Behind the Breakthrough

From Originator to Mortgage Marketing Expert w/ Phil Treadwell

February 11, 2020 Industry Syndicate Episode 2
Behind the Breakthrough
From Originator to Mortgage Marketing Expert w/ Phil Treadwell
Chapters
Behind the Breakthrough
From Originator to Mortgage Marketing Expert w/ Phil Treadwell
Feb 11, 2020 Episode 2
Industry Syndicate

Before the mortgage industry knew Industry Syndicate co-founder Phil Treadwell as the "Mortgage Marketing Expert," he was originating loans. He was in the trenches, face to face with consumers, working his tail off to consistently close more loans. Phil grew a successful business as an originator, and again as a regional manager of a large mortgage company, but he also had his fair share of struggles and headwinds.

Host Megan Anderson dives deep into Phil Treadwell's story of specifically what he did to breakthrough from local loan originator to mortgage industry influencer and leader.

*Behind the Breakthrough is an Industry Syndicate Original podcast, the first and only podcast network for the real estate and mortgage industry.

--
Looking for the best podcasts for Real Estate Agents and Mortgage Loan Officers?

Download the new Industry Syndicate mobile app:
iPhone: http://bit.ly/SyndicateApple
Android: http://bit.ly/SyndicateGoogle 

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ⓒ 2020 Industry Syndicate podcast network

Show Notes Transcript

Before the mortgage industry knew Industry Syndicate co-founder Phil Treadwell as the "Mortgage Marketing Expert," he was originating loans. He was in the trenches, face to face with consumers, working his tail off to consistently close more loans. Phil grew a successful business as an originator, and again as a regional manager of a large mortgage company, but he also had his fair share of struggles and headwinds.

Host Megan Anderson dives deep into Phil Treadwell's story of specifically what he did to breakthrough from local loan originator to mortgage industry influencer and leader.

*Behind the Breakthrough is an Industry Syndicate Original podcast, the first and only podcast network for the real estate and mortgage industry.

--
Looking for the best podcasts for Real Estate Agents and Mortgage Loan Officers?

Download the new Industry Syndicate mobile app:
iPhone: http://bit.ly/SyndicateApple
Android: http://bit.ly/SyndicateGoogle 

--
Follow the Industry Syndicate on social media:
Instagram
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

ⓒ 2020 Industry Syndicate podcast network

spk_0:   0:03
welcome to behind the breakthrough with your host, Megan Anderson, the podcast where we tell the stories of today's leaders before they were leaders. The struggles doubts, fears and insecurities they had to overcome in order to reach their current level of success. Let's go ahead. Let's break behind The breakthrough is an industry syndicate. Original podcast industry syndicate is the first podcast network for the real estate and mortgage industry. Go get the completely free industry syndicate Podcast app right now from the APP store or Google play. Welcome, Thio the podcast. Phil, I'm so excited to have you on here and I know all about you. But for those of the listeners that don't know about you, go ahead and give us a little bit of background on who you are and how you got into the mortgage space.

spk_1:   1:11
Thank you very much. I'm excited to be here. Thank you so much for having me. My background has pretty much always been in the mortgage industry. I've been doing this for 15 and 1/2 going on 16 years, pretty much all in origination as a loan officer, branch manager, regional, a couple of years ago got this wild hair and decided to start a podcast. And so that's been a lot of fun. Had Ah ah, lot of incredible guests on their including yourself, and that's parlayed into some speaking engagements and doing a lot with social media and content creation. And that's been a fun couple years.

spk_0:   1:47
Yeah, for those of though, for those for those individuals that don't know what your podcast is, what tell him a little bit more about it?

