Earth, and God blesses all the ground his foot touches, and turns it into blessed Earth. So he spends his life walking with God over thousands of square miles. And you and I are called to join father Abraham, and join YHWH, the great Elohim Creator, in ending the curse and spreading blessing everywhere as we go walking with him in the name and presence of Jesus, the Snake Crusher. That's what ministry is all about. We walk throughout this planet and we take the new blessings of the Lord to cover and break the curse. It's a beautiful beginning, but it's going to take us a while to get there.

That's all for today. We have a new resource, I really hope you'll take advantage of it. We're starting something brand new, every Tuesday at 9AM Eastern Standard Time on the Facebook page of MediaLight Network. We were gonna launch this week a live video podcast. If you miss it live, you can catch the recorded version on MediaLight's YouTube page, and we'll put the link for all this in the show notes. You can find it also on any audio podcast player you might want to use. We have video and audio version. All of this is for you, because we really believe that God can use you. He can use you to spread the Good News to the cursed Earth, that the curse is gone, and the perfect man, the seed of Eve, has returned and fought the serpent, the 'nakash', in the wilderness, and he has crushed his head forever. We can be set free through Jesus. So go spread that message and take advantage of this new opportunity on Facebook every Tuesday morning at nine o'clock. Shine your light, because you are the light of the world.