Behind the Breakthrough

From Walmart Assistant Manager to Mortgage Company Exec w/ Chad Reidlinger

March 17, 2020 Industry Syndicate Episode 7
Behind the Breakthrough
From Walmart Assistant Manager to Mortgage Company Exec w/ Chad Reidlinger
Chapters
Behind the Breakthrough
From Walmart Assistant Manager to Mortgage Company Exec w/ Chad Reidlinger
Mar 17, 2020 Episode 7
Industry Syndicate

This week, mortgage industry leader Chad Reidlinger gets deep and insightful with host Megan Anderson about his journey from an assistant manager at Walmart, to an executive at Hamilton Group Funding.

Chad & Megan also talk about how your greatest gift could actually be creating problems in your life. We all struggle with this, but self-awareness and realization is the first step to minimizing or eliminating it's negative effects. 

*Behind the Breakthrough is an Industry Syndicate Original podcast, the first and only podcast network for the real estate and mortgage industry.
 
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 Looking for the best podcasts for Real Estate Agents and Mortgage Loan Officers?
 
 Download the new Industry Syndicate mobile app:
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Connect w/ Megan Anderson on social media:
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 Follow the Industry Syndicate on social media:
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ⓒ 2020 Industry Syndicate podcast network

Show Notes Transcript

This week, mortgage industry leader Chad Reidlinger gets deep and insightful with host Megan Anderson about his journey from an assistant manager at Walmart, to an executive at Hamilton Group Funding.

Chad & Megan also talk about how your greatest gift could actually be creating problems in your life. We all struggle with this, but self-awareness and realization is the first step to minimizing or eliminating it's negative effects. 

*Behind the Breakthrough is an Industry Syndicate Original podcast, the first and only podcast network for the real estate and mortgage industry.
 
 --
 Looking for the best podcasts for Real Estate Agents and Mortgage Loan Officers?
 
 Download the new Industry Syndicate mobile app:
 iPhone: http://bit.ly/SyndicateApple
Android: http://bit.ly/SyndicateGoogle

--
Connect w/ Megan Anderson on social media:
Instagram
Facebook
LinkedIn 

--
 Follow the Industry Syndicate on social media:
 Instagram
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

ⓒ 2020 Industry Syndicate podcast network

spk_0:   0:03
welcome to behind the breakthrough with your host, Megan Anderson, the podcast where we tell the stories of today's leaders before they were leaders. The struggles doubts, fears and insecurities they had to overcome in order to reach their current level of success. Let's go ahead. Let's break through behind The breakthrough is an industry syndicate. Original podcast industry syndicate is the first podcast network for the real estate in mortgage industry. Go get the completely free industry syndicate podcast app right now from the APP Store or Google play, Welcome to another episode of Behind the Breakthrough I'm your host, Megan Anderson, and this week's guest is Chad Reed. Linger. In today's episode, we dive into how sometimes your greatest gifts can also be your greatest challenges and how to come to terms and overcome. Not. We also take a look at the hiring process, what to look for when you're hiring and growing your team. And then we talk a lot about how to work smarter instead of harder and letting go of that perfection in hiring individuals to help you get the job done. So let's go ahead and let's breakthrough. We have a special guest today we have chatter. How do you say your last

spk_1:   1:50
name read? Linger reason or nobody gets it right. So it's

spk_0:   1:53
okay, Chad with us today. And I'm really excited to have a chat on. We've been working together for a while now, and I was just at your event in Orlando. And for those of you that don't know Chad, he's the He's the talent acquisition in sales development at Hamilton Group funding. And you do so much You've been killing the social media game recently. I just want to mention that I've been loving all the content you coming out with and for those that are listening, tell us a little bit more about who chat iss.