spk_1:   1:55
Sure, So I have the mortgage marketing expert podcast, and the premise of the podcast is we bring on expert guests who give first hand experience and knowledge on how people can build, aim or effective and efficient business. And we talk about everything from mindset to tactics and really anything that goes into helping an originator build the business. But we focus a lot on the marketing side of things because we believe that marketing is really where it begins. We have, ah, kind of AH, saying that's marketing is what get someone's attention. Sales is what makes them a customer, and there are a lot of people out there who focus a lot on sales. When they think they're marketing, they're trying to convert leads. They're trying to actually sell a product or a service. And marketing is, I think, a little underrated when it comes to that cause, Really, all you're trying to do is get a message out there. You're trying to get someone's attention so that later you can convert that and and we talk about all kinds of different things that people need to do or think about or be in the right mindset of toe. Be more effective at that

spk_0:   3:01
now when it comes to marketing, obviously you didn't start out with just marketing. Was there like a time period in your career where you kind of shifted? Went out on a limb? Was that the podcast that kind of made that shift for you? I think

spk_1:   3:15
that was part of it. You know, I always considered myself a good salesman, a good salesperson. Most of the career paths that I was on on again, predominantly mortgage. But prior to that, the few jobs that I did have were more sales related. I did some door to door sales, which for anybody that's done, that is is definitely a grind. But I learned a lot through that because you have an opportunity to be comfortable with people saying, No, you don't take the rejection personally. They're just not interested in your products. And I did network marketing for, ah, a short period of time, which again create some thick scan. It kind of tells you had a had a cell creatively and put your message out there whatever. Most people don't want to hear it. I also did some corporate recruiting for a transportation company where I recruited truck drivers and and again it was all about framing a message. And what I learned as I progressed in my mortgage career was that as I went out and talked to Realtors, I wasn't trying to sell them a product. I was trying to get them comfortable with me, and the message is that we were going to be giving consumers together and how we could partner to build a bigger business. So while I've always considered myself a salesman, what I realized is I was able to get sales and I was able to sell a product or service because I really liked and and had a knack for marketing, so I don't think it's much if there was a transition is Muchas how I looked at what I was doing. I thought I was selling when really what I was was creating a brand. I was creating a message. I was creating attention so that I could sell them that product or service. And I think again, I talk a lot about that distinction because it was such a mental click for me and really took my career to the next level.

spk_0:   5:00
Love that. Talking about taking your career to the next level. You know, this podcast is all about kind of the break through all the struggles that we go through to reach the level of success that we've achieved. And I'm curious. Is there any points in your life that kind of stand out as maybe it the time you were like, Oh my gosh, this is so hard. How am I going to get through this? That, in hindsight, is time has passed. You look back on him now and you're like I needed to go through that in order to be where I'm at today.

spk_1:   5:35
Yeah, there's That's a great question. First of all, and second, I think we all have time periods in our life where we think we're not getting results or we're not getting the results. We feel like we should, and I can identify several times in my career where I felt like that. But it's about consistence and persistence, and we talk again a lot about that. With guests on our podcast and people that I coach and mentor, you can't do something for a short period of time and just expect that you're going to get a lot of results with it. I go back to my podcast because that's something that I've gotten a lot of accolades for and people have been very complimentary of, and it's not really even because of me. It's because of the caliber of guests that we had on and the information that they've shared. But even in the beginning of that, we didn't have a lot of listeners. We didn't have a lot of audience. We were continually putting out content. We were putting out episodes and while we always had an element of people that were listening, I remember the first day I had 10 downloads and one day I remember like you know, it's Oh my Gosh, this is incredible. And now we've had a CZ many as 1000 downloads in one day, and so it changes perspective. It wasn't that I wasn't excited about 1000 downloads in one day. That's absolutely incredible. It didn't mean the same thing. Surprisingly enough is those 1st 10 So we stayed consistent, and I look back at times in my career where I wasn't getting the results that I wanted as I was closing loans or I was talking to a lot of people and they weren't converting. You know, each one of those teaches you a skill or a mindset that helps you get to that next stage. And I think that that's really the moral of the story is even as I've created a bigger platform with the podcast and then speaking engagements. The reason I started it was to create more exposure or to create more attention to get better recruiting results so that as I reached out to hire people or to build my business at, you know, at Mason and Duffy or previous companies, when I wanted to put branches on the ground when I reached out to people or in markets that I hadn't personally done business in my effectiveness went way down because I didn't have any any credibility, really. And so I created the podcast so that whenever people googled me or looked on social media, there was something for them to see. But in the 1st 6 or eight months, I didn't get any actual results. From that, I had to continue to put out guests and put out episodes and and create a lot of content over several years to where Now people do pick up the phone and call and say, Hey, I saw a poster, I saw your podcast or the reach out through social media. I'd like to know more about what you do and how you do it, and so you know, that's really the the key for me that continues at every stage to take your business to the next level because none of us have made it. We all have room to grow, and we can all do a lot of different things. But for me, every stage where I grew substantially or incremental was a direct result of being consistent over time.

