IronOrbit Podcast

The Healthcare Ransomware Epidemic: How to Protect Your Patients

February 25, 2020 IronOrbit
IronOrbit Podcast
The Healthcare Ransomware Epidemic: How to Protect Your Patients
Chapters
IronOrbit Podcast
The Healthcare Ransomware Epidemic: How to Protect Your Patients
Feb 25, 2020
IronOrbit

Just as cloud technology has empowered people to build, communicate, and innovate, it has enabled breakers, hackers, and lone criminals to attack with incredible efficiency. 

Not only can individual breakers do more damage more cheaply, and more easily, they can do so without any affiliations or organization to arm or direct them. Extortion is a bigger business than ever, and now it doesn't have to rely on people depositing bags stuffed with cash. Ransomware attacks are happening more and more because cybercriminals are finding that it pays well.

In fact, the threat of ransomware attacks has grown to crisis levels. While there’s increased awareness, attacks are becoming more sophisticated. While no one is immune, the healthcare industry has been and continues to be, prime targets. And for good reason. Healthcare organizations are considered low-hanging fruit by cybercriminals. Hackers know healthcare centers are notorious for having inefficient security. Most hospitals don’t have procedures in place to restore a network once locked by ransomware. Most applications in Hospitals have little or no network segmentation. There are no firewalls between workloads. Basic security protocols are not in place. 

This podcast looks briefly at some of the healthcare data breaches and ransomware attacks that have occurred during the past few years. The cyberattack is just one aspect of the problem. These threats disrupt operations and even threaten physical harm to the patient. Consequently, medical centers that fall prey to cybercriminals often become targets of malpractice lawsuits.

This podcast also talks about one healthcare system that fought back successfully by proactively testing their own security, looking for weaknesses, and planning for such an event. The Interfaith Medical Center deployed a variety of network security technologies to protect against ransomware and other cyber threats. They virtualized their services in the process. It's estimated that their zero-trust network saved the institution more than $2 million over a 7-year period. It's a model approach which more and more health systems are sure to adopt. There are things hospital administration and staff can do immediately to protect their data and the privacy of their patients. Awareness and employee training are a good beginning.

Education needs to be combined with a cyber defense infrastructure. Backup and disaster recovery solutions need to be part of the design. Healthcare organizations need a cyber-security and protection system that exceeds basic compliance standards.

Show Notes

Just as cloud technology has empowered people to build, communicate, and innovate, it has enabled breakers, hackers, and lone criminals to attack with incredible efficiency. 

Not only can individual breakers do more damage more cheaply, and more easily, they can do so without any affiliations or organization to arm or direct them. Extortion is a bigger business than ever, and now it doesn't have to rely on people depositing bags stuffed with cash. Ransomware attacks are happening more and more because cybercriminals are finding that it pays well.

In fact, the threat of ransomware attacks has grown to crisis levels. While there’s increased awareness, attacks are becoming more sophisticated. While no one is immune, the healthcare industry has been and continues to be, prime targets. And for good reason. Healthcare organizations are considered low-hanging fruit by cybercriminals. Hackers know healthcare centers are notorious for having inefficient security. Most hospitals don’t have procedures in place to restore a network once locked by ransomware. Most applications in Hospitals have little or no network segmentation. There are no firewalls between workloads. Basic security protocols are not in place. 

This podcast looks briefly at some of the healthcare data breaches and ransomware attacks that have occurred during the past few years. The cyberattack is just one aspect of the problem. These threats disrupt operations and even threaten physical harm to the patient. Consequently, medical centers that fall prey to cybercriminals often become targets of malpractice lawsuits.

This podcast also talks about one healthcare system that fought back successfully by proactively testing their own security, looking for weaknesses, and planning for such an event. The Interfaith Medical Center deployed a variety of network security technologies to protect against ransomware and other cyber threats. They virtualized their services in the process. It's estimated that their zero-trust network saved the institution more than $2 million over a 7-year period. It's a model approach which more and more health systems are sure to adopt. There are things hospital administration and staff can do immediately to protect their data and the privacy of their patients. Awareness and employee training are a good beginning.

Education needs to be combined with a cyber defense infrastructure. Backup and disaster recovery solutions need to be part of the design. Healthcare organizations need a cyber-security and protection system that exceeds basic compliance standards.