spk_1:   2:27
Well, thanks for the introduction. They've got to keep up with you, so you know it's way don't want Don't be left in the dust there on social media, but ah, somebody mistried reeling. Er, um I am the again, Like you said the head of talent acquisition and sales development of Hamilton. Your funding been here for eight years now. So for the 1st 7 years, my partner Howard Vernick and I, we had a branch at Hamilton Group funding. Ah, profit and loss branch, where we had our own personal production team and, ah, any given time. We averaged about 450 units a year in production, like right around a 1,000,000 right around $100 million a year in business, close between 40 and 50 transactions a month, and did that through hiring loan partners and eventually hired some some business development people that kind of help scale me. I was only able to have so many appointments. And so, you know, as we hit different different peaks in our business, we have, you know, we upgrade our problems. And so ah, a lot of people when they talk about their production of their teams, it's like, You know, we did this monster that much, but really, it's through outside loan originators. It's not really their production. So we didn't hire any outside loan originators. We have, like maybe one or two, like, uh, just because we really like those people but never recruited anybody to do that and just give you a quick background. So I've been doing this since, like 2000 since I graduated from Florida State University, started a Bank of America spent my 1st 9 years there. Uh, then I got an idea that I wanted to prove to myself that I could manage people really good. So I had an old manager at Bank of America that I really liked him as a person didn't really respect him as a manager, and I'm like, I could do it better. You know, we all have that, like, you know, that that thing of all I can do it. And so I gave up My personal production was doing about $50 million a year of the time in 2009. And I was like, after the crash, you know, business. So I gave up My personal production is like, Hey, I'm gonna go manage and got a job, took a position at PNC Bank, Um, and spend about 18 months there. And I think in the 1st 12 months I hired 22 ellos and I think I was like, the only happy person in my office. So it was like a series of problems every day. Loan officers couldn't close her loans on time that, you know, it's like operations was another state, and I was like, What am I doing like I'm miserable because it's like every day there's a lot of loan officers at my door on. Then what was worse is I would tell them what to do. The good brother to grow their business. And then I followed with them. I didn't do anything. It was like it was so easy. What? I just did it for myself. But then when other people it's like you give them the Here's the strategy. Here's what's to say Here's what to do. Come back and see me in a week and then, like nothing, right. It's It's like But meanwhile, like, What are you doing all day? Like, you know, you got two bones in your pipeline. So did that for 18 months and decided, You know what? I don't want to depend on other people anymore to GM too far as my paychecks concern. So I took a I got back into production 2011 ish, um, and just been doing this ever since, and you really started building a team in, like, 2012. And then that's kind of where uh, no into the business really take off. But more like that's where my happiness factor took off because I realized I didn't have to do the things I didn't want to do any more. And that was like the big epiphany in my in my mortgage career.

spk_0:   6:03
Now, what was different between because you're managing people now and you're managing a team now. So how do you feel Like your past experience of when you were managing those people and you were giving him the tactics, they weren't utilizing them. Thio, now in your team, listening and utilizing them like What kind of shifted? Was it something with you? Was that the people? Was it just something you learned?

spk_1:   6:28
I think it's, you know, Well, you know, it's kind of like I didn't learn my lesson the first time now. So it's a great question because I am kind of, you know, Hamilton approached us. E. I think was run September of 2018. Howard and I were co branch managers, 50 50 partners. We split the branch pl every month and and it was a very difficult decision. We love our team. Had I think of the time my heater 20 or 22 people on our team as faras the all the different people that helped us all our processors are our pipeline manager. I mean, we had hired a sales manager, so we, you know, we really had things cranking, and it was a very difficult decision. And I think for me, what stood out of my mind is I had we had 1/3 partner at one time and, uh, you know him and I didn't agree on a lot of things, and we re agreed to disagree. But the one thing he always said to me that really stood out issues like Chad look is like you need a bigger platform. He's like the way that you're built your skill set. He's like, You know, you're not made to run a branch is like you're made to basically run a company, and he's like, You just need a bigger platform. You need more resource is, um and that, you know, He said that to me years ago, and that kind of stuck with me, and after 20 years of doing the same thing, I was like, You know what I do? I do want to build something bigger. I do wanna have more influence and be able to just have new challenges. And so we weren't looking for like there was. We weren't replacing anybody at Hamilton, so we weren't like that job. What we what Howard and I are doing now that didn't exist. So when they approached us, it was definitely out of the blue. We weren't looking for it, but it was like, You know what? Maybe this is the time to, you know, step out of the personal production piece again and take the opportunity to make a difference on more people cause I went from having 20 people that and I look for I don't look for us that they work for me. It's like I work for them, like if you that's just the way it is, like they all depend on me and I have to go out and and you make it rate every day and pay the bills. But now I feel like Okay, I went from having 20 bosses to know I have, like, you know, over 200 bosses. So it's interesting, I definitely enjoy it. But, you know, with the one piece of it that I shifted in my head because the same thing kept rearing its ugly head over and over my career. And what what happens? Like I would get frustrated when people wouldn't implement the strategies that I just know we're gonna work for them. It happened to me, a PNC. It happened to me when I have like, I used to have a real big real estate mastermind group where I have all my realtors come every month to our office and, you know, it's I wanted to be a want. I wanted to be a mastermind where they were all sharing ideas, but it kind of ended up happening was over time. It was like just me, sharing all the ideas on their job, how they could do their job better. And then, after like 18 months of doing it every month, I got frustrated again that they weren't doing anything. It's like guys like, Don't you want to grow your business? Don't you want to make more money? And then I end up shutting down that mastermind and that was a good lesson because I ended up like stop. We stopped working with some of those realtors and they were all really good realtors. It was a by invitation only mastermind. And I find that was like my big aha moment of, like, stop, like, just give without any. I've always done this on the morgue inside, like we're throwing our business. I've always given without any expectation of receiving. But in those moments I was making it more about me about why aren't they doing this? I'm giving them all this value. It's like stop. So when I realize now is that when I go like every Wednesday, we teach a hump day sales training, you put on some of those with talking about NBS highway and and I've I've learned that, you know what? If I do that and you know 70 loan officers show up, then you know what that's Even though I could focus on that 100 didn't or 150 didn't. But I'm like, you know what if those are the 7 70 that want to show up and learn and engage that I'm here to teach those 70 people on what to do? So I stopped focusing on who wasn't doing things and started focusing on who waas.