spk_0:   8:37
Yeah, I think that that is key to I mean, you and I both talk about how important social media is, but there's also this aspect that comes in of, you know, fear of judgment. And when you initially don't get those likes, don't get those views that you were originally hoping for. And this could be anything in business. You know, you don't bring in as much as you thought you would. You don't, you know, convert as high as you thought you would. We we get afraid, and we want to retract, and we want to close. But it's so important to continue to be consistent. And I think just believing in the value that you're able to provide really allows you to kind of keep going with that. So I love that you bring that up. Now, I have another question for you. I mean, you live in Texas right now. Um, but you weren't always in Texas. Tell us a little bit about kind of your life growing up.

spk_1:   9:31
Yes. So I grew up in southwest Missouri. I am the product of an entrepreneur. My dad is a builder, owns a construction company. Still does quite a bit of work to this day. And My mom was a teacher, so I had this really cool mix of academia where I had to do good in school and get good grades mixed with a guy who only went to college for a couple of years to play baseball and, you know, owned his own business. And so I think I had a good mix of those two things. Whenever I graduated high school, I went to the University of Arkansas and Fayetteville, and I stayed in Northwest Arkansas for about 18 years. Outside of a short stint in Denver and a little bit of time back in Missouri, I stayed in Northwest Arkansas for people that aren't familiar with that area. You have Tyson Foods, which is the largest food producer in the world, that it's headquartered there. Wal Marts, which is the largest brick and mortar retailer on the planet's headquartered. There, J B. Hunt Transportation, which is one of the largest trucking companies in the world. And so there's a lot of corporate stuff going on in that area has exploded, and there was a lot of opportunity specifically in housing. I moved down here to Dallas because most of the companies that I had worked for were based here, and I had an opportunity of the previous company to relocate here and do some work. That was before I found my current company, Mason and Duffy, and I love it. You know, Texas is a really cool place when it comes to travelling. You can get pretty much anywhere in the country in a few hours and, you know, historically whatever people asked where I was from and I would say Bentonville, Arkansas, are Fayetteville, Arkansas. They're like, Where's that? We're now

spk_0:   11:08
on our

spk_1:   11:08
people say, Where you from? Your like Dallas? I'm like, Okay, that makes sense. And so, you know, that's kind of nice to Thio to do that, but, you know, I I was a kid that always had an entrepreneurial bug. I was always trying to start little side businesses and and again, you balance that with playing sports and you're trying to do good in school and those types of things, so that the mortgage industry was a great industry for me because I still got to do numbers. I was always a numbers guy, you know, as I worked through interest rates and loan amounts that I was kind of you check that box, if you will. Bitch loan officers, mortgage originators. Mortgage brokers have an opportunity to build their own business within a company. You still get to have that personality and flair and and combine the two. And so I don't know that I was necessarily called into the mortgage business, but I feel like I'm able to kind of fill a calling in it. And so it's some pretty passion about moving this industry forward.

spk_0:   12:06
I must say the first time I met you was in Arkansas. That was also the first time that I had ever been there, and it's actually a really cool town. There's a lot of money in there because there's all you know, Walmart. There's all these big corporations in there, and it's really a surprisingly beautiful spot. Although I must say something now that you've been living in Texas when I first met you, you did not have that Texas accent, and now you're like a full blown Texan. You're just stopping Well, I

spk_1:   12:37
don't know if I should take that as a complimentary dig, but I will say our VP of operations who was born and raised in the Bay Area, and when he was in the Army, he lived in Fort Fort Smith, Arkansas, which isn't isn't too far from where I lived. And so he has perspective in both places. And when I moved to Texas, we were at N B a annual conference and people asked where I was from. I would say, you know, Texas and because it was in Austin, he's like, Yeah, but you didn't originally lived there. And so finally we found a native Texan that had been born and raised in Austin, and we had this conversation front of him. She laughed and and he asked. He said, Well, how long do you have to live in Texas before you can say you're a Texan? And she said that? Well, the old adage is, I wasn't born here, but I sure got here as soon as I could. And so, with her permission, I say now that I'm a Texan and I'm from Dallas, even though I've only been here a short period of time.

spk_0:   13:26
I love that when it comes to the mortgage space. What was your first job within the mortgage space? I've

spk_1:   13:32
started out as a loan officer. Yeah, from the very beginning, I answered a newspaper ad and they said the newspaper ad wanted someone with management and sales experience. I had the sales, and in college I was the store manager for Blockbuster Video in Fayetteville, where University of Arkansas is that that I always make the disclaimer that if Blockbuster video was still around, I would still be working there. That was the funnest job that I ever had, except for the fact that you have to work every weekend and every holiday. So I answered this ad for sales and management experience, and it was a mortgage company. And that was in 3 4004 And they were a little small mortgage banker that had in house underwriting. They were, you know, full legal F h, which was a big deal at the time. So during that time period, when a lot of folks were doing a lot of subprime loans and a lot of this, you know, different products that were out there, we really focused on F H Ava and conventional and why we did a little bit of subprime. That wasn't our niche, and I fortunately learned from a mentor who taught me how to put a good file together, taught me the importance of working with me a referral relationships, how to take care of your customers, how to really build the business the right way. And so, through the crash and through all the craziness that happened, I just went back to the fundamentals that I was taught where a lot of the people at that time were career salespeople where mortgage was the hot thing. And that was, you know, if you have a heart beating confide Amir, you could get a mortgage. That wasn't the way that we operated in the companies that I worked for operated. I think it's served me well.

spk_0:   15:08
Yeah. Is there anything that you kind of struggled with when you first got into originating that you kind of overdue Originate now?

spk_1:   15:17
Not anymore. Having originated in several years as a regional, but to answer your question, Yeah, I was essentially a kid, you know. I was 22 years old, 21 years old, getting into an industry that you know is a difficult one for someone who's young. I had to fight for credibility from Realtors. I had to fight for credibility from even customers because I even though I looked a little older than I was, I was still young. And I remember my first boss said. I had a goatee at the time. This early two thousands. I carried my nineties go T a little little too far into the two thousands and he said, Ah, where it's high every day and keep the hair on your face because they make you look older. And it really wasn't until I was probably 45 years into my career and really starting to produce a good amount of business where I had some credibility. And even then, you know, you know, late twenties, early twenties to late twenties wasn't a time where people really thought, Oh, my gosh, this is an expert or experienced or whatever And so I had to fight for that for a long time. I think I still maybe have to fight that battle. Even now you don't 37 years old. There's not a lot of people who have done the amount of things in the industry that I've done and are at my age, and there are some There's some really, really talented people out there. But I have a unique perspective of, I guess, technically being a millennial while spending most of my career learning from Gen Xers and baby boomers. So I come from the old school, but yet I have the desire and the appetite for a lot of the new way of doing things. And so I still fight some of that challenge. Now, as I get offered to speak at places or I get opportunities, tow the rooms are to get into rooms with people who are. You know, some of the who's who in our industry and have been doing this, you know, 25 30 40 years. I still the back of my mind, you know? Question. Am I capable of being in this room, like in my, you know, worthy of associating with these kinds of people? And I think you and I, you know, had that conversation with Rene Rodriguez and amplify your well talked about kind of that inferiority Hoster sender. Amerigo and I think that's something that has been a challenge because I've been my career has progressed faster than my age has. And so there's a little bit that impostor complex that make everyone challenges and has challenged with a different times. But it's definitely something that, uh, affected me a lot early in my career.

spk_0:   17:51
Yeah, I mean, you talked about how you would, you know, dress up, not shave your face, which I completely get that because when I do videos, I try and dress in business attire so that I look, you know, older and more professional than coming in with a T shirt. So I understand that completely. I'm curious, though. In what ways? Especially when you were starting out. And it was hard to gain that credibility and get people to listen to you. What were some ways that you found that would help overcome that?