spk_0:   10:42
I love that because I think that's so important. I feel the same way since I've been doing, you know, more speaking engagements. You have these ideas and you want to give them to people. And there's always gonna be those people that won't implement or won't even listen. And at the end of the day, you can't make people want things. They have to want it for themselves. And I think we're all kind of in this journey where we have to. It's like when your parents tell you something, you don't listen until all of a sudden you're like, Yeah, they were really right where they I think that is so funny. Now I wanna backtrack a little bit back to when you got first started in the mortgage business because you said you went straight from college into the mortgage space and I I love asking this question for everyone because it's not like, you know, we go to school wanting to get into the mortgage space, so tell us a little bit about how you got there,

spk_1:   11:36
so that's a great question, because it's actually not straight into mortgage. So I started so with my first job at will, So I went to Florida State University and you stop, companies would come and do their presentations to try to get you to come work for them. And eso Bank of America is one of those companies. And, you know, I was just thinking all it could be cool to be a banker and, like my perception of what a banker was, was way more glamorous than what, like it actually was. But they didn't actually call me initially. So my first job out of college was actually Wal Mart as an assistant store manager s o. So, you know, at the time I met my, uh, which, which is now my wife, I had met my wife are time my girlfriend in college, and she's always been, like, very detail oriented, like everything has to be a certain way. And so when I left college, I had, like, $8500 in credit card debt, and she's like, I'm not moving down there until you pay off your debt. She was always been like debt free and always like, you know, that's just kind of waste your lives. And so that was my motivation. So I got a job at Walmart, and at the time I think my salary was like coming. This was back in 2000. People like 55,000 year, which was like I was rich, right? That was like, Oh, my God, like I'm being broke my whole life And now all of a sudden I'm 55 grand. But here's what I learned very quickly. First of all, they had me on a salary because I was an assistant store manager. And if you first of all I despise walking around Wal Mart, so and then imagine, like imagine two days a week. You have to walk around Wal Mart from seven o'clock in the morning till nine o'clock at night. I literally was like, I'm gonna kill myself. So luckily like two months later or three months later, I pay off my credit cards and Bank of America called. So I started with them, Actually, in October of 2000 it was probably like four or five months after I graduated, and I started as a personal banker. And Bank of America was one of the only banks that actually let their bankers in their branches do mortgages, and they should have been the only one cause I have no idea what I was doing, but it was like they let us do the vanilla stuff. And what I found really quickly was like, I really liked the mortgage stuff. Um And then I thought that there was a mortgage Department of Bank of America and I kind of saw hand love doing the mortgages. And I saw what these guys were making. And I was like, Yeah, I want to do that. Um And so that was kind of what? Greta, We gravitated into the mortgage business. I think I did do one pit stop in 2000. It was either two or three. I don't remember exactly, but there was a position of Bank of America. It's time called the bank account executive at any of my old bank people will. They might remember this position, but I had 36 bank branches that I was in charge of on teaching them the mortgage business in the bank branches. What about 80 people that I was responsible for teaching and none of them knew what they were doing. Just like I didn't at the time when I first started on DSO, this was like through the 2000 to 2003 years. The business was really, really good. That was like a real big refinance boom time. And so this position was across the country. And then they started realizing like, Oh, my God, these guys were making way more money than we ever planned for them to make. And so they ended up cutting the position in 2003 from the entire company on. So that was really when they gave us the crossroads of, like, Chad. You can either be a branch manager in the reef in the retail bank branch and go do this and you know, your salary is gonna be on. It was like, 65,000 year and you get some incentives or you can go into the mortgage space. And I've, like, never wanted to work in a place where my income was gonna be limited based on here's what you earn. And so that to me 2003 was an easy decision of like I'm going full time mortgage because I didn't want anybody to cap what I could earn.