spk_1:   18:21
I was. I tried to be an expert, or at least very well versed. And whatever it is I was talking about so early in my career, I new guidelines Ford and backward. I understood what it took to get someone qualified. The types of loans I was doing at the time were manual underwrite F H A loans where a lot of people were doing the subprime 80 20 is 80% 1st in a 20% 2nd They got him in at 100% loan with eight and 1/2 for 9% on the first mortgage and 12 on a second. I could get them done with a manual underwrite F h ey with down payment assistance. I could also get them in with no money, but the interest rate was seven and 1/2 percent. And the interesting thing about that is at the time the type of credit challenges and income challenges that we were dealing with. You have the gets really creative and really understand the guidelines to get some of those loans to qualify without just going subprime and doing some of the liar loans. So through that I was able to grow my knowledge base of the mortgage industry. And then as I progressed, if there was a certification that was offered or there was a class that was offered, I had an appetite to go do those things because I felt like to compete. I had to know what I was talking about. I couldn't look like someone that wasn't experienced, and I think I've always had an appetite to grow and learn, and that's why this time in our industry is so much fun because even those of us that have been doing it a long time, it's not just about guidelines anymore. There's the technology aspect of it. There's a reaching the customer. There's, you know, all the different ways that you can add value to referral partners. There's always something to learn, and that's been the fun part of this industry. But even now, that's how I fight. Some of that imposter syndrome, if you will, is I try to really understand my craft and stay in my lane. I typically don't talk a lot about things that I don't have a lot of experience in. Give a little bit of knowledge that I have and then leave that to someone else. But that's my advice for people. Is if you know your stuff. If you've worked hard at your craft, even when you feel like you don't necessarily deserve it, no, that you put the work in. Know that you've gotten there. If you haven't and you've taken shortcuts well, you know what? There may be some justification for that imposter syndrome A little bit,

spk_0:   20:38
Yeah, very impactful. And I love that it was almost like this, um, fear of judgment. That really kind of gave you the motivation to be that Lerner. And so I think it's important for everyone listening that a lot of the times we have these, these these things that we tell ourselves, you know, I'm not good enough. Oh, I don't know if I deserve to be in this space. It's so important for us to look at these things and see it as okay, Well, really one. I do deserve to be here because I've put in in all this effort into just I love the fact that it just it motivated you to do something to excel You and a lot of the times I think we have a hard time taking a look at these things that are causing us pain or fear and accepting the fact that a lot of times those things that are causing us pain and fear are actually what we need to give us the motivation to come out on top. And I love the fact that you mentioned staying in your lane. I know that there's probably some people listening on here that are like, uh You know, I should probably touch up on my guidelines, but I really hate that stuff, you know? How else could I be of, you know, credibility? Maybe you're young in this space. How else could I be of credibility to my referral partners to people that are surrounding me? Well, there's so many different ways to do this. I know when we were out, Rene Rodriguez is amplify event Bill Bill was there and he was talking about when he was starting off. He would go and he would create landing pages and websites for referral partners. So, really, it's about honing in on what it is that your craft is and what it is that you're good at staying in that lane and implementing that to come out on top to gain that credibility. So there's so many different ways to achieve that. A