spk_0:   15:40
Yeah, you killed it. You killed it, too. I mean, I was I was reading your LinkedIn profile before we got on here and, you know, with you said it on there. Within a few years, you became top 3% in the nation,

spk_1:   15:52
and there was, like, 2300 loan officers at the time. And, yeah, his top 3% of me. I got to have given time. I think I was doing maybe, like, 50 to 60 million. Um, you know, per year and personal production. And that was like, that was before they would let you hire assistance. It was painful, but it was before I had kids. And my wife is pretty cool about working late hours and stuff, so But I was like, that was a hustle because it was, you know, they wouldn't let you hire your own. And I was like, I'll pay for my own assistant. I don't want to build a team. And that was before building the team was a thing, but I just knew I was like, I'm killing myself here. But the getting the business had always come pretty easy for me.

spk_0:   16:30
Speaking of working late hours, you know, she's it's great that she was fully supportive of that. I know you have Children. Has she become less and less supportive of that, Like what's a closer and came in the picture?

spk_1:   16:42
I'm sure she would have. And, you know, I made some of these changes before I had kids. My son's ball is 11 now, so he's born in 2009. So it was just me and her. So, like, that wasn't a problem. But luckily, you know, I started learning howto build the team, right or right? Like a year after, um, you know, my son was born, so that was, like, perfect timing because, you know, I was able to people have a lot of limiting beliefs and, you know, one of those is, you know, if I do more business, I have to work more hours or I do more business. I'm gonna have more problems or more fires or, you know, stuff like that And what I've learned, you know, through I've always had you have always hired coaches. I've always wanted to be part of mastermind groups. I still do that today. Um and it's like I learned quickly that I didn't have to do all the things I didn't want to do. And I started really thinking about, like what a wide like and what? Why not? Like? And I always loved getting the deal, getting the business, earning the business. And I hated the paperwork like I want to poke my eyes out like when all of a sudden you get the stack of tax returns and I'm like, I don't want to look at this like I can't stand this. And so in 2012 I hired my first loan partner, and that was like that changed my whole business because I didn't have to do the things anymore that I didn't want to do. And quite frankly, when you hire the right person, they do it better than you anyway, because they love that part of the business. And that was that was like the beginning of the end of like building teams and just being infatuated with surrounding myself with people that are better at the things that I didn't want to do any more.

spk_0:   18:24
That's so important now. Was it hard Thio give up some level of control in the beginning by doing that

spk_1:   18:32
from for me? No, because I'm like, I'm not the perfectionist whatsoever, so I'm like big on disk profiling, and we do that on every single person we hire. And when we built our team, and so for me, giving up the control, I never had a problem with it. I know a lot of people struggle with that, but I think if you do your due diligence in hiring the right people that have the skill set that you are looking for, it's much. It's much easier, but I can tell you right now. But I still work with people at my company that do struggle a lot with. It has to be me or, you know, it's like I do it better. You know, Carl White was one of those people that, like, always kind of said like, If somebody could do it, 80% as good as you that's good enough. And I've always embraced that and and I don't I'm not delusional to think like I'm so much. I'm so good at these things that, you know nobody can do it as good as me. Like I've always knew I my only waited to scale businesses, destroy myself with good people like you can't you can only do so much and I never wanted. And first of all, a lot of people to This is something my wife and I talked about a lot. A lot of people can go do six or eight loans a month, and that's a good business. And they could make a really good living, and there could be super happy, and they don't need to surround themselves with a whole bunch of support. But I'm just not built that way like I can't I can't shut it off like there's no off button. So she understands that, But and so in order for me not to be working crazy hours all the time, you know, I had no choice but to surround myself with good people.

spk_0:   20:07
Yeah, I think that that's a smart lesson for everyone to take here. So for anyone that's not, you know, familiar with the disk method, Can you tell us a little bit about what it is or what you look for specifically when you're looking to bring someone on your team?

spk_1:   20:20
Absolutely. So so this profile is actually I get it from the Tony Robbins website, so if you just Googled Tony Robbins disc, you can go on there and it used to be free. Now they charge like, Um, it's like $9 for one version, and it's like 60 bucks for the full version. I like Howard. I would not hire anybody without putting them through a disc profile. And whenever we used to early on, it always ended badly. You know, it's like I'll give you a perfect example of that a little bit more about the disk. But we had hired a lone partner at one time that came on a recommendation. We didn't this profile and what we look for specifically alone partners for people that are detail oriented. We look for people that are stable. We look for people that are not going to shy away from the phone. So, um, there's certain things that will tell you about that. But the most important piece that you want to look for if you're a rainmaker or you're you're running a team, you want to surround yourself with people. The last thing you want to do is surround yourself with somebody who wants to become you. Because so what happened was is that you know, we had hired this loan partner and Howard had put 18 months into this guy, you know, making him a strong loan partner for us. He was much more of like the outside sales guy. And you know, not so much of the inside. But you know, Howard is is amazing when it comes to that stuff and spent a lot of time and and we got him up to doing about $40 million a year for our team and making a real, real good living because we didn't have our loan like we had our long partners on salaries, But they also got basis points. And so that kind of goes against the grain of, like, what? A lot of people in my industry t justice toe like give them this salary and keep him. But I'm like, I want to keep my loan partners forever, and I want them to make a really, really good living. So all my loan partners were making six figures, some north of 200,000 year. A lot of people thought that was crazy, but they most of them didn't leave except for this one. And because we didn't this profile him, and we would have seen that in two seconds. If we would have just profiled them that he is not cut out to be. He wanted to become Chad, and there's nothing wrong with that. It's just you don't want to have somebody take $40 million a year, a year of referral business away from your team. That's not a good That's not a good strategy for building a team, so that one hurt. But it was a very expensive lesson that way. We never made that mistake again.

spk_0:   22:52
What is the disc? Part? Sand? 40.

spk_1:   22:54
So it's a D I s C. And so it s O. The deep part stands for how dominant your personality. How much of a driver are you? So if you're a hi Dee, you're like super light, Make decisions fast. Let's go, let's go on. And then the low D is You're gonna deliberate over a lot, right? You did all the facts. You take a long time to make decisions for usually business owners or higher D. Andi make decisions kind of quickly. And there's another word that people associate with the Heidi. But I won't say a thing. I is. How much of an influencer are you How engaging are you? Like a high I would be. You're the center of attention or you want to be standing on stage. I'm pretty sure, Megan, I can tell where you would want where you would be on that profile. Little eyes. You're like you're an introvert, right? You don't You don't want to talk to people you want to. You know, you don't wanna be on the phone. I'm s his stability. Like how stable are you? Your Lowe s is like you're all over the place. You're like, you're gonna bounce around your very you leave at the drop of a dime. Hi s is like you really embrace, you know, having longevity at a company, or you're staying in a position for a long time, and then the sea is your attention to detail. So you're C is like So when I'm hiring people for either an admin position or alone partner position, I want somebody who's go embrace systems was gonna embrace, you know, checklist or attention to detail. I'm not that person, but I know that if I wanna have somebody follow, you know, followed rules in the C. R. M or follow a spreadsheet. Or here's what we need to do. Every time we talk to a borrower, you want to hire somebody with the high C. So this gave us so much insight. A CZ two. Because every position you hire, you're looking for different qualities, so there's no right or wrong answers in the profile. It's just putting like what I've one of my superpowers is putting people in positions for them to win, and the disc profile not only lets me do that, but it also gives you a lot of really good insight as to how people like to receive recognition or praise. You know, Are they driven by money? Are they driven by a pat on the back? Are they driven by recognition in front of a group of people like it tells you all of that. So it kind of helps you also fill, you know, fill them up with feeling good about themselves because you can make sure you deliver that positive reinforcement. So it hits home to that individual person

spk_0:   25:23
that's so important. And speaking of, you know, finding your why and what motivates individuals. I'm curious what that is for you,

spk_1:   25:33
I think, to be honest with you. I've struggled with that. So I've read Simon Civics books. Start with why gone through the whole process and like, you know, some people come up with these like, amazing, deep rooted, like I have this passion for like, you know, you having a country helping a country get running water. You know, it's like I wish I could say I was that person. I think for me because I've always, you know, some people say it's my wife, It's my kids, and it is like, I want them to have everything. But I've been doing this before them and I still was like this. So the thing that always motivated me the most and it's not maybe it's not as deep as I would like to show us faras like some cool answers somebody else might have. But what motivates me is helping other people get what they want. Yeah, that was my number one secret in growing my mortgage business, and I'm using that same philosophy in that same secret as faras, adding, like minded people are having them joined Hamilton. So I because I'm doing all these, you know, I do all these 15 minute free consultations with mom officers. And they're like, What do you get out of this like then I tell them I promise I won't hurt you. And I promise you I will not talk about my company's value proposition. So I have these, like, conversations with them. I just love helping them grow their business. And I know that, like, 95% of those people are never gonna work with, But I did the same exact thing on the mortgage side. I would go teach classes at real estate offices. I would go. Do you know Webinars? I'd have 100 realtors show up these webinars 95 of them and I'm never gonna work with and I didn't care. So I feel 5% of them I wouldn't work with. And so I think for me, the deep root is if you like, it's like old, that old adage, if you help enough, other people get what they want and you do it without any expectation of return. That is the answer. And that's my why is I love seeing people succeed, you know, whether it's at my company or not in my company, like I just love. It gives me a win for them to come back to me a month later or two months later and say, Chad, that conversation we had, you told me to do this on LinkedIn. You told me to do this with my dad, my database. I did that and that's what happened. Like I love that even though I had zero like, it doesn't help me or my family or my paycheck, but at the long run, it all comes back to you.