spk_1:   22:29
1000%. And Bill hello stat is one of the smartest men that I've ever met. He is extremely talented at marketing, but he, as he was talking through and telling those stories, said the exact same thing. I did what I knew, and I think that's what people need to understand is in today's day and age because there are so many ways to add value, you don't have to create some new thing. Focus on what you do. So the younger originators, the newer originators that are out there, that may not be as guideline driven. Don't worry about that. Focus on what your strength iss your strength, maybe in creating attention on social media or the tactics of using social media. Keep in mind some of the top producers that she may want to do business with have been around for a while. And maybe that's not a tactic that they're good at. And so the value that you can add is, Hey, I can help you promote your listings. I can help you promote your team. I can help you get the word out. They will refer you deals so long as they know, even if you're not super well versed on the guidelines, that you're backed up with a team that ISS And that was my line, you know, early. And I remember those those very first few months when I was going out trying to get my first deals. When someone would ask a question, I would answer what I knew and say. But because guidelines are changing so quickly and they all do and they always have, I want to check and make for sure that I'm telling you the right answer. I will call you in 1/2 an hour an hour, whatever. Most Realtors don't care if you don't know the question right on the spot, so long as you give them the right answer at some point in time. And the best example was the very first referral that I got. A Realtor walked up to me that I was in Missouri at the time and I was driving an old beat up Jeep Grand Cherokee and I had a Razorback sticker on the back of it, and she walked up to me and she said, Is that your jeep out there? I'm thinking I parked in the wrong spot or you shouldn't say, Why did you bring this junker in our parking lot? But she said, My husband is a huge Razorback fans. She's like, Who are you? And I gave her my name in the company I was with, and she said, Can you do bridge loans? And I said yes and she said, Great. I have someone you can go talk to right now. So on the way there, I'm calling my boss, saying, Can we do bridge loans? And how do you do him? And I was pretty sure we could, cause I had heard the term, but I had no idea what it was. I had no idea what I needed to do. And really, all it was was bridging the equity from a property that hadn't been sold yet so that he could go ahead by another property. They're few and far between. They don't really exist much anymore. But it was something that was pretty standard at the time. And I say that because she didn't care that I was, you know, brand new in the business. She didn't ask. She wanted to know. Can he accomplish what I'm needing him for? And the most important piece of that story is we found some commonality, right? I used the example. If you're in a foreign country and you see another American, you're like, Oh, hey, we're both from the U. S. When you're in the U. S. You don't do that unless you're in it. If I'm in Florida and I see another text I'm like, Oh, yeah. Hey, I live in Texas and in Texas. I don't do that unless I'm in San Antonio. Oh, hey, I'm from Dallas, right when I'm in Dallas, don't walk around high fiving. People try to find commonality wherever you're at. And so that's super important for people to realize the things that you're interested in, whether that's wakeboarding or whether that's making gingerbread houses, I don't care what it is. Find other people that like that, and they'll automatically want to do business with you because there's a common ground. They're mine happened to be a Razorback sticker on the back of a beat up Jeep Grand Cherokee, and I did a lot of business with her for a long time, and so that's really a key to this is I consistently talked about what I knew and was true to who I was, and I attracted people to me that how we're of a like mind and had things in common, and I didn't know that I was doing that at the time. This is just hindsight's 2020. I can articulate to people what they need to be doing. I probably just got lucky, you know, it all worked out the way it was supposed to work out. But that's my advice to the new loan officers right now.

spk_0:   26:36
Yeah, and there's so many ways to find, you know, what you might have in common with individual social media is a great way to do that. If you get on, make sure that you're following and that you're friends with real estate agents in your area, and it's really easy millennials. We've all done this. We know how to stock. Now it's so easy to go on there and see what might be what you might have in common. And then, you know, when you're making that call to set that coffee date or whatever it might be, you already know what is something that you can go in talking to them about 7%. I think that is great. Now I have another question for you. How did you take the shift, then, from being a loan originator to jumping into recruiting or what was the next step there?

spk_1:   27:20
So whatever, I have been originator the whole time. And even when I was a branch manager, I was producing branch Manager as I accepted different positions and was trying to kind of further my career. I went I was at a company originating and they have an opening for a business development manager that really focused on recruiting and opening branches. And I transitioned into that while still recruit while still originating on a smaller scale. And I was with that company for a couple of years, and then I had another opportunity for someone that was looking for an area manager. And so when I made that transition, they said, Are you wanting to originate or not originate? And I said, I've originated, you know, for almost a decade, I'm still open to continuing to originate. But I really impassioned about honing that next set of skills, which was recruiting and hiring branches, and I will say, having not originated for quite a while now, I still have the itch. When we talk about these tactics, sometimes I just want to go do them. For me personally, it's a different kind of challenge. I'm past the point of trying to figure out what to do and how to build a business as an originator. It's Now you know that quote that says you don't truly know something until you try to teach it to someone else? That's part of my learning is if I can understand different concepts and figure out you know the right way to do something in the market. I figured that out that now the challenge is how do I put it in bite sized pieces to see other people successful. And so you know, that transition was more of it was a gradual process. I still think about all the time. Should I go back in in addition to my current role and start originating again because it's so different than it was whenever I I gave it up? But yeah, I mean, the name of the game is helping people achieve the dream of home ownership. We can talk about 1000 tactics of talking to realtors, reaching the consumer, social media, podcasting, all these different things. But at the end of the day, if you're taking your pat on the back from social media likes or from referrals or leaves that are created, nothing happens until all of those things get translated into Scuse me into a borrower doing an application and they end up closing on a home. That's what funds all of this. That's what helps move the industry and feed this whole asset classes. Real estate. So while we we want to get granular and talk about the details, because that's fun, we have to keep in perspective why we're doing this whole thing, which is to help people get in houses.