spk_0:   27:57
I think it's kind of comical that your greatest kind of gift and your passion is wanting to help other people reach their goals. And then earlier, when we were on this, you were talking about how you kind of had to go through a breakthrough of it, driving you crazy of people not, you know, taking these actionable steps and things that you were teaching them. And I think that's just like a lesson that I want everyone on here. Thio kind of notice. Is that a lot of the times, our biggest qualities. At the same time, they have a dark side and there things that we have to overcome, a swell and once you overcome those. I mean, it sounds like now you found this really kind of perfect balance with it, where you're giving without expectation. You're not expecting things in return, but at the same time, it's got annoyed the crap out of you. Sometimes they don't listen,

spk_1:   28:48
And that's so insightful of you to pick up on because you're absolutely right. Like that was it was so frustrating because I wanted it for them more than they wanted it for them. And that was what was like, I couldn't like I couldn't get I couldn't get past that. I was like, It got me so frustrated I would just like, stop doing it. But I'm like, stop like, you know, like I know for me like one of my main guys Listen to is Gary Vaynerchuk, right? And I love listen to Gary v stuff, and you know, people ask them all the time, like you say the same stuff over and over again. Like when you gonna change Your tune is like people have to listen to you. People have to hear it 99 times before you know, that person takes action. So, you know, I was giving up too soon on them taking action when I should have just kept going. And maybe, you know, maybe if I would have done that for 24 months, that mastermind, 7 18 they would have done it, you know, and I just I got frustrated, and that's what I've learned now Maybe it's my old age, but I've learned, like, just be patient. They'll do it when they're ready. If they don't do it, that's okay. Just keep giving and other people somewhat somebody else. Well, then implement the strategies. But that's very insightful on your part to kind of pick up on that that parallel?

spk_0:   30:01
Well, it's so fascinating to me now. Speaking of Gary, I know that you've begun to implement a lot of kind of his philosophies on social media, and you've been doing it now for I don't know. It's been a while. It's been like, you know, a few months you've been really, really, really consistent with producing this really high quality content and posting it, you know, everywhere. And I'm curious, kind of how that process has been for you. If it's, you know, paying off, it's it's, you know, just enlighten us a little bit about what you've been doing in the outcome of it.

spk_1:   30:34
So you know, what I've really tried to do is follow Gary V put out Gary his content model, so he puts out a lot of stuff for free. And that's why I resonate with him so much because he's giving without any expectation of return. So whenever he sells a new shoe or a book like out in the 1st 1 in line is, I just want to give back to him. So I downloaded the Gary V content model online, and what he talks about is he talks about creating pillar content, right? Just like, you know, with the podcast, right? So So what I'd started doing was I started creating pillar content, so I started doing what's called the Mortgage Lab, which I had you on as a guest and and you're interviewing people. And again, it's it's giving without any expectation of return. So that's usually 45 minutes to an hour. The mortgage lab. I do that every Friday, so that's like one of my pillar piece of content. Then I have a show called Two Takes, where Howard and I We picked four topics every week that we go back and forth and kind of debates. Kindly pardon the interruption. Um and then I have mindset Monday and then I'm also implementing. Starting on March 5th, I'm gonna teach a webinar each and every week on howto build $100 million mortgage team, which is part of, like Russell Brunson's perfect weapon are Siris. So I have four pillar pieces of content and then what I've done is I've hired a team of virtual assistance I have breaking here that works in my office. I have hired a team to take up the pillar content, break it all up into micro content and then be able to use those on all the different social media platforms so it could be extremely overwhelming to try to come up with all that content. But if you just focus on the pillar content than all the rest of the micro content, if you have, you know the right help in place can take care of itself. So and I'm always looking for ways to find some more content. So, as an example, I have all these 15 minute conversations I've been having with ellos. So I started recording those like, not sure you fear them like I'm not recording it like like we are here. But I'm recording it from, like, my iPad or from a camera sitting next to me so you can't hear what they're saying. But you can hear the advice I'm giving. And so now that's giving me a whole nother. Uh, you're a large amount of content.

spk_0:   32:51
You're already doing it too. You know,

spk_1:   32:54
I love it and I love it because like every conversation with them is different, everyone's having different problems in their business. And so, like, things just come up that I wouldn't even think to share. And the hardest part for me has always been coming up with content, like creating content. I'm not like I'm not creative in that aspect. So as if you, Gary V, like he records his day. And so when I started doing is I started having like, we have a full time videographer that you know, we you know, you've used them and we've kind of lent them out to the you know, all different places that we go and events that we go way, have him help, But he's kind of been recording a lot of my day now to wear just my Davey comes my content and I think that loan officers out there or whoever's listening to this, right, just get him. You get another camera, get an iPad, get whatever, just something cheap. It doesn't have to be and start recording your day and 90% of it's gonna be boring, whatever don't all of ours is, but 10% of its gonna be gold. And, you know, whether you're a loan officer just talking to people or you're a business owner talking thio, your customers, your customers are all gonna have the same questions. Why not capture some of that content and then be able to put it out in a cool way, like they're kind of seeing the behind the scenes of what your day looks like and believe it about People are interested in that. Like we wouldn't

spk_0:   34:17
you think that it's

spk_1:   34:18
it's been great. So,

spk_0:   34:20
yeah, the behind the scenes is, like, so authentic. And I think people love it because it doesn't feel like this production that is edited and crazy. It's just welcome to my life. Here's what I d'oh and people love just feeling like they're a part of it and they're getting to see something that they don't naturally get to see. And I love that you bring up the idea of killer content because I mean from each podcast episode that ideo I get like 8 to 10 quotes I get, like, five audio grams, and that makes it so easy to stay consistent on social media. It's not this something that you need to over think you could do whatever it is that you enjoy doing, whether it's Facebook lives or, you know, Blawg Post. Whatever the case may be, just find something you like. And I love that you brought in those 15 minute conversations because it didn't take any extra time out of your day. I mean, these were things that you were already doing, that you were turning into content, and that's what I want people to start to think about, how we take the things that were already doing and turn it into content, like your meetings with your real estate agents, your meetings with your clients, whatever the case may be, there's so many things that you're already doing that, you can easily turn into content

spk_1:   35:40
100%. You just need to pay attention. And I think as you start doing it, you know, I'm sure you've seen this like more opportunities to capture content. Start presenting themselves because now you're aware Wow, that was a good because when I started finding is I was hanging up on these calls and I was like, Wow, that was really good. I wish I'd like it was like it was like it was like I just start recording, but otherwise I have to reenact Amaar and I have to go like, create the piece or whatever. And the other thing to think about too, is that and this is something that was just opened up to me by another coach that I have is I've never been a good writer. I write like I like, I talk right, and it's just the way that I am, and I've never you know, that's not my strength. So But what I started finding is you can hire writers that I could sit there and I just turn my phone on and I turn it on record or I turn on the voice memo and I just talk about a topic and I'll send that over it. And I found I found writers through various online platforms fiber and you know, it's so now. Even though I'm not a good writer, I could have good articles written by me just talking about a topic We're all fully capable of picking a topic, you know, in talking about it for five or 10 minutes. And I just send that voice recording over to a freelance writer, and now they're writing the copy. So I just want the main takeaway. There is just be resourceful in the way you think about things that whole excuse. If I don't have time like, well, do you have $10 because Or $5? Because you can go on fiber and you can pay somebody five bucks to write the article for you? Like, how much time does that take? So it just being, I think it's a lack of resourcefulness that that where people hit walls and it's their limiting beliefs that stop them from having the breakthrough, right?

spk_0:   37:34
Yes, it's so true, and it's so much better if you could make your own content versus I know there's all these platforms for their, like auto posts, this stuff, it's just trash. People know that. It's just automated stuff. They see 50,000 of them. It becomes a kn valuable. At that point, it's all about providing value. And we all have our own individual awesomeness to offer our own authentic value. So keep that in mind, too, because they see so many people fall into this trap of pre created content.