spk_0:   29:59
Yeah, exactly. Um, when you were kind of making the shift out of originating three, you know, was there was there anything that, like for our listeners that are listening right now that are kind of going through that transition? Maybe they're ready to make that step. Is there any kind of advice that you might want to give to them?

spk_1:   30:22
Sure. I think it's understand what you're wanting to do. What are you trying to accomplish? What? Is there a goal that you have? Is there a challenge that you have? You know, a lot of people that I talked to, they're just say, Well, I'm tired of originating Well, why? Because just because you get into opening branches or being a regional area manager, orb is never whatever. That doesn't necessarily mean that you're completely disconnected from origination. I talked to my originators on the ground multiple times a day, all day, every day. The only difference is as opposed to getting the joy of the files and the borrowers that sail through the process. We only get talked to aboutthe ones where there's challenges or the problem files. And so as an originator, you always have an element of challenges. It's the mortgage industry, but they're much easy to balance, at much easier. Excuse me to balance out when you have, you know, 80 or 90% clean files, and then you know that 10% that that creates challenges. If someone calls me, it's either for a question or something they don't know or know how to do. Or if it's about a specific file. It's typically because there's a challenge. So I say all that to say, make sure that you understand why you're wanting to make the transition. If it's to make more money, stay originating, build a huge hog nasty team. I promise you'll make a ton of money. You'll make any more money. You only have to focus on what you're doing. But if you're looking for a different challenge. If you have a goal of being a CEO of a company, well, yeah, You probably need to go from origination to running a branch and running a branch to an area into region and all the way up. And if that's because you want to take the next step in your career, great. But my biggest piece of advice to anyone that's looking at making any type of transition is why and then if it's why I don't like this or I want to stop doing this is there way that you can hire someone to take that off of your plate and continue to focus on the things that do make you happy? Because a lot of times, what people are trying to get away from when they say they want to go into management set of origination is it's because they're not very good at, you know, creating loans and driving production, and that's a huge part of what you need to do is a manager is help other people drive production, and that's a completely different type of challenge and is finding leads of yourself. So be really self aware about what's motivating you and what's driving you before you try to take the next step. And if you could answer those questions for yourself and you have a clear path and plan, go for it. Take a leap.

spk_0:   32:46
Now, If people have any questions or they want to reach out to you and talk about these kind of things, where can they find out more about you?

spk_1:   32:54
So I'm pretty easy to get in touch with. I'm all over social media. Facebook Instagram linked in Twitter It's all of them are just at Phil Treadwell, also through the mortgage marketing experts. Podcast, too. You can go, Ah, message me through any of those pages or someone on my team will get it to me. And you can also go to my website, which is just fill Treadwell dot com.

spk_0:   33:17
Well, thank you for being here. I have one more question for you. You know, this podcast is all about the struggles that lead to the breakthrough and for anyone on here that is struggling right now, what is one tip or some words of wisdom that you want to leave with our listeners?

spk_1:   33:37
So my advice for anyone that's going through a struggle, and anyone that's going through a challenge is you're not alone. We all go through struggles. We all go through challenges. The way that I personally deal with those is to understand there's something that I need to learn. And there's some growing that I need to do through this struggle for two reasons. One, you're going to learn a set of skills, or you're going to learn something that's going to help you later on in life, in a completely different scenario than you ever thought it would come in handy or two. Someone else will come along in your life that's had a very similar struggle or the same type of challenge and the skills and the things that you learn. You're in arable to pass along to them and help them get through that struggle, because very few things have I done in my business career or personal life. That hasn't been a direct result of a friend or mentor who's given me Cem words of wisdom to to get through those things. So when you're struggling, remember that number one other people are struggling, the same types of things that you are into your learning things that are either going to help you later in life or help someone else that you come across

spk_0:   34:50
there. You have it somewhere. It's a wisdom. Thank you again for joining us. And I look forward to seeing each and

spk_1:   34:55
every one of you next. Thanks, Megan. I appreciate you having me on