spk_1:   38:08
Just think, if you would not read it, then who else is going to ask you to tell my realtors all the time? Like they would send me these newsletters like, Did you? Did you Did you read your newsletter? They're like, why would you think I would if I opened it up and it looks like it can piece, I'm gonna delete it. I'd rather get a two sentence email from you, and at least I know it's from you, and I'm gonna read it instead of this. Like I don't care about your recipe. You know, it's like, But if you have a recipe, if you enjoy cooking, then hell, yeah. I want to see your recipe because that's you you're putting your spin behind it. It's Megan's recipe, but if it's like some can thing from a newsletter, you know it's gonna fall flat and you're not helping them understand who you are. And the other thing I think don't do enough of is they only share the good stories. They only share the fit, the winds. It's like that fake social media stuff. And but I've really started doing and finding my voice is sharing the losses, like sharing the things that didn't go well. Like my mindset money, it's gonna come out this Monday is like stuff that, like I've literally been thinking about, not I have been going back and forth like I don't want to share this. I don't want to share this. I don't want to share this, but I feel like I have Thio and even though, like I know, I know, some people are gonna look down on me for like what I went through in 2008 and you know, it was a look. We all went through a lot of hard times if we were in the business back that long ago. But, you know, I was like, you know what I need to share this because there's a story behind it. And even though, like I went through a lot of pain, somebody else is gonna be able to overcome whatever they're going through right now. If I share my story and I've seen a lot of people online like sharing stories about their business failing, Russell Brunson's a famous person. You know, he shares that people sharing stories about their relationships, not working out their divorce or whatever. It makes you human. Yeah, and, like stop being somebody who's perfect who everything goes so well like nobody cares if you look at anything in sports or in pop culture. People get tired of the people that are winning all the time like everybody started like liking Tiger Woods again when he went through his fall right when he felt that anything with Kobe Bryant right, that whole thing with his wife when they was cheating or whatever. Then people start getting behind you again because they want us to think they want. They won't be part of the come up. They want to be part of the rebuild. But if you're at the top of the mountain, all the time. The only thing they want to see is you fall so like, let's start talking about the the trials and tribulations if you really want to connect with your audience.

spk_0:   40:48
Yeah, and another thing that I love about sharing the hardships is that we all go through them. But there's this some like psychological, you know? Oh, it's not okay to show that side of me because people might think differently of me. But the thing is, is, once you share those hardships, it allows other people to step in and accept their hardships as well. And there's this beautiful like healing aspect that takes please and motivation, and it just allows people to be like, You know what? It's okay. Look at this awesome person. They're succeeding. They went through this. I know I'm in this situation right now, but I have faith and I have hope. And I'm gonna get through this. That's the power and sharing our story. And I want to thank you for sharing our story with us today. Anyone that's listening, where can they find more of you?

spk_1:   41:41
Well, luckily, my name is not very common. So the Google Chad reeling her, They'll find me. It's r e I d l i n g e r. But you know, I'm all over. You know, whether it's instagram like to do a lot on LinkedIn. Facebook even got a tic tac account now. So, like my eight year old daughter's, like, seriously bad. Like you're on tic TAC. So I'm actually actually having a lot of fun with the tech top platform. So just just look up, Chidori, Linger and you'll you'll inevitably find me because there's only one.

spk_0:   42:11
Yeah, And the podcast is the mortgage lab.

spk_1:   42:14
The mortars lab? Yep. And so that the way we've been putting out the shows, the podcast, I think we're gonna actually be putting out the podcast. Starting next week, we've been gathering up all the audio clips. So the mortgage labs we've been putting out on YouTube, so we do have a YouTube channel as well, but as far as the morning, it will be called the Mortars Lab. And all of our audio content will be there from all of our different platforms that we're doing. Whether it's two takes or mortars lab or anything like that, I'll be I'll be sharing a lot of tips and tricks and stuff and just personal stuff through the podcast is Well,

spk_0:   42:47
I love that I have one more question for you. Yes, for those that are listening that are maybe going through their own hardships or struggles right now, what is what are some words of wisdom that you want to give to them? Ultimately help them break through.

spk_1:   43:04
My biggest thing is perception. So what I have found is if you if you have the right perception and you're grateful those two things together are the most powerful combination that you can possibly have. And I really started doing this after I went through. You unleash the power within. But you know, every single morning I have a ritual. And part of part of that ritual is waking up and talking verbalizing all the things in my life that I'm grateful for because ice Tony Robbins will tell you my life as well. Tony Robbins will tell you that it's impossible to be grateful and unhappy and upset and angry at the same time. So be grateful for what you have in your life and and also just make sure that you're looking through things in the proper lens. Far too many times. People are just looking at it in one way when they're possibly be another way to look at it. So perception is reality. And if you just change your perception of certain situations, you can 100% change your what you believe is to be your reality free today.

spk_0:   44:20
Uh, I love that so much. Well, thank you for taking time today and being on this podcast. They really appreciate your job.

spk_1:   44:27
My pleasure, Megan. Any time and I'll be a fantastic Thanks, everyone. I thank you.